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Encyclopedia > The Sandman (DC Comics Modern Age)
The Sandman


Cover of The Sandman #1, by Dave McKean Download high resolution version (589x900, 129 KB)Cover of the first issue of Neil Gaimans The Sandman, by Dave McKean. ... Cages (1998) by Dave McKean David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, filmmaker and musician. ...

Publisher Vertigo imprint of DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format ongoing
Publication dates 1988 - 1996
Number of issues 75 issues
Main character(s) Dream of the Endless
Creative team
Writer(s) Neil Gaiman
Artist(s) Mike Dringenberg
Sam Kieth
Malcolm Jones III
Dave McKean
Charles Vess
Jill Thompson
Michael Zulli
and others
Colourist(s) Danny Vozzo
Creator(s) Neil Gaiman
Mike Dringenberg
Sam Kieth

The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. It became the flagship of DC's Vertigo imprint, and is kept in print as a series of ten graphic novels. It is widely considered one of the most original, sophisticated and artistically ambitious comic book series of the modern age. By the time of the series's conclusion, it had made significant contributions to the artistic maturity of comic books and become a pop culture phenomenon in its own right. Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... DC Comics (originally called National Periodical Publications or National Periodicals) is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Cover of The Sandman #1, by Dave McKean. ... The Endless are a group of beings who embody various aspects of the universe in the DC comic book series The Sandman, by Neil Gaiman. ... Neil Gaiman (November 2004) Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is an English Jewish author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many comic books. ... Death, from The Sandman #8, drawn by Mike Dringenberg Mike Dringenberg is a French/American comics artist best known for his work on DC/Vertigos Sandman series with writer Neil Gaiman. ... Sam Kieth is a writer and illustrator of comic books. ... Malcolm Jones III (born 1970, died 1996) was an American comics artist best known as an inker on The Sandman, where he added his illustrative line and textures to the work of pencillers such as Mike Dringenberg, Kelley Jones and Colleen Doran. ... Cages (1998) by Dave McKean David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, filmmaker and musician. ... Charles Vess (born 1951) is an American illustrator. ... Jill Thompson (1966 - ) is a comic book writer and illustrator. ... Michael Zulli is an American comics artist best known for his work on The Sandman with writer Neil Gaiman. ... Daniel Danny Vozzo is an artist who has worked as a colorist in the comics industry. ... Neil Gaiman (November 2004) Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is an English Jewish author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many comic books. ... Death, from The Sandman #8, drawn by Mike Dringenberg Mike Dringenberg is a French/American comics artist best known for his work on DC/Vertigos Sandman series with writer Neil Gaiman. ... Sam Kieth is a writer and illustrator of comic books. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Neil Gaiman (November 2004) Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is an English Jewish author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many comic books. ... DC Comics (originally called National Periodical Publications or National Periodicals) is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Wolverine, a member of the X-Men, a popular franchise in the Modern Age, and an anti-hero, a popular character type The Modern Age of Comic Books is an informal name for the period of American comic books generally considered to last from the mid-1980s until present day. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ...


The protagonist of Sandman is Dream, the immortal anthropomorphic personification of dreams and storytelling. He is known by an array of names, most often Morpheus, but also Oneiros, Lord Shaper, the Prince of Stories, and, rarely, "The Sandman". He is one of a family of seven siblings known as the Endless, each of whom personifies some aspect of reality, such as Death or Desire. The protagonist or main character is the central figure of a story. ... Cover of The Sandman #1, by Dave McKean. ... An example of an anthropomorphic animal (by Carrie J. Berman). ... Pierre-Cécile Puvis de Chavannes: The Dream, 1883 A girl sleeps in her bed, before reaching REM sleep. ... Morpheus (he who forms, shapes, molds) is the principal Greek god of dreams. ... In Greek mythology, the Oneiroi were the sons of Hypnos, the god of sleep. ... The Sandman is a character in popular Western folklore who brings good sleep and dreams by sprinkling magic sand on to the eyes of children. ... The Endless (Destiny, Death, Dream, Destruction, Desire, Despair and Delirium) are a group of beings who embody various aspects of the universe in the DC comic book series The Sandman, by Neil Gaiman. ... Death is a fictional character from the DC comic book series, The Sandman (1988 - 1996). ... Desire is one of the Endless, a fictional character from Neil Gaimans comic book series, The Sandman. ...


