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Encyclopedia > Theatre
Serge Sudeikin's poster for the Bat Theatre (1922).
Serge Sudeikin's poster for the Bat Theatre (1922).

Theatre (or theater, see spelling differences) (from French "théâtre", from Greek "theatron", θέατρον, meaning "place of seeing") is the branch of the performing arts defined as simply as what "occurs when one or more human beings, isolated in time and/or space, present themselves to another or others."[1] By this broad definition, theatre has existed since the dawn of man, as a result of human tendency for story telling. Since its inception, theatre has come to take on many forms, often utilizing elements such as speech, gesture, music, dance, and spectacle, combining the other performing arts, often as well as the visual arts, into a single artistic form. Modern Western theatre is dominated by realism, although many other forms, including classical and experimental forms, as well as Eastern forms, are frequently performed. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (450x639, 47 KB) Serge Sudeikin. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (450x639, 47 KB) Serge Sudeikin. ... Sudeikins poster for the Chauve-Souris Theatre 1922. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... A theater or theatre is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed or other performances such as musical concerts may be given. ... UK spelling theatre. ... Spelling differences redirects here. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Overview of theatre

Summer Theatre in Szczecin, Poland
Summer Theatre in Szczecin, Poland

Drama (literally translated as action, from a verbal root meaning "To do") is the branch of theatre in which speech, either from written text (plays), or improvised is paramount. And the companion word drama is also Greek, dran meaning to do. The first theatre, the Theatre of ancient Greece, created the definition of a theatre: an audience in a half-circle watching an elevated stage where actors use props staging plays. Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance routines, and spoken dialogue. However, theatre is more than just what one sees on stage. Theatre involves an entire world behind the scenes that creates the costumes, sets, and lighting to make the overall effect interesting. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x1584, 2841 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Theatre Opera house Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts New York City Ballet New York City Opera Culture... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x1584, 2841 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Theatre Opera house Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts New York City Ballet New York City Opera Culture... , The New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, seen from the Lincoln Center Plaza. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,272 × 1,704 pixels, file size: 759 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,272 × 1,704 pixels, file size: 759 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Stettin redirects here. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... For other uses of Greek Theatre, see Greek theatre (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dialogue (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


There is a long tradition of political theatre, which aims to educate audiences on contemporary issues and encourage social change. The Catholic church took advantage of the entertainment value of theatre to create passion plays, mystery plays, and morality plays. Political theater is drama or performing art which emphasizes a political issue or issues in its theme or plot. ... A Passion play is a dramatic presentation depicting the suffering and death of Jesus. ... Mystery plays are one of the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. ... Morality plays (15th-16th c. ...

The Kutiyattam, Sanskrit theatre from the province of Kerala, is one of the oldest living theatrical traditions in India. It is traditionally performed in the Kuttampalams, theatres located in Hindu temples. The Kutiyattam goes back more than 2000 years and represents a unique synthesis of Sanskrit classicism and local traditions of Kerala (particularly the comic theatre in the Malayalam language). Artist Guru Māni Mādhava Chākyār as Ravana in Kutiyattam
The Kutiyattam, Sanskrit theatre from the province of Kerala, is one of the oldest living theatrical traditions in India. It is traditionally performed in the Kuttampalams, theatres located in Hindu temples. The Kutiyattam goes back more than 2000 years and represents a unique synthesis of Sanskrit classicism and local traditions of Kerala (particularly the comic theatre in the Malayalam language).[2] Artist Guru Māni Mādhava Chākyār as Ravana in Kutiyattam

