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Encyclopedia > The Wizard of Oz (1939 movie)
The Wizard of Oz
Directed by Victor Fleming
Written by Noel Langley,
Florence Ryerson,
and Edgar Allan Woolf
(screenplay).
Based on L. Frank Baum's novel
Starring Judy Garland,
Frank Morgan,
Ray Bolger,
Jack Haley,
Bert Lahr,
Billie Burke,
and Margaret Hamilton
Produced by Mervyn LeRoy
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date August 25, 1939 (USA)
Runtime 101 min
Language English
Budget $2,777,000 USD (estimated)
IMDb page

The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It is based on L. Frank Baum's turn-of-the-century children's story The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, in which a resourceful American girl is snatched up by a Kansas tornado and deposited in a fantastic land of witches, talking scarecrows, cowardly lions, and more. It stars Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke and Margaret Hamilton. While not the first feature film produced in Technicolor (as commonly believed), The Wizard of Oz makes conspicuous use of the technique; its Kansas bookend sequences are in sepia-toned black-and-white, while the Oz scenes are in full three-strip Technicolor. Image File history File links DVD cover for the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz showing stars Ray Bolger as The Scarecrow, Jack Haley as The Tin Man, Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale and Bert Lahr as The Cowardly Lion. ... For the Arkansas lawyer and judge Victor A. Fleming, see Vic Fleming. ... Noel Langley (December 25, 1911 – November 4, 1980) was a motion picture screenwriter probably best known for being one of the screenwriters for The Wizard of Oz. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author and the creator of one of the most beloved classics of childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American film actress who is considered one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... Frank Morgan (June 1, 1890 - September 18, 1949) was an American actor. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Jack Haley (August 10, 1898 - June 6, 1979) was an American film actor. ... Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim, (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967) was a United States comic actor, best remembered today for his role as the Cowardly Lion in the classic 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, but known during his life for a career in burlesque, vaudeville and Broadway. ... Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke (Washington, D.C., 7 August 1885 – Los Angeles, California, 14 May 1970) was a pretty, delightful and funny actress primarily known to modern audiences for her role as Glinda, the Good Witch of the North in The Wizard of Oz. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... Mervyn LeRoy (October 15, 1900 - September 13, 1987) was an American film director, producer and sometime actor. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A musical film belongs to a film genre that features songs, sung by the actors, interwoven into the narrative. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author and the creator of one of the most beloved classics of childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens story written by L. Frank Baum, illustrated by W.W. Denslow, and first published in 1900. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... A tornado over land. ... This article is part of the Witchcraft series. ... Scarecrows in a rice paddy in Japan A scarecrow is a device (traditionally a mannequin) that is used to discourage birds like crows from disturbing crops. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae. ... Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American film actress who is considered one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... Frank Morgan (June 1, 1890 - September 18, 1949) was an American actor. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Jack Haley (August 10, 1898 - June 6, 1979) was an American film actor. ... Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim, (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967) was a United States comic actor, best remembered today for his role as the Cowardly Lion in the classic 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, but known during his life for a career in burlesque, vaudeville and Broadway. ... Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke (Washington, D.C., 7 August 1885 – Los Angeles, California, 14 May 1970) was a pretty, delightful and funny actress primarily known to modern audiences for her role as Glinda, the Good Witch of the North in The Wizard of Oz. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... Technicolor is a three-strip color film process pioneered in the 1930s by the Technicolor Corporation, a company created by the husband-and-wife team of Herbert and Natalie Kalmus. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... Sepia tone is a type of monochrome photographic image in which the picture appears in shades of brown as opposed to greyscale as in a black-and-white image. ... Black-and-white (or variations including Black and White) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ...

Contents


History

L. Frank Baum (born Lyman Frank Baum on May 15, 1856) published his book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900. Over the following years it sold millions of copies, and Baum wrote thirteen more Oz books before his death on May 15, 1919. Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author and the creator of one of the most beloved classics of childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens story written by L. Frank Baum, illustrated by W.W. Denslow, and first published in 1900. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In January 1938, MGM bought the rights to the book. The script was completed on October 8, 1938. Filming started on October 13, 1938 and was completed on March 16, 1939. The film premiered on August 12, 1939, and went into general release on August 25. 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years). ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in Leap years). ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ...


The movie's script was adapted by Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson, and Edgar Allan Woolf. Several people assisted with the adaptation without official credit: Irving Brecher, William H. Cannon, Herbert Fields, Arthur Freed, Jack Haley, E.Y. Harburg, Samuel Hoffenstein, Bert Lahr, John Lee Mahin, Herman J. Mankiewicz, Jack Mintz, Ogden Nash, and Sid Silvers. It was directed by Victor Fleming, Richard Thorpe (uncredited), George Cukor (uncredited), and King Vidor (uncredited). Noel Langley (December 25, 1911 – November 4, 1980) was a motion picture screenwriter probably best known for being one of the screenwriters for The Wizard of Oz. ... Arthur Freed (September 9, 1894 _ April 12, 1973) was born in Charleston, South Carolina. ... E. Y. Yip Harburg (April 8, 1896 - March 5, 1981) was a lyricist who worked with many well-known composers. ... John Lee Mahin, (August 23, 1902 - April 18, 1984) was a prolific screenwriter and producer. ... Herman Jacob Mankiewicz (November 7, 1897—March 5, 1953) was a Polish-American legendary Hollywood screenwriter. ... Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy, funny, light verse. ... For the Arkansas lawyer and judge Victor A. Fleming, see Vic Fleming. ... This article needs cleanup. ... George Cukor George Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ...