Gaiman has summarized the plot of the series as: "The king of dreams learns one must change or die and then makes his decision." The character's initially haughty, and often cruel, manner begins to soften after his years of imprisonment at the start of the series, but the challenge of undoing past sins and changing old ways is an enormous one for a being who has been set in his ways for billions of years.


Unlike most popular US comic books of its time, The Sandman existed almost completely outside of the superhero genre. The first third of the series somewhat conformed to the horror genre, but it later grew into an elaborate fantasy series, incorporating elements of classical and contemporary mythology. The series is occasionally labeled as "Sophisticated Suspense", a small genre that also includes Swamp Thing (particularly after Alan Moore took over writing it in the 1980s), and Jamie Delano's Hellblazer. Superman and Batman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle or horrify the reader. ... // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art, literature, film, television, games and music that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of either plot, theme, setting, or all three. ... Classical mythology usually refers to the religious legends and practices of classical antiquity: Greek mythology; Roman mythology; Greek religion; and Roman religion. ... // The word mythology (Greek: μυθολογία, from μυθος mythos, a story or legend, and λογος logos, an account or speech) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use supernatural events or characters to explain the nature of the universe and humanity. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... Alan Moore Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton, England) is a British writer most famous for his work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels, Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Jamie Delano. ... Hellblazer is a comic book series published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics, which features the central character John Constantine. ...

Contents


Setting

The storylines primarily take place in the Dreaming, Morpheus's realm, and the waking world, with occasional visits to other domains, such as Hell, Faerie, Asgard, and the domains of the other Endless. Many used the contemporary United States of America and the United Kingdom as a backdrop. (The DC Universe was the official setting of the series, but well-known DC characters and places were rarely featured after 1990). The Dreaming is a part of a fictional, supernatural world used as the setting for several comic book series and graphic novels, particularly The Sandman by Neil Gaiman, all published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is a place or a state of pain and suffering. ... In mythology and in fiction, Faerie (see also fairy) is an otherworldly realm, home to the Fae or fairies, though many believe this place to be neither mythical nor fictional, but quite real. ... In Norse mythology, Asgard (Old Norse: Ásgarðr) is the realm of the gods, the Æsir, thought to be separate from the realm of the mortals, Midgard. ... The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ...


Most of the storylines take place in modern times (presumably the late 80s and early 90s), but many short stories are set in the past, taking advantage of the immortality of many of the characters to deal with historical individuals and events.


Art

Also unlike most comic books, The Sandman did not feature an ongoing illustrator; instead, different artists were hired for each new storyline, sometimes for only a single issue. Aside from co-creator Sam Kieth, artists who illustrated a significant number of issues include Colleen Doran, Mike Dringenberg, Marc Hempel, Kelley Jones, Jill Thompson and Michael Zulli. Their styles ranged from cartoony expressionism (Hempel) to detailed, delicate realism with a hint of the Pre-Raphaelites (Zulli). The lettering for each issue was done by Todd Klein, save for a handful of issues during the book's second major storyline, where John Costanza filled in while Klein was away on honeymoon. Sam Kieth is a writer and illustrator of comic books. ... Colleen Doran (July 24, 1963 - ) is an American comic book writer and artist, best known for her fantasy series A Distant Soil. ... Death, from The Sandman #8, drawn by Mike Dringenberg Mike Dringenberg is a French/American comics artist best known for his work on DC/Vertigos Sandman series with writer Neil Gaiman. ... Marc Hempel is an American cartoonist/comics artist best known for his work on The Sandman with Neil Gaiman, Breathtaker with Mark Wheatley, his own characters Gregory and Tug & Buster, and the anthology series Marc Hempels Naked Brain. ... Jill Thompson (1966 - ) is a comic book writer and illustrator. ... Michael Zulli is an American comics artist best known for his work on The Sandman with writer Neil Gaiman. ... The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... Realism is commonly defined as a concern for fact or reality and rejection of the impractical and visionary. ... Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ... Todd Klein is a well-known and respected comic book letterer. ... John Costanza is an artist who has worked in the comics industry. ...


