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Encyclopedia > The Who
The Who
The Who performing in 2007(on left: Roger Daltrey, on right: Pete Townshend)
The Who performing in 2007
(on left: Roger Daltrey, on right: Pete Townshend)
Background information
Origin Shepherd's Bush, West London, England
Genre(s) Rock, hard rock, pop rock, art rock
Years active 1964–1982, 1989, 1996–1997, 1999-present
(On and off reunions: 1985, 1988, 1990, 1991)
Label(s) Decca, Brunswick, Polydor, Track, MCA, Universal Republic, Warner Bros., (More info)
Website www.thewho.com
Members
Pete Townshend
Roger Daltrey
Former members
John Entwistle
Keith Moon
Kenney Jones

The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. The primary lineup consisted of Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle and Keith Moon. The band reached international success, became known for their award-winning live performances,[1][2] are regarded as one of the most influential rock bands of the 1960s and 70s, and recognized as one of the greatest rock and roll bands of all time.[3][4] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (1516 × 852 pixel, file size: 455 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944), is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Shepherds Bush is a district of West London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, situated 4. ... Satellite image of the inner part of West London Ayad Dibis is the best in West London. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the genre. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... The Brunswick Records logo Brunswick Records is a United States based record label. ... 1920s vintage Polydor export label with its double-horn gramophone logo In 1954 Polydor Records introduced their distinctive orange label. ... Track Records is a record label founded by The Who to distribute artists and projects they wanted to support. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by MCA Inc. ... Republic Records logo. ... Warner Bros. ... The following is a discography of albums and singles released by the UK rock band The Who. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944), is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... John Alec Entwistle (October 9, 1944 – June 27, 2002) was an English bass guitarist, songwriter, singer, and horn player, who was best known as the bass guitarist for the rock band The Who. ... Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ... Kenneth Thomas Kenney Jones (born 16 September 1948, Stepney, East London) is a veteran English rock drummer best known for his work in Small Faces, Faces, and The Who. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944), is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... John Alec Entwistle (October 9, 1944 – June 27, 2002) was an English bass guitarist, songwriter, singer, and horn player, who was best known as the bass guitarist for the rock band The Who. ... Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ...


The Who rose to fame in the United Kingdom with a pioneering instrument destruction stage show, as well as a series of top ten hit singles (including the celebrated "My Generation") and top five albums, beginning in 1965 with "I Can't Explain". They first hit the top ten in the USA in 1967 with "I Can See for Miles". The 1969 release of Tommy was the first in a series of top five albums for the group in the USA, followed by Live at Leeds (1970), Who's Next (1971), Quadrophenia (1973), and Who Are You (1978) among others. The destruction of musical instruments is a decades-old tradition in pop and rock music, is normally carried out by band members during a live performance, particularly at the end of the gig. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Music sample My Generation Problems? See media help. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... I Cant Explain is a song released by English rock band The Who in 1965, written by Pete Townshend and produced by Shel Talmy. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... I Can See For Miles is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who, which was recorded for the bands 1967 album, The Who Sell Out. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... Live at Leeds (1970) is The Whos first live album, and indeed is their only live album that was released while the band was still recording and performing regularly. ... For the song by Tom Lehrer, see That Was the Year That Was. ... Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ... For other uses, see Who Are You (disambiguation). ...


Keith Moon died in 1978, after which the band released two more studio albums, the top five Face Dances (1981) and the top ten It's Hard (1982), with drummer Kenney Jones, before officially disbanding in 1983. They reformed on several occasions to perform at special events such as Live Aid and for reunion tours such as their 25th anniversary tour (1989) and the Quadrophenia revival tours of 1996 and 1997. In 2000, the three surviving original members began to discuss the possibility of recording an album of new material. These plans were delayed following the death of John Entwistle in 2002. Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey continue to perform as The Who. In 2006 they released the studio album Endless Wire, which reached the top ten in the USA and UK. Face Dances is an album by British rock band The Who originally released in 1981 in the US on Warner Bros. ... Its Hard is the 10th studio album by British rock band The Who and the second album after drummer Keith Moon died. ... Kenneth Thomas Kenney Jones (born 16 September 1948, Stepney, East London) is a veteran English rock drummer best known for his work in Small Faces, Faces, and The Who. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ... Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ... Endless Wire is a studio album by The Who, and their first new studio album of original material in twenty-four years following the release of Its Hard in 1982. ...

Contents

History

1960s

Early days

The first band that could be considered a parent of The Who was a "trad jazz" band started by Pete Townshend and John Entwistle called The Confederates. Townshend played the banjo and Entwistle the French horn (which he would continue to use in The Who and in his solo career). Roger Daltrey, founder of the Detours, met John Entwistle in the street (with his bass slung over his arm) and asked him to join his band. Entwistle agreed and suggested Townshend as an additional (rhythm) guitarist.


In their early days the band was known as The Detours. Like many of their British peers, the group was heavily influenced by American blues and country music, initially playing mostly rhythm and blues. The initial lineup of the band consisted of Roger Daltrey on lead guitar, Pete Townshend on rhythm guitar, John Entwistle on bass, Doug Sandom on drums, and Colin Dawson on lead vocals. After Colin Dawson left the band, Daltrey moved to lead vocals and Townshend became sole guitarist. In 1964 drummer Doug Sandom left the band, and Keith Moon became The Who's drummer. Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... R&B redirects here. ... Doug Sandom (b. ...