It won Academy Awards for Best Music, Original Score and Best Music, Song (Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg for "Over the Rainbow"). Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... From Rule Sixteen of the Special Rules for The Music Awards Original Score: An original score is a substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Academy Award for Best Song 1930s 1934 - The Continental from The Gay Divorcee 1935 Lullaby of Broadway from Gold Diggers of 1935 1936 The Way You Look Tonight from Swing Time 1937 Sweet Leilani from Waikiki Wedding 1938 - Thanks for the Memory from The Big Broadcast of 1938 1939 Over... Harold Arlen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1960 Harold Arlen (February 15, 1905 - April 23, 1986) was an American composer of popular music. ...


Casting the film was problematic, with actors shifting roles repeatedly at the beginning of filming. One of the primary changes was in the role of the Tin Woodsman. The Tin Man was originally slated for Ray Bolger, and Buddy Ebsen was to play the Scarecrow. Bolger was unhappy with the part, and convinced producer Mervyn LeRoy to recast him as the Scarecrow. Ebsen didn't object to the change at first, but just 9 days into filming, he suffered an allergic reaction to the metallic makeup and had to leave the movie. Jack Haley was given the part the next day. The makeup used on Jack Haley was quietly changed to nonmetallic. Ironically, despite his near-death experience with the makeup, Ebsen well-outlived all the principal players. Buddy Ebsen as Jed Clampett Buddy Ebsen (April 2, 1908 – July 7, 2003) was an American actor, who is best-remembered for his role as Jed Clampett in the popular television series The Beverly Hillbillies. ...


The role of Dorothy was given to Judy Garland on February 24, 1938. After the casting of her role, a few executives at MGM contemplated replacing her with Shirley Temple, but were not able to get Fox to comply with the "loan" of the young actress. Other MGM officials vetoed the idea of using Temple. February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Shirley Temple Black was a former child actress and United States diplomat Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928), later known as Shirley Temple Black, is an American film actress and diplomat who is considered by many to be the most famous child actress in history. ... The Fox Film Corporation was an American company which produced motion pictures, formed in 1915 when founder William Fox merged two companies he had established in 1913: Greater New York Film Rental, a distribution firm, which was part of the Independents; and Fox (or Box, depending on the source) Office...


Originally, Gale Sondergaard was cast as the Witch. She became unhappy with the role when the Witch's persona shifted from a sly glamorous witch into the familiar ugly hag. She turned down the role, and was replaced on October 10, 1938 with Margaret Hamilton. Gale Sondergaard (February 15, 1899 - August 13, 1985) was a US film actress. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ...


On July 25, 1938, Bert Lahr was signed and cast as the Cowardly Lion. Frank Morgan was cast as the Wizard on September 22, 1938. On August 12, 1938, Charlie Grapewin was cast as Uncle Henry. July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years). ...


The songs were recorded in a studio prior to filming. Several of the recordings were completed while Buddy Ebsen was still with the cast. So, while he had to be dropped from the cast, his singing voice remained, in the group vocals of "We're off to See the Wizard". His voice is easy to detect. Ray Bolger and Bert Lahr (and also Jack Haley, who had a solo but was not in the group vocal) were speakers of non-rhotic accents from the Northeast, and did not pronounce the r in wizard. Buddy Ebsen was a Midwesterner, like Judy Garland, and pronounced the r. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In linguistics, rhotic can refer to: a rhotic consonant such as IPA a rhotic accent such as General American an r-colored vowel such as IPA This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States of America defined by the US Census Bureau. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


Filming began on October 13, 1938, with Richard Thorpe directing. Thorpe was fired an unknown number of days after some scenes were shot, and George Cukor took over. He changed Judy Garland and Margaret Hamilton's makeup and costumes, which meant that all of their scenes had to be discarded and re-filmed. Cukor had a prior commitment to direct the movie Gone with the Wind, so he left on November 3, 1938, and Victor Fleming took over for him. October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years). ... Gone With the Wind was an instant success. ...

The main title card from the opening credits of MGM's The Wizard of Oz.
Enlarge
The main title card from the opening credits of MGM's The Wizard of Oz.

Ironically, on February 12, 1939, Victor Fleming again replaced George Cukor in directing Gone With The Wind. The next day King Vidor would be assigned as director to finish the filming of the movie (mainly the sepia shots of the Kansas farm). The title card from The Wizard of Oz (1939 movie) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... The title card from The Wizard of Oz (1939 movie) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Sepia may refer to any of the following: The genus Sepia of cephalopod, a grouping of cuttlefish. ... Bales of hay on a farm near Ames, Iowa A farm is the basic unit in agriculture. ...