Each issue featured a cover created by Dave McKean. McKean’s approach combined painting, photography, pencil and ink drawings, collage, digital art, found objects and even sculpture, resulting in distinctive, often abstract or surreal, images. Cages (1998) by Dave McKean David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, filmmaker and musician. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Photography is the process of making pictures by means of the action of light. ... Drawing is a means of making an image, using any of a wide variety of tools and techniques. ... Collage (From the French, coller, to stick) is regarded as a work of visual arts made from an assemblage of different forms, thus creating a new whole. ... Computer-generated image created by Gilles Tran using POV-Ray 3. ... An Italian Futurist sculpture by Umberto Boccioni at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City (MoMA). ... Black square by Kazimir Malevich Abstract art is now generally understood to mean art that does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses shapes and colors in a non-representational or subjective way. ... Kay Sage. ...


Collections

The Sandman was initially published as a monthly serial, in 32-page booklets (with some exceptions to this pattern). As the series quickly increased in popularity, DC Comics began to reprint them in hardcover and paperback editions, each representing either a complete novel or a collection of related short stories.


DC first published "The Doll's House" storyline in a collection called simply The Sandman. Shortly thereafter, the first three volumes were published and named independently and also collected in an eponymous boxed set. (Death's debut story, "The Sound of Her Wings" from issue #8, appeared both at the beginning of The Doll's House and at the end of early editions of Preludes and Nocturnes, creating overlap between the first two volumes. This overlap isn't present in newer editions.) Further collections would then be released shortly after their completion in serial form.


A total of ten collections contain the full run of the series, and have all been kept in print. They are as follows:

