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Encyclopedia > The Wiggles
The Wiggles
The Wiggles in The Big Red Car, during a concert in Washington, D.C., 2007
The Wiggles in The Big Red Car, during a concert in Washington, D.C., 2007
Background information
Origin Sydney, Australia
Genre(s) Children's music
Years active 1991–present
Label(s) ABC For Kids (Australia),
Koch Entertainment and Playhouse Disney (USA)
Website http://www.thewiggles.com.au/
Members
Murray Cook
Jeff Fatt
Anthony Field
Sam Moran
Former members
Greg Page
Phillip Wilcher

The Wiggles are a children's musical group formed in Sydney, Australia in 1991. Their original members were Anthony Field, Murray Cook, Greg Page, and Jeff Fatt. In 2006, Page was forced to retire from the group due to illness and was replaced by understudy Sam Moran. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... ABC Kids is the brand for childrens programming on ABC and ABC2, While the ABC Kids Channel was a Digital TV channel in Australia run by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Koch Entertainment LP is a North American entertainment company with offices in New York, Nashville and Toronto. ... Fox Playhouse is the brand name for Disney Channels preschool programs, often airing as its own channel outside of the United States. ... Murray Cook Murray Cook (born June 30, 1960 in Cowra, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian vocalist, songwriter and guitarist. ... Jeff Fatt Jeff Fatt (born July 21, 1953 in Casino, New South Wales, Australia) is a Chinese Australian musician and actor. ... Anthony Field (born May 8, 1963 in Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Sam Moran, born in Sydney, New South Wales[], and raised in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia is the newest member of the children’s band The Wiggles. ... Greg Page Gregory John Page (born January 16, 1972 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Phillip Wilcher, also known as the Fifth Wiggle, was one of the founding members of the Wiggles, Australias richest entertainers, that left the group after the groups debut album in 1991. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Anthony Field (born May 8, 1963 in Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Murray Cook Murray Cook (born June 30, 1960 in Cowra, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian vocalist, songwriter and guitarist. ... Greg Page Gregory John Page (born January 16, 1972 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Jeff Fatt Jeff Fatt (born July 21, 1953 in Casino, New South Wales, Australia) is a Chinese Australian musician and actor. ... Sam Moran, born in Sydney, New South Wales[], and raised in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia is the newest member of the children’s band The Wiggles. ...


Field and Fatt were members of the Australian pop band The Cockroaches in the 1980s, and Cook was a member of several bands before meeting Field and Page at Macquarie University, where they were studying to become pre-school teachers. A school project led to the recording of their first album and tour in 1991. As a result of their background, the group combines music and theories of child development in their videos, television programs, and live shows. Since their inception, other regular characters (Captain Feathersword, Dorothy the Dinosaur, Henry the Octopus, and Wags the Dog) and a troupe called "The Wiggly dancers" have toured with them and appeared in their CDs, DVDs, and television programs. This article is about the genre of popular music. ... The Cockroaches were an Australian rock / pop band who achieved reasonable success in the 1980s and 1990s. ... Macquarie University is an Australian university located in Sydney. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The group has franchised their concepts to other countries, developed Wiggles sections in amusement parks in Australia and the US, and won several recording industry awards. The Wiggles have been called "the world's biggest preschool band"[1] and "your child's first rock band".[1] The group has achieved worldwide success with their children's albums, videos, television series, and concert appearances. The Wiggles were named Business Review Weekly's top-earning Australian entertainers for three years in a row and earned $A50 million in 2006.[2] They have earned seventeen gold, twelve platinum, three double-platinum, and ten multi-platinum awards for sales of over 17 million DVDs and four million CDs.[3] By 2002, The Wiggles had become the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC's) most successful pre-school television program. Franchising (from the French franchir: vt to clear an obstacle or difficulty)[1] refers to the method of practicing and using another persons philosophy of business. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... The Business Review Weekly (BRW) is Australias pre-eminent weekly business magazine. ... ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia, Kiribati, Nauru, Tuvalu, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Norfolk Island Inflation rate 2. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ...

Contents

History

The founding members of The Wiggles, 2004, during a visit to NASA; from left to right: Greg Page, Jeff Fatt, Murray Cook, and Anthony Field
The founding members of The Wiggles, 2004, during a visit to NASA; from left to right: Greg Page, Jeff Fatt, Murray Cook, and Anthony Field