The movie's filming was completed on March 16, 1939. On June 5, 1939 it had its first sneak preview. After this preview, as a response to several audience members, some scenes were deleted. Audience members thought the movie was too long; others found some of the witch's scenes too scary. March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in Leap years). ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ...


On August 7, 1939, The Wizard Of Oz, a movie that cost $2,777,000 to make, unheard of at the time, was officially and legally copyrighted. It premiered at the Strand Theatre in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin on August 12, 1939, and in Hollywood's Grauman's Chinese Theater on August 15. August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... For copyright issues in relation to Wikipedia itself, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. ... Oconomowoc is a city located in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. ... Graumans Chinese Theater Graumans Chinese Theatre, at 6925 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood is a world-famous movie palace that opened in 1927 and has since become one of Southern Californias most recognizable and visited landmarks. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ...


On August 17, 1939, the movie opened nationally. Judy Garland and her frequent film co-star Mickey Rooney performed after the screening at Loews Capitol Theater in New York City, and would continue to do this after each screening for a week. August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Joe Yule, Jr. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ...


In spite of the publicity, the movie was only moderately successful in its initial theatrical run. It achieved its iconic status after decades of television showings, beginning on November 3, 1956. The viewing audience for this broadcast was estimated at 45 million people, and was the beginning of a tradition. For decades to follow, the movie was aired in the United States on or near Easter, although today with the Turner cable networks now holding the television rights, the film is generally shown during the summer and Christmas seasons. As of now, the rights to its distribution are held by Warner Bros. Family Entertainment. November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ...


Plot

(Also including deleted scenes and other filming information.)


These opening scenes were the last ones to be filmed. They were filmed from late February - March 16, 1939. Dorothy is an orphan from Kansas, raised by her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry. At the beginning of the film, Dorothy is telling the three farm hands about her conflict with a local rich, stern and humorless woman, Almira Gulch (played by Margaret Hamilton, who also plays the Witch of the West). Each hand advises her in his characteristic way, foreshadowing their appearance in Dorothy's dream of Oz. One suggests that it's not smart to walk with Toto near Gulch's property (Scarecrow). The next starts making a passionate speech, straight from the heart (Tin Woodman), but is stopped in mid-speech by Aunt Em, his right arm upraised. The last recommends a more aggressive approach, as he would do... then is found to be afraid of hogs (Cowardly Lion). Dorothy Gale is the protagonist in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... The Scarecrow is a character in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and later Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... The Tin Woodman or Tin Woodsman, also known in films as Tin Man, is a character in L. Frank Baums Oz books. ... The Cowardly Lion is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ...


Dorothy's dog, Toto, gets in trouble for biting her, and Gulch comes to Dorothy's house with an order from the sheriff allowing her to take the dog, presumably to be put to sleep. Dorothy's aunt and uncle argue unsuccessfully with Ms. Gulch about the ordeal, and Toto is taken away, as the exasperated Dorothy calls her "a wicked old witch" (foreshadowing her role in Dorothy's dream). Toto escapes by jumping out of Ms. Gulch's basket, unnoticed by her. When the dog gets home, Dorothy decides that they should run away from home, because Ms. Gulch would be coming back for him. Euthanasia (Greek, good death) is the practice of killing a person or animal, in a painless or minimally painful way, for merciful reasons, usually to end their suffering. ...


Dorothy and Toto begin their journey, and they soon encounter Professor Marvel (played by Frank Morgan, who also the plays the Wizard of Oz, the doorman, the cabbie, and the guard; all of his characters are essentially a "humbug", in his own words, i.e. a fraud). He leads Dorothy into his trailer, and after sneaking a peak in her basket and finding a family photo, he pretends to see her Aunt Em crying, in his crystal ball. Dorothy is convinced, and she and Toto hurry home. On her way out of the trailer, though, a cyclone begins to form ("a 'whopper', speaking in the vernacular of the peasantry"). When she gets home, her whole family is already down in the storm cellar and cannot hear her stomping on its door. Seeing the tornado approaching (a very convincing special effect, made from a large muslin stocking spinning on a sliding track, accompanied by poweful off-screen fans that nearly knock her off her feet at one point), Dorothy rushes inside the house and gets to her bedroom, but the "Gale" wind blows the window out of its frame, hitting her in the head, knocking her out. Frank Morgan (June 1, 1890 - September 18, 1949) was an American actor. ... A doorman or a bouncer is a term for a person who deals with disorderly people in a bar or pub. ... Look up cabbie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Taxi driver has several meanings: A taxi driver or cabbie is a person who drives a taxicab for income. ... A guard is either a person or an organisation. ... A tornado over land. ...


Although Dorothy is lying unconscious, the audience (and Toto) already begins to see various objects, stirred up by the cyclone, starting to appear in the window. (There is also a very noticeable edit in the audio track. A three-CD collection of all the music from the film, issued in 1995 with remastered music, contains a fuller version of this track). 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Remaster (and its derivations, frequently found in the phrases digitally remastered or digital remastering) is a word and concept ushered into the mass consciousness via the digital age, although it had existed before then. ...