  • Preludes and Nocturnes (collecting The Sandman #1-8, 1988-1989, ISBN 1-56389-011-9): Dream is imprisoned for decades by an occultist seeking immortality. Upon escaping, he must reclaim his objects of power while still in a weakened state, confronting a dream junkie, the legions of Hell, and an all-powerful madman in the process. Guest starring several DC superheroes/villains: John Constantine, Scott Free, J'onn J'onzz, and Doctor Destiny.
  • The Doll's House (collecting The Sandman #9-16, 1989-1990, ISBN 0-930289-59-5): Morpheus tracks down rogue dreams that escaped the Dreaming during his absence. In the process, he must shatter the illusions of a family living in dreams, disband a convention of serial killers, and deal with a "dream vortex" that threatens the existence of the entire Dreaming.
  • Dream Country (collecting The Sandman #17-20, 1990, ISBN 1-56389-016-X): This volume contains four independent stories. The imprisoned muse Calliope is forced to provide story ideas, a cat seeks to change the world with dreams, Shakespeare puts on a play for an unearthly audience, and a shapeshifting immortal (obscure DC comics character Element Girl) longs for death.
  • Season of Mists (collecting The Sandman #21-28, 1990-1991, ISBN 1-56389-041-0): Dream travels to Hell to free a former lover, Nada, who he condemned to torment thousands of years ago. There, Dream learns that Lucifer has abandoned his domain. When Lucifer gives the Hell's key (and therefore, the ownership of Hell) to the Sandman, Morpheus himself becomes trapped in a tangled network of threats, promises, and lies as gods and demons from various pantheons seek ownership of Hell.
  • A Game of You (collecting The Sandman #32-37, 1991-1992): Barbie, a New York divorcée, travels to the magical realm that she once inhabited in her dreams, only to find that it is being threatened by the forces of the Cuckoo. This series introduces the character of Thessaly, who will play a key role in Morpheus' eventual fate.
  • Fables and Reflections (collecting The Sandman #29-31, 38-40, 50, Sandman Special #1 and Vertigo Preview #1, 1991, 1992, 1993): A collection of short stories set throughout Morpheus' history, most of them originally published both before and after the "Game of You" story arc. Four issues dealing with kings and rulers, were originally published under the label Distant Mirrors, while three others, detailing the meetings of various characters, were published as the Convergences arc. Fables and Reflections also includes the Sandman Special, originally published as a stand-alone issue, which assimilates the myth of Orpheus into the Sandman mythos as well as a very short Sandman story from the Vertigo Preview promotional comic.
  • Brief Lives (collecting The Sandman #41-49, 1992-1993): Dream's erratic younger sister Delirium convinces him to help her search for their missing brother, the former Endless Destruction, who left his place among the family three hundred years before. However, their quest is marred by the death of all around them, and eventually Morpheus must turn to his son Orpheus to find the truth, and undo an ancient sin.
  • Worlds' End (collecting The Sandman #51-56, 1993): A "reality storm" strands travelers from across the cosmos at the "Worlds' End Inn". To pass the time, they exchange stories.
  • The Kindly Ones (collecting The Sandman #57-69 and Vertigo Jam #1, 1994-1995): In the longest Sandman story, Morpheus becomes the prey of the Furies, avenging spirits who torment those who spill family blood.
  • The Wake (collecting The Sandman #70-75, 1995-1996): The conclusion of the series, wrapping up the remaining loose ends in a three-issue "wake" sequence, followed by three self-contained stories.

In addition, the cover images from The Sandman have been compiled into one volume: Preludes and Nocturnes is the first graphic novel collection of the comic book series The Sandman, published by DC Comics. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Hellblazer John Constantine (Born 1953 in Liverpool England) is the fictional protagonist of the comic series Hellblazer. ... Mister Miracle is a DC Comics superhero created by Jack Kirby, originally as part of The Fourth World series of titles. ... The Martian Manhunter (Jonn Jonzz), alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, is a comic book superhero appearing in DC Comics. ... Dr. Destiny is a DC Comics supervillain. ... Dream Country is the third graphic novel collection of the comic book series The Sandman, published by DC Comics. ... Detail of painting The Muses Urania and Calliope by Simon Vouet, in which she is supposedly holding a copy of The Odyssey In Greek mythology, Calliope (Greek: Καλλιoπη, beautiful-voiced) was the muse of epic poetry, and is now best known as Homers muse, and therefore, the inspiration for... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Element Girl is the name of a DC Comics superhero. ... Season of Mists (1992) is the fourth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman, written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Kelley Jones, Mike Dringenberg, Malcolm Jones III, Matt Wagner, Dick Giordano, George Pratt and P. Craig Russell, coloured by Steve Oliff and Danny Vozzo, and lettered by... Image:Gareth. ... A Game of You (1993) is the fifth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. ... Fables and Reflections (1993) is the sixth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. ... The head of Orpheus, from an 1865 painting by Gustave Moreau. ... Brief Lives (1994) is the seventh collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. ... The Kindly Ones (1996) is the ninth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. ... In Greek mythology the Erinyes or Eumenides (the Romans called them the Furies) were female personifications of vengeance. ... This article is about The Wake, the graphic novel in The Sandman series. ... A wake is a ceremony associated with death. ...

  • Dustcovers: The Collected Sandman Covers (1998): Dave McKean's covers use techniques such as painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, and computer manipulation.