Anthony Field and Jeff Fatt were members of The Cockroaches, a Sydney pop band that toured Australia and recorded two albums of "catchy roots rock"[4] during the 1980s.[4] After The Cockroaches disbanded in 1988, Field enrolled at the Institute of Early Childhood Studies at Macquarie University in Sydney.[4] Murray Cook was the guitarist in a minor Sydney pop band, Bang Shang a Lang, and had worked as a clerk at the Australian Taxation Office before enrolling at Macquarie.[5] Field, Cook, and Greg Page were among the half dozen men in a program with approximately 500 women.[4] Image File history File links 63423main_wiggles_wave. ... Image File history File links 63423main_wiggles_wave. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Greg Page Gregory John Page (born January 16, 1972 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Jeff Fatt Jeff Fatt (born July 21, 1953 in Casino, New South Wales, Australia) is a Chinese Australian musician and actor. ... Murray Cook Murray Cook (born June 30, 1960 in Cowra, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian vocalist, songwriter and guitarist. ... Anthony Field (born May 8, 1963 in Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Anthony Field (born May 8, 1963 in Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ... Jeff Fatt Jeff Fatt (born July 21, 1953 in Casino, New South Wales, Australia) is a Chinese Australian musician and actor. ... The Cockroaches were an Australian rock / pop band who achieved reasonable success in the 1980s and 1990s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Macquarie University is an Australian university located in Sydney. ... Murray Cook Murray Cook (born June 30, 1960 in Cowra, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian vocalist, songwriter and guitarist. ... Bang Shang a Lang (BSL) is a minor Australian pub rock band, active in the mid-to-late 1990s and early 2000s. ... The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) is the Australian government agency that collects taxes and enforces taxation legislation (except customs and external revenues, which are handled by the Australian Customs Service). ... Greg Page Gregory John Page (born January 16, 1972 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian musician and actor. ...


Motivated to utilize early educational concepts to create high-quality children's music, the classmates created a music project for their classes and produced their first album in 1991.[4] They needed a keyboardist, so Field asked his old band mate, Fatt, for his assistance in what they thought would be a temporary project.[6] The group received songwriting help from John Field, Anthony's brother and former band mate, and from Phillip Wilcher whom they met at Macquarie. Wilcher's departure from the group shortly before they achieved international fame "seemed reminiscent of the misfortunes of Pete Best, the 'fifth Beatle' who famously departed the Beatles before they became the biggest band in the world".[7] According to Welcher, The Wiggles' first recording sessions were held at his home in Sydney.[7] Phillip Wilcher, also known as the Fifth Wiggle, was one of the founding members of the Wiggles, Australias richest entertainers, that left the group after the groups debut album in 1991. ... “Peter Best” redirects here. ... The Fifth Beatle is an informal title that various commentators in the press and entertainment industry have applied to persons who were at one point a member of The Beatles, or who had a strong association with the Fab Four other than John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...

 Audio samples:
  • "Get Ready to Wiggle"
    First recorded in 1991 on The Wiggles' first album, this was originally a Cockroaches tune changed slightly to fit the genre of children's music. It inspired the name of the group.
    "Do the Monkey"
    "Do the Monkey", recorded by The Cockroaches in 1999. With very little changes, it is almost the same as The Wiggles' version, showing how The Wiggles revamped many songs in The Cockroaches' library
    "Do the Monkey"
    Originally a Cockroaches tune, one of the many songs in The Cockroaches' library that was changed from Australian pub rock to children's music
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

The group reworked a few Cockroaches tunes to better fit the genre of children's music; for example, "Get Ready to Wiggle" inspired the band's name.[4] Field gave a copy of their album to one of his young students to test out the effect of their music on children; the child's parent returned it because her child had listened to it repeatedly.[8]


Early career

Using his connections with The Cockroaches, Field arranged for the Australian Broadcasting Company (ABC) to distribute The Wiggles' album in Australia. Field, Cook, and Page began their teaching careers,[9] but on their manager's advice, they toured in unusual settings throughout Sydney, New South Wales, and Eastern Australia.[4][6] Their debut performance was at a pre-school in Randwick. They busked at Circular Quay, performing for crowds debarking from Manly Ferry, and toured in Westfield shopping centres. They performed at pre-schools, and were promoted by local playgroups or nursing mothers' associations with whom they split their proceeds.[10] Field, Cook, and Page, along with Fatt, decided to give up teaching for a year to focus on performing full-time to see if they could make a living out of it.[9] The Australian Broadcasting Company was a consortium of entertainment interests which was formed in 1929 to supply radio programs to the Australian radio market. ... NSW redirects here. ... The eastern states of Australia are the states on the eastern coast of Australia. ... Child picking up book. ... Randwick is a suburb in south-eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Busking is the practice of doing live performances in public places to entertain people, usually to solicit donations and tips. ... Buildings and railway station at Circular Quay Circular Quay wharf and railway station as seen from an approaching Rivercat ferry. ... Manly ferry services connect the suburb of Manly, New South Wales with Circular Quay by commuter ferry. ... The Westfield Group is a multinational company that owns shopping centres in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... A pre-school playgroup, in everyday usage just a playgroup, is a organised group providing care and socialisation for children under five. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


As Fatt reported, "it was very much a cottage industry".[10] They served as their own roadies and travelled in Fatt's van, towing a trailer with borrowed equipment. John Field and Mick Conway, who later became The Wiggles' general manager, performed with them.[10] Their act was later augmented with supporting characters: the "friendly pirate" Captain Feathersword and the animal characters Dorothy the Dinosaur, Henry the Octopus, and Wags the Dog. These characters were initially performed by the original members of The Wiggles: Field played Captain Feathersword and Wags; Cook played Dorothy; and Fatt played Henry.[11] The use of the term has expanded, and is used to refer to any event which allows a large number of people to lalalawork part time. ... The road crew (or roadies) are the technicians who travel on tour, usually in sleeper buses, with musicians and who handle every part of the production except actually playing the music. ... The term general manager is a descriptive term for certain executives in a business operation. ...


