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Encyclopedia > Thelema

Thelema is the English transliteration of the Ancient Greek noun θέλημα: "will", from the verb θέλω: to will, wish, purpose. Early Christian writings use the word to refer to the will of God,[1] the human will,[2] and even the will of God's opponent, the Devil.[3] Note: This article contains special characters. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ...


Thelema is also an initially fictional philosophy of life first described by François Rabelais (16th century) in his famous books, Gargantua and Pantagruel.[4] The essence of this philosophy was summarized in the phrase "fay çe que vouldras" ("Fais ce que tu veux," or, "Do what thou wilt"), and this philosophy was later put into practice in the mid 18th century by Sir Francis Dashwood at Medmenham.[5] François Rabelais François Rabelais (c. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Gargantua and Pantagruel is a connected series of five novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Francis Dashwood, 15th Baron le Despencer (December, 1708 - December 11, 1781) was an English rake and politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer (1762-1763) and founder of The Hellfire Club. ... Medmenham is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. ...


This Thelemic Law of Rabelais was revived by Aleister Crowley[5] in 1904 when Crowley wrote The Book of the Law, which contains both the word Thelema in Greek as well as the phrase "Do what thou wilt." From this, Crowley took Thelema as the name of the philosophical, mystical and religious system which he subsequently developed, which includes ideas from occultism, Yoga, and both Eastern and Western mysticism (especially the Qabalah).[6] Thus Shri Gurudev Mahendranath, in speaking of svecchachara, a Sanskrit term which he considered the eastern equivalent of the term Thelema, wrote that "Rabelais, Dashwood, and Crowley must share the honor of perpetuating what has been such a high ideal in most of Asia."[5] Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, Avadhut and founder of the spiritual organization known as the International Nath Order. ... Svecchachara is the Sanskrit equivalent of the Greek word Thelema, interpreted by Aleister Crowley as Do What Thou Wilt. ...

The Unicursal Hexagram is one of the common symbols of Thelema
The Unicursal Hexagram is one of the common symbols of Thelema

Contents

Image File history File links Crowley_unicursal_hexagram. ... The Traditional Unicursal Hexagram The Unicursal Hexagram is a hexagram or six sided and six pointed star that is unique in that it can be traced or drawn as one complete symbol, rather than two overlaid triangles. ...

Antecedents of Thelema

Although the modern Thelemic movements trace their origins to the works of François Rabelais and Aleister Crowley, the latter pointed to important antecedents to his use of the term, and other instances are apparent from research. The word is of some consequence in the original Greek Christian scriptures, referring to divine and human will. One well-known example is from “The Lord’s Prayer” in Matthew 6:10, “Your kingdom come. Your will (Θελημα) be done, On earth as it is in heaven.” Some other quotes from the Bible are: This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...

“He went away again a second time and prayed, saying, "My Father, if this cannot pass away unless I drink it, Your will be done.” —Matthew 26:42
“But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, even to those who believe in His name, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.” —John 1:12-13
“And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect.” —Romans 12:2
"…and they may come to their senses and escape from the snare of the devil, having been held captive by him to do his will.” —2 Timothy 2:26
"Worthy are You, our Lord and our God, to receive glory and honor and power; for You created all things, and because of Your will they existed, and were created." —Revelation 4:11

Crowley acknowledged Saint Augustine's "Love, and do what thou wilt" as a premonition of the Law of Thelema. In the Renaissance, a character named "Thelemia" represents will or desire in the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili of the Dominican monk Francesco Colonna. Colonna's work was, in turn, a great influence on the Franciscan monk Francois Rabelais, whose Gargantua and Pantagruel includes an "Abbey of Theleme" which Crowley embraced as a direct precursor to his modern Thelema. St. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... It has been suggested that Poliphilo be merged into this article or section. ... Francesco Colonna (1433 (?) - 1527), was an Italian Dominican priest and monk who was credited by an acrostic in the text with the authorship of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... François Rabelais (ca. ... Gargantua and Pantagruel is a connected series of five novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. ...


Rabelaisian Thelema

François Rabelais
François Rabelais

The word "Thelema" was used by François Rabelais, a Franciscan and later a Benedictine monk of the 16th century.[7] Eventually he left the monastery to study medicine, and so moved to Lyon in 1532. It was there that he wrote Gargantua and Pantagruel, a connected series of books. They tell the story of two giants—a father (Gargantua) and his son (Pantagruel) and their adventures—written in an amusing, extravagant, and satirical vein. Image File history File links Francois_Rabelais_-_Portrait. ... Image File history File links Francois_Rabelais_-_Portrait. ... François Rabelais (ca. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... This article is about the French city. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ... Gargantua and Pantagruel is a connected series of five novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. ...


It is in the first book (ch. 52-57) where Rabelais writes of the Abbey of Theleme, built by the giant Gargantua. It pokes fun at the monastic institutions, since his abbey has a swimming pool, maid service, and no clocks in sight.


One of the verses of the inscription on the gate to the Abbey of Theleme says:

Grace, honour, praise, delight,
Here sojourn day and night.
Sound bodies lined
With a good mind,
Do here pursue with might
Grace, honour, praise, delight.

But below the humour was a very real concept of utopia and the ideal society. Rabelais gives us a description of how the Thelemites of the Abbey lived and the rules they lived by:

All their life was spent not in laws, statutes, or rules, but according to their own free will and pleasure. They rose out of their beds when they thought good; they did eat, drink, labour, sleep, when they had a mind to it and were disposed for it. None did awake them, none did offer to constrain them to eat, drink, nor to do any other thing; for so had Gargantua established it. In all their rule and strictest tie of their order there was but this one clause to be observed,
Do What Thou Wilt;
because men that are free, well-born, well-bred, and conversant in honest companies, have naturally an instinct and spur that prompteth them unto virtuous actions, and withdraws them from vice, which is called honour. Those same men, when by base subjection and constraint they are brought under and kept down, turn aside from that noble disposition by which they formerly were inclined to virtue, to shake off and break that bond of servitude wherein they are so tyrannously enslaved; for it is agreeable with the nature of man to long after things forbidden and to desire what is denied us.

In 1904, the same phrase would appear in the Book of the Law. The Book of the Law, also known as Liber AL vel Legis, is the text central to philosophical / religious practice called Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley. ...


Sir Francis Dashwood adopted some of the ideas of Thelema from Rabelais and quoted this same phrase in French when he founded a group called the Monks of Medmenham (better known as The Hellfire Club).[5] An abbey was established at Medmenham, described in the 1911 Britannica as follows: Francis Dashwood, 15th Baron le Despencer (December, 1708 - December 11, 1781) was an English rake and politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer (1762-1763) and founder of The Hellfire Club. ... Medmenham is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. ... The Hellfire Club was an exclusive English club that met irregularly from 1746 to around 1763, run by Sir Francis Dashwood. ... (Redirected from 1911 Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...

