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Encyclopedia > Thelonious Monk
Thelonious Monk
Thelonious Monk, foreground, performing at Expo 67 in Montreal. (Credit: Library and Archives Canada)
Thelonious Monk, foreground, performing at Expo 67 in Montreal. (Credit: Library and Archives Canada)
Background information
Birth name Thelonious Sphere Monk
Also known as Monk
Born October 10, 1917(1917-10-10)
Origin Flag of United States Rocky Mount, North Carolina, USA
Died February 17, 1982 (aged 64)
Genre(s) Jazz, bebop, hard bop
Occupation(s) Pianist, composer
Instrument(s) Piano
Label(s) Blue Note, Prestige, Riverside, Columbia

Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. Image File history File links Thelonious_Monk_1967. ... The 1967 International and Universal Exposition, or simply Expo 67 was the General Exhibition Category 1 Worlds Fair held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from April 27 to October 29, 1967. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Quebec Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location of Rocky Mount within North Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States U.S. state North Carolina County(s) Edgecombe, Nash Founded Circa March 22, 1816 Incorporated February 28, 1867 Government  - Mayor Frederick E. Turnage Area  - City  35. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... Hard bop is an extension of bebop (bop) music which incorporates influences from rhythm and blues, gospel music, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Blue Note Records is a jazz record label, established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff. ... Prestige Records was a record label founded in 1949 by Bob Weinstock (October 2, 1928–January 14, 2006). ... The Incredible Jazz Guitar Of Wes Montgomery, a 1960 Riverside release. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...


Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire (including his classic works "'Round Midnight" and "Blue Monk"). He is often regarded as a founder of bebop, although his playing style evolved away from the form. His compositions and improvisations are full of dissonant harmonies and angular melodic twists, and are impossible to separate from Monk's unorthodox approach to the piano, which combined a highly percussive attack with abrupt, dramatic use of silences and hesitations. Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Round Midnight is a 1944 song by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... Blue Monk is a jazz standard written by Thelonius Monk that has become one of his most enduring tunes. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ...

Contents

Life and career

Early life

Little is known about Monk's early life. He was born on October 10, 1917 in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, the son of Thelonious and Barbara Monk, two years after a sister named Marian. A younger brother, Thomas, was born a couple of years later. Monk started playing the piano at the age of nine; although he had some formal training and eavesdropped on his sister's piano lessons, he was essentially self-taught. October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Rocky Mount within North Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States U.S. state North Carolina County(s) Edgecombe, Nash Founded Circa March 22, 1816 Incorporated February 28, 1867 Government  - Mayor Frederick E. Turnage Area  - City  35. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ...


In 1922 the family moved to Manhattan living at 243 West 63rd St., and Monk attended Stuyvesant High School, but did not graduate. Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Stuyvesant High School, commonly referred to as Stuy, is a New York City public high school that specializes in mathematics and science. ...


He briefly toured with an evangelist in his teens, playing the church organ, and in his late teens he began to find work playing jazz. He is believed to be the pianist featured on recordings Jerry Newman made around 1941 at Minton's Playhouse, the legendary Manhattan club where Monk was the house pianist. His style at the time is described as "hard-swinging," with the addition of runs in the style of Art Tatum. Monk's stated influences include Duke Ellington, James P. Johnson, and other early stride pianists. For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Minton’s Playhouse is a jazz club and bar located on the first floor of the Hotel Cecil at 210 West 118th Street in Harlem. ... Arthur Tatum Jr. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... James Price Johnson (February 1, 1894 - November 17, 1955) was a pianist and composer. ... Stride is a pioneering jazz piano style. ...


Monk's unique piano style was largely perfected during his stint as the house pianist at Minton's in the early-to-mid 1940s, when he participated in the famous after-hours "cutting competitions" that featured most of the leading jazz soloists of the day. The Minton's scene was crucial in the formulation of the bebop genre and it brought Monk into close contact and collaboration with other leading exponents of bebop including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, and Milt Jackson. Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (26 May 1926 – 28 September 1991) was one of the most influential musicians of the latter half of the 20th century. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Milton (Milt) Jackson (January 1, 1923 – October 9, 1999) was an American jazz vibraphonist and one of the most important figures in the hard bop style. ...