An overview of the traditional theatres of India suggests that multiple systems of communication are ordered into hierarchies that vary from theatre to theatre. Abstract masks and song-less mime dominate the Seraikella Chhau of Bihar, while the shifting use of municipal space flavours the grand Ram Lila at Ramnagar in Uttar Pradesh. In the Kuchipudi theatre (Andhra Pradesh) and the Bhagavatamela (Tanjore district, Tamilnadu), elaborate dance and stylised hand gestures prevail. Spectacular headdresses, costumes, and colour-coded makeup distinguish both the Kathakali theatre of Kerala and the Yakshagana of Karnataka.[3] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1168x1766, 295 KB)[edit] Summary Mani Madhava Chakyar as Ravana at the age of 89! It was one of his last performance (Thripunithura). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1168x1766, 295 KB)[edit] Summary Mani Madhava Chakyar as Ravana at the age of 89! It was one of his last performance (Thripunithura). ... Kuttiyattam is a form of theatre in the South Indian state of Kerala. ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... Temples Categories: Temples in India | Temples in USA | Temples in Singapore | Temples in Malaysia | Temples in SriLanka | Hindu temples ... Nātyāchārya VidÅ«shakaratnam Padma Shri Māni Mādhava Chākyār ( 1899 - 1990 ) Guru Mani Madhava Chakyar ( Māni Mādhava Chākyār ) ( 15 February 1899 - 14 January 1990) was a performance artist and Sanskrit scholar from Kerala, South India, considered to be the greatest... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, Telugu: రావణాసురుడు IAST ; sometimes transliterated as Raavana or Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of Rama in the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... For other uses, see Bihar (disambiguation). ... See Ramnagar for disambiguation , Ramnagar is a city and a municipal board in Varanasi district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... , Uttar Pradesh (Hindi: , Urdu: , IPA:  , translation: Northern Province), [often referred to as U.P.], located in central-south Asia and northern India, is the most populous and fifth largest state in the Republic of India. ... Kuchipudi (కుచిపుడి) is a Classical Indian dance form from Andhra Pradesh, a state of South India. ... Andhra redirects here. ... Tamil Nadu (தமிழ் நாடு, Land of the Tamils) is a state at the southern tip of India. ... Kathakali (IPA: [kat̪ʰakaÉ­i], Malayalam:�·ഥ�·ളി , Sanskrit:�·थ�·ळि) is a form of Indian dance-drama. ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... A Yakshagana artist wearing pagaDe, one type of head-wear. ... , Karnataka (Kannada: , IPA:  ) is a state in the southern part of India. ...


There are a variety of philosophies, artistic processes, and theatrical approaches to creating plays and drama. Some are connected to political or spiritual ideologies, and some are based on purely "artistic" concerns. Some processes focus on a story, some on theatre as event, and some on theatre as catalyst for social change. According to Aristotle's seminal theatrical critique Poetics, there are six elements necessary for theatre: Plot, Character, Idea, Language, Song, and Spectacle. The 17th century Spanish writer Lope de Vega wrote that for theatre one needs "three boards, two actors, and one passion". Others notable for their contribution to theatrical philosophy are Konstantin Stanislavski, Antonin Artaud, Bertolt Brecht, Orson Welles, Peter Brook, and Jerzy Grotowski. For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Aristotles Poetics aims to give an account of poetry. ... Lope de Vega Lope de Vega (also Félix Lope de Vega Carpio or Lope Félix de Vega Carpio) (25 November 1562 – 27 August 1635) was a Spanish playwright and poet. ... A portrait of Konstantin Stanislavski by Valentin Serov. ... Antonin Artaud Antoine Marie Joseph Artaud, better known as Antonin Artaud (born September 4, 1896, in Marseille; died March 4, 1948 in Paris) was a French playwright, poet, actor and director. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For the British politician, see Peter Brooke. ... Jerzy Grotowski (11 August 1933 – 14 January 1999) was a Polish theatre director and a leading figure in avant garde theatre of the 20th century. ...


The most recognisable figures in theatre are the directors, playwrights, and actors, but theatre is a highly collaborative endeavour. Plays are usually produced by a production team that commonly includes a scenic or set designer, lighting designer, costume designer, sound designer, dramaturg, stage manager, and production manager. The artistic staff is assisted by technical theatre personnel who handle creation and execution of the production. A theatre director is a principal in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a play by unifying various endeavors and aspects of production. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Production teams are the groups of technical staff whom put on the show. ... Scenic design also known as Stage design is the creation of theatrical scenery. ... This article is about lighting design in theater. ... Costume designer is a cinema term which refers to a person whose responsibilty is to design costumes for a movie or stage production. ... Sound design is a technical/conceptually creative field. ... Dramaturg is a position in the theater which gained its modern-day function through the innovations of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, a playwright and theater practitioner who worked in Germany in the 18th century. ... Part of the stage managers panel at Wolf Trap Center for the Performing Arts Stage management is a sub-discipline of stagecraft. ... Theatrical production management is a sub-division of stagecraft. ... Technical theatre describes the creation and execution of those aspects of theatre which are beyond performance, including the creation of the physical environment, sound elements, and special effects. ...