At Medmenham, on the Thames above Marlow, there are fragments, incorporated into a residence, of a Cistercian abbey founded in 1201; which became notorious in the middle of the 18th century as the meeting-place of a convivial club called the Franciscans after its founder, Sir Francis Dashwood, afterwards Lord le Despencer (1708-1781), and also known as the Hell-Fire Club, of which John Wilkes, Bubb Dodington and other political notorieties were members. The motto of the club, fay Ce que voudras (do what you will), inscribed on a doorway at the abbey, was borrowed from Rabelais description of the abbey of Thelema in Gargantua.[8]

We have little direct evidence of what Dashwood's Hellfire Club did or believed.[9][10] The one direct testimonial comes from John Wilkes, a member who never got into the chapter-room of the inner circle[11][10] and later fell out with the club.[9] He describes their origin as follows: To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

A set of worthy, jolly fellows, happy disciples of Venus and Bacchus, got occasionally together to celebrate woman in wine and to give more zest to the festive meeting, they plucked every luxurious idea from the ancients and enriched their own modern pleasures with the tradition of classic luxury.

Their meeting place did contain statues of various gods, including the Egyptian Harpocrates pictured as a god of silence.[9] The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and Crowley would also describe Harpocrates in this way. The group derived more from Rabelais than simply the inscription over the door, in the opinion of Lt.-Col. Towers, who wrote "My interpretation of the caves remains as stated, that they were used as a Dionysian oracular temple, based upon Dashwood’s reading of the relevant chapters of Rabelais."[12] The child Horus represented to the ancient Egyptians the new-born Sun, rising each day at dawn. ... The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (or, more commonly, the Golden Dawn) was a magical order of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, practicing a form of theurgy and spiritual development. ... Heru-ra-ha is a composite deity in Aleister Crowleys quasi-Egyptian mythology; composed of Ra-Hoor-Khuit and Hoor-par-kraat. ...


Gossip of the time and the later Historical Memoires of Sir Nathaniel Wraxall (1815) accused the Monks of performing Satanic rituals.[10][13] But few modern sources outside the Church of Satan[14] describe the Monks' activities this way. Gerald Gardner and others such as Mike Howard[15] say the Monks worshipped "the Goddess." Daniel Willens argued that the group likely practiced Freemasonry, but also suggests Dashwood may have held secret Roman Catholic sacraments. He asks if Wilkes would have recognized a genuine Catholic Mass, even if he saw it himself and even if the underground version followed its public model precisely.[16] Most sources say that Dashwood held strong anti-Catholic views, citing reports of actions as well as words.[9] The Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon also minimizes the connection with Freemasonry.[10] Sir Nathaniel William Wraxall (April 8, 1751 - 1831), English author, was born in Queens Square, Bristol. ... Satanism Associated organizations The Church of Satan First Satanic Church Prominent figures Anton LaVey | Blanche Barton | Peter H. Gilmore | Peggy Nadramia | Karla LaVey Associated concepts Left-Hand Path | Pentagonal Revisionism | Suitheism | Survival of the fittest | Might is Right Books and publications The Satanic Bible | The Satanic Rituals | The Satanic Witch... “Freemasons” redirects here. ...


Later, Sir Walter Besant and James Rice referred to Rabelais' Abbey of Thelema in their novel The Monks of Thelema (1878), as did C.R. Ashbee in his utopian romance The Building of Thelema (1910). Sir Walter Besant (1836 - 1901) was a novelist and historian from London. ... James Rice (1844 - 82), novelist, was educated at Cambridge, and studied law, from which he drifted into literature. ... The Monks of Thelema was a novel by Walter Besant and James Rice. ... Charles Robert Ashbee (London, May 17, 1863–Sevenoaks, Kent, May 23, 1942) was a designer and entrepreneur who was a prime mover of the English Arts and Crafts movement that took its craft ethic from the works of John Ruskin and its co-operative structure from the socialism of William...


Shri Gurudev Mahendranath, who discussed meditation and Eastern studies with Aleister Crowley in the 1930s, wrote that Dashwood and Crowley both revived the Thelemic Law from Rabelais.[5] Aleister Crowley acknowledged in The Antecedents of Thelema (1926) that Rabelais "set forth in essence the Law of Thelema, very much as it is understood by the Master Therion himself," and wrote further that "the masterpiece of Rabelais contains in singular perfection a clear forecast of the Book which was to be revealed by Aiwass to Ankh-f-n-khonsu 370 years later."[17] But Crowley biographer Lawrence Sutin writes that in his opinion, which clearly differs with Crowley's, Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, Avadhut and founder of the spiritual organization known as the International Nath Order. ... Aiwass is the figure who is said to have dictated The Book of the Law to Aleister Crowley on April 8th, 9th, and 10th in 1904. ... Ankh-af-na-khonsu (lit. ...

Questions of prophecy aside, Rabelais was no precursor of Thelema. Joyous and unsystematic, Rabelais blended in his heterodox creed elements of Stoic self-mastery and spontaneous Christian faith and kindness.[18]

Some other scholars argue that Martin Luther influenced Rabelais, and that the French author wrote from a specifically Christian perspective. In particular, Alexander Pocetto of the Allentown College of St. Francis de Sales draws many parallels between him and the saint.[1] Erich Auerbach (1946) disagrees,[19] as does the old Catholic Encyclopedia entry on the Renaissance.[20] Erich Auerbach (November 9, 1892 in Berlin - October 13, 1957 in Wallingford, Connecticut) was a German philologist and comparative scholar and critic of literature. ...


Crowleyan Thelema

Aleister Crowley (18751947), scribe of Liber Legis

In 1904, Aleister Crowley (October 12, 1875December 1, 1947) — an English occultist, writer, and social provocateur— claimed to have received and written down The Book of the Law, which was to serve as the foundation of the religious and philosophical system he called Thelema,[21][22] so named, according to his friend of the 1930s, Shri Gurudev Mahendranath, "in reverence to the Rabelaisian masterpiece."[5] He summed up the Law of Thelema[23] in these phrases from the Book: Aleister Crowley This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Aleister Crowley This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, Avadhut and founder of the spiritual organization known as the International Nath Order. ...

  • "Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law"[24]
  • "Love is the law, love under will"[25]
  • "There is no Law beyond Do what thou wilt"[26]

Crowley wrote that the Law is not a license to indulge in casual whim or to mindlessly accept cultural mores, but is rather a mandate to discover and manifest one's True Will, which he described as one's inner divine nature, spiritual destiny, or proper course in life. The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ...