In 1999, some years after Gaiman completed The Sandman, he wrote a lavishly illustrated Sandman novel, Sandman: The Dream Hunters with art by Yoshitaka Amano. Like many of the single-issue stories throughout The Sandman, Morpheus appears in Dream Hunters, but it a supporting character at best. At the time of release Gaiman claimed that this book incorporated Morpheus into an existing Japanese legend, not unlike his use of the story of Orpheus. Gaiman has since admitted that this was a joke on his part, and that he made up the "legend" out of whole cloth. Cages (1998) by Dave McKean David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, filmmaker and musician. ... Sandman: The Dream Hunters is a graphic novel by Neil Gaiman and Yoshitaka Amano. ... Yoshitaka Amano (February 24, 2006) Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 Amano Yoshitaka, born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist, best known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs for the video game series Final Fantasy. ...


As the 10th anniversary arrived, Gaiman wrote several new stories about Morpheus and his siblings, one story for each, which were published in 2003 as the Endless Nights anthology. The Sandman: Endless Nights is a graphic novel by Neil Gaiman as a follow-up (but not a sequel) to his ground-breaking Sandman series. ...


Neil Gaiman's blog already talks about an Absolute Sandman which would be a new edition of all the 10 volumes [1]. In November, the first of four volumes of the Absolute Edition Sandman will be available, collecting the first 20 issues.


Other books and series

Because of the amount of critical acclaim Sandman received and because of its commercial viability (at the time of its conclusion, it was DC’s best-selling series), a number of spin-off volumes have been produced. Fans disagree about the quality and legitimacy of these volumes, and most agree that while a few approach The Sandman in quality, the majority are of a decidedly lesser quality. Here is a list of the more important ones:

  • Death: The High Cost of Living (1993), a three-issue, Gaiman-penned limited series starring Morpheus’ older sister.
  • Sandman: Midnight Theatre (1995), in which Wesley Dodds, the Golden Age Sandman, meets Lord Morpheus of The Endless, the Modern Age Sandman.
  • Death: The Time of Your Life (1996): another three-issue, Gaiman-penned Death limited series, also featuring supporting characters from A Game of You.
  • The Sandman: Book of Dreams (1996), a collection of prose short stories featuring the world of The Sandman in some way. It contains work from some notable contributors, among them Caitlin R. Kiernan, Tad Williams, Gene Wolfe, Tori Amos and Colin Greenland. Publisher DC Comics allegedly imposed restrictive terms on contributing authors, leading to a few authors withdrawing their stories.
  • The Dreaming (1996 - 2001), a monthly series set in Morpheus’ realm but featuring none of the Endless. It was written and illustrated by a variety of writers and artists; Caitlin R. Kiernan wrote the largest number of scripts for the series.
  • The Sandman Presents (1999-2001): a collection of limited series by various authors and illustrators featuring secondary characters from The Sandman, such as The Corinthian and The Furies.
  • Sandman: The Dream Hunters (1999): a prose novel that incorporates a so-called Japanese folk tale into the Sandman mythos, written by Gaiman and featuring illustrations by Yoshitaka Amano. It is not actually based on any exisiting Japanese folklore, but rather incorporates elements of Chinese and Japanese folklore and mythology into a new "myth".
  • The Sandman Companion by Hy Bender (2000), a non-fiction work providing extra information about the series. Its first section discusses the ten Sandman collections sequentially, analysing their meaning, explaining some of Gaiman's myriad references and sometimes providing information on the writing of the comics. It also features a lengthy interview about the series with Gaiman himself.
  • The Little Endless Storybook (2001), a one-shot comic book which depicts The Endless as toddlers and follows Delirium's dog, Barnabas as he attempts to find the missing Delirium, written and illustrated by Jill Thompson
  • Lucifer (2001 - present): a monthly series written by Mike Carey continuing the story of Lucifer following the events of the fourth collection, Season of Mists.
  • Sandman: Endless Nights (2003): a graphic novel with one story for each of the Endless. They are set throughout history but two take place after the final events of the monthly series. It was written by Gaiman and featured a different illustrator for each story.
  • Death: At Death’s Door (2004): a manga-style graphic novel, written and illustrated by Jill Thompson, showcasing Death’s activities during Season of Mists. This may become part of a series of manga novels starring Death.
  • The Dead Boy Detectives (2005): a sequel to Death: At Death's Door, also by Jill Thompson, featuring the two young ghosts from Season of Mists. (The title was previously used for a The Sandman Presents limited series about the same characters.)