The Detours changed their name to "The Who" in 1964 and, with the arrival of Keith Moon that year, their line-up was complete. However, for a short period during 1964, under the management of famed mod Peter Meaden, they changed their name to The High Numbers, during which time they released "Zoot Suit/I'm The Face", a single designed to appeal to their mostly mod fans. When it failed to chart, the band fired Meaden and quickly reverted to The Who. They became one of the most popular bands among the British mods, a 1960s subculture involving cutting-edge fashions, scooters and music genres such as rhythm and blues, soul, and beat music. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Peter Meaden was a 1960s Mod and short time manager of the band The Who during their early days. ... Zoot Suit b/w Im the Face was the first single of the British rock and roll The Who, when they were known as The High Numbers. ... The Mods and the Rockers were two British youth movements of the early 1960s. ... A modern scooter The Piaggio MP3. ... R&B redirects here. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ...


In September 1964, at the Railway Tavern in Harrow and Wealdstone, England, Pete Townshend smashed his first guitar. Playing on a high stage, Townshend's physical style of performance resulted in him accidentally breaking off the head of his guitar when it broke through the ceiling. Angered by snickers from the audience, he proceeded to smash the instrument to pieces on the stage. He then picked up a Rickenbacker twelve-string guitar and continued the concert. A large crowd attended their next concert, but Townshend declined to smash another guitar. Instead, Keith Moon wrecked his drumkit.[5][6] Instrument destruction became a staple of The Who's live shows for the next several years. The incident at the Railway Tavern is one of Rolling Stone magazine's "50 Moments That Changed the History of Rock 'n' Roll".[7] The destruction of musical instruments is a decades-old tradition in pop and rock music, is normally carried out by band members during a live performance, particularly at the end of the gig. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


The band would soon crystallise around Townshend as the primary songwriter and creative force. Entwistle would also make notable songwriting contributions. Moon and Daltrey contributed a handful of songs in the 60s and 70s.


Singles band

The Who's first release, and first hit, was January 1965's "I Can't Explain", influenced by the early Kinks hits (with whom they shared American producer Shel Talmy). The song was first played in the USA on WTAC AM 600 in Flint, Michigan by DJ "Peter C" Cavanaugh[8] where Keith Moon allegedly drove a Cadillac into a hotel pool during his 21st birthday. The song was a top 10 hit in the UK and was followed by "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere", which was the only song credited as being composed in a joint effort by Townshend and Daltrey, though Townshend implied Daltrey assisted in songwriting without credit in the liner notes to Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy. I Cant Explain is a song released by English rock band The Who in 1965, written by Pete Townshend and produced by Shel Talmy. ... The Kinks, a British Invasion pop/rock band, were formed in London in 1963 by Dave Davies and Peter Quaife. ... Shel Talmy (born August 11, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, United States) is a notable record producer. ... Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere was a single released by The Who in 1965. ... Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy is a compilation album by British rock band The Who. ...


Their debut album My Generation (The Who Sings My Generation in the U.S.) was released the same year. The album included such mod anthems as "The Kids Are Alright" and the title track "My Generation". Subsequent hits, such as the 1966 singles "Substitute", about a young man who feels like a fraud, "I'm a Boy" about a young boy dressed as a young girl, "Happy Jack" about a mentally disturbed young man, and 1967's "Pictures of Lily", a tribute to masturbation, all show Townshend's growing use of stories of sexual tension and teenage angst. More hits followed, including "I Can See for Miles" and the 1968 single "Magic Bus". This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Kids Are Alright is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Substitute is a song by The Who written by Pete Townshend. ... Im A Boy is a 1966 rock song written by Pete Townshend for his band The Who. ... Happy Jack is a song by the British rock band The Who. ... Pictures of Lily is a single by the British rock band The Who. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... I Can See For Miles is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who, which was recorded for the bands 1967 album, The Who Sell Out. ... Magic Bus is one of The Whos most popular songs. ...


Conceptual work

Although they had success as a singles band, Townshend had more ambitious goals. He wanted to treat The Who's albums as unified works, rather than collections of unconnected songs. Although Townshend later said that the song "I'm A Boy" was from a projected opus, the first sign of this ambition came in their 1966 album A Quick One, which included the storytelling medley "A Quick One While He's Away", which they later referred to as a "mini opera", and which has been called the first prog epic.[9] A Quick One (1966) is the second album released by British rock band The Who. ... A Quick One While Hes Away is a 1966 medley written by Pete Townshend and recorded by The Who for their album A Quick One. ...


A Quick One was followed by The Who Sell Out in 1967, a concept album which played like an offshore radio station, complete with humorous jingles and commercials, and which also included a mini rock opera, called "Rael" (whose closing theme ended up on "Tommy"), as well as The Who's biggest USA single, "I Can See for Miles". The Who famously destroyed their equipment onstage at the Monterey Pop Festival that year and subsequently repeated the routine on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour with literally explosive results as Keith Moon detonated his drum kit. In 1968 The Who were the headliner of the first Schaefer Music Festival in New York City's Central Park. Also that year, Pete Townshend became the subject of the first Rolling Stone interview. Townshend revealed in that interview that he was working on a full-length rock opera. This was Tommy, the first work billed as a rock opera and a major landmark in modern music. Back cover The back cover of The Who Sell Out The Who Sell Out is The Whos third album, released in 1967. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... The term Pirate Radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio transmission. ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ... Poster promoting the festival The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... The Smothers Brothers are an American musical-comedy team, formed by real-life brothers Tom and Dick Smothers. ... The Schaefer Music Festival was a music festival which had been held in the summers between 1967 and 1976 at the Trump Wollman Skating Rink in New York Citys Central Park. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ...


Tommy & Live at Leeds

Around this time the spiritual teachings of India's Meher Baba began to influence Townshend's songwriting, an influence that continued for many years. Baba is credited as "Avatar" on Tommy. In addition to its commercial success, Tommy also became a critical smash, with Life Magazine saying, "...for sheer power, invention and brilliance of performance, Tommy outstrips anything which has ever come out of a recording studio,"[10] and Melody Maker declaring, "Surely The Who are now the band against which all others are to be judged." Meher Baba (Persian: مهر بابا Devanāgarī: महर बाबा ), (February 25, 1894, Merwan Sheriar Irani – January 31, 1969), was an Indian spiritual teacher who said he was the Avatar. ... This article is about the concept in Hindu philosophy. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ... This article is about the music newspaper. ...