First recordings (1944–1954)

In 1944 Monk made his first studio recordings with the Coleman Hawkins Quartet. Hawkins was among the first prominent jazz musicians to promote Monk, and Monk later returned the favor by inviting Hawkins to join him on the 1957 session with John Coltrane. Monk made his first recordings as leader for Blue Note in 1947 (later anthologised on Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 1) which showcased his talents as a composer of original melodies for improvisation. Monk married Nellie Smith the same year, and in 1949 the couple had a son, T.S. Monk, who later became a jazz drummer. A daughter, Barbara (affectionately known as Boo-Boo), was born in 1953. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ... John William Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967), nicknamed Trane, was an American jazz saxophonist and composer. ... Blue Note Records is a jazz record label, established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... T.S. Monk (Born in 1949 as Thelonious Sphere Monk, Jr) is a jazz drummer, composer and bandleader. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In August 1951, New York City police searched a parked car occupied by Monk and friend Bud Powell. The police found narcotics in the car, presumed to have belonged to Powell. Monk refused to testify against his friend, so the police confiscated his New York City Cabaret Card. Without the all-important cabaret card he was unable to play in any New York venue where liquor was served, and this severely restricted his ability to perform for several crucial years. Monk spent most of the early and mid-1950s composing, recording, and performing at theaters and out-of-town gigs. Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... From Prohibition until 1960, New York City required cabaret card permits to be held by all workers in its nightclubs. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...


After his cycle of intermittent recording sessions for Blue Note during 19471952, he was under contract to Prestige Records for the following two years. With Prestige he cut several under-recognized, but highly significant albums, including collaborations with saxophonist Sonny Rollins and drummer Art Blakey. In 1954, Monk participated on the famed Christmas Eve sessions which produced the albums, Bags' Groove and Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants by Miles Davis. Davis found Monk's idiosyncratic accompaniment style difficult to improvise over and asked him to lay out (not accompany), which almost brought them to blows. Blue Note Records is a jazz record label, established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Prestige Records was a record label founded in 1949 by Bob Weinstock (October 2, 1928–January 14, 2006). ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bags Groove is an album recorded in 1954 by Miles Davis, for Prestige Records. ... Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants is an album recorded by Miles Davis, for Prestige Records. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (26 May 1926 – 28 September 1991) was one of the most influential musicians of the latter half of the 20th century. ...


In 1954, Monk paid his first visit to Europe, performing and recording in Paris. It was here that he first met Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter, "Nica", member of the Rothschild banking family of England and patroness of several New York City jazz musicians. She would be a close friend for the rest of his life. Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Baroness Pannonica Nica de Koenigswarter (10 December 1913 – 30 November 1990) was a British bebop jazz enthusiast and member of the prominent Rothschild international financial dynasty. ... The Rothschild banking family of England was founded in 1798 by Nathan Mayer von Rothschild (1777-1836) who first settled in Manchester but then moved to London. ...


Riverside and Columbia (1954–1970)

At the time of his signing to Riverside, Monk was highly regarded by his peers and by some critics, but his records did not sell in significant numbers, and his music was still regarded as too "difficult" for mass-market acceptance. Indeed, Riverside had managed to buy out his previous Prestige contract for a mere $108.24. His breakthrough came thanks to a compromise between Monk and the label, which convinced him to record two albums of his interpretations of jazz standards. The Incredible Jazz Guitar Of Wes Montgomery, a 1960 Riverside release. ...