Dorothy awakes suddenly, to find that her house is being carried along, inside the cyclone. She sees some familiar faces out of the window, including the wicked Miss Gulch. In a dramatic, terrifying moment (underscored by the audio track's sudden and powerful mood change), Miss Gulch transforms into a witch and her bicycle into a broomstick. She cackles her famous Eeeeh-heh-heh-heh-heh-heh! associated with witches today and flies away. Minutes later, Dorothy and Toto land in Munchkinland, a county in the land of Oz. (The dramatic footage of the house falling toward the camera was actually a reversed piece of film, of a model house being dropped toward a floor painted to resemble sky and clouds). The movie transitions from sepia-toned to beautiful Technicolor as Dorothy and Toto walk out of the house. This article is part of the Witchcraft series. ... Technicolor is a three-strip color film process pioneered in the 1930s by the Technicolor Corporation, a company created by the husband-and-wife team of Herbert and Natalie Kalmus. ...


Shortly thereafter, Glinda, the Good Witch of the North (played by Billie Burke), arrives in an iridescent bubble. She asks Dorothy whether she is a good witch or a bad witch, and despite Dorothy's repeated explanation, Glinda appears not to quite understand who Dorothy is nor where she came from. She informs her of where she is, and that she killed the Wicked Witch of the East with her house. She introduces her to the Munchkins, a small community of little people who sing and dance in order to thank Dorothy for freeing them from the Witch's reign of tyranny. Glinda (or Glinda the Good) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke (Washington, D.C., 7 August 1885 – Los Angeles, California, 14 May 1970) was a pretty, delightful and funny actress primarily known to modern audiences for her role as Glinda, the Good Witch of the North in The Wizard of Oz. ... The Wicked Witch of the East is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his classic books. ...

Mid-song, there is a burst of flame and the Wicked Witch of the West (Margaret Hamilton) arrives. Having heard about the recent death, she wants to know who killed her sister, and she wants to claim her dead sister's powerful ruby slippers. To her horror, Glinda magically moves the slippers to Dorothy's feet. The Wicked Witch makes threats to Dorothy, but Glinda reminds her that her magic is largely ineffective in Munchkinland: "Oh rubbish! You have no power here! Begone before somebody drops a house on you, too!" The Wicked Witch vows revenge on Dorothy and Toto, with her famous "I'll get you, my pretty, and your little dog, too!", and she disappears in the same way she arrived. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens books. ... The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens books. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... The ruby slippers are the shoes worn by Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz which give her the power of returning home any time she wishes. ...


The Munchkin Land scenes were filmed from December 10 - 23, 1938.


On December 23, 1938, during a second filming of her departure from Munchkinland the lift Margaret Hamilton was standing on did not go down fast enough. When the fire started she nearly got caught in it. Her green makeup did catch fire, she was severely burned and she was out of the filming for six whole weeks, spending time in the local hospital. She returned to the set on February 11, 1939. December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ...


Glinda tells Dorothy that the only way to get back to Kansas is to follow the yellow brick road to the Emerald City, where she can ask the mysterious Wizard of Oz for help. Before Glinda disappears in her bubble, she tells Dorothy never to take off the slippers, and to "just follow the Yellow Brick Road". The road of yellow brick is an element in the novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... The fictional city of Oz as portrayed in the 1939 movie The Emerald City is the fictional capital of the Land of Oz in L. Frank Baums Oz books, first described in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...

from left to right, Jack Haley, Ray Bolger, Judy Garland, and Bert Lahr
from left to right, Jack Haley, Ray Bolger, Judy Garland, and Bert Lahr

On her journey, Dorothy befriends a supposedly brainless (though very resourceful) talking scarecrow (Ray Bolger), a supposedly heartless (though very kind) tin woodsman (Jack Haley), and a definitely cowardly lion (Bert Lahr). All three of them sing songs detailing their difficult handicaps. They too decide they will visit the Wizard to obtain what they desire, despite the Witch's threats to stop them. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Jack Haley (August 10, 1898 - June 6, 1979) was an American film actor. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American film actress who is considered one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim, (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967) was a United States comic actor, best remembered today for his role as the Cowardly Lion in the classic 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, but known during his life for a career in burlesque, vaudeville and Broadway. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Jack Haley (August 10, 1898 - June 6, 1979) was an American film actor. ... Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim, (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967) was a United States comic actor, best remembered today for his role as the Cowardly Lion in the classic 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, but known during his life for a career in burlesque, vaudeville and Broadway. ...


Two scenes filmed along the way were cut. First was about 2 minutes of Ray Bolger's "If I only had a brain" song scenes. The second one was a scene where the witch follows up on her threat to turn the Tin Man into a beehive. Originally there was a scene with dozens of bees flying around the Tin Man. Domesticated honeybees are kept in beehives. ... Families Andrenidae Apidae Colletidae Halictidae Heterogynaidae Megachilidae Melittidae Oxaeidae Sphecidae Stenotritidae bee or bees, see bee (disambiguation). ...