The Who performed much of Tommy at the Woodstock Music and Art Festival later that year. That performance, and the ensuing film, catapulted The Who to superstar status in the USA. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...


In February 1970 The Who recorded Live at Leeds, which is thought by many to be the best live rock album of all time.[11] The album, originally relatively short and containing mostly the show's hard rock songs, has been re-released in several expanded and remastered versions over the years, remedying technical problems with the original recording and adding portions of the performance of Tommy, as well as versions of numerous earlier singles and interstitial stage banter. The Leeds University gig was part of the Tommy tour, which not only included gigs in European opera houses, but also saw The Who become the first rock act to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. Live at Leeds (1970) is The Whos first live album, and indeed is their only live album that was released while the band was still recording and performing regularly. ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


1970s

Lifehouse & Who's Next

Also in 1970, The Who began work on a studio album that was never released. At the Isle of Wight Festival in August, Daltrey introduced "I Don't Even Know Myself" as "off the new album, which we're sort of half-way through". But within a few weeks of that concert Townshend wrote "Pure and Easy", a song which he later described as the "central pivot" of what became an ambitious concept album/performance art project called Lifehouse, distracting him and the band from work on the album in progress. Lifehouse was never completed in its intended form. Some Lifehouse songs were released as non-album-track singles, b-sides and on various albums over the years, such as 1974's outtakes compilation Odds & Sods and Townshend's 1972 solo album Who Came First. Townshend would later reconstruct it as a radio play for the BBC in 2000, and most of the material was released on a 6-CD album from Pete Townshend's website shortly after. The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... This article is about Performance art. ... For the 2005 album by the band Lifehouse, see Lifehouse (Lifehouse album). ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... Odds and Sods is a compilation album by British rock band, The Who. ... Who Came First is the first major-label solo album by Pete Townshend, guitarist and lead songwriter of The Who. ... Radio drama, which had its greatest popularity in the U. S. and in most other countries before the widespread access to television programming, depends on dialogue, music and sound effects to help the listener imagine the story in her or his minds eye--in this sense, it resembles reading... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ...


Meanwhile, in March of 1971, the band began recording the available Lifehouse material with Kit Lambert in New York, and then restarted the sessions with Glyn Johns in April. Selections from the material, along with one unrelated song by Entwistle, were released as a traditional studio album, Who's Next, which became their most successful album among both critics and fans, but which effectively terminated the Lifehouse project. Who's Next reached #4 in the USA pop charts and #1 in the UK. Two tracks from the album, "Baba O'Riley" and "Won't Get Fooled Again", are often cited as pioneering examples of synthesiser use in rock music; ironically, both tracks' distinctive keyboard sounds were actually generated in real time by a Lowrey organ[12] (though in the case of "Won't Get Fooled Again", the organ's output was processed through the filters of a VCS3 synthesiser). However, synthesisers can be found elsewhere on the album, playing a prominent role in "Bargain", "Going Mobile", and "The Song is Over". Kit Lambert (May 11, 1935 – April 7, 1981) was a record producer and the manager for The Who. ... Glyn Johns (born February 15, 1942 in Epsom, Surrey, England) is a recording engineer and record producer. ... For the song by Tom Lehrer, see That Was the Year That Was. ... For the song by Tom Lehrer, see That Was the Year That Was. ... Teenage Wasteland redirects here. ... For the Farscape episode of the same name, see Wont Get Fooled Again (Farscape episode). ... The term synthesiser is also used to mean frequency synthesiser, an electronic system found in communications. ... The VCS 3 (from Voltage Control for Studio with 3 components) is an oscillation effects musical analog synthesiser, initially made in 1969 by EMS. The VCS 3 was smaller and less cumbersome than the Moog Taurus and similar early synthesizers. ... Bargain is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who, and it appears on their famous album, Whos Next (1971). ... Going Mobile is the 7th track of the famous album Whos Next by The Who. ...


Quadrophenia & By Numbers

Who's Next was followed by Quadrophenia (1973), a work in the rock opera vein, but which can also be seen as something of an autobiographical or social history piece about early 1960s adolescent life and conflict in London. The story is about a youth named Jimmy, his struggle for self-esteem, his conflicts with his family and others, and his mental illness.[13] His personal story is set against a backdrop of the clashes between Mods and Rockers in the early 1960s in the UK, particularly the riots between the two factions at Brighton. The supporting US tour featured a legendary November 20, 1973 San Francisco, California concert where drummer Keith Moon passed out twice during the show and was replaced by a member of the audience, Scot Halpin. Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Mods and the Rockers were two British youth movements of the early 1960s. ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ...


The band's later albums contained songs of more personal content for Townshend, and he eventually transferred this personal style to his solo albums, as seen on the album Empty Glass. 1975's The Who by Numbers had several introspective songs in this vein, lightened by the crowd-pleasing "Squeeze Box", another hit single. Nevertheless, some rock critics considered By Numbers to have been Townshend's "suicide note."[14] A movie version of Tommy was released that year. It was directed by Ken Russell, starred Roger Daltrey in the title role and earned Pete Townshend an academy award nomination for Best Original Score. In 1976 The Who played a concert at Charlton Athletic Football Ground which was listed for over a decade in the Guinness Book of World Records as the loudest concert ever.[10] Empty Glass is the sophomore solo album by Pete Townshend, guitarist for the successful rock band The Who. ... The Who By Numbers (1975) is an album by British rock band The Who. ... Squeeze Box is a song by The Who. ... Roger Daltrey as Tommy Tommy was a 1975 musical film, based on The Whos 1969 rock opera concept album Tommy. ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. ... Which band is the loudest band in the world is a subject of some dispute in musical circles. ...


