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Encyclopedia > The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Original title page.
Author L. Frank Baum
Illustrator W. W. Denslow
Country United States
Language English
Series The Oz Books
Genre(s) Fantasy, Children's novel
Publisher George M. Hill
Publication date 1900
Media type Print (Hardcover and Paperback), Audiobook
Pages 259 p., 21 leaves of plates (first edition hardcover)
ISBN N/A
OCLC 9506808
Followed by The Marvelous Land of Oz
Oz Portal

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children's novel written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. It was originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Chicago in 1900,[1] and has since been reprinted countless times, sometimes under the name The Wizard of Oz. The story chronicles the adventures of a girl named Dorothy in the Land of Oz. It is one of the best-known stories in American popular culture and has been widely translated. Its initial success, and the success of the popular 1903 Broadway musical Baum adapted from his story, led to Baum's writing and having published thirteen more Oz books. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply... William Wallace Denslow Copyright notice from Denslows Mother Goose of 1901 - note the use of the word, Rex even at that date William Wallace Denslow (May 5, 1856–March 29, 1915) was an illustrator and caricaturist remembered for his work in collaboration with author L. Frank Baum, especially his... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... Look up Fantasy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For other definitions of fantasy, see fantasy (psychology). ... Childrens books redirects here. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... See also: 1899 in literature, other events of 1900, 1901 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Cassette recording of Patrick OBrians The Mauritius Command done by Patrick Tull An audiobook is a recording that is primarily of the spoken word as opposed to music. ... ISBN redirects here. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published in 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baums books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Childrens books redirects here. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply... Categories: Stub | Oz ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... See also: 1899 in literature, other events of 1900, 1901 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Oz is a fairy country (fantasy region) containing four lands under the rule of one monarch. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ...


Baum dedicated the book "to my good friend & comrade, My Wife," Maud Gage Baum. In January 1901 the publisher, the George M. Hill Company, completed printing the first edition, which probably totaled around 35,000 copies. Records indicate that 21,000 copies were sold through 1900.[2] Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The original book has been in public domain in the United States since 1956. Baum's thirteen sequels entered public domain in the United States from 1960 through 1986. The rights to these books were held by the Walt Disney Company, and their impending expiration was a prime motivator for the production of the 1985 film Return to Oz, based on Baum's second and third Oz books. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, including the 1964 film of the same name, see Return to Oz (disambiguation). ...


Historians, economists and literary scholars have examined and developed possible political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Dorothy is a young girl who lives on a Kansas farm with her Uncle Henry, Aunt Em, and little dog Toto. One day the farmhouse, with Dorothy inside, is caught up in a tornado and deposited in a field in the country of the Munchkins. The falling house kills the Wicked Witch of the East. For the Doctor Who character, see Ace (Doctor Who). ... Uncle Henry is a fictional character from The Oz Books by L. Frank Baum. ... ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Alternate meanings: see Munchkin (disambiguation) The word munchkin was first coined by L. Frank Baum in his 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... The Wicked Witch of the East is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his classic books. ...


The Good Witch of the North comes with the Munchkins to greet Dorothy, and gives her a pair of shoes The Good Witch of the North is a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. ...

 that the Wicked Witch of the East had been wearing when she was killed. In order to return to Kansas, the Good Witch of the North tells Dorothy that she will have to go to the "Emerald City" and ask the Wizard of Oz to help her. 

On her way down the road paved with yellow brick to the Emerald City, Dorothy frees the Scarecrow from the pole he is hanging on, restores the movements of the rusted Tin Woodman with an oilcan, and encourages the Cowardly Lion to journey with her and Toto to the Emerald City. The Scarecrow wants to get a brain, the Tin Woodman a heart, and the Cowardly Lion, courage. All are convinced by Dorothy that the Wizard can help them too. Together, they overcome obstacles on the way. For other uses, see Emerald City (disambiguation). ... The Wizard, on the cover of Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz The Wizard of Oz (or simply The Wizard) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and further popularized by the classic 1939 movie. ... The road of yellow brick is an element in the novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... The Scarecrow is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and illustrator William Wallace Denslow. ... The Tin Woodman (also known as The Tin Man or The Tin Woodsman (the latter appearing only in adaptations)) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Cover of The Cowardly Lion of Oz (1929) by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ...


