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Encyclopedia > The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1987 film)
The Wonderful Wizard of OZ
Early edition cover
Author L. Frank Baum
Illustrator W. W. Denslow
Country United States
Language English
Series The Oz Books
Genre(s) Fantasy, Children's book
Publisher G. M. Hill
Released 1900
Media Type Print (Hardcover and Paperback), Audiobook
Pages 259 p., 21 leaves of plates (first edition hardcover)
ISBN N/A
Followed by His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz
Oz Portal

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children's book written in 1900 by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. It was originally published by the George M. Hill company in Chicago, and has since been reprinted countless times, sometimes under the name The Wizard of Oz. The story chronicles the adventures of a girl named Dorothy in the land of Oz. It is one of the best-known stories in American popular culture and has been widely translated. Its initial success led to Baum's writing and having published thirteen more Oz books. The book has been in public domain since 1956. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, and the creator with illustrator W. W. Denslow of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Categories: Stub | Oz ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... See also: 1899 in literature, other events of 1900, 1901 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) book is bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth or heavy paper) and a stitched spine. ... Paperback may refer to a kind of book binding by which papers are simply folded without cloth or leather and bound - usually with glue rather than stitches or staples - into a thick paper cover; or to a book with this type of binding. ... An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ... His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz is a 1914 film production, directed by J. Farrell McaDonald and written and produced by L. Frank Baum. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... See also: 1899 in literature, other events of 1900, 1901 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, and the creator with illustrator W. W. Denslow of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Categories: Stub | Oz ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ...


Historians, economists and literary scholars have examined and interpreted the sources and possible meaning of the book. See Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians. ...

Contents


Summary

Dorothy Gale is a young girl who lives on a Kansas farm with her Uncle Henry and Aunt Emily ("Auntie Em"), and her little dog Toto. (Although her last name is only revealed in later books in the Oz series.) One day a cyclone appears outside and before Dorothy can reach the storm cellar, the farmhouse is caught up in the cyclone and deposited in a grassy field in the country of the Munchkins. The falling house kills the Wicked Witch of the East, who had established a reign of terror over the Munchkins. ... Official language(s) English Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq. ... ... Terry, the Cairn Terrier who played Toto in the film Toto is the name of a fictional dog in L. Frank Baums The Wonderful Wizard of Oz series of childrens books. ... The CYCLONE, an early computer built in 1959 by Iowa State University, was based on the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) architecture developed by John von Neumann. ... Categories: Stub ... Alternate meanings: see Munchkin (disambiguation) The word munchkin was first coined by L. Frank Baum in his 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... The Wicked Witch of the East is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his classic books. ...


The Good Witch of the North comes with the Munchkins to greet Dorothy, and gives her the Silver Shoes the Wicked Witch of the East had been wearing when she was killed (her death is explained in The Tin Woodman of Oz as due to her being old and dried up before Oz became a fairyland). In order to return to Kansas, the Good Witch of the North consults a magical blackboard which recommends: "Let Dorothy go to the City of Emeralds" and ask the Wizard of Oz to help her. The Good Witch of the North also kisses Dorothy on the forehead, stating that no one will harm a person who has been kissed by her. On her way down the Yellow Brick Road, Dorothy meets some remarkable characters: she liberates the Scarecrow from the pole he's hanging on, restores the mobility of the rusted Tin Woodman, and encourages the Cowardly Lion to journey with her and Toto to the Emerald City. The Scarecrow wants to get a brain, the Tin Woodman a heart, and the Cowardly Lion courage; and they are convinced by Dorothy that the Wizard can help them too. Together they overcome a pair of ravening Kalidah and escape from a field of sleep-inducing poppies. The Good Witch of the North is a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Title page of The Tin Woodman of Oz. ... The Wizard of Oz (or simply The Wizard) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and further popularized by the classic 1939 movie. ... The road of yellow brick is an element in the novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... Cover of The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) by L. Frank Baum; illustration by John R. Neill. ... Cover of The Tin Woodman of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... Cover of The Cowardly Lion of Oz (1929) by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... The fictional city of Oz as portrayed in the 1939 movie The Emerald City is the fictional capital of the Land of Oz in L. Frank Baums Oz books, first described in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Comparative brain sizes In animals, the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Greys Anatomy. ... Fortitudo, by Sandro Botticelli Courage, also known as fortitude, is the ability to confront fear, pain, danger, uncertainty or intimidation. ... Kalidahs are a fictitious species of animal created by childrens author L. Frank Baum for his novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