Who Are You & Moon's death

In 1978, the band released Who Are You, a move away from epic rock opera and towards a more radio-friendly sound, though it did contain one song from a never-completed rock opera by John Entwistle. The release of the album was overshadowed by the death of Keith Moon in his sleep after an overdose of Heminevrin - a medication prescribed to him to combat alcohol withdrawal symptoms - only a few hours after a party held by Paul McCartney. Two ironies about the last album include the cover, which shows Moon sitting in a chair with the words "not to be taken away", and the song "Music Must Change", which has no drum track. Kenney Jones, of The Small Faces and The Faces, joined the band as Moon's successor. For other uses, see Who Are You (disambiguation). ... Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ... Clomethiazole (also called Chlormethiazole) is a sedative and hypnotic that is widely used in treating and preventing symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... Kenneth Thomas Kenney Jones (born 16 September 1948, Stepney, East London) is a veteran English rock drummer best known for his work in Small Faces, Faces, and The Who. ... Small Faces were a British mod group formed in 1965[1] by Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Jimmy Winston (who was soon replaced by Ian McLagan). ... Small Faces album cover Faces were an early 1970s rock band formed in 1969 from the ashes of The Small Faces after Steve Marriott left to form Humble Pie; new members Ron Wood (guitar) and Rod Stewart (vocals) (both from The Jeff Beck Group) joined Ronnie Lane (bass), Ian McLagan...


In 1979, The Who returned to the stage with well-received concerts at the Rainbow Theatre in London, at the Cannes Film Festival in France and at Madison Square Garden in New York City. By late autumn, the band had agreed to undertake a small tour of the United States. Sadly, this tour was marred by tragedy: on December 3, 1979 in Cincinnati, Ohio, a crush at Riverfront Coliseum before The Who's concert resulted in the deaths of eleven fans. The band was not told of the deaths until after the show because civic authorities feared more crowd control problems would arise if the concert was cancelled. The band members were reportedly devastated by this event. Also in 1979, The Who released a documentary film called The Kids Are Alright and a film version of Quadrophenia, the latter becoming a huge box office hit in the UK and the former capturing many of the band's most scintillating moments on stage over the years. In December, The Who became only the third band, after the Beatles and The Band, to be featured on the cover of Time Magazine. The accompanying article, written by Jay Cocks, was overwhelmingly positive with respect to The Who, their members, and their place in rock music, saying that The Who had "outpaced, outlasted, outlived and outclassed" all of their rock band contemporaries.[15] The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... U.S. Bank Arena (known originally as the Riverfront Coliseum, and known later as The Crown and the Firstar Center), is an indoor arena located in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio near the Ohio River next to the Great American Ball Park. ... Soundtrack album cover. ... Quadrophenia is a 1979 British film based on the 1973 rock opera album Quadrophenia by The Who. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... For other uses, see Band. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Jay Cocks is a film critic and screenwriter. ...


1980s

Decline and breakup

The band released two more studio albums with Jones as their drummer, Face Dances (1981) and It's Hard (1982). While both albums sold fairly well, and even with It's Hard receiving a five-star review in Rolling Stone, many fans were not receptive to the band's new sound. Shortly after the release of It's Hard, The Who embarked on their first of several 'farewell tours' after Pete Townshend declared his alcoholism, cleaned himself up, got sober, and stated that he wanted to do one more substantial tour with The Who before turning it into a studio-only band. It was the highest grossing tour of the year, with sellout crowds in numerous stadiums and arenas throughout North America.[16] Face Dances is an album by British rock band The Who originally released in 1981 in the US on Warner Bros. ... Its Hard is the 10th studio album by British rock band The Who and the second album after drummer Keith Moon died. ...


After their final show in December, 1982, Townshend spent part of 1983 trying to write material for the next studio Who album which was still owed to Warner Bros. Records from the contract they signed in 1980. By the end of 1983, however, Townshend had declared himself unable to generate material which he felt was appropriate for The Who and he issued a public statement in December, 1983, wherein he announced his decision to leave The Who. With Townshend formally ending The Who as an entity producing new music, Townshend focused on solo projects such as White City: A Novel, The Iron Man (which did feature appearances from Daltrey and Entwistle and two songs on the album credited to "The Who"), and Psychoderelict, a forerunner to the eventual release of the radio work Lifehouse. Warner Bros. ... White City: A Novel is a solo album by Pete Townshend of The Who. ... Psychoderelict was a concept album written, produced and engineered by Pete Townshend. ... For the 2005 album by the band Lifehouse, see Lifehouse (Lifehouse album). ...


Reunions

On 13 July 1985, the members of The Who, including Kenney Jones, reformed for a one-off performance at Bob Geldof's Live Aid concert at Wembley Stadium. The band performed "My Generation", "Pinball Wizard", "Love Reign O'er Me", and an obviously unrehearsed "Won't Get Fooled Again" (it was later revealed that the band had also intended to play a new Townshend composition, "After The Fire", but was unable to learn it well enough to be played, it became a solo hit for Daltrey later that year). Although the BBC's equipment blew a fuse at the beginning of "My Generation", the band kept playing, so most of "My Generation" was missed by the rest of the world. Robert Frederick Xenon Geldof[1], KBE[2], known as Bob Geldof (born 5 October 1951) [3], is an Irish singer, songwriter, actor and political activist. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ...