The Wiggles, called by their first names when they performed, adopted colour-coded shirts: Greg in yellow, Murray in red, Jeff in purple, and Anthony in blue. Anthony originally wore green but changed to avoid clashing with Dorothy the Dinosaur.[4] Additionally, each Wiggle developed a "schtick" based on their actual behaviours: Greg performed magic tricks; Murray played the guitar; Jeff fell asleep (as Sam Moran said, "Jeff really does fall asleep");[12] Anthony liked to eat. These behaviours evolved into caricatures, and served the same purpose as the uniforms in differentiating their characters and making them memorable to young children.[12] A shtick (Yiddish: שטיק) (or schtick) is an expression which refers to a comic theme or gimmick. ... Sam Moran, born in Sydney, New South Wales[], and raised in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia is the newest member of the children’s band The Wiggles. ...

Sam Moran and Jeff Fatt demonstrate The Wiggles' signature finger-wagging move.

Simple movements were developed by choreographer Leeanne Ashley to accompany each song.[4] One of these simple movements, their signature finger-wagging move, was created by Cook after seeing professional bowlers do it on television.[6] It became the group's policy to use this pose when being photographed with children. They insisted that touching children, no matter how innocently, was inappropriate. The use of the pose protected them from possible litigation; as Paul Paddick has explained, "There is no doubting where their hands are".[11] The group incorporated more dancing into their performances after the birth of Field's oldest daughter in 2004. "So [The] Wiggles have kind of become a bit more, dare I say, girly. Dorothy (the Dinosaur) does ballet now and we dance as well a lot more than we did", Field reported.[13] The group intentionally made mistakes in their dance moves in order to identify more with their young audience, although their performances were very energetic.[1] Sam Moran, born in Sydney, New South Wales[], and raised in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia is the newest member of the children’s band The Wiggles. ... Jeff Fatt Jeff Fatt (born July 21, 1953 in Casino, New South Wales, Australia) is a Chinese Australian musician and actor. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... Ten-pin bowling. ... Paul Paddick Paul Paddick (born February 16, 1967) is an Australian actor. ...


The Wiggles have always invited children with special needs and their families to pre-concert "meet and greet" sessions.[14] According to Fatt, many parents of these children have reported that The Wiggles' music has enhanced their lives, and that children with autism "respond to [The] Wiggles and nothing else".[15] Since 1995, The Wiggles have visited and performed for patients at the Sydney Children's Hospital every Christmas morning.[16] The group has always had a strict code of conduct based on zero tolerance of drug use, drinking, smoking, or bad language by any employee of their organisation.[17] Autism is a brain development disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, and restricted and repetitive behavior, all exhibited before a child is three years old. ... Sydney Childrens Hospital is a hospital for children in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, New South Wales. ... Zero tolerance is a strict approach to rule enforcement. ...


Success at home and abroad

Through the rest of the 1990s, The Wiggles maintained a busy recording and touring schedule, releasing multiple albums and home videos, and performing to increasingly large audiences in Australia and New Zealand. They filmed a television pilot for the ABC in the mid-90s, but "the project never got off the ground due to irreconcilable artistic differences".[8] They were told that they could not communicate with children by the ABC, who wanted them to "not speak, just sing". The ABC insisted that instead of their "trademark colourful skivvies and black trousers",[8] they wear shorts and caps. The Wiggles responded to this criticism by creating two seasons of a self-produced television series, The Wiggles,[8] which was produced and shown in Australia in 1998 and 1999, and shown in the U.S. beginning in 2001.[18] It was in these episodes and in their early videos that The Wiggles began their practice of featuring toddlers as performers.[8] A television pilot is a test episode of an intended television series. ...

The Wiggles stage, Oakland, California
The Wiggles stage, Oakland, California

The band gained popularity in the United States in 1998 when Lyrick Studios, the producers of Barney & Friends, began distributing Wiggles videos in the US and advertising them in their other videos. During their US tour, The Wiggles performed during the intermission of Barney Live.[4] In 1997, Twentieth Century Fox produced a feature-length film, The Wiggles Movie, which became the fifth-highest grossing Australian film of 1998.[19] For a few years during the late 90s, while "riding an enormous wave of success in America and the UK",[17] The Wiggles travelled in two planes and on two buses so that if disaster occurred, "at least half of them would survive and carry on".[17] After it proved to be a logistical nightmare, they ended the practice, although by 2007, they travelled in two separate buses between cities.[17] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Oakland redirects here. ... The new HIT Entertainment logo, introduced in June 2006. ... Barney & Friends is a popular childrens television show produced in the United States, mainly aimed at preschoolers. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their...