The Book of the Law

Main article: The Book of the Law

Crowley's system of Thelema begins with The Book of the Law, which bears the official name Liber AL vel Legis. It was written in Cairo, Egypt while on his honeymoon with his new wife Rose Crowley (née Kelly). This small book contains three chapters, each of which was written down in one hour, beginning at noon, on April 8, April 9, and April 10. Crowley claims that the author was an entity named Aiwass, whom he later identified as his own Holy Guardian Angel. Several years later, Crowley added a short section at the end called "The Comment", which warns against the "study" of the Book and "discussing" its contents, and states that all "questions of the Law are to be decided only by appeal to my writings" and is signed Ankh-f-n-khonsu. [27] Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: , Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Aiwass is the figure who is said to have dictated The Book of the Law to Aleister Crowley on April 8th, 9th, and 10th in 1904. ... Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


True Will

Main article: True Will

According to Crowley, the discovery and manifestation of one's unique True Will is the central task of every Thelemite. True Will is an idea that could be described in its dynamic aspect as the singular path of possible action that encounters no resistance in going because it is supported by the inertia of the whole Universe; theoretically, no two True Wills can contradict each other because each one has its own absolutely unique career in its passage through Infinite Space. Hence, to follow one's True Will means to respect all True Wills, described as "Love is the law, love under will". The apparent pacifism of this doctrine is complicated, however, by the possibility that the majority of beings do not know their True Will. The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ... The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ...


Crowley referred to the process of discovering the Will as the Great Work, the basis of which is Love or Union with the All (similar in vein to the mystical aspects of Buddhism and Hinduism). The term Magick is applied to the general set of techniques used to accomplish the Great Work, which usually includes practices based on Yoga, the Qabalah, Hermeticism, and ceremonial ritual. According to Crowley, the two great milestones in this process are attaining the Knowledge and Conversation of one's Holy Guardian Angel (which Crowley described as a person's "Secret Self") and then crossing the Abyss, a mystical process where the individual ego is "annihilated" (symbolized by the spilling of the blood into the Graal of Babalon) and the adept achieves union with the All by entering the City of the Pyramids. After this, the "Master of the Temple" may either remain there, move on to higher states, or return to every-day life to fulfill some earthly destiny. (See also: Thelemic mysticism) The philosophers stone, a longtime Holy Grail of Western alchemy, is a mythical substance that supposedly could turn inexpensive metals into gold and/or create an elixir that would make humans immortal. ... Union generally refers to two or more things joined into one, such as an organization of multiple people or organizations, multiple objects combined into one, and so on. ... Image:Buddhasunset crop. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article refers to the magical system of Aleister Crowley and Thelema. ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... Hermeticism should not be confused with the concept of a hermit. ... Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... Within the mystical system of Thelema, the Abyss is the great gulf or void between the phenomenal world of manifestation and its noumenal source. ... eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... Graal can be: One of the different language forms (Italian, French - see also Oc) of what is known in English as the Holy Grail. ... Babalon riding The Beast, as depicted on the Lust card of Crowleys Thoth Tarot. ... Within the mystical system of Thelema, The City of the Pyramids is the home to those adepts that have crossed the great Abyss, having spilled all their blood in the Graal of Babalon. ... Within the modern system of Thelema, developed by Aleister Crowley in the first half of the 20th century, is a complex mystical path designed to do two interrelated things: to learn ones unique True Will and to achieve union with the All. ...


Cosmology

The Stele of Revealing, depicting Nuit, Hadit as the winged globe, Ra-Hoor-Khuit seated on his throne, and the creator of the Stélé, the scribe Ankh-af-na-khonsu
The Stele of Revealing, depicting Nuit, Hadit as the winged globe, Ra-Hoor-Khuit seated on his throne, and the creator of the Stélé, the scribe Ankh-af-na-khonsu

The Book of the Law establishes a triadic cosmology – derived from ancient Egyptian mythology – each entity “speaking” in one of its three chapters. The first is Nuit, the infinitely-expanded Goddess of the Night Sky, the Queen of Space; Hadit, the infinitely-condensed Point, the hidden Flame in the being of all that lives; and Ra-Hoor-Khuit, a manifestation of Horus, the Hawk-Headed sun god, the Crowned and Conquering Child. Other divinities that exist within Thelema are: Image File history File links Stele_of_revealing. ... Image File history File links Stele_of_revealing. ... Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... In the Ennead mythology, Nuit (alternatively spelt Nut) was the sky goddess, in contrast to most other mythologies, which usually have a sky father. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Horus (disambiguation). ...

  • Babalon—the Scarlet Woman, the Mother of Abominations, the Holy Whore
  • Chaos—the universal generative drive
  • Baphomet—the Serpent and the Lion, creative energy materialized
  • Aiwass—the being that, according to Crowley, dictated Liber AL vel Legis, and whom Crowley claimed to be his own Holy Guardian Angel
  • Ankh-f-n-khonsu—an actual Priest who lived in Thebes during the late XXVIth Dynasty of ancient Egypt, around 725 BCE.

Babalon riding The Beast, as depicted on the Lust card of Crowleys Thoth Tarot. ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... Baphomet, by Eliphas Lévi. ... Aiwass is the figure who is said to have dictated The Book of the Law to Aleister Crowley on April 8th, 9th, and 10th in 1904. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Magick

Main article: Magick

Crowley saw magick as the essential method for a person to reach true understanding of the self and to act according to one's True Will. In the broadest sense, magick is any act designed to cause intentional change. It is not capable of producing "miracles" or violating the physical laws of the universe (i.e. it cannot cause a solar eclipse), although "it is theoretically possible to cause in any object any change of which that object is capable by nature" (Book 4). Crowley describes the general process: This article refers to the magical system of Aleister Crowley and Thelema. ... The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ...

"One must find out for oneself, and make sure beyond doubt, "who" one is, "what" one is, "why" one is...Being thus conscious of the proper course to pursue, the next thing is to understand the conditions necessary to following it out. After that, one must eliminate from oneself every element alien or hostile to success, and develop those parts of oneself which are specially needed to control the aforesaid conditions." [28]

For Crowley, the practice of magick—although it equally applies to mundane things, like balancing the checkbook—is essentially to be used for attaining the Knowledge and Conversation of one's Holy Guardian Angel. Since achieving this state with one's 'Silent Self' can be extremely arduous, magick can be used not only to reach that particular goal, but to clear the way for it as well. For example, if one needed a particular dwelling to perform the operation, one could use magick to obtain a suitable home. Crowley stated that magick that did not have one of these goals as its aim was black magic and should be avoided. Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Practices and observances

Thelema
Category:Thelema
Core topics

The Book of the Law
Aleister Crowley
True Will · 93
Magick Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ... The number 93 is of great significance in the religion of Thelema, originated by Aleister Crowley in 1904 with the writing of The Book of the Law. ... This article refers to the magical system of Aleister Crowley and Thelema. ...