His debut for Riverside was a 'themed' record featuring Monk's distinctive interpretations of the music of Duke Ellington. The resulting LP, Thelonious Monk Plays Duke Ellington, was designed to bring Monk to a wider audience, and pave the way for a broader acceptance of his unique style. According to recording producer Orrin Keepnews, Monk appeared unfamiliar with the Ellington tunes and spent a long time reading the sheet music and picking the melodies out on the piano keys. Given Monk's long history of playing, it seems unlikely that he didn't know Ellington's music, and it has been surmised that Monk's seeming ignorance of the material was a manifestation of his typically perverse humor, combined with an unstated reluctance to prove his own musical competency by playing other composers' works (even at this late date, there were still critics who carped that Monk "couldn't play"). The album is generally regarded as one of the less successful Monk studio outings but one that encouraged more consumer interest to the point where Riverside felt ready to try out an album featuring Monk's own compositions.[citation needed] Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... Orrin Keepnews (born March 2, 1923 in The Bronx, New York City) is an American jazz record producer and writer. ...


Finally, on the 1956 LP Brilliant Corners, Monk was able to record his own music. The complex title track (which featured legendary tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins) was so difficult to play that the final version had to be edited together from three separate takes. The album however, was largely regarded as the first success for Monk; according to Orrin Keepnews, "It was the first that made a real splash." Brilliant Corners Brilliant Corners is a 1957 (see 1957 in music) album by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Orrin Keepnews (born March 2, 1923 in The Bronx, New York City) is an American jazz record producer and writer. ...


After having his cabaret card restored, Monk relaunched his New York career with a landmark six-month residency at the Five Spot Cafe in New York beginning in June 1957, leading a quartet that included John Coltrane on tenor saxophone. Unfortunately little of this group's music was documented, apparently because of contractual problems (Coltrane was signed to Prestige). One studio session was made by Riverside but only later released on Jazzland; an amateur tape from the Five Spot (not the original residency, it seems, but a later 1958 reunion) was uncovered in the 1990s and issued on Blue Note. On November 29 that year the quartet performed at Carnegie Hall and the concert was recorded in high fidelity by the Voice of America broadcasting service. The long-lost tape of that concert was rediscovered in the collection of the Library of Congress in January 2005. In 1958 Johnny Griffin took Coltrane's place as tenor player in Monk's band. The Five Spot Cafe was located in New York City at the corner of Cooper Square and St. ... John William Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967), nicknamed Trane, was an American jazz saxophonist and composer. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... The Voice of America (VOA) is the official international broadcasting service of the Government of the United States. ... The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... John Arnold Griffin III (born in 1928) is an American bop and hard bop tenor saxophonist. ...


In 1958, Monk and de Koenigswarter were detained by police in Wilmington, Delaware. When Monk refused to answer the policemen's questions or cooperate with them, they beat him with a blackjack. Though the police were authorized to search the vehicle and found narcotics in suitcases held in the trunk of the Baroness's car, Judge Christie of the Delaware Superior Court ruled that the unlawful detention of the pair, and the beating of Monk, rendered the consent to the search void as given under duress. State v. De Koenigswarter, 177 A.2d 344 (Del. Super. 1962). Monk was represented by Theophilus Nix, the second African-American member of the Delaware Bar Association. Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ... Hercules fights the Lernaean Hydra with a club A club or cudgel is perhaps the simplest of all melee weapons. ... The Delaware Superior Court is the trial court of general jurisdiction in the state of Delaware. ...


In 1964, Monk appeared on the cover of Time magazine. By now he was signed to a major label, Columbia Records, and was promoted more widely than earlier in his career. Monk also had a regular working group, featuring the tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse, but by now his compositional output had largely dried up. Only his final Columbia disc, Underground, featured a substantial number of new tunes, including his only waltz-time piece, "Ugly Beauty." 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Charlie Rouse (April 6, 1924 - November 30, 1988) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ...


He disappeared from the scene in the early 1970s and made only a small number of appearances during the final decade of his life. His last recording was completed in November 1971. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


Later life

Monk's manner was idiosyncratic. Visually, he was renowned for his distinctively "hip" sartorial style in suits, hats and sunglasses, and he developed an unusual, highly syncopated and percussive manner of playing piano. He was also noted for the fact that at times he would stop playing, stand up from the keyboard and dance in a counterclockwise fashion, ring-shout style, while the other musicians in the combo played. A shout or ring shout is an ecstatic dance ritual, first practiced by African slaves in the West Indies and the United States, in which worshippers move in a circle while shuffling their feet and clapping their hands. ...