Their "strong connection"[20] with the US was "forged in the shell-shocked weeks after the terrorist attacks on New York in 2001,"[20] when The Wiggles travelled to America to perform even when other acts cancelled their tours. Paul Field reported that "New York has really embraced them. It was a kind of watershed".[20] The decision earned them respect and loyalty in the US.[20] They performed 12 sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden in 2003, and have been in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, the first time in 2001. In 2003, November 1 was declared "Wiggles Day" in New York City.[20] A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... This article is about the state. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Balloon versions of Murray and Jeff at a Wiggles concert
Balloon versions of Murray and Jeff at a Wiggles concert

Strong sales of The Wiggles videos eventually caught the attention of the Disney Channel, who was impressed by their "strong pro-social message".[20] In January 2002, Disney began showing a Wiggles video clip between programs of its morning Playhouse Disney block. By June of that year, the popularity of these interstitials prompted the Disney Channel to add both seasons of "The Wiggles" to the Playhouse Disney program schedule, showing full episodes multiple times per day.[10][21] In 2002, The Wiggles began filming three seasons worth of shows exclusively with the ABC: "Lights, Camera, Action, Wiggles" aired on Channel 7 in 2003, and "The Wiggles Show" in 2004 and 2005.[22] The network called them "the most successful property that the ABC has represented in the pre-school genre".[8] Paul Field reported that a meeting at a New York licensing fair with Grahame Grassby, the ABC's acting director of enterprises, led to the ABC's "enthusiastic" agreement to produce The Wiggles' TV shows.[8] For the Disney Channel in other countries, see Disney Channel around the world. ... Fox Playhouse is the brand name for Disney Channels preschool programs, often airing as its own channel outside of the United States. ... In television, interstitials refers to short programming which is often shown between movies or other events. ... Channel 7 can mean: A small US-based personal computer game developer most famous for Iron Seed, a game set in space. ... This article is about the state. ... How to obtain a amature radio licence differs from country to country. ...


Their success in music and television has led to extensive merchandising of Wiggles-branded books, toys, clothing, and other products for children by the Toronto-based toy company Spin Master since 2003. In 2005, the group franchised its concept to other countries, branching into Taiwan and Latin American markets with versions of Mandarin- and Spanish-speaking Wiggles.[10] By 2007, The Wiggles employed 20 full-time workers in offices in Sydney and Dallas, Texas, as well as another 30 employees on their tours.[17] They became formally consolidated in 2005. The original four members serve as the group's only directors; Paul Field has been general manager of operations since the group was formed, and Mic Conway has been general manager since 2001.[10][23] A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common example of product merchandising. ... Wiggles franchises are the Wiggles approach to expanding their brand in non-Australian/United States Markets. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Mandarin may mean: Mandarin (linguistics), a group of dialects of spoken Chinese, or more specifically, its standardized version, Standard Mandarin Mandarin (bureaucrat), a bureaucrat of Imperial China, Vietnam and Korea, and in the United Kingdom and Canada, by analogy, any government bureaucrat Mandarin Airlines, a subsidiary of China Airlines Mandarin... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... For other uses, see Dallas (disambiguation). ... Consolidation is the act of merging many things into one. ... Paul Field, along with his brother Anthony Field, were both members of a popular Australian band, The Cockroaches. ...


Greg Page retirement

In December 2005, lead singer and founding member Page, at age 33, underwent a double hernia operation. He withdrew from The Wiggles' US tour in June 2006 after suffering fainting spells, lethargy, nausea, and loss of balance. He returned to Australia, where doctors diagnosed his condition as orthostatic intolerance, a chronic but not life-threatening condition.[24] Page's final performance with The Wiggles was in Kingston, Rhode Island.[25] Look up hernia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Orthostatic intolerance is the failure of the body to properly adjust to an upright position, especially with respect to blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure. ... Kingston is a small town in the state of Rhode Island in the United States. ...


On November 30, 2006, the Wiggles announced Page's retirement from the group. "I’ll miss being a part of The Wiggles very much, but this is the right decision because it will allow me to focus on managing my health", Page said in a taped message posted on the group's webpage.[24] Page was replaced by Sam Moran, who had served as an understudy for The Wiggles for five years and had already stood in for Page on 150 shows. Initially, The Wiggles struggled over their decision to replace Page, but they decided to continue as a group because they thought that was what their young audience would want.[25] They decided to be "honest" with their audience about Page's illness because it provided a "teachable moment" and an opportunity to demonstrate to young children that it was "part of life", as Fatt said.[15] is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sam Moran, born in Sydney, New South Wales[], and raised in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia is the newest member of the children’s band The Wiggles. ...