Some[weasel words] theatre theorists argue that actors should study all of the commonly-taught acting methods to perfect their craft (though many others disagree), such as the Meisner, Stanislavsky, Strasberg, and Hagen acting methods. Theater, overall, encompasses people, ideas, and the works of art that result from their collaboration. The Meisner Technique has influenced some of the most popular stage and screen actors of our time. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Method acting is an acting technique in which actors try to replicate real life emotional conditions under which the character operates, in an effort to create a life-like, realistic performance. ... Presentational acting is a concept in theatre which holds that actors should strive to, in some sense, become their characters, rather than simply portraying them. ...


Genres of theatre

There are a variety of genres that writers, producers, and directors can employ in theatre to suit a variety of tastes: A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ...

  • Black comedy: Comedy that tests the boundaries of good taste and moral acceptability by juxtaposing morbid or ghastly elements with comical ones.
  • Comedy: Comes from the Greek word komos which means celebration, revel, or merrymaking. It does not necessarily mean funny, but can focus on a problem that leads to some form of catastrophe which in the end has a happy and joyful outcome.
  • Comedy of manners: Witty, cerebral form of dramatic comedy that depicts and often satirises the manners and affectations of a contemporary society. A comedy of manners is concerned with social usage and the question of whether or not characters meet certain social standards.
  • Commedia dell'arte: A very physical form of comedy which was created and originally performed in Italy. Commedia uses a series of stock characters and a list of events to improvise an entire play.
  • Domestic drama: Drama that focuses on the everyday domestic lives of people and their relationships in the community where they live.
  • Farce: A comic dramatic piece that uses highly improbable situations, stereotyped characters, extravagant exaggeration, fast pacing, and violent horseplay.
  • Grand Guignol: Now broadly used to refer to any play with on-stage violence, the term originally referred to the bloody and gruesome melodramas produced at the Theatre du Grand Guignol in Paris, France.
  • Melodrama: Originally, a sentimental drama with musical underscoring. Often with an unlikely plot that concerns the suffering of the good at the hands of the villains but ends happily with good triumphant. Featuring stock characters such as the noble hero, the long-suffering heroine, and the cold-blooded villain.
  • Meta-Theatre: A genre of theatre made popular with mostly modern audiences, although it did start back in the Elizabethan Era. Meta-Theatre is when a play often completely demolishes the so called "fourth wall" and completely engages the audience. Often about a group of actors, a director, writer and so on. It usually blurs the line between what is scripted and what goes on by accident.
  • Morality play: A morality play is an allegory in which the characters are abstractions of moral ideas.
  • Musical theatre: A theatrical genre in which a story is told through the performance of singing (with instrumental music), spoken dialogue, and often dance.
  • Natya: Sacred classical Indian musical theatre that includes natya proper (mime) and nritta (pure dance).
  • Nautanki: A diverse Indian form of street plays consisting of folklore and mythological dramas with interludes of folk songs and dances.
  • Opera: A theatrical genre in which a story is told and emotion is conveyed primarily through singing (with instrumental music).
  • Pantomime: A form of musical drama in which elements of dance, mime, puppetry, slapstick, and melodrama are combined to produce an entertaining and comic theatrical experience, often designed for children.
  • Poor Theatre: Jerzy Grotowski coined the phrase "poor theatre" in reference to the work he was doing with his theatre troupe in Poland. Grotowski's style of poor theatre consisted of many important fine points. For one, there was not a separate stage and place for the audience; instead the actors and the audience shared the same space. There were no sets, props, lighting, music, or any other technical features. The actors were paramount, although their costumes were simple. Grotowski had his actors go through physical training, and even would spend many months rehearsing a play. Some of these poor theatre plays would only be performed once, to a small audience. This theatre style was very popular during the 1960’s and 70’s, and later on, was used by many acting troupes around the world.
  • Physical theatre: Theatrical performance in which the primary means of communication is the body, through dance, mime, puppetry and movement, rather than the spoken word.
  • Rock opera: Concept albums and stage works performed in a dramatic context reminiscent of opera, except that the musical form is rock music.
  • Romantic comedy: A medley of clever scheming, calculated coincidence, and wondrous discovery, all of which contribute ultimately to making the events answer precisely to the hero's or heroine's wishes, with the focus on love.
  • Theatre for social change: Theatre that addresses a social issue and uses performance as a way of illustrating injustice to the audience.
  • Theatre of the Absurd: Term coined by Martin Esslin to refer to playwrights in Europe and the United States after World War II whose work reflected a sense of being adrift in a world where known values had been shattered. No playwrights ever dubbed themselves "Absurdists," although it has become commonplace to refer to Samuel Beckett, Eugène Ionesco, Harold Pinter, and Jean Genet, among others, by this term. It can be seen as related to the philosophy of existentialism.
  • Total Theatre: Most frequently invoked in reference to Richard Wagner's concept of a Gesamtkuntswerk, or "Total Art Work," in which music, drama, and dance operate together. It has also been used by artists such as Steven Berkoff, who created a style where the actors become both characters and set, often using just one prop throughout the entire play. The style uses features of Greek theatre (eg. a chorus or didactic message), exaggeration and surrealism.
  • Tragedy: A drama that treats in a serious and dignified style the sorrowful or terrible events encountered or caused by a heroic individual. The word "Tragedy" comes from the Greek word "Tragos" which is translated to "Goat". The original meaning may come from the mystery plays of the cult of Dionysos, which centered on the god being killed and his body ripped to pieces, and with a goat or other animal as a proxy for the bloodshed.
  • Tragicomedy: A drama that has a bitter/sweet quality, containing elements of tragedy and comedy.