Just before the group reaches the Art Deco-style Emerald City, the Wicked Witch casts a spell to stop them. She produces a giant field of poppies that put Dorothy, Toto and the Lion to sleep. The Scarecrow and the Tinman (who are not conventional organic creatures and are immune to the spell) cry for help, and Glinda produces a counterspell in the form of a snow shower to wake everybody up. They immediately arrive at the Emerald City, where they are only allowed in after Dorothy proves that Glinda sent her there. Asheville City Hall. ... Papaver rhoeas Poppy at High Wood cemetery, France. ... A fresh snowfall in Colorados (USA) high forests. ...

Dorothy and friends arrive at the Emerald City
Dorothy and friends arrive at the Emerald City

Inside the Emerald City, everything is green except for the Horse of a Different Color, who changes colors several times while taking the group to a salon (a special effect reportedly accomplished by coating the horse with different colors of Jell-o). They clean up, and just before they go to see the Wizard, the Wicked Witch flies above the Emerald City, writing words in the sky with her smoldering broomstick, demanding that the citizens "SURRENDER DOROTHY". After some difficulty, the four finally make it to the Wizard. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... A variety of pre-packaged gelatin dessert products for sale at a supermarket in the U.S. state of Wisconsin in 2004 By far the most popular use for gelatin products is as gelatin dessert, in the UK gelatin desserts are referred to as jelly, and in the US (where...


(Originally it was "SURRENDER DOROTHY OR DIE SIGNED WWW"; the last few words were cut after the first preview. A lot of the witch's scenes were cut, or script ideas never filmed, because MGM executives felt it made the witch too scary for children. Given the full text of that message, arguably the executives also felt some ideas were too silly.)


When the party meets the Wizard, they find him to be a terrifying floating head surrounded by fire and smoke. He bellows that he will only help them if they can obtain the broomstick of the Witch of the West. On their way to her castle, flying monkeys, sent by the Wicked Witch, capture Dorothy and Toto and take them to the castle.


Here was another deleted scene that the witch hints at when she says "They'll give you no trouble; I promise you that. I've sent a little insect on ahead to take the fight out of them" she sends a fictitious bug, "the jitterbug", that bites or stings them, causing Dorothy and friends to dance helplessly until the flying monkeys arrive to take Dorothy and Toto away. It, too, was cut after an early preview. (The only archival evidence remaining of this scene is the sound recordings and a backstage home movie filmed during rehearsals. Any original footage appears to have been lost. Some critics have pointed out that the bouncy song was inappropriate to the mood of the scene, as well as "dating" the movie, so that cutting it was a wise decision).


Once Dorothy gets to the witch's castle, the Witch demands the ruby slippers, but it turns out that the shoes actually cannot be removed... as long as Dorothy is alive. In a fury, the Witch orders one of her monkey slaves to kill Toto. The latter, however, escapes. He finds their friends and leads them to the castle to save Dorothy.


Dorothy, meanwhile, is locked inside a chamber with an hourglass and a crystal ball. When the hourglass runs out, Dorothy will die. As she waits and cries, she sees her Aunt Em in the crystal ball, wondering where her niece is. Dorothy cries out to her aunt, but the image of Aunt Em fades out as the image of the Wicked Witch fades in, cackling and mocking Dorothy, terrifying her; then turning and looking into the camera, continuing her devilish laughter before fading out.


(Originally, during these scenes there was a reprise of Dorothy, in terror, singing "Over the Rainbow" with slightly altered lyrics. It too was cut after an early preview of the film).


When they finally get inside the castle, they find Dorothy and try to escape (to the tune of Moussorgsky's A Night on Bald Mountain). The Witch stops them, and once she and her soldiers have them cornered, sets the Scarecrow on fire. Dorothy grabs a nearby bucket of water and, in throwing the water on her friend, she also hits the Witch and causes her to melt down to nothing (presumably dropping through that infamous trap door again), leaving just her dress, her pointed hat, her broomstick, and steam rising. To the travelers' surprise, her soldiers are delighted. They give Dorothy the broomstick and graciously send them on their way.


Originally, the crew returned to the Emerald City to a "hero's welcome", with everyone singing "The Wicked Witch is Dead". This too was cut after early previews. Footage of this scene no longer exists, except for a few frames seen in a later re-issue trailer. Once they are in the Wizard's room they present the broom to a shocked Wizard, who did not expect them to return. He tells them to come back later. Having just defeated the evil Witch, the four feel empowered, angry and bold; even the Lion. The previously "small and meek" Dorothy scolds the Wizard for lying, and they soon discover, thanks to Toto's exploring, that the Wizard is just a "man behind a curtain" (also played by Frank Morgan), not really a wizard at all, just a "humbug". The four friends are horrified, but the Wizard solves their problems through psychology rather than magic. He gives the Scarecrow a diploma, the Tinman a heart-shaped clock (he calls it a "testimonial"), and the Lion a badge of courage. A diploma (from Greek diploma) is a document issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that is one of the following: A certificate testifying that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, A deed conferring an academic degree. ...