It is said that he would rarely speak to anyone other than his beloved wife Nellie, and certainly in later years it was reported that he would go through an entire tour without speaking to the other members of his group. Bassist Al McKibbon, who had known Monk for twenty years and played on his final tour in 1971, later said "On that tour Monk said about two words. I mean literally maybe two words. He didn't say 'Good morning', 'Goodnight', 'What time?' Nothing. Why, I don't know. He sent word back after the tour was over that the reason he couldn't communicate or play was that Art Blakey and I were so ugly." [1] Al McKibbon (January 1, 1919 - July 29, 2005) was an American jazz bassist, known for his work in bop, hard bop, and Latin jazz. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although these anecdotes may typify Monk's behavior in his later life, in Lewis Porter's biography of John Coltrane, the saxophonist reveals a very different side of Monk; Coltrane states that Monk was, in his opinion:


"... exactly the opposite of Miles [Davis]. He talks about music all the time and wants so much for you to understand that if, by chance, you ask him something, he'll spend hours if necessary to explain it to you."


There has been speculation that some of Monk's quirky behaviour was due to mental illness. In the documentary film Straight, No Chaser (produced in 1989 by Clint Eastwood on the subject of Monk's life and music), Monk's son, T.S. Monk, reported that Monk was on several occasions hospitalized due to an unspecified mental illness that worsened in the late 1960s. No diagnosis was ever made public, but some have noted that Monk's symptoms suggest bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or Tourette's Syndrome. Whatever the precise diagnosis, anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that Monk was suffering from some form of pathological introversion (like Syd Barrett) and that from the late sixties onward he became increasingly uncommunicative and withdrawn. As his health declined, his last years were spent as a guest in the New Jersey home of his long-standing patron, Baroness Nica de Koenigswarter, who had also nursed Charlie Parker during his final illness. A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... T.S. Monk (Born in 1949 as Thelonious Sphere Monk, Jr) is a jazz drummer, composer and bandleader. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ... Tourette syndrome — also called Tourettes syndrome, Tourette Spectrum (TS), Tourettes disorder, or Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (after its discoverer, Georges Gilles de la Tourette) — is a neurological or neurochemical disorder characterized by tics — involuntary, rapid, sudden movements or vocalizations that occur repeatedly in the... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... Baroness Pannonica Nica de Koenigswarter (10 December 1913 – 30 November 1990) was a British bebop jazz enthusiast and member of the prominent Rothschild international financial dynasty. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ...


He died of a stroke on February 17, 1982 and was buried in Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York. Following his death, his music has been rediscovered by a wider audience and he is now counted alongside the likes of Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and others as a major figure in the history of jazz. In 1993, he was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Monk's music is arguably the most recorded of any jazz composer. In 2006, Monk was posthumously awarded a Pulitzer Prize for Music "Special Citation." [2] Stroke (or cerebrovascular accident or CVA) is the clinical designation for a rapidly developing loss of brain function due to an interruption in the blood supply to all or part of the brain. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Founded in 1903, the non-sectarian Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located on Secor Road in the hamlet of Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles north of New York City. ... Hartsdale is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (26 May 1926 – 28 September 1991) was one of the most influential musicians of the latter half of the 20th century. ... John William Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967), nicknamed Trane, was an American jazz saxophonist and composer. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Pulitzer Prize for Music was first awarded in 1943. ...