When they arrive at the Emerald City, the companions must wear special spectacles to keep the brilliance of the Emerald City from blinding them; wearing them, everything appears in different shades of green. They are told that the Wizard will only see one of them a day, and that the guard himself has never seen him. When each traveler meets the Wizard, he appears each time as someone or something different. To Dorothy, the Wizard is a giant head; the Scarecrow sees a beautiful woman; the Tin Woodman sees a ravenous beast; the Cowardly Lion sees a ball of fire. The Wizard agrees to help each of them, but his help is conditional; one of them must kill the Wicked Witch of the West, who rules over the Winkie Country. The Wicked Witch of the West, as portrayed by Margaret Hamilton in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens... The Winkie Country is a division of the fictional Land of Oz. ...


As Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion travel across the Winkie Country, the Wicked Witch sends wolves, crows, bees, and then her Winkie soldiers to attack them; but each threat is dispatched by the travelers. Then, using the power of the Golden Cap, the Witch summons the Winged Monkeys to destroy all the travelers except for the Cowardly Lion. The Winged Monkeys dare not attack Dorothy due to the mark of the Good Witch's kiss upon her forehead and decide to carry her and Toto back to the castle of the Wicked Witch. This was the third and final time that the Wicked Witch could command the Winged Monkeys due to the Cap's enchantment. Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Species See text. ... Families Andrenidae Apidae Colletidae Halictidae Megachilidae Melittidae Stenotritidae Bee collecting pollen Bees (a lineage within the superfamily Apoidea) are flying insects, closely related to wasps and ants. ... Flying monkeys, as illustrated by W. W. Denslow in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Winged Monkeys (often referred to as flying monkeys) are characters from The Wizard of Oz, of enough impact between the books and the 1939 movie to have taken their own place in pop culture, regularly referenced...


Dorothy is forced to work as a maid to the Wicked Witch, while the Lion is starved in an effort to make him agree to pull the witch's chariot. But the Lion refuses to do so, because Dorothy sneaks him food every night. Dorothy is also left unharmed because of the Good Witch of the North's mark and the Silver Shoes. When the Wicked Witch gains one of the shoes by trickery, Dorothy in anger grabs a bucket of water and throws it on the Wicked Witch, who begins to melt. The Winkies rejoice at being freed of her tyranny, and they help to reassemble the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman. So enamored are the Winkies of the Tin Woodman that they ask him to become their ruler, which he agrees to do after helping Dorothy return to Kansas. Impact of a drop of water. ...


The long walk from the Wicked Witch's former palace to the Emerald City is alleviated by Dorothy's use of the Golden Cap, which summons the Winged Monkeys to carry her and her companions to the Emerald City. The King of the Monkeys relates how he and his mischievous people were forced by a powerful sorceress to choose between submission or annihilation; through the Cap, they obeyed first a man named Quelala, then the Wicked Witch, and now Dorothy herself.


When Dorothy and her friends meet the Wizard of Oz again, he tries to put them off. Only under threat of seeing the Winged Monkeys again (who under the Wicked Witch's command attacked him in the past) is the Wizard convinced to allow the travelers in to his throne room. Toto accidentally tips over a screen in a corner of the throne room, revealing a wizened old man who had journeyed here himself long ago from Omaha. He once rose high in a hot air balloon, was swept away in an accident and finally landed in Oz; when the people saw the letters "OZ" on the balloon (in Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, we find they are his initials), they presumed he was their ruler and at his direction began building the Emerald City. Finding himself in a country of witches, the soon-to-be-designated Wizard saw the need to maintain anonymity—hence his appearances to Dorothy and the others, which are revealed as clever (for the dawn of the 20th century) special effects. Flag Seal Nickname: Gateway to the West Location Location in Nebraska Coordinates , Government Country   State     County United States   Nebraska     Douglas Founded   Incorporated 1854   1857 Mayor Michael Fahey Geographical characteristics Area     City 307. ... Hot air balloon being inflated by its propane burners prior to a dawn launch Hot air balloons are the oldest successful human flight technology, dating back to the Montgolfier brothers invention in Annonay, France in 1783. ... Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz is the fourth book set in the Land of Oz (though most of the action is outside of it) written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by John R. Neill. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ...