Mysticism

Thelemic mysticism
The Great Work
Holy Guardian Angel
The Gnostic Mass Within the modern system of Thelema, developed by Aleister Crowley in the first half of the 20th century, is a complex mystical path designed to do two interrelated things: to learn ones unique True Will and to achieve union with the All. ... -1... Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... Aleister Crowley wrote The Gnostic Mass—technically called Liber XV or Book 15—in 1913 while travelling in Moscow. ...

Thelemic texts

Works of Crowley
The Holy Books
Thelemite texts Aleister Crowley (1875-1947)—mystic, occultist, and mountaineer—was a highly prolific writer, not only on the topic of Thelema and magick, but on philosophy, politics, and culture. ... Aleister Crowley, the founder of the religion of Thelema, designated his works as belonging to one of several classes. ...

Organizations

A∴A∴ · OTO · EGC
Argenteum Astrum, also known as Argentinum Astrum, Argentinium Astrum (Latin for silver star), Astron Argon (Greek for shining star), or simply A∴A∴(According to the Thelema Website, A..A.. stands for Arcanum Arcanorum; Latin for Secret of Secrets or Mystery of Mysteries), is a magical order created by Aleister... Lamen of the Ordo Templi Orientis Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) (Order of the Temple of the East, or the Order of Oriental Templars) is an international fraternal and religious organization founded at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica (EGC), or the Gnostic Catholic Church, is the ecclesiastical arm of Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), an international fraternal initiatory organization devoted to promulgating the Law of Thelema. ...

Deities

Nuit · Hadit · Horus
Babalon · Chaos
Baphomet · Choronzon
Ankh-f-n-khonsu
Aiwass · Ma'at In the Ennead mythology, Nuit (alternatively spelt Nut) was the sky goddess, in contrast to most other mythologies, which usually have a sky father. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Heru-ra-ha is a composite deity in Aleister Crowleys quasi-Egyptian mythology; composed of Ra-Hoor-Khuit and Hoor-par-kraat. ... Babalon riding The Beast, as depicted on the Lust card of Crowleys Thoth Tarot. ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... Baphomet, by Eliphas Lévi. ... This article is about the Thelemic demon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aiwass is the figure who is said to have dictated The Book of the Law to Aleister Crowley on April 8th, 9th, and 10th in 1904. ... For other uses, see Maat (disambiguation). ...

Other topics

Stele of Revealing
Abrahadabra
Unicursal Hexagram
Abramelin oil In the system of Thelema, Stèle of Revealing refers to an ancient Egyptian work of art that played a role in the creation of the system. ... Abrahadabra is a word that first appears in The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ... The Traditional Unicursal Hexagram The Unicursal Hexagram is a hexagram or six sided and six pointed star that is unique in that it can be traced or drawn as one complete symbol, rather than two overlaid triangles. ... Abramelin oil, also called Oil of Abramelin, is a ceremonial magical oil used by Aleister Crowley and his followers in the OTO. [citation needed] It was first mentioned in print in The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, an important text in the religion Thelema religion. ...


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Although there are communal ceremonies informed by Thelema and organizations to support them (see Thelemic organizations), Thelemic practice is largely an individual affair. Generally, practices are designed to assist the Thelemite in finding and manifesting True Will, although some include celebratory aspects as well. [29]


Crowley wrote many rituals and discussed numerous spiritual practices that he considered central to the Thelemic experience. These include (but are certainly not limited to):

  • Liber Resh—consisting of four daily adorations to the sun
  • The purification, consecration and exaltation of one's Body of Light by the use of rituals of invocation (e.g. the Ritual of the Pentagram)
  • Eucharistic celebrations, such as The Gnostic Mass or the Mass of the Phoenix
  • Development in Yoga
  • Keeping a magical record (a sort of diary for recording ritual and mystical experiences)
  • "Saying Will" before the main meal of the day (a simple set of statements—sometimes presented as a dialog with others—declaring that it is the individual's will to eat and drink, in order to fortify his body, in order to accomplish the Great Work.)

Within the system of magick, the Body of Light—often referred to as the subtle body—is the part of a person that can leave the corporeal body and carry ones senses and consciousness during astral travels. ... Aleister Crowley wrote The Gnostic Mass—technically called Liber XV or Book 15—in 1913 while travelling in Moscow. ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ...

Ethics

Thelema stresses individual liberty balanced by responsibility and discipline, the inherent divinity of every person, regardless of gender [30], and the battle against superstition and tyranny. Ultimately, the interpretation of Thelema and The Book of the Law is left to the individual; for this reason, aggressive attempts at conversion are strongly frowned upon, although using personal example to promulgate the Law is encouraged [31].


Crowley wrote two documents to codify his concept of Thelemic ethics: Oz and Duty.


Liber Oz

Liber Oz establishes the rights of the individual. For each person, these include the right to: live by one's own law; live in the way that one wills to do; work, play, and rest as one will; die when and how one will; eat and drink what one will; live where one will; move about as one will; think, speak, write, dress, love, paint, carve (etc.) as one will; and kill those who would thwart these rights. The rights established in Oz are often considered to be complemented by the obligations given in Duty.


Duty

Duty is described as "A note on the chief rules of practical conduct to be observed by those who accept the Law of Thelema." There are four sections:

  1. Duty to Self: essentially describes the self as the center of the universe, with a call to learn about one's inner nature. Further, every Thelemite is to develop every faculty in a balanced way, establish one's autonomy, and to learn and do one's True Will.
  2. Duty to Others: A Thelemite is called to eliminate the illusion of separateness between oneself and all others, to fight when necessary, to avoid interfering with the Wills of others, to enlighten others when needed, and to recognize the divine nature of all other beings. Further, it is noble to relieve the suffering of others, but pity (seen as condescending) should be avoided.
  3. Duty to Mankind: Thelemites should try to establish the Law of Thelema as the sole basis of conduct. Further, the laws of the land should have the aim of securing the greatest liberty for all individuals. Crime is viewed from the point of view of violating one's True Will ("Thus, murder restricts his right to live; robbery, his right to enjoy the fruits of his labour; coining, his right to the guarantee of the state that he shall barter in security; etc.").
  4. Duty to All Other Beings and Things: Quite simply: "It is a violation of the Law of Thelema to abuse the natural qualities of any animal or object by diverting it from its proper function" and "The Law of Thelema is to be applied unflinchingly to decide every question of conduct."