He explains to them that his presence in Oz was an accident, that he was lost in a hot air balloon, and that he is, in fact, from Kansas as well (which seems strange since the text on his balloon reads "Omaha", a town in Nebraska). He promises to take Dorothy home in the same balloon that got him there in the first place. He announces to his people that he will leave the Scarecrow, the Tinman and the Lion in charge of the Emerald City. Just before takeoff, though, Toto jumps out of the balloon's basket to chase a cat. Dorothy goes after him, and the Wizard accidentally takes off, unable to get back to the ground, and once again proving to be a humbug: "I can't come back! I don't know how it works!" Given that admission, it's anyone's guess how he would have found his way back to Kansas. Hot air balloons are the oldest successful human flight technology, dating back to the Montgolfier brothers invention in Annonay, France in 1783. ... Location in Nebraska Founded  -Incorporated  1854  1857 County  Douglas County Mayor  Michael Fahey Area  - Total  - Water  1290. ... State nickname: Cornhusker State Other U.S. States Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Governor Dave Heineman (R) Official languages English Area 200,520 km² (16th)  - Land 199,099 km²  - Water 1,247 km² (0. ...


Just as Dorothy is resigning herself to spending the rest of her life in Oz, Glinda appears. She tells Dorothy that she can use the ruby slippers to return home... both herself and "Toto too!" She didn't tell her at first, though, because Dorothy had to learn a lesson. When her three friends asked what she has learned, a tearful Dorothy replies that, if she can't find what she's looking for in her own backyard, then she never really lost it to begin with.


Dorothy and Toto say goodbye to their friends, and Glinda instructs her to click her heels together and repeat the words, "There's no place like home." There is a montage of her face, her shoes clicking heels, and the house again falling toward the camera, all transitioning from Technicolor back into the same sepia tones that had begun the film. She awakens in her Kansas house surrounded by her family and friends. She tells them about her journey, and they tell her it was all a bad dream, although Dorothy protests that it was real. The movie ends with Dorothy hugging Toto and exclaiming to her Auntie Em that there really is no place like home. Technicolor is a three-strip color film process pioneered in the 1930s by the Technicolor Corporation, a company created by the husband-and-wife team of Herbert and Natalie Kalmus. ...


Differences from the book

The film's basic plot is not very different from the original novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, but quite a bit less detailed. Baum originally provided complex back stories for all the characters and locations, which are largely omitted in the film. The book featured several sub-plots (including a confrontation with the belligerent Hammer-Heads and a visit to a town with inhabitants and structures constructed of china) that, though relevant, weren't integral to the main plot. Numerous other abridgments occur: for example, the mice have no involvement with the band's escape from the poppies in the movie; a blizzard is used instead. It is also worth noting that in the original book the enchanted slippers were silver, not ruby. This was changed to show off the film's sophisticated color technology. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens story written by L. Frank Baum, illustrated by W.W. Denslow, and first published in 1900. ...


In the movie, Glinda is the name of the Good Witch of the North who returns to show Dorothy how to use the Ruby Slippers to go home. In the book, however, the Witch of the North's name is not given; and Dorothy must journey to visit Glinda, the Good Witch of the South, to learn how to use the silver shoes. Also the Tin Woodsman's name is changed to simply the Tin Man. Glinda (or Glinda the Good) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ...


Some fans believe that the book tends to be a lot darker and in some places even gruesome, greatly diverging from the movie. For instance, in the book there is a scene in which the Tin Woodsmen chops the head off a tiger. He also uses his axe to chop off all the limbs of anthropomorphized trees, which are not capable of speaking as in the movie. The trees then shake in pain and terror. In the movie, the only time he wields his axe is to chop through the door of the room where the witch is holding Dorothy captive. The fans who have this opinion generally tend to agree that Return to Oz, the 1985 semisequel to The Wizard of Oz, is much closer to the feel of the original books and blame The Wizard of Oz for spreading misconceptions of the book, and the unpopularity of the image of Oz Return to Oz portrays. The 1985 film Return to Oz is arguably an unofficial sequel to The Wizard of Oz. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The main point of contention with Baum's fans is the ending, which they feel strongly goes against the nature of the original. In Baum's novel, there is no hint that Oz is anything but a real place, to which Dorothy returns repeatedly (she eventually moved to Oz permanently and was joined by her aunt and uncle) in the numerous sequels. A counterargument to that complaint is that in the original cut of the movie, the film concludes by panning under Dorothy's bed, revealing the ruby slippers. Another counterargument would be that in the more widley-distributed version of the film, this was not necessarily an ordinary dream -- her uncle comments that "for awhile there we thought you were going to leave us" -- and that her experience might have been "real", but in another dimension. The movie is just vague enough on that point to leave the door open to such an explanation.


Fame

The popularity of the film is primarily due to the large number of times it has been shown on television. The vast majority of people who have seen the film have seen it on television rather than watching it on the big screen. The film, It's a Wonderful Life has a similar history of relative neglect and then becoming popular because of frequent showings on television. Its a Wonderful Life is a 1946 Frank Capra film, released originally by RKO Radio Pictures. ...


The Wizard of Oz has generated many rumors and stories, some of which have reached the level of urban legends. The most common of these, which refuses to die, claims that one of the cast or crew hanged himself on the set, and can be seen in the Enchanted Forest scene. This is not true. It is in fact an escaped bird. The re-release of the movie to theaters for a time in the late 1990s settled this issue, as the picture was large enough to reveal the truth that the small TV screen had made to seem ambiguous. Urban legends are a kind of folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ...