Sam Moran era

Although Moran's transition as The Wiggles' lead singer was "smooth" for the young children of their audience, it was more difficult for their parents.[15] Cook reported that Moran did well as a Wiggle, and that the addition of Moran changed their sound, forced the group to rethink things, and made the band stronger.[1] Although Moran struggled with the spontaneity of The Wiggles' stage performances, Cook said, "We’ve never felt like we had to carry him or anything. He’s a smart guy. But it is a bit different, just having a different person on stage".[1] Moran's background in musical theatre was different from that of his band mates, so The Wiggles had to change the way they recorded their music.[1] At sound checks, their practice was to improvise, but Moran often did not know the songs the other three used at those times.[1] Cook reported that it took some time for Moran, but a year after Page's retirement stated, "We’re slowly educating each other".[1] Moran was featured in his first DVD and CD as a member of the group in early 2008, and a sixth season of The Wiggles' television series featuring Moran was filmed and began airing in Australia.[26] The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ...


In September 2005, Australia's largest theme park, Dreamworld in Queensland, opened a "Wiggles World" section. Driven by the Dreamworld success, Six Flags opened its first "Wiggles World" section at their largest theme park at Jackson, New Jersey in April 2007, and planned to open 20 more at its parks across the U.S. in the next decade. The sections emphasized family involvement; they offered joint rides on which parents and children could equally participate.[14] In 2008, Six Flags announced their intentions to open parks with Wiggles World sections in Dubai and across the Arab world.[27] Dreamworld is a theme park situated on the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... For the national flags of Texas, see Six flags over Texas. ... Jackson Township is a township located in Ocean County, New Jersey. ... Location of Dubai in the UAE Coordinates: , Country Emirate Dubai Incorporated (town) June 9, 1833 Incorporated (emirate) December 2, 1971 Founder Maktoum bin Bati bin Suhail (1833) Seat Dubai Subdivisions Towns and villages Jebel Ali Hatta Al Hunaiwah Al Aweer Al Hajarain Al Lusayli Al Marqab Al Shindagha Al Faq... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...


At the end of 2007, The Wiggles donated their complete back catalogue of 27 master tapes to Australia's National Film and Sound Archive.[28] Also in 2007, The Wiggles organisation built a digital recording and television studio in Sydney called "Hot Potato Studios", for the purpose of creating their own DVDs and CDs.[23] In 2008, they began to offer downloads of Wiggles ringtones and songs, and streaming video on an on-demand website.[1] The Australian National Film and Sound Archive preserves and shares Australias moving images and sound recordings from the countrys first film images to the modern classics. ... In digital recording, the analog signal of a motion-picture/sound is converted into a stream of discrete numbers, representing the changes in air pressure (chroma and luminance values in case of video) through time; thus making an abstract template for the original sound or moving image. ... This article is about the computer terms. ... A ring tone is the sound made by a telephone when ringing. ... Streaming media is just-in-time delivery of multimedia information. ... Video on demand (VOD) systems allow users to select and watch video and clip content over a network as part of an interactive television system. ...


Characters

Aside from the four Wiggles, four secondary characters usually appear in their television series, videos, and live concerts. These characters were developed in the early 1990s and were originally played by group members and by Anthony Field's brother Paul, the band's manager. They are now played by hired actors, occasionally touring without The Wiggles as "Dorothy the Dinosaur and Friends".[11] In 1998, Moran hosted this show before becoming Page's understudy.[29]

Paul Paddick Paul Paddick (born February 16, 1967) is an Australian actor. ...

Dorothy the Dinosaur

Dorothy is a "rososaurus", a "yellow-spotted green dinosaur with surprisingly scary teeth".[30] She lives in a pink and purple house with her own Rosy Orchestra and a rose garden in her backyard. She loves to eat roses and dance the ballet.[30] She enjoys serving guests rose-derived treats such as "rosy tea".[31] Dorothy, originally played by Cook, has been played by Leeanne Ashley[32] and Lyn Stuckey.[29] South Australian Carolyn Ferrie, a trained opera singer and dancer, has provided her voice since 1997, when she worked with Anthony Field on an Irish music Wiggles CD.[33] Ferrie described Dorothy as "a dinosaur superstar ... very open, friendly, and warm. She is like a mother figure even though she is only meant to be five, and kids really respond to her ... She is calm and mothering but friendly as well. She's young and still playful but has got a motherly feeling to her".[33] Ferrie insisted that Dorothy "is number one after the boys including Captain Feathersword, in terms of who kids say they love".[33] Dorothy has a distinctive, charming, trill-like, descending laugh created by Ferrie.[33][31] For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic politically divided between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ...


In the spring of 2007, it was announced that Dorothy would star in her own television show in Australia.[33] The show had a distinct look and sound. Whereas The Wiggles' TV shows were "hyper-real and cartoonish"[23] and had a pop sound, Dorothy's show was "really rich and beautiful looking"[23] and based its sound on orchestral music.[23] A philharmonic orchestra An orchestra is a musical ensemble used most often in classical music. ...