In 1988 the band was honoured with the British Phonographic Industry's Lifetime Achievement Award. The Who played a short set at the award ceremony (which is the last time Kenney Jones has worked with The Who to date). In 1989 they embarked on a 25th anniversary "The Kids Are Alright" reunion tour which emphasised Tommy. Long time Townshend collaborator Simon Phillips played drums during the tour. Demand for tickets was phenomenal, inspiring Newsweek to say, "The Who tour is special because, after the Beatles and the Stones, they're IT." There were massive sellouts in stadiums throughout North America, including a four-night stand at Giants Stadium.[17] In all, over two million tickets were sold. The British Phonographic Industry was founded in 1973 to represent the interests of British music companies and to fight the growing problem of music piracy. ... For other persons named Simon Phillips, see Simon Phillips (disambiguation). ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


1990s

Partial reunions

In 1990, their first year of eligibility, The Who were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by U2, with Bono saying, "More than any other band, The Who are our role models." The Who's display at the Rock Hall describes them as prime contenders for the title of "World's Greatest Rock Band". Only The Beatles and The Rolling Stones receive a similar accolade at the Rock Hall. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... For other uses, see Bono (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ...


In 1991 The Who recorded a cover version of Elton John's "Saturday Night's Alright For Fighting" for a tribute album. This was the last time that they released any studio work with John Entwistle. Pete Townshend toured in 1993 to promote his Psychoderelict album. On one night of the tour John Entwistle guested for several songs at the end of the show. In 1994 there were rumours of an upcoming 30th anniversary tour. These never happened but Roger Daltrey turned 50 and celebrated with two concerts at Carnegie Hall. These performances included guest spots by both John Entwistle and Pete Townshend. Although all the surviving original members of The Who were in attendance, they did not appear on stage together except for the finale, "Join Together", along with all the other guest stars at the end of each show. Roger Daltrey toured later that year with an orchestra and special guest John Entwistle. The band consisted of John "Rabbit" Bundrick on keyboards, Zak Starkey on drums and Simon Townshend filling in for his absent brother. Pete Townshend had given Daltrey his consent to call this band The Who, but Daltrey declined. Overall, the Daltrey Sings Townshend tour was not a major commercial success. Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Saturday Nights Alright For Fighting (sometimes written Saturday Nights Alright (For Fighting)) is a rock & roll song performed by musician Elton John. ... Psychoderelict was a concept album written, produced and engineered by Pete Townshend. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... John Rabbit Bundrick (born November 21, 1948) is a prominent rock keyboardist, pianist, and organist, having played on albums by The Who, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Roger Waters, Free, and Crawler, among several others. ... Zak Starkey (born 13 September 1965 at Queen Charlottes Maternity Hospital in London) is an British drummer, is well-known as the first-born child of The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (whose real name is Richard Starkey) and his first wife, Maureen Cox. ... Simon Townshend is a British guitarist, singer and songwriter. ...


Quadrophenia tour

In 1996 Pete Townshend was asked to join the lineup for a major rock concert at Hyde Park. He intended to perform Quadrophenia as a solo acoustic piece using parts of the film on the screens. After contacting Entwistle and Daltrey it was agreed that a one-off performance of Quadrophenia would happen. The band was augmented by Zak Starkey on drums (although he was initially reluctant), Rabbit on keyboards and Simon Townshend and Geoff Whitehorn on guitars. Also, Jon Carin was added as an additional keyboard player, a horn section was added alongside backing vocalists and several special guests would join to play characters from the album. These included David Gilmour, Ade Edmonson, newsreader Trevor McDonald and Gary Glitter. The whole performance was narrated by Phil Daniels who played Jimmy the Mod in the film. Despite a few technical difficulties the show was a huge success and many considered this to be the best act of the day above headliner Eric Clapton. The success of this show led to a sold out six night residency in New York at Madison Square Garden. These shows were not billed as The Who. “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... Zak Starkey (born 13 September 1965 at Queen Charlottes Maternity Hospital in London) is an British drummer, is well-known as the first-born child of The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (whose real name is Richard Starkey) and his first wife, Maureen Cox. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Adrian Edmondson Adrian Edmondson (sometimes credited as Ade Edmondson, born 24 January 1957 in Bradford, Yorkshire, Britain) is a British actor, comedian, director, and writer who gained fame as Vyvyan in The Young Ones in the early 1980s. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Gary Glitter (born May 8, 1944) is an English rock and pop singer and songwriter who had a string of chart successes with a collection of 1970s glam rock hits including Rock and Roll parts 1 & 2, I Love You Love Me Love, Im the Leader of the Gang... Philip Daniels (born October 25, 1958 in Islington, London) is an English actor. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ...


The success of the Quadrophenia shows led to a major US and European tour. The show was reworked for the tour and included several Who standards as the encore. The show was originally billed under the band members names but was eventually billed as The Who to aid ticket sales.


After the success of Quadrophenia The Who disbanded once again. Pete Townshend went on to perform many acoustic shows, John Entwistle mounted several shows with his own band The John Entwistle Band and Roger Daltrey toured with the British Rock Symphony performing The Who and other classic rock songs with an orchestra. In late 1999 The Who reformed as a five-piece band with Rabbit on keyboards and Zak Starkey on drums and performed several charity shows in small venues. Many of the songs at the shows were taken from Who's Next and included songs not performed for 30 years or more.


2000s

Charity shows and Entwistle's death

The success of the 1999 shows led to a US tour in the Summer of 2000 and a UK tour in November that year. The tour ended with a charity show at the Royal Albert Hall for the Teenage Cancer trust with special guests which was released later on CD and DVD. With the numerous rave reviews of the shows in the press all three members of The Who began to discuss the possibility of a new album.[18] The Who, at the time (2002) consisting of John Entwistle, Roger Datlrey, Pete Townshend, Zak Starkey, and John Rabbit Bundrick, performed a concert at the Royal Albert Hall for the Teenage Cancer Trust. ...