Additionally, the large group of "little people" cast to play the Munchkins were rumored to have held wild drunken orgies, but these stories are likely to have been exaggerated. This rumor was enhanced significantly by Judy Garland herself. On a late-night talk show in the 1960s, seemingly a little "medicated" herself, the host started to ask about the little people, and she blurted out, "They were drunks!" The audience roared, and that episode fed fuel to the story. Alternate meanings: see Munchkin (disambiguation) The word munchkin was first coined by L. Frank Baum in his 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


According to another story, which appears to be true, the coat Frank Morgan wore as Professor Marvel, which was handpicked from a second-hand clothing rack, once belonged to L. Frank Baum (the author of the Oz series of books). The inside pocket had his name on it. After completion of the film, the coat was presented to Baum's widow who confirmed it was indeed his. Ironically, Morgan died in the late 1940s, the one major player who did not live to see the great esteem in which the film would ultimately be regarded. Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author and the creator of one of the most beloved classics of childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


There was occasional talk of a sequel with the original characters, but it never materialized. One story holds that Margaret Hamilton's witch was to be resuscitated somehow. Hamilton, who in real life was a kind and gentle woman, refused to revive that role, saying it would frighten children too much to see the seemingly really-dead, most-sincerely-dead, evil witch come back to life.


The movie continues to generate a cult following, despite its age and original creative intent as a musical cinematic fable for children. Director John Boorman utilized aspects of the film in his 1974 science fiction classic Zardoz. Wizard of Oz collectibles, such as autographs and props from the film, are among the most sought-after of all movie memorabilia. On May 24, 2000, a pair of ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the film (with red sequins; seven pairs are believed to exist) sold at auction for $666,000. 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Zardoz is a 1974 science fiction film directed by John Boorman and starring Sean Connery in one of his first post-Bond roles. ... Autograph of king Charles XII of Sweden (1682-1718) An autograph is a document written entirely in the handwriting of its author, as opposed to a typeset document or one transcribed by an amanuensis or a copyist (see allography). ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Several film scholars have written interesting interpretations of the film, including several attempts by structuralist semiologists suggesting that the film was intended to prepare America for entry into war, although this ignores the fact that the Second World War had not yet started. Such obscure and esoteric interpretations usually posit Dorothy as representing a depressed, monochrome America, turning to Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal (the flimflam magician) for hope. She enters a more colourful Europe (Munchkinland), threatened by the Wicked Witches of the East (Stalinism) and West (Fascism). She defeats Stalinism when her house falls upon the Eastern Witch early on, which suggests the overwhelming power of commercial capitalism and its precedence in Western Europe. To defeat Fascism, she receives the aid of Britain (Glinda), the naive peasantry (the Scarecrow), the dehumanized Proletariat (the heartless Tin Man), and the emasculated nobility (Cowardly Lion). The Wizard who encourages and profits from the defeat of the Western Witch turns out to be another version of the same flimflam man she met at home, a cynical politician who realizes that none of Dorothy's allies truly require anything that they didn't already have. He is both a supreme humanitarian and a misanthrope, in that he excels at detecting the weaknesses of others, because he knows his own so well. He is, in fact, the spirit of democracy. And the seemingly "muddled" good witch, Glinda, appears to represent God: all-knowing, all-powerful... and, of course, on the side of the Allies. There is also a similar theory that portrays the elements of the story together as a populist allegory. Structuralism is general approach in various academic disciplines that seeks to explore the inter-relationships between some fundamental elements, upon which higher mental, linguistic, social, cultural etc structures are built, through which then meaning is produced within a particular person, system, culture. ... Semiotics (also spelled Semeiotics) is the study of signs and sign systems. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The New Deal was President Franklin D. Roosevelts legislative agenda for rescuing the United States from the Great Depression. ... World map showing location of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Stalinism is a brand of political theory, and the political and economic system implemented by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Capitalism has been defined in various ways. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the...


There are also several coincidences between this movie and the Pink Floyd album, Dark Side of the Moon. For more detail about this, see Possible film and music synchronizations. Pink Floyd circa 1971. ... Dark Side of the Moon (DSotM; the initial The is included in some versions of the title) is a 1973 concept album by Pink Floyd, dealing with the pressures of life such as time, money, war, mental illness, and death. ... The Wizard of Oz and Pink Floyds Dark Side of the Moon If you begin the album on the third roar of the MGM lion (using the NTSC version of the movie, not the 25 frame/s PAL version which runs a little over 4% faster) the coincidences include...


The film has been deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is the unofficial national library of the United States. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


In 1998, the American Film Institute ranked it #6 on its "100 Greatest Movies" list, and two songs from the film are on the 100 years, 100 songs list ("Ding, Dong, the Witch is Dead" was #82 and "Over the Rainbow" was #1). It is also consistently in the top 100 on the IMDB Top 250 Films List. 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... The American Film Institute is an independent non-profit organization created by the National Endowment for the Arts, which was established in 1965 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act. ... In 1998, the American Film Institute polled more than 1,500 artists and leaders from the film industry to select the 100 greatest American films of all time. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ...