This article is about a tone of comedy. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... Komos or Chorus?, revellry scene from an Attic Komast cup, ca. ... The comedy of manners satirizes the manners and affectations of a social class, often represented by stock characters, such as the miles gloriosus in ancient times, the fop and the rake during the Restoration, or an old person pretending to be young. ... Commedia redirects here. ... Domestic drama expresses and focuses on the realistic everyday lives of middle or lower classes in a certain society, generally referring to the post-Renaissance eras. ... Look up farce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Promotional poster for a Grand Guignol performance This article is about the Paris theatre. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ... The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ... Morality plays are a type of theatrical allegory in which the protagonist is met by personifications of various moral attributes who try to prompt him to choose a godly life over one of evil. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... ... ... Nautanki is a kind of street play popular in northern India especially in the states of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pantomime (disambiguation). ... Physical theatre is a general term used to describe any mode of performance that pursues storytelling through primarily physical means. ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ... A romantic comedy may be a film or novel, presenting a story about romance in a comedic style. ... The Theatre of the Absurd, or Theater of the Absurd (French: Le Théâtre de lAbsurde) is a designation for particular plays written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, as well as to the style of theatre which has evolved from... Martin Julius Esslin (born Julius Pereszlenyi on June 6, 1918–died February 24, 2002) was a Hungarian born English playwright and critic best known for coining the term the theatre of the absurd in his work of that name (1962). ... Existentialism is the philosophical movement positing that individual human beings create the meaning and essence of their lives as persons. ... Steven Berkoff (born August 3, 1937) is an English actor, writer and director. ... The Greek chorus (choros) is believed to have grown out of the Greek dithyrambs and tragikon drama in tragic plays of the ancient Greek theatre. ... The Didactic is facts based as opposed to the Dialectic which is feelings based. ... Max Ernst. ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... Tragicomedy refers to fictional works that blend aspects of the genres of tragedy and comedy. ...