Discography (LP and CD issues only)

Carlos Wesley (Don) Byas (October 21, 1912-August 24, 1972) was a popular African-American jazz musician born in Muskogee, Oklahoma in the United States. ... Charlie Christian (29 July 1916 – 2 March 1942) was an American jazz guitarist. ... Oran Thaddeus Page (27 January 1908 in Dallas, Texas - 4 November 1954 in New York City), jazz trumpeter, singer, bandleader, better known as Hot Lips Page by the public, and Lips Page by his fellow musicians. ... Thelonious Monk plays the Music of Duke Ellington (aka, Thelonious Monk plays Duke Ellington) is Monks first album for Riverside Records. ... The Unique Thelonious Monk, Monks second album for Riverside Records, is made up of old standards as was Riversides initial plan in order to broaden consumer interest. ... Brilliant Corners Brilliant Corners is a 1957 (see 1957 in music) album by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Clark Terry performs with the Great Lakes Navy Band Jazz Ensemble Clark Terry (born December 14, 1920) is an American swing and bop trumpeter and flugelhorn player. ... Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane is a 1957 album by Thelonious Monk. ... Recorded in 1957, this album was the result of a collaboration of Thelonious Monk with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. ... Monks Music is a 1957 album by jazz band Thelonious Monks septet. ... Gerald Joseph Gerry Mulligan (April 6, 1927 – January 20, 1996) was an American jazz musician, composer and arranger best known for his baritone saxophone playing. ... At Carnegie Hall is a much acclaimed live album by The Thelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane. ... Misterioso is a 1958 (see 1958 in music) album by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... John Arnold Griffin III (born in 1928) is an American bop and hard bop tenor saxophonist. ... Charlie Rouse (April 6, 1924 - November 30, 1988) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Charlie Rouse (April 6, 1924 - November 30, 1988) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Monks Dream is the first album of jazz legend Thelonious Monk with Columbia Records. ... Criss Cross is Thelonious Monks 26th album and his second with Columbia Records. ... Miles & Monk at Newport was a combined album of a Miles Davis appearance at Newport with an appearance of Thelonious Monk, from the LP era. ... Underground is a 1967 album by Thelonious Monk. ... Thelonious Monks album Monks Blues was originally released in 1968 and put on CD in 1994 Track Listing Lets Cool One Reflections Little Rootie Tootie Just a Glance at Love Brilliant Corners Consecutive Seconds Monks Point Trinkle, Tinkle Straight, No Chaser Blue Monk Round Midnight ... The Complete 1957 Riverside Recordings is a 1957 album by Thelonious Monk. ...

Samples

  • of "Ruby, My Dear"

Compositions

  • Ask Me Now
  • Ba-lue Bolivar Ba-lues-are (aka Bolivar Blues)
  • Bemsha Swing
  • Bluehawk
  • Blue Monk
  • Blues Five Spot (aka Five Spot Blues)
  • Blue Sphere
  • Boo Boo's Birthday
  • Brake's Sake
  • Bright Mississippi
  • Brilliant Corners
  • Bye-Ya
  • Coming on the Hudson
  • Crepuscule with Nellie
  • Criss Cross
  • Epistrophy
  • Eronel
  • Evidence
  • 52nd Street Theme
  • Four in One
  • Friday the 13th
  • Functional
  • Gallop's Gallop
  • Get It Straight
  • Green Chimneys
  • Hackensack
  • Harlem is Awful Messy
  • Hornin' In
  • Humph
  • I Mean You (aka Stickball)
  • Introspection (aka Playhouse)
  • In Walked Bud
  • Jackie-ing
  • Let's Call This
  • Let's Cool One
  • Light Blue
  • Little Rootie Tootie
  • Locomotive
  • Misterioso
  • Monk's Dream
  • Monk's Mood
  • Monk's Point
  • North of the Sunset
  • Nutty
  • Off Minor (aka What Now)
  • Oska T
  • Pannonica
  • Played Twice
  • Raise Four
  • Reflections
  • Rhythm-a-ning
  • Round Lights
  • 'Round Midnight (song)
  • Ruby, My Dear
  • San Francisco Holiday (aka Worry Later)
  • Shuffle Boil
  • Sixteen
  • Skippy
  • Something in Blue
  • Straight, No Chaser
  • Stuffy Turkey
  • Teo
  • Thelonious
  • Think of One
  • Trinkle Tinkle
  • Two Timer (aka Five Will Get You Ten)
  • Ugly Beauty
  • Well, You Needn't (It's Over Now)
  • We See (aka Manganese)
  • Who Knows
  • Work