A 2005 poll by the AFI ranked Dorothy's line "Toto, I've got a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore" as the fourth most memorable line in cinema history [1]. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


In 1977, Aljean Harmetz wrote The Making of The Wizard of Oz, a detailed description of the creation of the film based on interviews and research; it was updated in 1989. ISBN 0-7868-8352-9 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


All of the positive attention this movie has garnered since its television debut in the mid-1950s is a fair accomplishment, given that the film was considered an expensive failure in its initial release. The last thing on the minds of its creators, cast and crew likely would have been the legendary and beloved status it eventually achieved. Fortunately, most of the film's stars lived long enough to see and enjoy at least some of that acclaim. The last of the major players to pass on was Ray Bolger. The day after his death, a prominent editorial cartoonist nicely captured the cultural impact of this movie; it portrayed the the scarecrow running along the yellow brick road to catch up with the other characters, as they all danced off into the sunset. // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ...


Cast

Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American film actress who is considered one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... Dorothy Gale is the protagonist in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Frank Morgan (June 1, 1890 - September 18, 1949) was an American actor. ... The Wizard of Oz, born Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkel Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs, is a fictional character in the Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... The Scarecrow is a character in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and later Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim, (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967) was a United States comic actor, best remembered today for his role as the Cowardly Lion in the classic 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, but known during his life for a career in burlesque, vaudeville and Broadway. ... The Cowardly Lion is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Jack Haley (August 10, 1898 - June 6, 1979) was an American film actor. ... The Tin Woodman or Tin Woodsman, also known in films as Tin Man, is a character in L. Frank Baums Oz books. ... Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke (Washington, D.C., 7 August 1885 – Los Angeles, California, 14 May 1970) was a pretty, delightful and funny actress primarily known to modern audiences for her role as Glinda, the Good Witch of the North in The Wizard of Oz. ... Glinda (or Glinda the Good) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens books. ... From newspaper promotional for vaudeville character actor Charles E. Grapewin Charles E. Grapewin (December 20, 1869 - February 2, 1956) was a relatively notable vaudeville performer. ... Clara Blandick (June 4, 1881 - April 15, 1962) was a twentieth century American actress best known for her portrayl of Auntie Em in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. ... Meinhardt Raabe (IMDB:nm0704638), (born in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, 1915-09-02) is the oldest surviving Munchkin-actor from The Wizard of Oz. ... Image File history File links Jerry Maren (LolliPop Guild), Karl Slover, Clarence Swenson, Margaret Pellegrini. ... Image File history File links Clarence Swenson, Margaret Pellegrinii, Jerry Maren, Karl Slover. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ...

Sequels and related works

Journey Back To Oz is an official animated sequel to the 1939 MGM film The Wizard Of Oz. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Liza May Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... The Wiz is both a 1975 Broadway musical and a 1978 film adaptation of the play. ... The 1985 film Return to Oz is arguably an unofficial sequel to The Wizard of Oz. ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney) (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fairuza Alejandra Balk (born May 21, 1974) is an American film actress, probably most famous for her participation in the 1996 movie The Craft. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gregory Maguire is the author of the revisionist novels Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, Lost, Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister, and Mirror, Mirror for adults. ... Based upon the writings of L. Frank Baum, Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West (ISBN 0060987103) is a revisionist look at the land and characters of Oz that most people are familiar with through Baums The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as well as... Stephen Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Wicked is a musical that premiered on Broadway in October 2003. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Idina Menzel (born Idina Mentzel on May 30, 1971) is an American actress, singer and songwriter. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ...

See also

The road of yellow brick is an element in the novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... Dark Side of the Moon (DSotM; the initial The is included in some versions of the title) is a 1973 concept album by Pink Floyd, dealing with the pressures of life such as time, money, war, mental illness, and death. ... Zardoz is a 1974 science fiction film directed by John Boorman and starring Sean Connery in one of his first post-Bond roles. ... Somewhere Over the Rainbow (Dorthy) The Wicked Witch is Dead (Dorthy/Munchkins) We are off to see the Wizard (Dorthy/Munchkins) If i Only had a Brain (Scarecrow) If i only had a Heart (Tin Man) If i only had Courage (Lion) In the Wonderful land of Oz (Towns people...

External link

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:
The Wizard of Oz


The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...


The books | The authors (Baum | Thompson | McGraw | Volkov) | The illustrators (Denslow | Neill)
The film adaptations (The Wizard of Oz | The Wiz | Return to Oz)

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Wizard of Oz (1939 film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5625 words)
The re-release of the movie to theaters for a time in the late 1990s settled this issue, as the picture was large enough to reveal the truth that the small TV screen had made to seem ambiguous.
Wizard of Oz collectibles, such as autographs and props from the film, are among the most sought-after of all movie memorabilia.
The Wizard who encourages and profits from the defeat of the Western Witch turns out to be another version of the same flimflam man she met at home, a cynical politician who realizes that none of Dorothy's allies truly require anything that they didn't already have.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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