Death as illustrated by Chris Bachalo. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... The story Death: The Time of Your Life was written by Neil Gaiman, and is one of many spinoffs from his graphic novel series The Sandman. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Photo of Caitlín R. Kiernan by Kathryn A. Pollnac. ... Robert Paul Tad Williams (born March 14, 1957) is the author of several fantasy and science fiction novels, including Tailchasers Song; the Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series; the Otherland series and The War of the Flowers. ... Gene Wolfe (born May 7, 1931) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Tori Amos Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Colin Greenland (b. ... The Dreaming is an original manga series created by Artist/Author Queenie Chan and published by TOKYOPOP. Jeanie and Amber Malkin - identical twin sisters - are new students at the 100-year-old Greenwich Private College, a boarding school in North Sydney that lies on the edge of vast, virgin bushlands. ... Sandman: The Dream Hunters is a graphic novel by Neil Gaiman and Yoshitaka Amano. ... Yoshitaka Amano (February 24, 2006) Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 Amano Yoshitaka, born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist, best known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs for the video game series Final Fantasy. ... Hy Bender is an author who has written or cowritten 14 books. ... The Little Endless Storybook is a graphic novel by Jill Thompson published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. ... Lucifer is a comic book published by Vertigo, an imprint of DC Comics. ... Mike Carey is the writer of the Eisner Award nominated Lucifer and Hellblazer, comic book titles published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. ... The Sandman: Endless Nights is a graphic novel by Neil Gaiman as a follow-up (but not a sequel) to his ground-breaking Sandman series. ... Cover to the Comic Death at Deaths Door is a comic penned and inked in the manga-style, by Jill Thompson, author of the Little Endless. ... For other uses, see Manga (disambiguation). ... The Dead Boy Detectives are fictional characters that have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics Vertigo imprint. ...

Impact

The Sandman was one of the most widely respected comic book series of its time, finding recognition not only within the comic book industry but in the general literary world. A few years prior to Sandman, works such as Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller, and Maus by Art Spiegelman conferred a new respectability on comics, but no ongoing series has ever gained as much acclaim as Sandman.[citation needed] This helped support the notion that comic books could be high-quality literature or art even in a long-running series with no preset number of issues (i.e., the format comic books are usually published in). Watchmen is a twelve-issue comic book written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons, and originally published by DC Comics as a monthly limited series from 1986–1987. ... Alan Moore Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton, England) is a British writer most famous for his work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels, Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Screenshot of Beneath a Steel Sky, backgrounds courtesy of Dave Gibbons. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... Frank Miller on G4s Icons. ... Cover Maus: A Survivors Tale is a graphic novel by Art Spiegelman that recounts his fathers struggle to survive the Holocaust as a Polish Jew. ... Art Spiegelman (born February 15, 1948) is an American comics artist, editor and advocate for the medium of comics, best known for his Pulitzer Prize winning comic memoir, Maus. ...


The Sandman also demonstrated that a comic book series does not have to be a superhero series to be successful. Along with Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing stories, Sandman helped establish "sophisticated suspense", a genre which is meant for older readers, includes elements of horror and fantasy, and tackles controversial topics. In 1993, the success of Sandman inspired DC comics to launch the Vertigo imprint, which specialized in this genre and published some of the most acclaimed series of the 1990s, including Preacher and Animal Man. The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... Preacher is a comic book created by writer Garth Ennis and artist Steve Dillon, published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics, with painted covers by Glenn Fabry. ... Animal Man is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ...