Contemporary Thelema

Diversity of Thelemic thought

The core of Thelemic thought is "Do what thou wilt." However, beyond this, there exists a very wide range of interpretation of Thelema. For example, some organizations and persons regard Crowley's system to be only one possible manifestation of Thelema, choosing to borrow instead from Rabelais or other original system. Others accept The Book of the Law in some way, but not the rest of Crowley's "inspired" writings or teachings. Yet others take only specific aspects of his overall system—such as his magical techniques, ethics, mysticism, or religious ideas—while ignoring the rest. Considering the strong emphasis on the unique nature of Will inherent in each individual, it is perhaps inevitable that many Thelemites would tend to avoid strongly dogmatic or "fundamentalist" thinking. Crowley himself (at times) supported this view:

I admit that my visions can never mean to other men as much as they do to me. I do not regret this. All I ask is that my results should convince seekers after truth that there is beyond doubt something worth while seeking, attainable by methods more or less like mine. I do not want to father a flock, to be the fetish of fools and fanatics, or the founder of a faith whose followers are content to echo my opinions. I want each man to cut his own way through the jungle. [32]

Many adherents of Thelema are syncretic and recognize correlations between Thelemic and other systems of spiritual thought; most borrow freely from other traditions. For example, Nu and Had are thought to correspond with the Tao and Teh of Taoism, Shakti and Shiva of the Hindu Tantras, Shunyata and Bodhicitta of Buddhism, Ain Soph and Kether in the Qabalah. Adherents of Thelema, none so more than Crowley, make free use of the methods and practices derived from other traditions, including alchemy, astrology, qabalah, tantra, tarot, and yoga, regarding them all as being subsumed within Thelema. In the Ennead mythology, Nuit (alternatively spelt Nut) was the sky goddess, in contrast to most other mythologies, which usually have a sky father. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... This article is about the Chinese character and the philosophy it represents. ... De (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: te) is a key concept in Chinese philosophy, usually translated inherent character; inner power; integrity in Daoism, moral character; virtue; morality in Confucianism and other contexts, and quality; virtue (guna) or merit; virtuous deeds (punya) in Chinese Buddhism. ... Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... For other uses, see Siva (disambiguation). ... This article is an overview of Tantra and an in-depth look at the Tantra of Hinduism. ... Śūnyatā, शून्यता (Sanskrit), Suññatā (Pāli), stong pa nyid (Tibetan), Kuu, 空 (Japanese) qoÉ£usun (Mongolian), generally translated into English as Emptiness or Voidness, is a concept of central importance in the teaching of the Buddha, as a direct realization of Sunyata is required to achieve liberation from the cycle of... In Buddhist thought, bodhicitta (Ch. ... Image:Buddhasunset crop. ... Ein Sof (Hebrew: without end denoting boundlessness), also known as Divine Being, is the name for God, within the Kabbalah of Judaism, as he is unknown, or the mysterious and ultimate source of all existence. ... // Keter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... This article is an overview of Tantra and an in-depth look at the Tantra of Hinduism. ... This article is about the general history, iconography, and uses of tarot cards. ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ...


While some organizations attempt to stay true to Crowley's system (such as O.T.O. and the A∴A∴), several organizations deviate from his core teachings, in some cases substantially. For example, the Fraternitas Saturni (Brotherhood of Saturn), founded in 1928 in Germany, accepts the Law of Thelema, but extends it with the phrase "Mitleidlose Liebe!" ("Compassionless love!"). The Thelema Society, also located in Germany, accepts Liber Legis and much of Crowley's work on magick, while incorporating the ideas of other thinkers, such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles S. Peirce, Martin Heidegger, and Niklas Luhmann. In America, the writings of Maggie Ingalls (Nema) have inspired a movement called Maat Magick, along with an organization called the Horus-Maat Lodge, founded in 1979. This movement combines Crowley's essential elements of Thelema with Nema's system based on the Egyptian goddess Ma'at, as established in her received work, "Liber Pennae Praenumbra." HML aims to combine the current Aeon of Horus with the future Aeon of Ma'at, where the combined mind of humanity will awaken and mankind will achieve balance. Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) (Order of the Temple of the East, or the Order of Oriental Templars) is an international fraternal and religious organization. ... Argenteum Astrum, also known as Argentinum Astrum, Argentinium Astrum (Latin for silver star) or Astron Argyron (Greek for silver star), and often referred to as A∴A∴, was a magical order created by Aleister Crowley after leaving the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. ... Fraternitas Saturni (Brotherhood of Saturn, FS) is the oldest German magical order. ... Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... This article refers to the magical system of Aleister Crowley and Thelema. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... Charles Sanders Peirce Charles Sanders Peirce (September 10, 1839 – April 19, 1914) was an American logician, philosopher, scientist, and mathematician. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Niklas Luhmann (December 8, 1927 - November 6, 1998) was a German sociologist, administration expert, and social systems theorist, as well as one the most prominent modern day thinkers in the sociological systems theory. ... Nema has been practising and writing about Magick (magical working, as defined by Aleister Crowley) for over twenty-five years. ... Ancient Egyptian religion was polytheistic. ... For other uses, see Maat (disambiguation). ... Within the system of Thelema, history is taken and broken down into a series of Aeons, each with its own dominant concept of divinity and its own formula of redemption and advancement. ...


Contemporary Thelemic literature

By far, the bulk of Thelemic writing remains that of Aleister Crowley. He was highly prolific and wrote on the subject of Thelema for over 35 years, and many of his books remain in print. During his time, there were a few who wrote on the subject, including Charles Stansfeld Jones and J.F.C. Fuller. Since his death in 1947 only a few Thelemic voices have appeared in published books. Perhaps the four most published voices have been: Frater Achad Charles Stansfeld Jones (1886-1950), aka Frater Achad, was an early aspirant to A.A. (the 20th to be admitted as a Probationer, in December 1909) who claimed the grade of Magister Templi as a Neophyte. ... Major-General John Frederick Charles Fuller, CB, CBE, DSO, commonly J.F.C. Fuller, (September 1, 1878–February 10, 1966), was a British major-general, military historian and strategist, notable as an early theorist of modern armoured warfare, including categorising principles of warfare. ...

  • Israel Regardie, who not only edited many of Crowley's works, but wrote a biography of him—The Eye in the Triangle—and penned many books on ritual and Qabalah, such as Garden of Pomegranates, Golden Dawn, Middle Pillar, and Tree of Life.
  • Kenneth Grant, who has written many books on Thelema and the occult, such as The Magical Revival, Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God, Outside the Circles of Time, and Hecate's Fountain.
  • Lon Milo DuQuette, a popular author whose books are mostly dedicated to analyzing and exploring Crowley's system, including such books as Understanding Aleister Crowley's Thoth Tarot, The Chicken Qabalah of Rabbi Lamed Ben Clifford, The Magick of Aleister Crowley, and The Key to Solomon's Key.
  • Nema, whose Liber Pennae Praenumbra announces and explains the Ma'atian current has influenced Thelemites for over 25 years. She now has several books on Ma'atian Thelema including her book, Maat Magick.