The Wizard tries to persuade the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion that what they lack are not brains or a heart or courage, but faith in themselves. But he still agrees to meet each of them and to give them (without their knowledge) a placebo which brings out the qualities they had all along. In order to help Dorothy and Toto get home, the Wizard realizes that he will have to take them home with him in a new balloon which he and Dorothy fashion from green silk. Revealing himself to the people of the Emerald City one last time, the Wizard appoints the Scarecrow, by virtue of his brains, to rule in his stead. Dorothy chases Toto after he runs after a kitten in the crowd, and before she can make it back to the balloon the ropes break leaving the Wizard to rise and float away alone. A placebo, from the Latin for I will please, is a medical treatment (operation, therapy, chemical solution, pill, etc. ...


Dorothy turns to the Winged Monkeys to carry her and Toto home, but they cannot cross the desert surrounding Oz. The citizens of the Emerald City advise that Glinda, the Good Witch of the South, may be able to send Dorothy and Toto home. They, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion journey to Glinda's palace in the Quadling Country. Together they escape the Fighting Trees, dodge the Hammerheads, and tread carefully through the China Country. The Cowardly Lion kills a giant spider which is terrorizing the animals in a forest, and he agrees to return there to rule them after Dorothy returns to Kansas. Glinda (or Glinda the Good Witch) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... The Quadling Country is the southern division of L. Frank Baums Land of Oz. ...


At Glinda's palace, the travelers are greeted warmly, and it is revealed by Glinda that Dorothy had the power to go home all along. The Silver Shoes she wears can take her anywhere she wishes to go. She tearfully embraces her friends—all of whom will be returned, through Glinda's use of the Golden Cap, to their respective sovereignties: the Scarecrow to the Emerald City, the Tin Woodman to the Winkie Country, and the Cowardly Lion to the forest. Then she will give the Cap to the king of the Winged Monkeys, so they will never be under its spell again. Dorothy and Toto return to Kansas and a joyful family reunion.

Sources of images and ideas

Some scholars have asserted that the images and characters used by Baum and Denslow closely resembled political images that were well known in the 1890s. They state that Baum and Denslow did not simply invent the Lion, Tin Man, Scarecrow, Yellow Brick Road, Silver Slippers, cyclone, monkeys, Emerald City, little people, Uncle Henry, passenger balloons, witches and the wizard. These were all common themes in the editorial cartoons of the previous decade. Baum and Denslow, like most writers, used the materials at hand that they knew best. They built a story around them, added Dorothy, and added a series of lessons to the effect that everyone possesses the resources they need (such as brains, a heart and courage) if only they had self confidence. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was a children’s book, of course, but as Baum warned in the preface, it was a "modernized" fairy tale as well. Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians. ...


Translations

The Wizard of Oz has been translated into well over 40 different languages. In some cases, the story proved so popular in other countries that it was adapted to suit the local culture. For instance, in some countries where the Hindu religion is practiced, abridged versions of the book were published in which, for religious reasons, the Tin Woodman was replaced with a snake. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Superfamilies and Families Henophidia Aniliidae Anomochilidae Boidae Bolyeriidae Cylindrophiidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Uropeltidae Xenopeltidae Typhlopoidea Anomalepididae Leptotyphlopidae Typhlopidae Xenophidia Acrochordidae Atractaspididae Colubridae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Viperidae Snakes (from Old English snaca, and ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European base snag- or sneg-, to crawl), also known as ophidians, are cold blooded...


The Wizard of Oz was very successfully introduced in the Soviet Union in 1939. Translator Alexander M. Volkov took liberties with his translation, editing as he saw fit, and adding a chapter in which Elli (his name for Dorothy) is kidnapped by a man-eating Ogre and rescued by her friends. The book was titled The Wizard of Emerald City. Volkov went on to write his own independent series of sequels to the book, very loosely based on the originals, including: Urfin Juice and His Wooden Soldiers, Seven Underground Kings, The Fire God of the Marranes, The Yellow Fog, and The Mystery of the Forgotten Castle. The original book and all of its sequels were translated in a more faithful fashion some time later, and Russians now see these two versions as wholly different series. Russian illustrator Leonid Vladimirsky drew the Scarecrow short, round and tubby; his influence is evident in illustrations for translations across the Soviet bloc, where the Scarecrow is almost always portrayed as short, round and tubby. Leonid Vladimirsky has written at least two additional sequels to Alexander Volkov's alternative Oz, or "Magic Land" as it is called in Russian; additional sequels to this alternative Oz have been written by two more Russian authors and one German. Alexander Melentyevich Volkov (Russian: ) (1891 – 1977) was a Russian novelist and mathematician. ... The Ogre from Tom Thumb illustrated by Gustave Doré An ogre (feminine: ogress) is a large and hideous humanoid monster. ...