The Sandman also strengthened the importance of the writer in comic books. Before Sandman, writers were often overshadowed by superstar artists such as Todd McFarlane and Jim Lee. Gaiman became one of the most popular comic book creators of the era (launching his career as a novelist), and DC did not dare to continue The Sandman after he felt the series had come to a suitable conclusion. Almost universally, popular corporate-owned comic book series continue long after the original creators have left (which may be decades for especially popular series). Spawn #1 (1992), featuring one of McFarlanes most popular creations Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a cartoonist, comic book writer, artist, and media entrepreneur. ... Lees depiction of DC Comics Batman. ...


The series paved the way for the long-form but finite comic book series as multi-layered serial fiction. Like a novel, and unlike all but a few prior comics series, The Sandman told a single complete story over seventy-six issues with a beginning, middle, and definitive end. Yet the book was also composed chiefly of a handful of story arcs that also moved from commencement to conclusion on a smaller scale, and these arcs consisted of individual issues of the magazine which themsevles followed a finite narrative line within the context of the larger work surrounding them. Since The Sandman this format has become increasingly popular and a staple of DC's Vertigo imprint, e.g., Grant Morrison's The Invisibles, Brian Vaughan's Y - The Last Man (and Vaughan's Ex Machina from DC's Wildstorm imprint), Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso's 100 Bullets, and the aforementioned Lucifer series by Mike Carey, a Sandman spin-off. Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a comic book writer and artist. ... Cover to The Invisibles (v2) #1. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Y: The Last Man is a comic book series written by Brian K. Vaughan and published by Vertigo, about the sole survivor of the spontaneous, simultaneous death of every male on Earth. ... Ex Machina is a creator-owned comic book written by Brian K. Vaughan and published by Wildstorm Comics beginning in 2004. ... WildStorm WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm, is an American publisher of comic books. ... Brian Azzarello is an American comic book writer. ... Eduardo Risso (born on November 23, 1961 in Córdoba, Argentina) is an Argentine comic book artist. ... 100 Bullets is an Eisner and Harvey Award-winning comic book written by Brian Azzarello and illustrated by Eduardo Risso. ...


Todd Klein's distinctive lettering on The Sandman also helped popularize individual typescripts for the word balloons of certain characters, a technique that had been used in Cerebus and scattered other places. Gaiman & Klein particularly used unique styles for the Endless, such as Morpheus’ word balloons being black and irregular with white lettering and Delirium’s being irregular, abstract and multi-colored. Todd Klein is a well-known and respected comic book letterer. ... Cerebus the Aardvark (or simply Cerebus) was an ambitious monthly independent comic book begun by Canadian artist Dave Sim in 1977, and running for 300 issues and 6,000 pages, through March 2004. ...


In addition to its impact on comic books, The Sandman has had a significant influence on pop culture. The series was mentioned in songs by Tori Amos, Alice Cooper and others, Sandman posters can be seen in the background of the sitcom Roseanne, and Extreme Championship Wrestling star Raven is fond of wearing Sandman T-shirts. Dave Sim parodied the characters (Dream became "Swoon", Death "Snuff" and so on) in his Cerebus. Sam Kieth also parodied the character Death and Sandman fans in his comic, The Maxx. Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Tori Amos Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Alice Cooper (born Vincent Damon Furnier, February 4, 1948), is a hard rock singer and musician. ... It has been suggested that Jackie Harris be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the original promotion that lasted from 1992-2001. ... Scott Levy (born September 8, 1964), better known as Raven, is an American professional wrestler, currently wrestling for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. ... David Victor Sim (born May 17, 1956 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian comic book writer and artist, best known as the creator of the 6,000 page graphic novel Cerebus the Aardvark. ... Cerebus the Aardvark (or simply Cerebus) was an ambitious monthly independent comic book begun by Canadian artist Dave Sim in 1977, and running for 300 issues and 6,000 pages, through March 2004. ... Sam Kieth is a writer and illustrator of comic books. ... The Maxx #1, illustrated by Sam Kieth. ...