When the group arrives at the Emerald City, the Guardian of the Gates provides them with special green spectacles that will keep the brilliance of the Emerald City from blinding them. The Guardian of the Gates is an important character in the Oz books of L. Frank Baum. ...


When each traveler meets with the Wizard, he appears each time as someone or something different. To Dorothy, the Wizard is a giant head; the Scarecrow sees a beautiful woman; the Tin Woodman sees a ravenous beast; the Cowardly Lion sees a ball of fire. The Wizard agrees to help each of them, but one of them must kill the Wicked Witch of the West who rules over the Winkie Country. The Wicked Witch, as portrayed by Margaret Hamilton in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens books. ...


As the friends travel across the Winkie Country, the Wicked Witch sends wolves, crows, bees, and then her Winkie soldiers to attack them but they manage to get past them all. Then, using the power of the Golden Cap, the Witch summons the Winged Monkeys to capture all of the travelers. The Winkie Country is a division of the fictional Land of Oz. ... The monkeys caught Dorothy in their arms and flew away with her: illustration by W. W. Denslow in L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, 1900 Winged monkeys (often referred to in adaptations and popular culture as flying monkeys) are characters from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, of enough...


When the Wicked Witch gains one of Dorothy's silver shoes by trickery, Dorothy in anger grabs a bucket of water and throws it on the Wicked Witch, who begins to melt. The Winkies rejoice at being freed of the witch's tyranny, and they help to reassemble the Scarecrow and the Tin Man. The Winkies love the Tin Woodman and they ask him to become their ruler, which he agrees to do after helping Dorothy return to Kansas.


Dorothy uses the Golden Cap to summon the Winged Monkeys to carry her and her companions back to the Emerald City, and the King tells how they were bound by an enchantment to the cap by Gayelette. Gayelette is a character in L. Frank Baums novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


When Dorothy and her friends meet the Wizard of Oz again, he tries to put them off. Toto accidentally tips over a screen in a corner of the throne room, revealing an old man who had journeyed to Oz from Kansas long ago in a hot air balloon.


The Wizard persuades the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion that what they lack are not brains or a heart or courage, but faith in themselves. In order to help Dorothy and Toto get home, the Wizard realizes that he will have to take them home with him in a new balloon, which he and Dorothy fashion from green silk. Revealing himself to the people of the Emerald City one last time, the Wizard appoints the Scarecrow, by virtue of his brains, to rule in his stead. Dorothy chases Toto after he runs after a kitten in the crowd, and before she can make it back to the balloon, the ropes break, leaving the Wizard to rise and float away alone.


Dorothy turns to the Winged Monkeys to carry her and Toto home, but they cannot cross the desert surrounding Oz. The Soldier with the Green Whiskers advises that Glinda, the Good Witch of the South, may be able to send Dorothy and Toto home. They, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion journey to Glinda's palace in the Quadling Country. Together they escape the Fighting Trees, dodge the Hammer-Heads, and tread carefully through the China Country. The Cowardly Lion kills a giant spider, who is terrorizing the animals in a forest, and he agrees to return there to rule them after Dorothy returns to Kansas--the biggest of the tigers ruling in his stead as before. Dorothy uses her third wish to fly over the Hammer-Heads' mountain. The Soldier with the Green Whiskers is a major character in the Oz books of L. Frank Baum and his successors. ... Glinda depicted on the cover of Glinda of Oz Glinda (or Glinda the Good Witch) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... The Quadling Country is the southern division of L. Frank Baums Land of Oz. ... ...


At Glinda's palace, the travelers are greeted warmly, and it is revealed by Glinda that Dorothy had the power to go home all along. The Silver Shoes she wears can take her anywhere she wishes to go. She tearfully embraces her friends, all of whom will be returned, through Glinda's use of the Golden Cap, to their respective sovereignties: the Scarecrow to the Emerald City, the Tin Woodman to the Winkie Country, and the Cowardly Lion to the forest. Then she will give the Cap to the king of the Winged Monkeys, so they will never be under its spell again. Dorothy and Toto return to Kansas and a joyful family reunion. The Silver Shoes are lost during Dorothy's flight and never seen again.