Captain Feathersword

Captain Feathersword, "the friendly pirate",[34] wears a hat, patch, and puffy shirt[11] and wields a "feathery saber".[34] He was created by Field; Paul Paddick began playing him in 1993.[35] At first, Paddick's role was minor, but it eventually evolved, and he has been called "the Fifth Wiggle".[34] For many parents, his vocal impersonations "are the high point of the Wiggles stage show"[11] and include singers Mick Jagger, Cher, Placido Domingo and James Hetfield.[11] Paul Paddick Paul Paddick (born February 16, 1967) is an Australian actor. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Plácido Domingo (born January 21, 1941) is a world-renowned opera singer, conductor, and general manager. ... James Alan Hetfield (born 3 August 1963, Downey, California[1]) is the main songwriter (with drummer Lars Ulrich and sometimes guitarist Kirk Hammett), co-founder, vocalist and rhythm guitarist of the American thrash/heavy metal band Metallica. ...


Wags the Dog and Henry the Octopus

Wags is a tall, brown, furry dog with floppy ears and a happy face.[30] He "loves to sing and dance and kids bring 'bones' that the Wiggly dancers collect from the audience".[30] Wags was originally played by Field.[11][36]


Henry the Octopus, who directs an underwater band, likes to sing and to breakdance with his eight legs.[30] Since Henry's creation, Fatt has served as Henry's voice.[37][38] A boy hitting (holding) a pike Breakdance (media coined phrase), also known as breaking, b-girling or b-boying, is a street dance style that evolved as part of the hip hop movement that originated among African American youths in the South Bronx of New York City during the early...


Minor characters

For their stage shows, The Wiggles used two 16-metre (52 ft) trucks, three tour buses, a cast of 13 dancers, and 10 permanent crew members.[10] The "Wiggly dancers" have always made up a major part of the Wiggles shows and TV programs and play many of the minor roles. Minor characters of note include The Cook (portrayed by Anthony Field's late father, John, and Crowded House drummer Paul Hester),[39] Professor Singalottasonga, and Dapper Dave (both played by Moran),[40] and Officer Beaples and Fiona Fitbelly (both played by Leanne Halloran).[41] Crowded House is a rock group formed in Melbourne, Australia, and led by New Zealand musician and singer-songwriter Neil Finn. ... Paul Newell Hester (January 8, 1959 – March 26, 2005) was the drummer with Split Enz and Crowded House. ... Leanne is most commonly known for her work with the The Wiggles childrens group. ...


Musical style and educational theory

The Wiggles have written new music each year since their inception; they sequester themselves for a month each summer and write three albums worth of original children's music based on simple concepts familiar to young children and upon several genres of music and types of instruments. Most of their songs are short and start with the chorus because they believe that young children need to know the main topic of a song at the beginning.[4] They wrote songs individually at first, but eventually would write as a group, often with John Field, trumpet player Dominic Lindsay, and Paddick.[42] John Fogerty of Creedence Clearwater Revival, who appeared in a Wiggles video in 2002, was "very impressed"[4] with their songwriting, especially with their drum sound.[4] Trumpeter redirects here. ... This article is about the musician. ... Creedence Clearwater Revival (commonly referred to by its initials CCR or simply as Creedence) was an American rock band, which consisted of John Fogerty (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano), Tom Fogerty (guitar, vocals, piano), Stu Cook (bass guitar, vocals), and Doug Clifford (drums, percussion, vocals). ... In mathematics, hearing the shape of a drum relates to a series of results that do just that, i. ...


The transition from writing music for an adult rock band to writing children's music was not a big one. "The Wiggles music isn't all that far removed from what we did in The Cockroaches, just a different subject matter", Field stated. "The Cockroaches sing about girls and love and stuff like that; The Wiggles sing about hot potatoes and cold spaghetti".[43] Their songs are influenced by nursery rhymes, folk music and rock music that are accessible to parents and children.[12] Moran states that The Wiggles write songs they liked and would listen to, and then made them "child-appropriate".[12] A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ... Folk song redirects here. ... This article is about the genre. ...


Page reported, "First and foremost, we're entertainers."[43] The Wiggles capture the interest of children by first entertaining them, and then presenting them with educational messages.[43] The group decided to play different kinds of children's music.[4] They are not tied to one style or genre of music and often experiment in the studio; while some of their recordings are orchestral, others have a more live feel. The group was aware that their songs were often children's first exposure to music.[1] Cook was conscious that he was probably the first guitarist children would see, and said, "I always think that if it inspires kids to play guitar later on that would be great. I think it would be really nice if in 15 years I read that somebody got into guitar playing because of the Wiggles".[42] For the illustrated magazine, see Studio Magazine. ...