Other notable contemporary writers who address Thelema include Jerry Edward Cornelius, Christopher Hyatt, and Jack Parsons. Israel Regardie (Francis Israel Regudy) was born on November 17, 1907 in London, England to poor Jewish immigrant parents. ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... This article is about the British occultist. ... Lon Milo DuQuette Lon Milo DuQuette (Born July 11, 1948), AKA Rabbi Lamed Ben Clifford, American writer, lecturer, and occultist best known as an author who applies humor in the field of Western Hermeticism. ... Nema has been practising and writing about Magick (magical working, as defined by Aleister Crowley) for over twenty-five years. ... For other uses, see Maat (disambiguation). ... Christopher Hyatt is the pen name of Alan Miller. ... Jack Parsons on the cover of his book Freedom is a two-edged sword John Jack Whiteside Parsons (October 2, 1914 – June 17, 1952), (born Marvel Whiteside Parsons), was an American rocket propulsion researcher at the California Institute of Technology and co-founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and...


There are also numerous publications that print original Thelemic writing, such as the journals Light In Extension, Lion & Serpent, The Scarlet Letter, and Cornelia. (See External links).


Thelemic organizations

Several modern organizations of various sizes claim to follow the tenets of Thelema. The two most prominent are both organizations that Crowley headed during his lifetime, the A∴A∴—a teaching order designed to guide initiates through Crowley's mystical system of Thelema—and Ordo Templi Orientis—a fraternal order that initially developed from freemasonry and includes the Gnostic Catholic Church (which celebrates the Gnostic Mass). Argenteum Astrum, also known as Argentinum Astrum, Argentinium Astrum (Latin for silver star) or Astron Argyron (Greek for silver star), and often referred to as A∴A∴, was a magical order created by Aleister Crowley after leaving the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. ... Within the modern system of Thelema, developed by Aleister Crowley in the first half of the 20th century, is a complex mystical path designed to do two interrelated things: to learn ones unique True Will and to achieve union with the All. ... Lamen of the Ordo Templi Orientis Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) (Order of the Temple of the East, or the Order of Oriental Templars) is an international fraternal and religious organization founded at the beginning of the 20th century. ... “Freemasons” redirects here. ... Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica (EGC), or the Gnostic Catholic Church, is the ecclesiastical arm of Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), an international fraternal initiatory organization devoted to promulgating the Law of Thelema. ... Aleister Crowley wrote The Gnostic Mass—technically called Liber XV or Book 15—in 1913 while travelling in Moscow. ...


Since Crowley's death in 1947, other organizations have formed that try to carry on his initial work—for example, Phyllis Seckler's College of Thelema, the Ordo Templi Orientis of Kenneth Grant, Society O.T.O. of Marcelo Ramos Motta, OTO Foundation, Thelemic Order of the Golden Dawn, the Holy Order Of Ra-Hoor-Khuit, The Open Source Order of the Golden Dawn, and The Order of Thelemic Knights. Other groups of widely varying character exist which have drawn inspiration or methods from Thelema, such as the Illuminates of Thanateros and the Temple of Set. Groups such as Fraternitas Saturni, Horus-Maat Lodge, The Hawk and Jackal Covens, and The Thelema Society accept the Law of Thelema, but omit certain aspects of Crowley's system while incorporating the works of other mystics, philosophers, and religious systems. Phyllis Evalina Seckler (1917 - 2004), also known as Soror Meral, was a IXth degree member of Ordo Templi Orientis She was Master of 418 Lodge of O.T.O. from its inception in 1979 through 2004, founder of the College of Thelema and co-founder with James Eshelman of the... The College of Thelema is a California non-profit religious organization founded in 1973 by Soror Meral. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the British occultist. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Open Source Order of the Golden Dawn (OSOGD) is a Pagan community and initiatory teaching Order that draws upon the knowledge, experience, practices and spirit of the system of magical training and attainment developed by the original Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. ... The Illuminates of Thanateros are an occult society, founded in 1978, that pursues chaos magic. ... Forms of Satanism LaVeyan Satanism | Luciferianism | Religious Satanism | Sat/Tan Satanism | Setianism Associated Organizations First Satanic Church | Misanthropic Luciferian Order | Church of Satan | First Church of Satan | Order of Mars | Order of Nine Angles | Order of the Left Hand Path | Temple of Set Symbols and Figures Baphomet | Anton LaVey | Karla... Fraternitas Saturni (Brotherhood of Saturn, FS) is the oldest German magical order. ...


Thelema in comparative religion

Thelema has been attracting more attention in recent years from scholars of religion, especially those interested in new religious movements, contemporary Gnosticisms and Hermeticisms. References at the end of this article supply a few such sources. Perhaps the most unusual attempt was made by bishop Federico Tolli, in his German book Thelema — Im Spannungsfeld zwischen Christentum, Logentradition und New Aeon [33] For Tolli, Thelema is to be regarded as the dialectical consequence of Christianity. Christianity for Tolli exists as a community in Christ, whereas Tolli sees Thelema as a necessarily individualistic response to the world. A new religious movement or NRM is a term used to refer to a religious faith, or an ethical, spiritual or philosophical movement of recent origin that isnt part of an established denomination, church, or religious body. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


Taken from a 1938 theological dictionary (to the New Testament), the concept of 'salvation history' (Heilsgeschichte) has a great effect on Tolli's thought, and it is in this context that he discusses Crowleyan Thelema. Tolli regards Crowley's Heilsgeschichte as one in which the whole Universe (ergo the Will of God) is to combine (analogous to the Alchemical formula 'coagula'). "Love", in the form of combinatory attraction ("Love is the law, love under will"), is a universal principle — therefore akin to the concept of Natural religion. The main difference (for Tolli) is that in Christianity salvation of the entire Universe ("Ganzheit") cannot be made by 'solipsistic' man. The bishop sees Crowley as a failed – however talented – artist or "Mystagogie", but not as a "Satanist". The merit and contribution of bishop Tolli to Thelemic studies lies in the fact that it was he who first expresses that the genuine meaning and idea of Thelema does not necessarily contradict the teachings of Jesus, as Crowley himself affirms. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Natural religion might have the following meanings: A synonym for natural theology; religion based on reason and ordinary experience (this usage is primarily found in the 18th century and before — see, for example, David Humes Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion). ... Satanism is a religious or philosophical movement centered around Satan or another entity identified with Satan, or centered around the forces of nature, particularly human nature, represented by Satan as an archetype. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