Sources of images and ideas

Baum acknowledged the influence of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen, which he was deliberately revising in his "American fairy tales" to include the wonder without the horrors.[3] For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hans Christian Andersen (disambiguation). ...


Local legend has it that Oz was inspired by a prominent castle-like building in the community of Castle Park near Holland, Michigan where Baum summered. The yellow brick road was derived from a road at that time paved by yellow bricks. Baum scholars often reference the 1893 Chicago World's Fair as an inspiration for the Emerald City. Holland is a city in the western region of the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


Another influence lay in the Alice books of Lewis Carroll. Although he found their plots incoherent, Baum identified their source of popularity as Alice herself, a child with whom the child readers could identify; this influenced his choice of a protagonist.[4] John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ...


The Gold Standard representation of the story

See also: Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Some scholars have theorized that the images and characters used by Baum and Denslow closely resembled political images that were well known in the 1890s, specifically the debate of the day regarding monetary policy: the "Yellow Brick Road" represents the gold standard, the silver slippers (in the film ruby) represent the sixteen to one silver ratio (dancing down the road). Many other characters, and story lines represent identifiable people or circumstances of the day. The wicked witches of the east and west represented the local banks and the railroad industry, both of which drove small farmers out of business. The scarecrow represents the farmers of the Populist party, who managed to get out of debt by making more silver coinage . Unfortunately, the farmers did not have the brains to understand that introducing more coin into circulation reduced its value (Dorothy eventually losing her silver shoes). The Tin Man represents the factory workers of the industrialized North, who the Populists saw as being so hard-pressed to work grueling hours for little money that the workers had lost their human hearts and become mechanized themselves. (See Second Industrial Revolution) Toto was thought to be short for teetotaler, another word for a prohibitionist; it should be noted that William Jennings Bryan, the fiery popular candidate (possibly the Lion character) from the Populist party, was a teetotaler himself.Bryan also fits the allegorical reference to the cowardly Lion in that he retreated from his support of free silver after economic conditions improved in the late 1890's. The Munchkins being the common people (serfdom), the emerald city, Washington and its green-paper money delusion. The Wizard (a charlatan who tricks people into believing he wields immense power) the President. The kiss from the Good Witch of the North the electoral mandate; Dorothy must destroy the Wicked Witch of the West - the old West Coast "establishment" (money) with water (the US was suffering from drought). And of course "Oz" is the abbreviation for the measuring of these precious metals, ounces. Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians. ... For other uses, see Gold standard (disambiguation). ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the... The Second Industrial Revolution (1865–1900) is a phrase used by some historians to describe an assumed second phase of the Industrial Revolution. ... Teetotalism is the principle or practice of complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages. ... This article is about the prohibition of alcoholic beverages; separate articles on the prohibition of drugs in general and writs of prohibition are also available. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ...


Some biographers and scholars of Baum disagree, pointing to details of Baum's biography, his own statements and writing about the purpose of his book, and the lack of contemporary press discussing these perceived metaphors. The general consensus is that the books are written solely for the pleasure of Baum's younger readers, to give them a sense of possibility and imagination. [5][6]


Cultural impact

The Wizard of Oz has been translated into well over 40 different languages. In some cases, the story proved so popular in other countries that it was adapted to suit the local culture. For instance, in some countries where the Hindu religion is practiced, abridged versions of the book were published in which, for religious reasons, the Tin Woodman was replaced with a snake.[7] This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ...