Blue Monk is a jazz standard written by Thelonius Monk that has become one of his most enduring tunes. ... Epistrophy is a jazz standard composed by Thelonious Monk and Kenny Clarke in 1942. ... A song composed by Thelonious Monk, named after Pannonica de Koenigswarter who was named after a butterfly that her father had once tried to catch. ... Round Midnight is a 1944 song by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... Well You Neednt is a jazz standard composed by Thelonious Monk in 1944. ...

Trivia

  • The unusual name of Thelonious is given in many translations of Ovid's Metamorphoses as an alternate spelling for Philonius, Mercury's son. Today, most scholars agree that the spelling should have been Thelonious.[citation needed]
  • Asteroid (11091) Thelonious has been named in honor of Thelonious Monk.
  • Lupe Fiasco has mentioned Thelonious Monk in many of his songs, both homaging Pharrell in some, and Thelonious himself.
  • The coffee-shop that is frequented in the show Seinfeld is called Monk's after Thelonious Monk. Apparently there was a Thelonious Monk poster hanging in the room Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld would write the script.
  • In The Simpsons episode "Trilogy of Error", Lisa encounters a boy at another school named Thelonious who seemingly matches her intelligence and loneliness:
  • Thelonious: My name's Thelonious.
  • Lisa: As in "Monk?"
  • Thelonious: Yes. The esoteric appeal is worth the beatings.
  • John Coltrane described the difficulties of playing with Monk: "I always had to be alert with Monk, because if you didn't keep aware all the time of what was going on you'd suddenly feel as if you'd stepped into an empty elevator shaft." Another time he commented that if one didn't pay close attention while accompanying Monk, he could get so lost (in Monk's complex musical structures) he'd never find his way back.
  • North Coast Brewery brews a beer named Brother Thelonious, a Belgian style abbey ale, in honor of Thelonious Monk. North Coast Brewery is associated with the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz and donates $2 to the institute from every case of Brother Thelonious sold.
  • Monk is mentioned in Steely Dan's song "Midnight Cruiser". His name is mentioned is the first line of the song as "Thelonious my old friend, Step on in and let me shake your hand, So glad you're here again".

Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now Constanţa AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... Felonius Monk is the seventeenth episode from the second series of the popular American crime drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, which is set in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... Pharrell Williams (born April 5, 1973) is an American producer, singer, rapper, and songwriter. ... Wasalu Muhammad Jaco (born February 16, 1982), better known by his stage name Lupe Fiasco, is an American rapper. ... Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989, to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Trilogy of Error is an episode from season twelve of the animated TV series The Simpsons. ... Steely Dan is a Grammy-Award winning American rock band centered on core members Walter Becker and Donald Fagen. ... Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. ... Like Water for Chocolate is an album by rapper Common, released in March 2000. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Thelonious Monk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2006 words)
Monk is often regarded as a founder of bebop although his playing style evolved away from the form.
Monk started playing the piano at the age of six; although he had some formal training and eavesdropped on his sister's piano lessons, he was essentially self-taught.
Monk's unique piano style was largely perfected during his stint as the house pianist at Minton's in the early-to-mid 1940s, when he participated in the famous after-hours "cutting competitions" that featured most of the leading jazz soloists of the day.
Thelonious Monk - Biography - AOL Music (873 words)
Thelonious Monk, who was criticized by observers who failed to listen to his music on its own terms, suffered through a decade of neglect before he was suddenly acclaimed as a genius; his music had not changed one bit in the interim.
Thelonious Monk grew up in New York, started playing piano when he was around five, and had his first job touring as an accompanist to an evangelist.
Monk was suffering from mental illness and, other than a few special appearances during the mid-'70s, he lived the rest of his life in seclusion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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