The concepts of early childhood development and how young children learn influenced The Wiggles' songwriting and simple choreography in their stage shows, videos, and television programs. They believed that young children were egocentric, so The Wiggles stared continually into the camera in their videos and TV shows, and explained every action because they believed that young children needed to be told what to expect in order to feel safe. Their stage shows were full of action and audience participation.[4] From the group's inception, The Wiggles decided to "operate from the premise that a young child has a short attention span, is curious about a limited number of objects and activities, loves having a job to do and is thrilled by mastering basic movements".[4]


Reception

By 2008, The Wiggles had earned seventeen gold, twelve platinum, three double-platinum, and ten multi-platinum awards for sales of over 17 million DVDs and four million CDs.[3] They performed for over 1.5 million children in the US between 2005 and 2008.[15] They won APRA song writing awards for Best Children's Song three times and earned ADSDA's award for Highest Selling Children's Album four times.[3] They have been nominated for ARIA's Best Children's Album award six times,[44] and won the award six times.[45] In 2003, they received ARIA's Outstanding Achievement Award for their success in the U.S.[3] In "one of the highlights of their 15 years of being together",[46] The Wiggles were awarded honorary doctorate degrees from Australian Catholic University in 2006. Cook gave the commencement speech for the graduates.[46] “Golden record” redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... The Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) is a copyright collecting society representing New Zealand and Australian composers, lyricists and music publishers. ... The Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) is a trade group representing the Australian recording industry. ... Australian Catholic University The Australian Catholic University, or ACU National, is a Roman Catholic, public, multi-campus, multi-state university, based in eastern Australia, open to all staff and students regardless of their religious beliefs. ...


In 2003, when the group performed at Madison Square Garden, front-row tickets were sold for $US500,[20] in spite of The Wiggles' efforts to reduce scalping by limiting the number of seats sold per transaction.[47] In 2008, the group found themselves in the midst of a "ticketing scandal";[47] scalpers tried to sell a $AU19 ticket on eBay for almost $AU2,000 and a set of three tickets for $315 for concerts in Melbourne, and a group of three tickets to a Wiggles UNICEF charity concert in Sydney had a price tag of $AU510. The tickets were taken off eBay and voided.[47] Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ... Native American Big Mouth Spring with decorated scalp lock on right shoulder. ... This article is about the online auction center. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... UNICEF Logo The United Nations Childrens Fund or UNICEF (Arabic: ; French: ; Spanish: ) was established by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946. ...


Scholar Kathleen Warren, the group's former professor at Macquarie University, has been a consultant for The Wiggles since Field, Cook, and Page were students. Warren believed that the group "empowered" children,[10] especially in their practice of asking their audience to "Wake up Jeff" when Fatt pretended to fall asleep. Warren stated that asking children to interrupt Fatt's slumber helped them build confidence and to feel more in control of their lives. Fatt was the only original member of The Wiggles without a background in early childhood education; he explained that was the reason falling asleep was chosen as his schtick, "because it was a way of getting me involved in the shows without actually having to do anything".[8]


Between 1999 and 2003, to test the group's appeal across cultures, Warren used one of The Wiggles' CDs as an educational tool in a village near Madang, on the north coast of Papua New Guinea. She found that the children there were able to relate to the group's songs, including being able to sing along and to participate in their simple choreography.[10] The Wiggles did not change their material to accommodate non-Australian cultures because they found that children did not tend to have the same cultural identity as adults.[20] Madang Lighthouse Madang (old German name: Friedrich-Wilhelmshafen) is the capital of Madang Province and is a town with a population of 27,420 (in 2005) on the north coast of Papua New Guinea. ...


See also

  • List of guest stars with The Wiggles
  • List of The Wiggles' video and audio releases
  • List of The Wiggles episodes
  • Cultural references to The Wiggles