Russian author Alexander M. Volkov brought a rather free translation of the story to the Soviet Union in 1939 [8](the same year MGM released their film). He called it The Wizard of Emerald City and the country where the story is set was changed from Oz, to "Magic Land." Alexander Volkov took many liberties with his translation, editing as he saw fit, and adding a chapter in which Ellie (his name for Dorothy) is kidnapped by a man-eating Ogre and rescued by her friends. The Wizard is renamed “James Goodwin,” the Scarecrow is called “Strasheela” (derived from a Russian word meaning “terrifying”), and the Tin Woodman is now the IRON Woodman. All four of the witches, good and bad, have new names: Villina (Baum’s Good Witch of the North), Gingema (Wicked Witch of the East), Bastinda (Wicked Witch of the West), and Stella (Baum’s Glinda, Good Witch of the South) Volkov went on to write his own independent series of sequels to the book, very loosely based on the originals, including: Urfin Jus and His Wooden Soldiers, Seven Underground Kings, The Firey God of the Marrans, The Yellow Fog, and The Secret of the Deserted Castle. Some characters in these sequels clearly have their origins in the later Oz books, such as Ellie's uncle Charlie Black, who is a combination of Baum's Cap'n Bill and Johnny Dooit, and the last book invokes the Forbidden Fountain. The latter three sequels feature, instead of Ellie and Toto, her younger sister Annie along with her own dog, Toto's grandson Arto (which was absent from the last book) and her childhood friend Tim. The original book and all of its sequels were translated in a more faithful fashion some time later, and Russians now see these two versions as wholly different series. In 1959, beloved Russian illustrator Leonid Vladimirsky drew the Scarecrow short, round and tubby; his influence is evident in illustrations for translations across the Soviet bloc, where the Scarecrow is almost always portrayed as short, round and tubby. Leonid Vladimirsky has written at least two additional sequels to Alexander Volkov's alternative Oz; two more Russian authors and one German have written additional sequels to the "Magic Land" stories. The books have been faithfully translated to English by Peter Blystone as Tales of Magic Land. These last two books were previously made available as Oz books through Buckethead Enterprises of Oz, but were translated loosely to make them Oz books. Alexander Melentyevich Volkov (Russian: ) (1891 – 1977) was a Russian novelist and mathematician. ... The Wizard of the Emerald City (Russian: Волшебник Изумрудного Города) is a 1939 childrens novel by Russian writer Alexander Melentyevich Volkov. ... This article is about the mythological creature. ... Capn Bill is a fictional character found in L. Frank Baums Land of Oz. ... Johnny Dooit is a fictional inventor appearing in L. Frank Baums 1909 novel, The Road to Oz. ...


References to The Wizard of Oz (and Magic Land) are thoroughly ingrained in British, American, Russian, and other cultures. A mere sampling of the breadth in which it is referenced might include Futurama and Scrubs (the former parodied it in an episode, the latter based an episode off it), The Cinnamon Bear (a 1938 radio serial), RahXephon (a 2002 Japanese animated television show), Zardoz (a 1974 Sean Connery movie), Wizard and Glass (a 1997 Stephen King fantasy/Western novel), and the science fiction literature of Robert A. Heinlein, particularly The Number of the Beast. The Wizard of Oz Mystery, a murder mystery game based on the famous characters was released in 2007 from Shot In The Dark Mysteries. John Connor, a character in the Terminator series, cited that one of his favorite memories was of his mother reading him the story of the Wizard of Oz in Spanish as a child. Futurama is an animated American cartoon series created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen (also a writer for The Simpsons). ... Scrubs is an Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning American situation comedy/comedy-drama that premiered on October 2, 2001 on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence and is produced by Touchstone Television. ... For other uses, see My Way Home (disambiguation). ... The Cinnamon Bear is an old time radio program. ... Original run January 2002 – September 2002[1] Episodes 26 Manga Author Takeaki Momose Publisher Shogakukan Serialized in Monthly Sunday Gene-X Original run September 2001 – November 2002 Volumes 3 Novel Author Hiroshi Ohnogi Publisher Media Factory DrMaster Published July 2002 – February 2003 Volumes 5 Movie: RahXephon: Pluralitas Concentio Director Tomoki... Zardoz is a 1974 science fiction film written, produced, and directed by John Boorman. ... Wizard and Glass is the fourth book in the Dark Tower series by Stephen King. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Number of the Beast is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1980. ... Murder mystery games are generally party games wherein one of the partygoers is secretly playing a murderer, and the other attendees must determine who among them is the criminal. ... For other persons named John Connor, see John Connor (disambiguation). ... Look up terminator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 1967, The Seekers recorded "Emerald City" in which the vocalist sings of a visit to the Emerald City. The melody of the song is "lied an die Freude" from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. This article is about the Australian music group. ... The Symphony No. ...


Some of these references, however, can possibly be attributed more to the now-phenomenal popularity of the 1939 film version than the original novel. MGM's classic Technicolor film version of the novel has become an ingrained part of popular culture ever since it began to be shown annually on American television. The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ...