Theatre venues and styles

For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Introduction Antoine Watteaus commedia dellarte player of Pierrot, ca 1718-19, traditionally identified as Gilles (Louvre) Commedia dellarte, (Italian, meaning comedy of professional artists) was a form of improvisational theater which began in the 16th century and was popular until the 18th century, although it is still... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Dinner theater is an entertainment that combines a restaurant meal with a staged play. ... Fringe theatre is a term used to describe alternative theatre, or entertainment not of the mainstream. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In-yer-face theatre is a form of drama that sprang up in Great Britain in the 1990s. ... The oldest Kabuki theatre in Japan: the Minamiza in Kyoto The Kabukiza in Ginza is one of Tokyos leading kabuki theaters. ... Kuttiyattam is a form of theatre in the South Indian state of Kerala. ... Comic opera, or light opera, denotes a sung dramatic work of a light or comic nature, usually with a happy ending. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Noh performance at Itsukushima Shrine, Miyajima, Hiroshima Noh or No (Japanese: 能 Nō) is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Off-Off-Broadway refers to theatrical productions including plays, musicals or performance art pieces performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway productions or off-Broadway productions. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, home of the New York City Opera Bolshoi Theatre. ... Off West End is a term used to loosely define non-mainstream theatres in London. ... For other uses, see Pantomime (disambiguation). ... Theater background in Persia goes back to antiquity (641-1000 BC). ... Physical theatre is a general term used to describe any mode of performance that pursues storytelling through primarily physical means. ... Playback Theatre is an original form of improvisational theatre in which audience or group members tell stories from their lives and watch them enacted on the spot. ... Postmodern theatre is a recent phenomenon in world theatre, coming as it does out of the postmodern philosophy that originated in Europe in the 1960s. ... Proletcult Theatre is a Russian theatrical tradition that was concerned with the powerful expression of ideological content as political propaganda. ... Readers Theater is a style of theatre in which the actors do not need to memorize their lines. ... Regional theatres (also called resident theatres) in the United States are professional theatre companies outside of New York City that produce their own seasons. ... Repertory or rep, called stock in the U.S., is a term from Western theatre. ... A troupe of street theatre performers by the beach in Vancouver, Canada. ... Summer Stock is also the title of a 1950 musical motion picture starring Judy Garland. ... Temple dance denotes a religious performance held in the temples. ... The new Guthrie Theater from the river side The Guthrie Theater is a venue for staging plays in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Theatre of the Absurd, or Theater of the Absurd (French: Le Théâtre de lAbsurde) is a designation for particular plays written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, as well as to the style of theatre which has evolved from... The Theatre of the Oppressed is a method elaborated by the Brazilian director Augusto Boal starting from the 60s, first in Brazil and then in Europe. ...

Notable theatre festivals

The Edinburgh International Festival is a festival of performing arts that takes place in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, over three weeks from around the middle of August. ... Annual classical Indian dance festival timed to Shiva Ratri. ... Adam Arkin and David Paymer in a scene from Donald Margulies Brooklyn Boy, at South Coast Repertorys 2003 Pacific Playwrights Festival. ... South Coast Repertory South Coast Repertory (SCR) is a professional theatre company located in Costa Mesa, California. ... Official website: http://ci. ...

Awards in theatre

For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Molière Award is the national theatre award of France decided by the Association professionnelle et artistique du théâtre (APAT) and given out every April or May since 1987, during a ceremony called La Nuit des Molières (English: ). The award was created by Georges Cravenne, who was... The Sangeet Natak Akademi (DevanāgarÄ«: संगीत नाटक अकादेमी or, The National Academy for Music, Dance and Drama in English) is the first national level academy of art set up by the Government of India. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... The Hans-Reinhart-Ring (in French: LAnneau Hans-Reinhart) is a prestigious Swiss award in theatre. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... The London Critics Circle Theatre Awards (Drama Theatre Awards until 1990) are presented annually for achievements in London Theatre. ... The Manchester Evening News is an English daily newspaper published each week day evening and on Saturdays. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Joseph Jefferson Awards (The Jeff Awards) are given annually to acknowledge excellence in theatre in the Chicago area. ... The Lucille Lortel Awards recognize excellence in New York Off-Broadway theatre. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The New York Innovative Theatre Awards (IT Awards) are presented annually and were founded to honor excellence in Off-Off-Broadway Theatre and to help nuture the Off-Off-Broadway community. ... The Helpmann Awards recognise distinguished artistic achievement and excellence in Australias live performing arts sectors. ... The Green Room Awards are peer awards which recognise excellence in cabaret, dance, drama, fringe theatre, musical theatre and opera in Melbourne. ... The Matilda Awards are awards which recognise excellence in cabaret, dance, drama, fringe theatre, musical theatre and opera in Brisbane. ...