The band's appearance at The Concert for New York City in October 2001, was the most fervently cheered of any act by the audience of New York police officers, firefighters and rescue workers.[citation needed] While other acts that night performed songs steeped in sentimentality, The Who immediately launched into a blistering set of their top hits without acknowledging or invoking the recent tragedy, earning them praise from attendees and television viewers.[citation needed] The Who were also honoured with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award that year. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and...


Just before the onset of a tour in the summer of 2002, John Entwistle was found dead in his room at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. A coroner's investigation revealed that while not technically an overdose, a modest amount of cocaine in his system was a contributing factor in a fatal heart attack, the result of years of heart trouble caused or aggravated by regular cocaine use, hypertension, and decades of smoking.[citation needed] Over-consumption of alcohol and drugs had dogged all of the band members except for Roger Daltrey over the years.[citation needed] After a brief delay, the tour commenced in Los Angeles with bassist Pino Palladino. Most shows from the tour were released officially on CD as Encore Series 2002. Before the tour began new songs "Real Good Looking Boy" and "Certified Rose" were rehearsed alongside old classics such as "I Can See for Miles", but due to the death of Entwistle, they were not performed. In September, Q magazine named The Who as one of the "50 Bands to See Before You Die". For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Pino Palladino (born on October 17, 1957 in Cardiff, Wales, UK) is a noted rock and rhythm and blues electric bass player of Italian ancestry, related to the famous Angelo Palladino, from The Palladinos. ... Encore Series 2002 is a series of recordings from The Whos 2002 American Tour. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ...


Endless Wire

In 2004 The Who released two new songs, "Old Red Wine" and "Real Good Looking Boy" (with Pino Palladino and Greg Lake, respectively, on bass guitar), as part of a singles anthology (The Who: Then and Now), and went on an 18-date world tour, playing Japan, Australia, the UK and the US. Again, all shows were released on CD, as part of Encore Series 2004. The band also headlined the Isle of Wight Festival that year and received the usual ecstatic reviews.[19] Also that year, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked The Who #29 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[20] Pino Palladino (born on October 17, 1957 in Cardiff, Wales, UK) is a noted rock and rhythm and blues electric bass player of Italian ancestry, related to the famous Angelo Palladino, from The Palladinos. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Encore Series 2004 is a series of recordings from The Whos 2004 tour to Japan, Australia, the UK and the U.S. It contains soundboard recordings of all 18 concerts from the tour, available as 2-CD individual shows or as part of a box set. ... This article is about the music magazine. ...


The Who then announced that the spring of 2005 would see the release of their first new studio album in 23 years (tentatively titled WHO2). In March 2005, Pete Townshend's website issued a statement that the release was delayed indefinitely, and explained that expected UK/US tours in the summer of 2005 were also shelved. Part of this was due to slow recording of the new material, and part was due to Zak Starkey's commitment to tour with Oasis. Townshend continued working on the album, posting a novella called The Boy Who Heard Music on his Internet blog site. This concept developed into a mini-opera which formed the kernel for the new Who album, and later a full opera which Townshend presented at Vassar College. WHO2 is the working name for a new CD by The Who. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... The Boy Who Heard Music is a internet novella written by Pete Townshend. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ...


The Who performed "Who Are You" and "Won't Get Fooled Again" on the London stage of the Live 8 concert in July 2005. Steve White (drummer for Paul Weller and older brother of ex-Oasis drummer Alan White) took the place of Starkey, who was on tour with Oasis, and Damon Minchella (Ocean Colour Scene's bassist) filled in for Palladino (who was touring South America as the bassist for Jeff Beck). Also that year, The Who were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the Farscape episode of the same name, see Wont Get Fooled Again (Farscape episode). ... The main Live 8 concert was held at Hyde Park, London, England on 2 July 2005, in front of over 200,000 people. ... Steve White (born on 31 May 1965 in Bermondsey, London) is an English drummer, who has worked extensively with Paul Weller, The Style Council and other British musicians. ... Paul Weller (born John William Weller May 25, 1958, in Sheerwater, near Woking, Surrey) is an English singer-songwriter. ... Alan White (born 26 May 1972, in Eltham, South London) is an English drummer, longtime drummer of British rock group Oasis between 1995 and 2004. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Damon Minchella (born 1 June 1969, in Liverpool) is a British bass guitarist, formerly with Ocean Colour Scene, which he left in 2003. ... Ocean Colour Scene (often abbreviated to OCS) are an English rock band from Birmingham. ... Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ... The UK Music Hall of Fame honours musicians for their lifetime fame in music. ...

Remaining members Townshend and Daltrey
Remaining members Townshend and Daltrey

In 2006, The Who were the first recipients of the Freddie Mercury Lifetime Achievement Award in Live Music at the Vodaphone music awards. Roger Taylor and Brian May of Queen presented the award.[21] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Australian film composer, see Brian May (composer). ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ...


On October 3, 2006, iTunes released two singles in advance of their new album, Endless Wire entitled "Tea & Theatre" (which is played at the end of the concerts during the North American leg of the tour) and "It's Not Enough". is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Endless Wire is a studio album by The Who, and their first new studio album of original material in twenty-four years following the release of Its Hard in 1982. ...