Stage and screen adaptations

The earliest musical version of the book was produced by Baum and Denslow (with music by composer Paul Tietjens) in Chicago in 1902, and moved to New York in 1903. It used the same characters, and was aimed more at adult audiences. It had a long, successful run on Broadway. Baum added numerous additional political references to the script. For example, his actors specifically mention President Theodore Roosevelt, Senator Mark Hanna, and John D. Rockefeller by name. (Swartz, Before the Rainbow, pp 34, 47, 56) He wrote a version more faithful to the book in 1901, but it has never been produced. It included many of the same songs, however. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The Wizard of Oz was a 1902 stage play based on the book by L. Frank Baum, which was originally published in 1900. ...


The earliest "Oz" film series' were produced by Baum in 1908 and 1914 and often featured the young silent film actress Mildred Harris. Another series that Baum had nothing to do with, aside from a contractual agreement, appeared in 1910, which may have featured Bebe Daniels as Dorothy. Larry Semon, in collaboration with Frank Joslyn Baum, created a rather well-known but unsuccessful version in 1925. The most famous adaptation is the 1939 film — "The Wizard of Oz" — featuring Judy Garland as Dorothy (this, in turn, has been adapted into two separate stage productions, first by Frank Gabrielson (who wrote the 1960 version of The Land of Oz for Shirley Temple), and more recently by the Royal Shakespeare Company's John Kane), but the first stage production, in 1902, used a score that is now forgotten, and not the one heard in the 1939 film, though there have been attempts, mostly in Florida, to revive it. Early film versions of the book include a 1914 film produced by Baum himself entitled His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz, which incorporates several incidents from the book - the Scarecrow is first seen hanging on a pole, from which Dorothy rescues him, and the Tin Man is discovered standing rusted in the forest - and a 1925 film — "Wizard of Oz" — featuring Oliver Hardy as the Tin Woodsman [sic]. The Wiz was a hit musical with an all-black cast produced in the 1970s on Broadway; it was later made into a 1978 movie directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Diana Ross as Dorothy and Michael Jackson as the Scarecrow. The most recent adaption of the novel is Disney's 2005 TV movie The Muppets' Wizard of Oz. Mildred Harris Mildred Harris (November 29, 1901 - July 20, 1944) was a notable actress of the silent film era. ... Bebe Daniels in the 1920s Bebe Daniels (14 January 1901 - 15 March 1971) was a United States actress. ... Larry Semon (July 16, 1889 - October 8, 1928) was a film comedian during the silent era, mainly known for working with both Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy (of Laurel and Hardy) before they started working together. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... See also: 1938 in film 1939 1940 in film 1930s in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Movie historians and film buffs often look back on the year 1939 as the greatest year in film history. ... For the novel, see The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; For other senses of this title, see The Wizard of Oz. ... Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969), born Frances Ethel Gumm, was an American film actress considered by many to be one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... Cover of The Marvelous Land of Oz. ... Shirley Temple in Glad Rags to Riches Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928), later known as Shirley Temple Black, is an American diplomat and former film child actress. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company is a British theatre company, one of the most influential in the country. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz is a 1914 film production, directed by J. Farrell McaDonald and written and produced by L. Frank Baum. ... See also: 1924 in film 1925 1926 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films Ben-Hur His People The Unholy Three The Freshman Movies released Movies released in 1925 include: Ben-Hur, starring Ramon Novarro. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the New York area electronics stores, see Nobody Beats The Wiz. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... Portrait of Sidney Lumet, May 7, 1939. ... This article is about the American musician. ... For other people named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney) (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2005. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Promotional poster The Muppets Wizard of Oz, an original made-for-television movie, aired May 20, 2005 as a special Friday night edition of ABCs The Wonderful World of Disney. ...