See also

Thelema Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Svecchachara is the Sanskrit equivalent of the Greek word Thelema, interpreted by Aleister Crowley as Do What Thou Wilt. ... The Wiccan Rede is a saying that was formulated to sum up the ethics of the neo-Pagan religion Wicca. ... Aleister Crowley (1875-1947)—mystic, occultist, and mountaineer—was a highly prolific writer, not only on the topic of Thelema and magick, but on philosophy, politics, and culture. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b Rabelais, Francis de Sales and the Abbaye de Thélème by Alexander T. Pocetto, O.S. F.S., Allentown College of St. Francis de Sales, citing other writers. Online version here, retrieved from July 20, 2006.
  2. ^ e.g. John 1:12-13
  3. ^ e.g. 2 Timothy 2:26
  4. ^ Chappell, Vere. What is Thelema?. Retrieved July 7, 2006.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Mahendranath (1990).
  6. ^ Liber XIII vel Graduum Montis Abiegni: A Syllabus of the Steps Upon the Path by Aleister Crowley. Online version here, retrieved July 7, 2006. For confirmation that the order in question took the Book of the Law as an official document of the order that "may be changed not so much as the style of a letter," A syllabus of the official instructions of the A∴A∴ by Aleister Crowley. "This book is the foundation of the New Aeon, and thus of the whole of our Work." First section, list of Class "A" Publications. Online version here, retrieved July 7, 2006. And finally, for the part calling Thelema the word of the Law, Liber AL I:39-40
  7. ^ Rabelais, François, Gargantua and Pantagruel
  8. ^ Encyclopedia Britannica (1911). Buckingham.
  9. ^ a b c d Knowles, George. Sir Francis Dashwood. Online version here, retrieved July 22, 2006
  10. ^ a b c d The Hell-fire Clubs, Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon. Online version here, retrieved July 22, 2006
  11. ^ Coppens (2006)
  12. ^ Towers (1987) quoted in Coppens (2006)
  13. ^ see Howard and other sources on Black Mass rumors
  14. ^ Satanic Bible, quoted here, retrieved July 23, 2006.
  15. ^ Howard, The Hellfire Club, Online version here, retrieved July 22, 2006
  16. ^ "The Hell-fire Club: Sex, Politics, and Religion in Eighteenth-Century England" in Gnosis, Summer 1992. Online versions here, retrieved July 22, 2006
  17. ^ Crowley, Aleister. The Antecedents of Thelema. October 1926. Retrieved from [1] on July 4, 2006
  18. ^ Sutin, Lawrence. Do What Thou Wilt. New York, NY: St. Martin's Griffin. 2000. p. 126
  19. ^ Mimesis, 1946, quoted here, retrieved July 20, 2006.
  20. ^ Online version here, retrieved July 20, 2006.
  21. ^ "De Lege Libellum", in The Equinox III(1) (Detroit: Universal, 1919).
  22. ^ "Appendix: Notes on the nature of the 'Astral Plane'", in Magick in Theory and Practice, Book 4, purports to tell the reader what Thelema says about distinguishing independent entities on the Astral Plane from phantasms: "These mirror-mirages are therefore not Works of Magick, according to the Law of Thelema: the true Magick of Horus requires the passionate union of opposites... One must therefore insist that any real appearance of the Astral Plane gives the sensation of meeting a stranger." Online copy here, retrieved July 19, 2006
  23. ^ "Liber II The Message of The Master Therion", in The Equinox III(1) (Detroit: Universal, 1919). Online copy here, retrieved July 6, 2006
  24. ^ Liber AL I:40
  25. ^ Liber AL I:57
  26. ^ Liber AL III:60
  27. ^ Crowley, A., The Book of the Law
  28. ^ Crowley, Book 4
  29. ^ DuQuette, Lon Milo. The Magick of Thelema
  30. ^ "Every man and every woman is a star" AL I:3
  31. ^ "Success is thy proof: argue not; convert not; talk not over much!" AL III:42
  32. ^ Crowley 1979, ch.66
  33. ^ Leipzig, 2004.

References

  • Coppens, Philip (2006). Hell, no damnation. Retrieved July 21, 2006.
  • Crowley, Aleister. (1997). Magick: Book 4. 2nd ed. York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser.
  • Crowley, Aleister (1979), written at London;Boston, The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, Routledge & Kegan Paul, <http://www.hermetic.com/crowley/confess/index.html>
  • Del Campo, Gerald. Rabelais: The First Thelemite. The Order of Thelemic Knights.
  • DuQuette, Lon Milo. (1993). The Magick of Thelema. York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser.
  • Free Encyclopedia of Thelema (2005). Thelema. Retrieved March 12, 2005.
  • Kaczynski, Richard (2002). Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley. Tempe, AZ: New Falcon Publications.
  • Mahendranath, Shri Gurudev (1991). The Scrolls of Mahendranath. Seattle: International Nath Order.
  • Melton, J. Gordon (1983). "Thelemic Magick in America." Alternatives to American Mainline Churches, ed. Joseph H. Fichter. Barrytown, NY: Unification Theological Seminary.
  • Starr, Martin P. (2003). The Unknown God: W.T. Smith and the Thelemites. Bolingbrook, IL: Teitan Press.
  • Sutin, Lawrence (2000). Do What Thou Wilt. New York, NY: St. Martin's Griffin.
  • Thelemapedia. (2004). Thelema. Retrieved April 15, 2006.
  • Towers, Eric (1987). Dashwood: The Man and the Myth. Crucible. ISBN 0-85030-427-X
  • van Egmond, Daniel (1998). "Western Esoteric Schools in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries." in van den Broek, Roelof and Hanegraaff, Wouter J. Gnosis and Hermeticism From Antiquity To Modern Times. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge&#8212;writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others&#8212;in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

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Important elements within Thelema: The Book of the LawAleister CrowleyThelemic mysticismTrue WillThe Great Work • Holy Guardian Angel • AbrahadabraStele of Revealing93Aeon of HorusBody of LightNight of PanCity of the Pyramids Cover of The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley (Weiser 2004 Centennial Edition) The Book of the Law is the central sacred text of Thelema, written (or received) by Aleister Crowley in Cairo, Egypt in the year 1904. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Within the modern system of Thelema, developed by Aleister Crowley in the first half of the 20th century, is a complex mystical path designed to do two interrelated things: to learn ones unique True Will and to achieve union with the All. ... The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ... -1... Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... Abrahadabra is a word that first appears in The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ... In the system of Thelema, Stèle of Revealing refers to an ancient Egyptian work of art that played a role in the creation of the system. ... The number 93 is of great significance in the religion of Thelema, originated by Aleister Crowley in 1904 with the writing of The Book of the Law. ... Within the system of Thelema, history is taken and broken down into a series of Aeons, each with its own dominant concept of divinity and its own formula of redemption and advancement. ... Within the system of magick, the Body of Light—often referred to as the subtle body—is the part of a person that can leave the corporeal body and carry ones senses and consciousness during astral travels. ... Within the system of Thelema, the Night of Pan, or N.O.X., is a mystical state that represents the stage of ego-death in the process of spiritual attainment. ... Within the mystical system of Thelema, The City of the Pyramids is the home to those adepts that have crossed the great Abyss, having spilled all their blood in the Graal of Babalon. ...