The Sandman has also gained a decent amount of attention outside the comics world among other subcultures and has gained increasing popularity in the goth subculture. NYC goth band The Naked and the Dead (1985). ...


Occasional covers and work with Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano has brought the title to the attention of fans of Japanese art and pop culture, as well as video game fans familiar with Amano's work through the Final Fantasy series, as well as other game and anime projects he has contributed to. A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Final Fantasy ) is a series of role-playing video games produced by Square Enix (originally Square Co. ... // A scene from Cowboy Bebop (1998) Anime ) is a medium of animation originating in Japan, with distinctive character and background aesthetics that visually set it apart from other forms of animation. ...


The Sandman issue #19 "A Midsummer's Night Dream" won the World Fantasy Award in 1991 for Best Short Fiction. The following morning, the rules of the award were changed to ensure no other comics could get that award. As a result, it is the only comic that will ever win a World Fantasy Award unless the rules are again changed. First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ...


Richard Garfield, creator of the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering drew inspiration from Sandman #50 ("Ramadan") to create Magic's first expansion set: Arabian Nights. While the majority of the set involved Garfield researching the actual Arabian Nights stories, one card, named "City in a Bottle", was a direct nod to the ending of "Ramadan". Richard Garfield Richard Garfield (born 1966) is the billionaire game designer who created the card games Magic: The Gathering, Netrunner, BattleTech, Vampire: The Eternal Struggle (originally known as Jyhad), The Great Dalmuti, Star Wars Trading Card Game, and the board game RoboRally. ... Magic: The Gathering (colloq. ... Ramadan or Ramadhan (Arabic: رمضان) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and the holiest month in Islam. ...


See also

This is a list of characters appearing in The Sandman. ... The DC comic book series The Sandman may have concluded with Issue 75, but numerous comics, novels and spin-offs continue to make use of its characters, concepts and universe. ...

References

  • Bender, Hy (2000). The Sandman Companion : A Dreamer's Guide to the Award-Winning Comic Series. DC Comics. 1-56-389644-3.
  • Stephen Rauch, Neil Gaiman's The Sandman and Joseph Campbell: In Search of the Modern Myth (2003)
  • The Sandman Papers: An Exploration of the Sandman Mythology by Joe Sanders and Neil Gaiman (2006)

Awards and recognition

The Sandman issue #19 "A Midsummer's Night Dream" won the World Fantasy Award in 1991 for Best Short Fiction. The story The Tempest from Sandman 75 was a top votegetter for the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Award for Favorite Comic-Book Story for 1997. The trade paperbacks "Sandman: The Wake" and "Sandman: The Kindly Ones" were both top votegetters for the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Award for Favorite Reprint Graphic Novel/Album for 1997. "Dustcovers: The Collected Sandman Covers" was a top votegetter for the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Award for Favorite Reprint Graphic Album for 1998. Comics Buyers Guide (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ...


External links

  • Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Awards
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Sandman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (563 words)
The Sandman (DC Comics Golden Age), Wesley Dodds, a superhero first appearing in the 1940s whose costume is a business suit and gas mask (and later purple-and-gold tights); a member of the Justice Society of America
The Sandman (DC Comics Silver Age), a superhero created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby in the 1970s; he lives in the Dream Dimension and protects children in their dreams
The Sandman (DC Comics Modern Age), the king of dreams and one of the "Endless", in the series written by Neil Gaiman
The Sandman (DC Comics Modern Age) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2955 words)
The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996.
It became the flagship of DC's Vertigo imprint, and is kept in print as a series of ten graphic novels.
Sandman: Midnight Theatre (1995), in which Wesley Dodds, the Golden Age Sandman, meets Lord Morpheus of The Endless, the Modern Age Sandman.
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