An animated series based on the 1939 film was broadcast on ABC network during the 1990-1991 TV season. The cartoon featured Dorothy returning to Oz, reuiniting with her four friends, and journeying through the magical realm in an attempt to rescue the Wizard from a resurrected Witch of the West. Look up ABC in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Abbreviation ABC is an abbreviation with many meanings: The Latin alphabet, of which A, B, and C are the first three letters. ...


The Toronto Civic Light Opera Company created a new musical stage adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 2000, with a script by Joe Cascone (who was also the director) that was much more a tribute to the original book than to the 1939 movie version. Twenty-one new songs were written specifically for this production by James Patrick Doyle - they are now available on CD in a popular original cast recording released by Hungry Tiger Press in 2000 (link). Frank Baum/The Wizard was given a leading role in this adaptation - as Joe Casone writes in the CD booklet, "Baum himself is truly the central character of our new version-almost a rival to little Dorothy!" Although it only ran for one week, this production proved extremely popular and was brought back in 2001.


Another recent musical adaptation of an Oz-related book is the musical Wicked, based on the book Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire. Wicked is a musical that premiered on Broadway at the George Gershwin Theatre on October 30, 2003. ... Wicked book cover Wicked (ISBN 0-06-098710-3), or Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, is a novel by Gregory Maguire. ... Gregory Maguire received his Ph. ...


There has also been a spin-off, called "The Oz Kids". This animated series features the offsprings of the main characters of the original novel. A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... The Oz Kids is an direct-to-video animated spin-off of the novel Wizard of Oz. ...


The novel was parodied in a Futurama episode, and RahXephon explicitly references the novel. The science fiction film Zardoz starring Sean Connery also references the book (note the title of the film). Robert Heinlein used Oz to illustrate his World as Myth metaphysics, beginning with "Number of the Beast"; his characters discovered that all creators of fiction create actual universes, and they used Jacob Burroughs' dimensional travel device to visit Oz repeatedly in that book and in "The Cat Who Walks Through Walls" and "To Sail Beyond the Sunset". Futurama is an animated American cartoon series created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen (also a writer for The Simpsons). ... RahXephon ) is a science fiction anime television series about young Ayato Kamina, his ability to control a godlike mecha known as the RahXephon, and his inner journey to find a place with the world around him. ... Zardoz is a 1974 science fiction film directed by John Boorman and starring Sean Connery in one of his first post-James Bond roles. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery, KBE, (born August 25, 1930) is an Oscar-winning Scottish film actor who is best known as the original cinematic James Bond. ... Book cover The Number of the Beast is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1980 (ISBN 0-44-913070-3). ... Book cover The Cat Who Walks Through Walls is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1985. ... To Sail Beyond the Sunset is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1987. ...


The 100th episode of the sitcom Scrubs featured a parody of the novel. Each character in the episode represented a character from the novel. In addition, the 1939 movie's theme song ("Over the Rainbow") is played several times. Scrubs is an American sitcom that premiered on October 2, 2001, on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence, who also co-created Spin City. ... Over the Rainbow, music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg, is one of the most famous songs of the late 1930s. ...


The Sci-Fi series Stargate SG-1 often makes references to the novel. Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ... Stargate SG-1 (sometimes written STARGÃ…TE to mimic the title art, and popularly abbreviated as SG-1) is an American television series based upon the 1994 science fiction film Stargate. ...


The Oz story was cited as a major influence in the 1938 children's radio serial, The Cinnamon Bear. The Cinnamon Bear is an old time radio program. ...


The 2001 British comedy Late Night Shopping partly refers to the same theme: the four friends in the film are all having personal problems in life, that can all be matched up to the problems of the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardy Lion are having in the Wizard of Oz, and in much the same way, have to travel there and back to a distant-looking destination to finally overcome their anxieties. Also, the only woman character is the one who is leading the group (much the same way as Dorothy), and an explicit reference to the book is made by her, remarking that the whole situation feels much like in the Wizard of Oz. Late Night Shopping is a 2001 comedy funded by Film Four. The film is about four young friends (Sean, Vincent, Jody and Lenny) who all work the graveyard shifts in various soul-killing jobs (the hospital, a supermarket, a factory and a call center, respectively) then meet up in a...