Thelema and Religion: The Gnostic MassEcclesia Gnostica CatholicaHoly Books of Thelema Aleister Crowley wrote The Gnostic Mass&#8212;technically called Liber XV or Book 15&#8212;in 1913 while travelling in Moscow. ... Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica (EGC), or the Gnostic Catholic Church, is the ecclesiastical arm of Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), an international fraternal initiatory organization devoted to promulgating the Law of Thelema. ... Aleister Crowley, the founder of the religion of Thelema, designated his works as belonging to one of several classes. ...


Godforms: NuitHadit • Ra-Hoor-Khuit • BabalonChaosBaphometChoronzonAiwass • Ankh-af-an-khonsu In the Ennead mythology, Nuit (alternatively spelt Nut) was the sky goddess, in contrast to most other mythologies, which usually have a sky father. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Babalon riding The Beast, as depicted on the Lust card of Crowleys Thoth Tarot. ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... Baphomet, by Eliphas Lévi. ... This article is about the Thelemic demon. ... Aiwass is the figure who is said to have dictated The Book of the Law to Aleister Crowley on April 8th, 9th, and 10th in 1904. ... Ankh-af-na-khonsu (lit. ...


Organizations: Argenteum AstrumOrdo Templi Orientis Argenteum Astrum, also known as Argentinum Astrum, Argentinium Astrum (Latin for silver star), Astron Argon (Greek for shining star), or simply A∴A∴(According to the Thelema Website, A..A.. stands for Arcanum Arcanorum; Latin for Secret of Secrets or Mystery of Mysteries), is a magical order created by Aleister... Lamen of the Ordo Templi Orientis Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) (Order of the Temple of the East, or the Order of Oriental Templars) is an international fraternal and religious organization founded at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


Personalities: Allan BennettJack ParsonsCharles Stansfeld JonesGrady McMurtryKenneth GrantIsrael RegardieLon Milo DuquetteKenneth AngerLady Frieda Harris Allan Bennett, friend and associate of Aleister Crowley, member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. ... Jack Parsons on the cover of his book Freedom is a two-edged sword John Jack Whiteside Parsons (October 2, 1914 – June 17, 1952), (born Marvel Whiteside Parsons), was an American rocket propulsion researcher at the California Institute of Technology and co-founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and... Frater Achad Charles Stansfeld Jones (1886-1950), aka Frater Achad, was an early aspirant to A.A. (the 20th to be admitted as a Probationer, in December 1909) who claimed the grade of Magister Templi as a Neophyte. ... Grady Louis McMurtry (October 18, 1918-July 12, 1985) was a student of Aleister Crowley, and a promoter of Crowleys religion of Thelema. ... This article is about the British occultist. ... Israel Regardie (Francis Israel Regudy) was born on November 17, 1907 in London, England to poor Jewish immigrant parents. ... Lon Milo DuQuette Lon Milo DuQuette (Born July 11, 1948), AKA Rabbi Lamed Ben Clifford, American writer, lecturer, and occultist best known as an author who applies humor in the field of Western Hermeticism. ... Kenneth Anger Kenneth Anger (born February 3, 1927 in Santa Monica, California as Kenneth Wilbur Anglemyer) is an underground avant-garde film-maker and author. ... Lady Harris and Aleister Crowley // Frieda Harris and Thoth Tarot By an accident of fate Frieda Harris was commissioned by Aleister Crowley to paint the Thoth Tarot. ...


Thelemic texts: Works of Aleister CrowleyThe EquinoxLiber 777Magick (Book 4)ConfessionsBook of LiesKonx om PaxBook of ThothMoonchildLiber Aleph Aleister Crowley (1875-1947)—mystic, occultist, and mountaineer—was a highly prolific writer, not only on the topic of Thelema and magick, but on philosophy, politics, and culture. ... The Equinox was a large bi-annual periodical published by Aleister Crowley that served as the official organ of the A∴A∴ and later the O.T.O. It was subtitled The Review of Scientific Illuminism. ... The full name of this Class B document by Aleister Crowley is Liber 777 Vel Prolegoma Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticae Viae Explicande, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicum Sanctissimorum Scientiae Summae. ... Cover of Magick, Liber ABA, Book 4 by Aleister Crowley. ... Cover of The Confessions of Aleister Crowley by Aleister Crowley. ... Cover of The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley. ... Konx Om Pax: Essays in Light is a publication by British occulist Aleister Crowley, first published in 1907. ... Cover of The Book of Thoth by Aleister Crowley. ... Moonchild, the 1929 edition. ... Liber Aleph vel CXI: The Book of Wisdom or Folly is the title of The Equinox, volume III, number VI, by Aleister Crowley. ...


Magick and Ritual: MagickOil of AbramelinGematriaThoth TarotQabalahAstrologyYoga This article refers to the magical system of Aleister Crowley and Thelema. ... Abramelin oil, also called Oil of Abramelin, is a ceremonial magical oil used by Aleister Crowley and his followers in the OTO. [citation needed] It was first mentioned in print in The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, an important text in the religion Thelema religion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Thoth Tarot is a Tarot deck painted by Lady Frieda Harris according to instructions from Aleister Crowley. ... The tree of life Kabbalah (&#1511;&#1489;&#1500;&#1492; Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabb&#257;l&#257;h; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ...


Categories: Category:Thelema • Thelemites • Thelemite texts


  Results from FactBites:
 
www.thelema.org (292 words)
The Temple of Thelema is a true Outer Order of the Greater Mysteries, providing ceremonial initiation; coordinated and structured training; and regular group work, all in conformity with the principles of The Book of the Law.
Each is expected to aspire fervently to the Great Work; to dare, with courage undaunted, to perfect that Work; and ever to apply his or her best effort to effect Harmony within the Order, and within the world in general.
Thelema Coast-to-Coast, the popular Thelemic interview show, has released a podcast that features an interview with David Shoemaker, Grand Praemonstrator of the Temple of Thelema and Provost of the College of Thelema.
Thelema (1946 words)
The theology of Thelema postulates all manifested existence arising from the interaction of two cosmic principles: the infinitely extended, all-pervading Space-Time Continuum; and the atomic, individually expressed Principle of Life and Wisdom.
This "Law of Thelema", as it is called, is not to be interpreted as a license to indulge every passing whim, but rather as the divine mandate to discover one's True Will or true purpose in life, and to accomplish it; leaving others to do the same in their own unique ways.
Thelema has no direct parallel to the Judaeo-Christian concept of the devil or Satan; however, a pseudo-personification of confusion, distraction, illusion and egotistical ignorance is referred to by the name "Choronzon".
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