Criticisms

Although widely held as a classic of children's literature, the novel has repeatedly come under fire over the years. Some religious commentators, for example, have objected to Baum's portrayal of "good witches".[9] On a more secular note, feminist author Margery Hourihan has described the book as a "banal and mechanistic story which is written in flat, impoverished prose" and dismissed the central character as "the girl-woman of Hollywood".[10]


Adaptations

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a 1900 novel by L. Frank Baum, which has been adapted into several different works, the most famous being the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, starring Judy Garland. ...

Stage and screen

The earliest musical version of the book was produced by Baum and Denslow (with music by composer Paul Tietjens) in Chicago in 1902, and moved to New York in 1903. It used the same characters, and was aimed more at adult audiences. It had a long, successful run on Broadway. Baum added numerous additional political references to the script. For example, his actors specifically mention President Theodore Roosevelt, Senator Mark Hanna, and John D. Rockefeller by name. (Swartz, Before the Rainbow, pp 34, 47, 56) He wrote a version more faithful to the book in 1901, but it has never been produced. Although it included many of the same songs, it featured far fewer interpolations of other songs, which had nothing to do with the story than the 1902 version did. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The Wizard of Oz was a 1902 stage play based on the book by L. Frank Baum, which was originally published in 1900. ... In the mathematical subfield of numerical analysis, interpolation is a method of constructing new data points from a discrete set of known data points. ...


The earliest "Oz" film series were produced by Baum in 1908 and 1914 and twice featured the young silent film actress Mildred Harris. Another series that Baum had nothing to do with, aside from a contractual agreement, appeared in 1910, which may have featured Bebe Daniels as Dorothy. Larry Semon, in collaboration with Frank Joslyn Baum, created a rather well known but unsuccessful version in 1925. The most famous adaptation is the 1939 film, The Wizard of Oz, featuring Judy Garland as Dorothy. This, in turn, has been adapted into two separate stage productions, first by Frank Gabrielson, (who wrote the 1960 teleplay of The Land of Oz for Shirley Temple), and more recently by the Royal Shakespeare Company's John Kane), but the first stage production, in 1902, used a score partly written by Baum and released on compact disc in 2003 by Hungry Tiger Press, and not the one heard in the 1939 film, though there have been attempts, mostly in Florida by Constantine Grame, to revive it. Early film versions of the book include a 1914 film produced by Baum himself entitled His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz, which incorporates several incidents from the book—the Scarecrow is first seen hanging on a pole, from which Dorothy rescues him, and the Tin Man is discovered standing rusted in the forest—and a 1925 film, Wizard of Oz, featuring Oliver Hardy as the Tin Woodsman [sic]. The Wiz was a hit musical with an all-black cast produced in the 1970s on Broadway; it was later made into a 1978 movie directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Diana Ross as Dorothy and Michael Jackson as the Scarecrow. The most recent adaptation of the novel is "Tin Man" aired on the Scifi Channel on December 2nd - 4th 2007 in a 3 part miniseries. Mildred Harris Mildred Harris (November 29, 1901 - July 20, 1944) was a notable actress of the silent film era. ... Bebe Daniels (January 14, 1901 - March 16, 1971) was an American actress. ... Larry Semon (July 16, 1889 - October 8, 1928) was a film comedian during the silent era, mainly known for working with both Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy (of Laurel and Hardy) before they started working together. ... Frank Joslyn Baum was a lawyer, soldier, writer, and film producer, though his attempts to continue the legacy of his father brought him lawsuit and estrangement from his family. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... The year 1939 in film involved some significant events. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Cover of The Marvelous Land of Oz. ... For the cocktail named after this person, see Shirley Temple cocktail. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz is a 1914 film production, directed by J. Farrell McaDonald and written and produced by L. Frank Baum. ... See also: 1924 in film 1925 1926 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films Ben-Hur His People The Unholy Three The Freshman Movies released Movies released in 1925 include: Ben-Hur, starring Ramon Novarro. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... Oliver Hardy (born Norvell Hardy; January 18, 1892 – August 7, 1957) was an American actor, most remembered for his role in one of the worlds most famous double acts, Laurel and Hardy, with his friend Stan Laurel. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... Portrait of Sidney Lumet, May 7, 1939. ... For the author-illustrator, see Diana Ross (author). ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ...