Other adaptations

The most recent adaptation of the story is the comic book Dorothy, launched by Illusive Arts Entertainment in November 2005. Presented in semi-fumetti style using digitally altered photographs, this retelling of Baum's story has been updated to 2005 and "stars" model Catie Fisher as 16-year-old Dorothy Gale, a disaffected youth with dyed hair and piercings who steals her uncle's car and runs away from home ... until she encounters a tornado and is knocked unconscious. She awakens in a strange land and utters: "I don't think this is Kansas ... maybe it's Colorado." A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Cover of Dorothy Volume 1 Published by: Illusive Arts Entertainment Created by: Greg Mannino, Mark Masterson Dorothy is a comic book series directed and produced by Greg Mannino, written by Mark Masterson, animated by Ray Boersig, and starring Catie Fisher. ... Fumetti or photo novels are a form of comics illustrated with photographs rather than drawings. ... Union City, Oklahoma tornado (1973) A tornado is a violently rotating column of air which is in contact with both a cumulonimbus (or, in rare cases, cumulus) cloud base and the surface of the earth. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...


This version of the tale, created by Greg Mannino, written by Mark Masterson with artwork by Greg Mannino and Ray Boersig, is in part a retelling of Baum's tale and in part a retelling of the 1939 movie version of the story, as it incorporates elements of the Judy Garland film (such as the above homage to "I don't think we're in Kansas, anymore". Child of a library, storyteller extraordinaire; a true enigma to most, a true friend to all. ...


Horrorcore rap group ICP's first Joker's Card (Carnival of Carnage) features a song called "Wizard of the Ghetto", taking an idosyncratic view of the traditional children's fairytale. In 2003 Violent J from this group released a solo EP entitled Wizard of the Hood which has a storyline based on The Wizard of Oz. The Insane Clown Posse (ICP) are an American hardcore hip hop/midwestern rap group originally from Detroit, Michigan, consisting of Violent J (Joseph Bruce) and Shaggy 2 Dope (Joseph Utsler). ... Insane Clown Posse (ICP) is a horrorcore rap group from suburban Detroit. ... Detroit rapper Joseph Bruce (better known as Violent J) took a break from the Insane Clown Posses Jokers Cards to release the Wizard of the Hood EP. This is the solo debut of Violent J. The story is basically that of The Wizard of Oz, only more urban...


In 2002, Breaking Benjamin included a track on their debut album Saturate entitled "Home," featuring distinct references to Baum's series. Breaking Benjamin is a post-grunge/Nu metal band from Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. ... Saturate is the first album by Breaking Benjamin. ...


In 2002, Todd McFarlane released a series of horror-centric action figures based on the book called 'The Twisted Land of Oz'. Each action figure was accompanied by a chapter of a grim retelling of the story. The toy line was extremely controversial due to its sexually explicit "Dorothy" figure, which featured a blindfolded Dorothy who was bound in an extreme state of sexual bondage and had several sex slave brandings that according to the figure's backstory, were inflicted by the Munchkins after turning Dorothy into a sex slave. A model in bondage cuffs with a leg spreader In the context of BDSM, bondage involves people being tied up or otherwise restrained for pleasure. ...


In 2004, the Scissor Sisters included a track on their self-titled debut album entitled "Return to Oz" which alludes to characters from Baum's series in the context of drug abuse. Scissor Sisters are a glam-rock band with influences drawn from disco, pop and the gay-club scene of New York City, and was named after a lesbian sex position (see tribadism). ...


In 2005, german power metal group Demons & Wizards released their album Touched By the Crimson King, which included a track titled "Wicked Witch," that clearly references the series.


In 2006, Cursive released an album, Happy Hollow, that distinctly references both Dorothy and her Oz-related adventures. The lead single from the album, Dorothy at Forty, is perhaps the most extreme example, in which the narrator struggles to convince Dorothy to abandon her dreams of Oz. Cursive is any style of handwriting in which all the letters in a word are connected, making a word one single (complicated) stroke. ... Happy Hollow Park & Zoo is a small zoo and young child-oriented amusement park in Kelley Park in San Jose, California, USA. The zoo section of the park includes many rare and endangered species such as lemurs, parma wallabies, and until recently a jaguar. ... Dorothy at Forty is the first single off of the album, Happy Hollow by Cursive. ...


Foxwoods recently released a commercial depicting four rich friends and their dog that parodies the Wizard of Oz cast, even showing the wizard himself, the singer of the song. Categories: Casinos | Hotels of the United States | US geography stubs ...