Endless Wire was released on 30 October 2006 (31 October in the USA). It was their first full studio album of new material since 1982's It's Hard. The new album featured songs inspired by many subjects, such as the incidence of Stockholm syndrome during the Beslan school hostage crisis ("Black Widow's Eyes"), Mel Gibson's 2004 film, The Passion of the Christ ("Man in a Purple Dress" and "2000 Years") and it contained the band's first mini-opera since "Rael" on 1967's The Who Sell Out. Excerpts from the mini-opera, called "Wire & Glass", were released as a Maxi-single on July 17 exclusively on iTunes, and was released on CD and limited edition 12" vinyl in the UK on 24 July. "Mirror Door" was released in a radio edit and was first played on BBC Radio 2, on The Ken Bruce Show at 10:00 on 8 June 2006. Endless Wire debuted at #7 on Billboard and #9 in the UK Albums Chart. Endless Wire is a studio album by The Who, and their first new studio album of original material in twenty-four years following the release of Its Hard in 1982. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Its Hard is the 10th studio album by British rock band The Who and the second album after drummer Keith Moon died. ... For other uses, see Stockholm syndrome (disambiguation). ... The Republic of North Ossetia in Russia The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to as the Beslan school siege or Beslan massacre)[2][3][4] began when a group of a attackers demanding an end to the Second Chechen War took more than 1,100 schoolchildren and adults hostage... Black Widows Eyes is a song by The Who and, written by Pete Townshend, and is featured on their most recent album Endless Wire. ... Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, AO (born January 3, 1956) is an American-Australian actor, historian, Academy Award-winning director, producer and screenwriter. ... This article is about the film. ... A Man in a Purple Dress is a song by The Who, written by Pete Townshend, and is featured on their most recent album Endless Wire. ... Two Thousand Years is a song by The Who featured on their most recent album Endless Wire. ... Back cover The back cover of The Who Sell Out The Who Sell Out is The Whos third album, released in 1967. ... Wire & Glass is the first single released from The Whos 2006 album, Endless Wire. ... A maxi single or maxi-single is a music single release with more than the usual two tracks (generally an a-side song and a b-side song). ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... The UK Albums Chart is a chart of the sales positions of albums in the United Kingdom. ...


In advance of the album, and later to support it, The Who embarked upon their The Who Tour 2006-2007. First they did a 24-date European tour followed by the rest of the world. These are their first shows since their 2004 world tour and brief performance at Live 8 in 2005. Members of the latest lineup remain, including keyboardist John "Rabbit" Bundrick, bassist Pino Palladino, drummer Zak Starkey and guitarist Simon Townshend, who is also acting as the supporting act for The Who with his band The Casbah Club. Other opening acts on the tour include The Pretenders and Rose Hill Drive. Shows are again on CD and DVD as part of Encore Series 2006. The Who Tour 2006-2007 is The Whos first worldwide concert tour in several years. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ... John Rabbit Bundrick (born November 21, 1948) is a prominent American-born rock keyboardist, pianist, and organist, having played on albums by The Who, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Roger Waters, Free, and Crawler, among several others. ... Pino Palladino (born on October 17, 1957 in Cardiff, Wales, UK) is a noted rock and rhythm and blues electric bass player of Italian ancestry, related to the famous Angelo Palladino, from The Palladinos. ... Zak Starkey (born 13 September 1965 at Queen Charlottes Maternity Hospital in London) is an British drummer, is well-known as the first-born child of The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (whose real name is Richard Starkey) and his first wife, Maureen Cox. ... Simon Townshend is a British guitarist, singer and songwriter. ... Casbah Club are a mod rock band formed in 2004. ... The Pretenders are an Anglo-American rock band. ... Rose Hill Drive Rose Hill Drive is a young American rock power trio. ... Encore Series 2006 is a series of recordings from The Who Tour 2006-2007. ...


Zak Starkey was invited to become a full member of Oasis in April 2006, and, in November 2006 of The Who, but he declined, preferring to split his time between the two bands.


On 24 June 2007, The Who topped the bill at the Glastonbury Festival. is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ...


Amazing Journey

On 6 November 2007, a new documentary on The Who went on sale, titled Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who. It was shown on VH1 prior to release. The product description states: "Spanning four decades, this authorised and definitive anthology of The Who relives their journey from humble beginnings to their meteoric rise to rock legend status in a 2-film DVD set. Filled with all-new interviews with band members Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend and former member Kenney Jones and music icons Sting, The Edge of U2, Eddie Vedder and more, this must-have collection also features electrifying rare and unreleased concert footage in mind-blowing 5.1 surround sound. David Wild, a contributing editor of Rolling Stone, says it's "Brilliant. An exceptionally smart and intimate portrait." "For music that spoke to generations of fans, and refused to be classified, the answer is - and always will be - The Who."


The documentary includes a lot of footage not seen in earlier Who documentaries, including film from their acclaimed 1970 Leeds University appearance and a 1964 performance at the Railway Hotel when they were known as the High Numbers.


On October 30, 2007, Roger Daltrey announced plans for The Who to return to touring in 2008 for a set of shows in Japan and Australia. "We don't want to stop..." Daltrey said. "We don't want those long hiatuses that we used to have.... You should at least keep the ball rolling."[22]


During this announcement, Daltrey also implied that Pete Townshend was working on new material for the group, and on February 11, 2008, Townshend confirmed this on the band's website. "I am hoping to come up with some songs for a more conventional Who record," Townshend wrote. He also stated that Roger Daltrey is working on setting up album work. [23]


The Who will also be honoured at the upcoming 2008 VH1 Rock Honors in Los Angeles. Taping of the show will take place July 12th, followed by a network broadcast on the 17th. [24] The VH1 Rock Honors logo The VH1 Rock Honors are an annual ceremony that pays homage to bands who influenced the sound of rock music. ...


Influence

The Who are one of the most influential groups in rock music. Their progressive approach to the writing of albums and their exciting live shows are matched by few. The hard rock style they brought to England's music scene was one that set the stage for other bands ranging from Led Zeppelin to the Clash. The Who have sold more than 100 million albums worldwide.[25] Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... This article is about the English punk rock band. ...