An animated series based on the 1939 film was broadcast on ABC network during the 1990-1991 TV season. The cartoon featured Dorothy returning to Oz, reuniting with her four friends, and journeying through the magical realm in an attempt to rescue the Wizard from a resurrected Witch of the West. Look up ABC in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Abbreviation ABC is an abbreviation with many meanings: The Latin alphabet, of which A, B, and C are the first three letters. ...


A recent musical adaptation of an Oz-related book is the musical Wicked, based on the book Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire. The musical has broken Broadway and West End records and received considerable critical and popular success. Another adaption especially for children was performed by the Festspiele Balver Höhle in 2005. Wicked is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and a libretto by Winnie Holzman. ... Wicked, or Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, is a parallel novel by Gregory Maguire. ... Gregory Maguire (born June 9, 1954 in Albany, New York) is an American author. ... Map of Germany showing Balve Balve is a town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ...


There has also been a spin-off, called "The Oz Kids". This animated series features the offspring of the main characters of the original novels. A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... The Oz Kids is an direct-to-video animated spin-off of the novel Wizard of Oz. ...


In December 2007, RHI Entertainment and Sci Fi released Tin Man. This three-part miniseries, advertised as a re-imagined version of the Wizard of Oz, gave the story a heavy science fiction/fantasy emphasis and at first glance, gives only allusive references to most of the original story and the 1939 film.[11] However, the revelation in the third part of Tin Man that the heroine, DG, is a descendant of Dorothy Gale indicates that the series may portray a future version of Oz, rather than a re-imagining. RHI Entertainment is an American producer of television movies and miniseries, founded in the 1980s by Robert Halmi Jr. ... There are two television channels named Sci-Fi: a British satellite television channel; see Sci Fi channel (United Kingdom) a United States television channel; see Sci Fi channel (United States) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Tin Man is a three-part television miniseries from RHI Entertainment and Sci Fi Pictures original films that is airing each night on the Sci Fi Channel on December 2-December 4, 2007 at 9 pm Eastern. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ...


Comics

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (2006), adapted by David Chauvel. Art by Enrique Fernandez.

The novel was adapted into a comic book in 2005, illustrated/painted by Enrique Fernandez and adapted by David Chauvel, with almost all dialogue and narration taken directly from Baum's original. The comic was originally published in 2005 in France, where it won the prestigious Grand Prix de La Ville De Lyon Award of Illustration. In 2006, it was adapted into English and published in America by Image Comics. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 900 pixel, file size: 174 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover to the 2005 adaptation of the Wizard of Oz, by David Chauvel and Enrique Fernandez. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 900 pixel, file size: 174 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover to the 2005 adaptation of the Wizard of Oz, by David Chauvel and Enrique Fernandez. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ...


Other comics art adaptations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz have been published both in the USA and in other countries.


The Wizard of Oz served as the inspiration for the 1994 Legion of Super-heroes annual from DC Comics, with the characters traveling down a star path to rescue Valor (Mon El) from the villainous Star Finger. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


The comic book Dorothy was launched by Illusive Arts Entertainment in November 2005. Presented in semi-fumetti style using digitally altered photographs, this retelling of Baum's story has been updated to 2005 and "stars" model Catie Fisher as 16-year-old Dorothy Gale, a disaffected youth with dyed hair and piercings who steals her uncle's car and runs away from home ... until she encounters a tornado and is knocked unconscious. She awakens in a strange land and utters: "I don't think this is Kansas ... maybe it's Colorado." This version of the tale, created by Greg Mannino, written by Mark Masterson with artwork by Greg Mannino and Ray Boersig, is in part a retelling of Baum's tale and in part a retelling of the 1939 movie version of the story, as it incorporates elements of the Judy Garland film. Cover of Dorothy Volume 1 Published by: Illusive Arts Entertainment Created by: Greg Mannino, Mark Masterson Dorothy is a comic book series directed and produced by Greg Mannino, written by Mark Masterson, animated by Ray Boersig, and starring Catie Fisher. ... Fumetti (or photo novels) are a genre of American comics illustrated with photographs rather than drawings. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...