Oz no Mahōtsukai

A Japanese animation adaptation of four of Baum's Oz books known as Oz no Mahoutsukai was created in 1986. It consists of 52 episodes and follows the story of Dorothy and her adventures in Oz with the Tin Woodman, Cowardly Lion, and Scarecrow. It continues on to the story of Ozma and Mombi, and follows through the events of other Oz books. Oz no Mahōtsukai ) is an anime adaption of The Wizard of Oz which ran on the Japanese network TV Tokyo from October 6, 1986–September 28, 1987. ... A scene from the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) Anime ) is an abbreviation of the Japanese word アニメーション (animēshon), which is based on the English word animation. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Princess Ozma Princess Ozma is a fictional character in the Land of Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ... Mombi is a character from the L Frank Baum Oz Books series, and appears in the book The Marvelous Land of Oz. ...


In 1987, HBO purchased the rights to the series and dubbed/edited together key episodes of the series into a series of movies. Production for the English version was done by the Canadian studio Cinar. Actress Margot Kidder was hired as narrator for the series, which aired as a mini-series. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ...


An earlier, feature-length anime adaptation of the story was made by Toho in 1982 and was directed by Fumihiko Takayama, with music by Joe Hisaishi (known for composing the music to many of Hayao Miyazaki's works). The English version of the movie stars Aileen Quinn as the voice of Dorothy. Like the 1939 Judy Garland film version, this anime take on The Wizard of Oz ends the story with Dorothy's trip home to Kansas after visiting the Wizard, and is a musical boasting original vocal songs such as "It's Up To You," "Home," and "A Wizard Of A Day," all sung by Aileen Quinn in the English version. This film was seemingly made with the American market in mind, as it was released in the United States before it premiered in Japan. In the U.S., it was released on video and also syndicated to local television stations. Toho Co. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joe Hisaishi (久石 譲 Hisaishi Jō, born December 6, 1950) is a composer and director responsible for over 100 soundtracks and conventional albums dating back to 1981. ... Portrait of animator Hayao Miyazaki. ... Aileen Quinn (born on 28 June 1971 in Yardley, Pennsylvania, USA) is an American actress who played the title role in the movie Annie. ...


Supêsu Oz no bôken

Another japanese animation consisting of 26 episodes, this time involving Dorothy and the characters traveling in space around the galaxy of Oz. It was dubbed and edited into the feautre-length (75 minute) The Wonderful Galaxy of Oz for U.S. consumption.


References

  • Baum, Frank Joslyn & MacFall, Russell P. (1961) To Please a Child. Chicago: Reilly & Lee Co.
  • Culver, Stuart. "Growing Up in Oz." American Literary History 4 (1992) 607-28.
  • Culver, Stuart. "What Manikins Want: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and The Art of Decorating Dry Goods Windows and Interiors", Representations, 21 (1988) 97-116.
  • Dighe, Ranjit S. ed. The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (2002)
  • Gardner, Martin & Nye, Russel B. (1994) The Wizard of Oz and Who He Was. East Lansing : Michigan State University Press
  • Gardner, Todd. "Responses to Littlefield" (2004), online
  • Green, David L. and Dick Martin. (1977) The Oz Scrapbook. Random House.
  • Hearn, Michael Patrick (ed). (2000, 1973) The Annotated Wizard of Oz. W. W. Norton & Co. ISBN 0-393-04992-2
  • Littlefield, Henry. "The Wizard of Oz: Parable on Populism." American Quarterly. v. 16, 3, Spring 1964, 47-58.
  • Riley, Michael O. (1997) Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum. University of Kansas Press ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  • Ritter, Gretchen. "Silver slippers and a golden cap: L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and historical memory in American politics." Journal of American Studies (August 1997) vol. 31, no. 2, 171-203.
  • Rockoff, Hugh. "The 'Wizard of Oz' as a Monetary Allegory," Journal of Political Economy 98 (1990): 739-60 online at JSTOR
  • Sunshine, Linda. All Things Oz (2003)
  • Swartz, Mark Evan. Oz Before the Rainbow: L. Frank Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" on Stage and Screen to 1939 (2000).
  • Velde, Francois R. "Following the Yellow Brick Road: How the United States Adopted the Gold Standard" Economic Perspectives. Volume: 26. Issue: 2. 2002. also online here
  • Ziaukas, Tim. "100 Years of Oz: Baum's 'Wizard of Oz' as Gilded Age Public Relations" in Public Relations Quarterly, Fall 1998