Technical theatre

Main article: Stagecraft
  • Professional Stagehands (IATSE)
  • LDI (USA)
  • United States Institute for Theatre Technology

Stagecraft (or Technical Theatre) is the art of building, attaching, and rigging scenery for theater and television as well as other technical aspects of performance including sound, costuming, makeup, and lighting. ... The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, or I.A.T.S.E., (Full name: International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada) is a labor union. ... ...

See also

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Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Break a leg is a well-known saying in theatre which means good luck. It is typically said to actors before they go out onto stage to perform. ... For other uses, see Censor. ... Culinary theatre refers to the creation or enhancement of a spectacle during the service of food and beverages. ... Digital theatre is a hybrid art form, gaining strength from theatre’s ability to facilitate imagination and create human connections, and digital technology’s ability extend the reach of communication and visualization. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... Epic theater, also known as theater of alienation or theater of politics, is a theater movement arising in the early to mid-20th century, inextricably linked to the German playwright Bertolt Brecht. ... // The origin of me pooping my pants and Asian theatre can be traced to over 3500 years ago, beginning with early 3000BC Main article: Sanskrit Plays Folk theatre and dramatics can be traced to the religious ritualism of the Vedic Aryans. ... Oscar Wilde remains one of Irelands best-known playwrights The history of Irish theatre begins with the rise of the English administration in Dublin at the start of the 17th century. ... . ... This is a list of playwrights either born in Ireland or holding Irish citizenship. ... List of notable playwrights. ... Dramatists listed in chronological order by country and language: See also: List of playwrights; Lists of writers // Rosie Malek-Yonan (Assyria/Iran) Monica Malek-Yonan (Assyria/Iran) (1912-1988) Kylie Tennant (1916-1999) Morris West (1917-2000) Jack Davis (1923-2002) Dorothy Hewett (born 1927) Alan Seymour (born 1933) Wendy... // This is a list of theatre directors. ... METAMORPHOSE - Mask Sound & Dance Theatre is an original idea created by Reinhard Kreckel in 1987. ... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, home of the New York City Opera Bolshoi Theatre. ... A puppet is any controlled character, whether formed by a shadow, strings, by the use of a glove, by direct mechanical contrivance (for example a cable-controlled figure for film or TV) or electronic guidance (such as a radio or infrared remote controller). ... Scenic design also known as Stage design is the creation of theatrical scenery. ... Founded in 1963 by a group of Northeastern Pennsylvania Theatre personalities, Showcase Theatre became one of the major performing arts groups in the Luzerne and Lackawanna County regions of Pennsylvania. ... Stagecraft (or Technical Theatre) is the art of building, attaching, and rigging scenery for theater and television as well as other technical aspects of performance including sound, costuming, makeup, and lighting. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Theatre for Development, or TfD, means live performance, or theater used as a development tool -- as in international development. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Theater of the United States is based in the Western tradition, mostly borrowed from the performance styles prevalent in Europe. ... Theatre techniques are procedures that facilitate a successful presentation of a play. ... There are a variety of theatrical styles used in theatre and drama. ... Tableau vivant, Folies Bergères c. ... The interior of the Comédie-Française, Paris, showing the stage, boxes, galleries and orchestra sections of the house. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... Nātyāchārya Vidūshakaratnam Padma Shri Māni Mādhava Chākyār ( 1899 - 1990 ) Guru Mani Madhava Chakyar ( Māni Mādhava Chākyār ) ( 15 February 1899 - 14 January 1990) was a performance artist and Sanskrit scholar from Kerala, South India, considered to be the greatest...

References

  1. ^ Bernard Beckerman, head of Hofstra University's department of drama, in his book, Dynamics of Drama
  2. ^ UNESCO Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity : "Kutiyattam, Sanskrit Theatre"
  3. ^ Hansen, Kathryn. Grounds for Play: The Nautanki Theatre of North India. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1992 1992. pp208-209

Further reading


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Theatre for social change: Theatre that addresses a social issue and uses performance as a way of illustrating injustice to the audience.
Theatre of the Absurd: Term coined by Martin Esslin, theatre in which characters are engaged in an absurd, that is meaningless, activity or life.
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