This is a start on a list of famous guest stars on the Wiggles. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Wright, Anders. "Baby's first rock band", San Diego Citybeat, 2008-03-25. Retrieved on 2008-03-31. 
  2. ^ Neill, Rosemary. "Toy story", The Australian, 2007-12-01. Retrieved on 2008-03-26. 
  3. ^ a b c d About Us. The Wiggles Official Website. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Scott, Paul. "Kid Rock", The New York Times, 2006-04-02. Retrieved on 2007-01-23. 
  5. ^ Mulligan, Mark. A brief history of nearly everything BSL (Bang Shang a Lang Website) (DOC). Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  6. ^ a b c Enough Rope with Andrew Denton, episode 15, The Wiggles. ABC TV Online (2003-06-23). Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  7. ^ a b Sams, Christine. "The fifth Wiggle speaks out", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2005-08-01. Retrieved on 2007-01-22. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Tabakoff, Jenny. "Wake up, Aunty!", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2002-10-01. Retrieved on 2007-11-26. 
  9. ^ a b Chamberlain, Adrian. "The Wiggles: Rock star status with screaming crowds of tots", Canwest News Service, 2008-04-17. Retrieved on 2008-05-08. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i Munro, Catharine. "The Wiggly way", The Age, 2005-05-22. Retrieved on 2007-11-29. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g Meacham, Steve. "The master of sword play", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2005-12-03. Retrieved on 2007-08-10. 
  12. ^ a b c d Durden, Douglas. "A new face", Richmond Times-Dispatch, 2007-08-05. Retrieved on 2007-08-10. 
  13. ^ "Offspring put the wiggle in the Wiggles, says Australian children's group", The Canadian Press, 2008-03-08. Retrieved on 2008-03-27. 
  14. ^ a b Zuel, Bernard. "Welcome to Wiggles World", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2007-12-15. Retrieved on 2007-12-23. 
  15. ^ a b c d Markstrom, Serena. "Fab Four of kid rock comes to town", The Register Guard, 2008-03-21. Retrieved on 2008-03-23. 
  16. ^ Australian AP. "Wiggles make Christmas hospital visit", The West Australian, 2007-12-26. Retrieved on 2008-01-06. 
  17. ^ a b c d e Blake, Elissa. "Unusual suspects", Daily Telegraph, 2007-09-02. Retrieved on 2007-09-03. 
  18. ^ See episode guide, TV.com. Retrieved 2007-11-25.
  19. ^ Release Success of Australian Productions - Top 5 Box Office Each Year. Australian Film Commission. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h "They're off to see the Wiggles, the wonderful Wiggles of Oz", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2003-11-03. Retrieved on 2008-01-22. 
  21. ^ Disney Channel (2002-06-12). "The Wiggles Join Playhouse Disney Monday, June 17". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  22. ^ See episode guide, TV.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  23. ^ a b c d e Elliott, Tim. "It's a wiggly, wiggly world", Sydney Morning Herald, 2007-01-13. Retrieved on 2008-05-16. 
  24. ^ a b Associated Press. "The Wiggles’ lead vocalist to stop performing", MSNBC, 2006-11-30. Retrieved on 2007-08-08. 
  25. ^ a b Steinberg, Jacques. "Hush, Mama, don’t you cry, a new yellow Wiggle will sing", The New York Times, 2006-12-04. Retrieved on 2008-02-04. 
  26. ^ Williams, David E. "Wiggling on without Greg", CNN, 2006-10-10. Retrieved on 2008-03-28. 
  27. ^ Perry, Byron. "Six Flags to build in Arab world", Variety, 2008-03-04. Retrieved on 2008-03-12. 
  28. ^ "Wiggles donate early tapes to Archive", Herald Sun, 2007-12-19. Retrieved on 2007-12-23. 
  29. ^ a b "Wiggles Sam's family values", The Daily Telegraph, 2006-12-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-18. 
  30. ^ a b c d e Wright, Diane. "Hey, kids! It's fun--and you may even learn something", The Seattle Times, 2007-03-14. Retrieved on 2007-11-28. 
  31. ^ a b Horswill, Amanda. "Meet Dorothy Dinosaur's giggle", The Courier Mail, 2007-06-05. Retrieved on 2007-11-24. 
  32. ^ Leeanne Ashley. TV.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  33. ^ a b c d e Browne, Rachel. "Kids will go dotty about solo Dorothy", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2007-05-27. Retrieved on 2007-11-23. 
  34. ^ a b c Baughman, Tony. "Captain Feathersword may steal The Wiggles' show", The Aiken Standard, 2007-11-12. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  35. ^ Yeap, Sue. "The fifth Wiggle sails on", The Age, 2006-08-17. Retrieved on 2007-08-10. 
  36. ^ Wags has also been played by Edward Rooke, Andrew McCourt, Kristy Talbot, and Paddick. Tv.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  37. ^ Jeff Fatt. TV.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  38. ^ Other performers of Henry include Reem Hanwell, Kristy Talbot, and Katherine Patrick. TV.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  39. ^ Harris, Chris. "Crowded House drummer Paul Hester found dead in Australia", MTV.com, 2005-03-28. Retrieved on 2007-10-14. 
  40. ^ Meacham, Steve. "First Dorothy, then another yellow road", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2006-12-15. Retrieved on 2007-11-30. 
  41. ^ Leanne Halloran. TV.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-30.
  42. ^ a b Bourgeau, Michel. "Play your guitar with Murray" (DOC), bangshangalang.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-06. 
  43. ^ a b c Sachs, Rob (2006-05-18). The Wiggles rock! (Just ask your kids). NPR. Retrieved on 2008-03-25.
  44. ^ History: List of winners. ARIA Awards 2007. Retrieved on 2008-04-05.
  45. ^ 2007 ARIA Awards winners announced. Pop Republic.tv. Retrieved on 2008-04-05.
  46. ^ a b Sams, Christine. "Wiggles four degrees hotter", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2006-04-06. Retrieved on 2007-11-28. 
  47. ^ a b c "Hot potato for Wiggles tickets", The Daily Telegraph, 2008-04-14. Retrieved on 2008-04-29. 

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rehabilitating Mr. Wiggles (583 words)
Wiggles books for sale and available for signing as well as original comics and art for purchase.
Wiggles book at the Internazionale Festival, a yearly cultural event in Ferrara featuring influential authors, journalists, and artists from all over the world.
I'm not sure what exactly I'll be doing there yet, but it will probably involve some sort of interactivity.
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