External links

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  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, available freely at Project Gutenberg
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz at American Literature
  • Wonderful Wizard of Oz Questions and Answers
  • Pros and cons of Oz as an allegory
  • German Oz-Fanpage
  • [1] copy of Hugh Rockoff, "The 'Wizard of Oz' as a Monetary Allegory," Journal of Political Economy 98 (1990): 739-60
  • [2] David B. Parker, “The Rise and Fall of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a "Parable on Populism’” (1994)


Image File history File links En_the_wonderful_wizard_of_oz. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

The Oz books
Previous book:
N/A
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
1900
Next book:
The Marvelous Land of Oz


The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... The characters n/a (sometimes N/A) is an abbreviation that is mainly used in information tables. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... Title page of The Marvelous Land of Oz. ...



The world of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Oz portal
The land | The characters | The books
The authors (Baum | Thompson | McGraw | Volkov) | The illustrators (Denslow | Neill)

The feature film adaptations

(1908: The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays | 1910: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz | The Land of Oz | 1914: The Patchwork Girl of Oz | The Magic Cloak of Oz | His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz | 1925: Wizard of Oz | 1939: The Wizard of Oz | 1964: Return to Oz | 1969: The Wonderful Land of Oz | 1971: Ayşecik ve Sihirli Cüceler Rüyalar Ülkesinde | 1972: Journey Back to Oz | 1975: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | 1976: The Wizard of Oz | 1978: The Wiz | 1981: The Marvelous Land of Oz | 1982: The Wizard of Oz | 1985: Return to Oz | 1986: Ozu no Mahōtsukai : 1987: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | Ozma of Oz | The Marvelous Land of Oz | The Emerald City of Oz | 1990: Supēsu Ozu no Bōken : 1996: The Wonderful Galaxy of Oz | 2005: The Muppets' Wizard of Oz | The Patchwork Girl of Oz) This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, and the creator with illustrator W. W. Denslow of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was an American writer of childrens stories. ... Eloise Jarvis McGraw (1915 - November 30, 2000) was an author of childrens books. ... Alexander Melentyevich Volkov (Russian: ) (July 14, 1891 – July 3, 1977) was a Russian novelist and mathematician. ... Categories: Stub | Oz ... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays was an early attempt to bring L. Frank Baums Oz books to the screen. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... The Magic Cloak of Oz is a 1914 film directed by J. Farrell MacDonald. ... His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz is a 1914 film production, directed by J. Farrell MacDonald and written and produced by L. Frank Baum. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... For the novel, see The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; For other senses of this title, see The Wizard of Oz. ... Return to Oz (1964) was an animated television special produced by Rankin/Bass. ... The Wonderful Land of Oz is a 1969 film by Barry Mahon, based on the novel The Marvelous Land of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Journey Back To Oz is an official animated sequel to the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... This feature length (115 minute) film is an adaption of the childrens novel written by L. Frank Baum. ... This short film was based on the novel by L. Frank Baum. ... For the New York area electronics stores, see Nobody Beats The Wiz. ... Ozu no Mahōtsukai is a 1982 anime feature film directed by Fumihiko Takayama, from a screenplay by Yoshimitsu Banno and Akira Miyazaki, produced by Banno and Katsumi Ueno for Toho Co. ... DVD cover For other uses, see Return to Oz (disambiguation) The 1985 film Return to Oz is a motion picture arguably created as an unofficial sequel to The Wizard of Oz. ... Oz no Mahōtsukai ) is an anime adaption of The Wizard of Oz which ran on the Japanese network TV Tokyo from October 6, 1986–September 28, 1987. ... Oz no Mahōtsukai ) is an anime adaption of The Wizard of Oz which ran on the Japanese network TV Tokyo from October 6, 1986–September 28, 1987. ... Promotional poster The Muppets Wizard of Oz, an original made-for-television movie, aired May 20, 2005 as a special Friday night edition of ABCs The Wonderful World of Disney. ...

Wicked
(The books | The musical)

... Wicked is a musical that premiered on Broadway at the George Gershwin Theatre on October 30, 2003. ...


 
 

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