An erotic re-telling of the story is featured in Lost Girls, by Alan Moore and Melinda Gebbie, in which an adult Dorothy meets Alice from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Wendy Darling from Peter Pan and the trio recount the stories of their respective works as allegories for their sexual awakenings. Lost Girls is an erotic graphic novel depicting the sexual adventures of three important female fictional characters of the late 19th and early 20th Century, namely Alice from Alices Adventures in Wonderland, Dorothy Gale from The Wizard of Oz, and Wendy Darling from Peter Pan. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Melinda Gebbie is a comic book artist, partner of Alan Moore. ... John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... Alice in Wonderland redirects here. ... Wendy Darling as portrayed in Disneys Peter Pan. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ...


Oz no Mahōtsukai

Main article: Oz no Mahōtsukai

An Anime adaptation of four of Baum's Oz books known as Oz no Mahoutsukai was created in 1986. It consists of 52 episodes and follows the story of Dorothy and her adventures in Oz with the Tin Woodman, Cowardly Lion, and Scarecrow. It continues on to the story of Ozma and Mombi, and follows through the events of other Oz books. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, see The Wizard of Oz (adaptations). ... Animé redirects here. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Princess Ozma Princess Ozma is a fictional character in the Land of Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ... Mombi is a character from the L Frank Baum Oz Books series, and appears in the book The Marvelous Land of Oz. ...


In 1987, HBO purchased the rights to the series and dubbed/edited together key episodes of the series into a series of movies. Production for the English version was done by the Canadian studio Cinar. Actress Margot Kidder was hired as narrator for the series, which aired as a mini-series. Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... ...


An earlier, feature-length anime adaptation of the story was made by Toho in 1982 and was directed by Fumihiko Takayama, with music by Joe Hisaishi (known for composing the music to many of Hayao Miyazaki's works). The English version of the movie stars Aileen Quinn as the voice of Dorothy. Like the 1939 Judy Garland film version, this anime take on The Wizard of Oz ends the story with Dorothy's trip home to Kansas after visiting the Wizard, and is a musical boasting original vocal songs such as "It's Strictly Up To You," "I Dream Of Home," and "A Wizard Of A Day," all sung by Aileen Quinn in the English version. The lyrics to these songs were by Sammy Cahn and Allen Byrnes. This film was seemingly made with the American market in mind, as it was released in the United States before it premiered in Japan. In the U.S., it was released on video and syndicated to local television stations. The English-language version of Tohos famous logo, used from the early 1960s to the late 1990s. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Mamoru Fujisawa (藤澤 守 Fujisawa Mamoru), known professionally as Joe Hisaishi (久石 譲 Hisaishi Jō, born December 6, 1950) is a composer and director responsible for over 100 soundtracks and conventional albums dating back to 1981. ... Hayao Miyazaki ) (born January 5, 1941 in Tokyo, Japan) is the prominent director of many popular animated feature films. ... Aileen Quinn (born on 28 June 1971 in Yardley, Pennsylvania, USA) is an American actress who played the title role in the movie Annie. ... Sammy Cahn (June 18, 1913 – January 15, 1993) was an award-winning American lyricist, songwriter and musician, best known for his romantic lyrics to tin pan alley and Broadway songs, as recorded by Frank Sinatra, Doris Day and many others. ...


The Wonderful Galaxy of Oz

Another Japanese animation consisting of twenty-six episodes, this time involving Dorothy and the characters traveling in space around the galaxy of Oz. It was dubbed and edited into the feature-length (75 minute) Supêsu Oz no bôken for U.S. consumption. The Wonderful Galaxy of Oz is a 1990 futuristic adaptation of the classic story The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ On May 17, 1900 the first copy of the book came off the press; Baum assembled it by hand and presented it to his sister, Mary Louise Baum Brewster. The public saw the book for the first time at a book fair at the Palmer House in Chicago, July 5-20. The book's copyright was registered on Aug. 1; full distribution followed in September. Katharine M. Rogers, L. Frank Baum, pp. 73-94.
  2. ^ Oz Reference Home Page
  3. ^ L. Frank Baum, Michael Patrick Hearn, The Annotated Wizard of Oz, p 38, ISBN 0-517-500868
  4. ^ L. Frank Baum, Michael Patrick Hearn, The Annotated Wizard of Oz, p 38, ISBN 0-517-500868
  5. ^ Responses to Littlefield - The Wizard of Oz - Turn Me On, Dead Man
  6. ^ Wizard of Oz - Frequently Asked Questions - The Oz Books
  7. ^ The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
  8. ^ http://emeraldcity.ru/eng/index.htm Friends of the Emerald City (Volkov's) EmeraldCity.ru
  9. ^ Wizard of Oz - Frequently Asked Questions - The Books http://thewizardofoz.info/faq02.html#20 accessed 9th June 2007
  10. ^ Margaret Houihan, Deconstructing the Hero, p. 209, ISBN 0-415-14186-9
  11. ^ Sci Fi Wire - Tin Man Previewed

Hallway in the Palmer House Hilton The Palmer House Hilton is a famous and historic hotel in downtown Chicago. ...

References

  • Baum, Frank Joslyn & MacFall, Russell P. (1961) To Please a Child. Chicago: Reilly & Lee Co.
  • Culver, Stuart. "Growing Up in Oz." American Literary History 4 (1992) 607-28.
  • Culver, Stuart. "What Manikins Want: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and The Art of Decorating Dry Goods Windows and Interiors", Representations, 21 (1988) 97-116.
  • Dighe, Ranjit S. ed. The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (2002)
  • Gardner, Martin & Nye, Russel B. (1994) The Wizard of Oz and Who He Was. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press
  • Gardner, Todd. "Responses to Littlefield" (2004), online
  • Green, David L. and Dick Martin. (1977) The Oz Scrapbook. Random House.
  • Hearn, Michael Patrick (ed). (2000, 1973) The Annotated Wizard of Oz. W. W. Norton & Co. ISBN 0-393-04992-2
  • Littlefield, Henry. "The Wizard of Oz: Parable on Populism." American Quarterly. v. 16, 3, Spring 1964, 47-58.
  • Parker, David B. (1994) "The Rise and Fall of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a 'Parable on Populism'." Journal of the Georgia Association of Historians. 16 (1994): 49-63
  • Riley, Michael O. (1997) Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum. University of Kansas Press ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  • Ritter, Gretchen. "Silver slippers and a golden cap: L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and historical memory in American politics." Journal of American Studies (August 1997) vol. 31, no. 2, 171-203.
  • Rockoff, Hugh. "The 'Wizard of Oz' as a Monetary Allegory," Journal of Political Economy 98 (1990): 739-60 online at JSTOR
  • Rogers, Katharine M. L. Frank Baum: Creator of Oz. New York, St. Martin's Press (2002).
  • Sherman, Fraser A. (2005). The Wizard of Oz catalog: L. Frank Baum's novel, its sequels and their adaptations for stage, television, movies, radio, music videos, comic books, commercials and more. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co. ISBN 0786417927
  • Sunshine, Linda. All Things Oz (2003)
  • Swartz, Mark Evan. Oz Before the Rainbow: L. Frank Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" on Stage and Screen to 1939 (2000).
  • Velde, Francois R. "Following the Yellow Brick Road: How the United States Adopted the Gold Standard" Economic Perspectives. Volume: 26. Issue: 2. 2002. also online here
  • Ziaukas, Tim. "100 Years of Oz: Baum's 'Wizard of Oz' as Gilded Age Public Relations" in Public Relations Quarterly, Fall 1998
  • [1]McFARLANE’S MONSTERS SERIES 2: TWISTED LAND OF OZ

External links

Wikisource has the complete text of:
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz


Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links En_the_wonderful_wizard_of_oz. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

The Oz books
Previous book:
N/A
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
1900
Next book:
The Marvelous Land of Oz


The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... The characters N/A (sometimes n/a) are an abbreviation that is mainly used in information tables. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published in 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baums books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2422 words)
Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians.
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The Wizard of Oz has an official sequel, the animated production Journey Back To Oz (the music was composed in 1964, but funding for the animation could not be raised until eight years later), featuring the voice of Liza Minnelli, Garland's daughter, as Dorothy and Margaret Hamilton as the voice of Aunt Em.
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