During their earliest Mod genesis, The Who provided inspiration for most, if not all, of the major bands during the Britpop wave in Britain during the mid-1990s. Bands such as Blur, Oasis, Stereophonics and Ash draw a heavy influence from the band's work, which, especially with the Mod counter-culture, provided a quintessentially "Cool Britannia" ideal. Britpop is a subgenre of alternative rock that originated in the United Kingdom. ... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Stereophonics are a rock band from Wales with members Kelly Jones, Richard Jones (no relation to Kelly) and Javier Weyler. ... Ash are an alternative rock band that formed in Downpatrick, Northern Ireland in 1992. ... Cool Britannia is a media term that was used in the late 1990s to describe the contemporary culture of the United Kingdom. ...


The Who have also been called "The Godfathers of Punk" in numerous publications[26], as well as in Spike Lee's film, Summer of Sam. Part of the foundation of punk rock lies in The Who's onstage aggression, violence and snotty attitude. The Stooges, MC5, Ramones, Sex Pistols, the Clash, Generation X, Green Day and many other punk rock and protopunk rock bands, point to The Who as a major influence. Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... Summer of Sam is a 1999 film about the Son of Sam serial murders. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This article is about the rock band. ... MC5 (short for Motor City Five) was a hard rock band formed in Detroit, Michigan, USA in 1964 and active until 1972. ... This article is about the band. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... This article is about the English punk rock band. ... Generation X were a pop-influenced punk rock band, formed on 21 November 1976 by Billy Idol, Tony James and John Towe. ... This article is about the band Green Day. ... Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ...


The group has been credited with devising the "rock opera" and it made one of the first notable concept albums. Following in the footsteps of Tommy were David Bowie's The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway by Genesis, Jethro Tull's Thick as a Brick and Pink Floyd's The Wall, among others. Recently, the idea was adopted by The Flaming Lips with Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and Green Day with American Idiot. The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars is a 1972 concept album by David Bowie, praised as the definitive album of the 1970s by Melody Maker magazine. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Alternate cover The cover of the 1995 25th anniversary re-release. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... The Flaming Lips (formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1983) are an American alternative rock band. ... Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots is the tenth album by The Flaming Lips, released on July 16, 2002. ... Singles from American Idiot Released: 2004 Released: 2004 Released: 2005 Released: 2005 Released: 2005 This article is about Green Day album. ...

Pete Townshend
Pete Townshend

In 1967 Pete Townshend coined the phrase "power pop" to describe The Who's sixties singles sound.[27] The guiding lights of the seventies power pop movement, from the The Raspberries to Cheap Trick, take much of their inspiration from The Who.[28] Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... The Raspberries were a rock and roll band from Cleveland, Ohio. ... Cheap Trick is an American rock band from Rockford, Illinois, that gained popularity in the late 1970s. ...


The Who's influence can also be seen in their early incorporation of synthesisers into rock music[29], with Who's Next featuring the instrument prominently and the single "Won't Get Fooled Again" becoming the first hit single to be driven by a synthesiser track.


"My Generation" is perhaps the band's most covered song. Iron Maiden, Oasis, Sweet, Pearl Jam, Patti Smith, Green Day, McFly, Di-Rect and Hilary Duff have recorded it. Oasis used it as their set closer during their 2005 world tour. The Zimmers, known as "the world's oldest rock band", made a tongue-in-cheek version and used it as their first single, which became a hit in Britain. David Bowie covered "I Can't Explain", "Pictures of Lily" and "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere". The Sex Pistols, the Ramones and Great White covered "Substitute". The Jam and The Breeders have covered "So Sad About Us". The Clash referred to the "I Can't Explain" riff in "Clash City Rockers" and "Guns on the Roof". Pearl Jam performed "Baba O'Riley" and "The Kids Are Alright" during their tours in the 1990s and 2000s. Pearl Jam have also played many other Who songs such as "Leaving Here", "Blue, Red, & Grey", "Love, Reign O'er Me" and "Naked Eye". German band Scorpions covered "I Can't Explain" while shock metal band W.A.S.P. covered "The Real Me". Van Halen covered "Won't Get Fooled Again" on their 1993 live album Live: Right Here, Right Now, explicitly describing it as "a tribute to The Who" and in 1995, Phish covered Quadrophenia for their second annual Halloween concert tradition of performing another band's album in its entirety, which was later released as Live Phish Volume 14. Phish continued to cover "Drowned" regularly in their live performances. The Grateful Dead also covered "Baba O'Riley" in the early 1990s, as did Nirvana. Rush covered "The Seeker" on their 2004 "Feedback" EP and live during their R30 tour that same year. Limp Bizkit also did a cover of "Behind Blue Eyes" in their 2004 album Results May Vary. McFly covered "Pinball Wizard" for the B-side to their 2004 single "I'll Be Ok", and played the song live in their 2005 tour. Fish (ex Marillion) covered "The Seeker" during his Songs from the Mirror period. Many other artists, ranging from Buddy Rich to Richard Thompson to U2 to Petra Haden (who covered The Who Sell Out in its entirety), have covered Who songs. Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Sweet (referred to as The Sweet on albums before 1974 and singles before 1975) were a popular 1970s British band. ... This article is about the rock group. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... This article is about the band Green Day. ... For the characters of Back to the Future, see McFly family. ... Di-rect are a rock-oriented boyband from the Hague, Netherlands, which was first formed in 1999. ... Hilary Erhard Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress, singer, songwriter, producer, fashion designer, and spokesperson. ... Cover from The Zimmers single My Generation The Zimmers are a British band, and thought to have the oldest members in the world:[1] the lead singer, Alf, is 90, and the oldest member, Buster, is 100. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ... The Jam were an English punk rock/mod revival band active during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... The Breeders are an American rock band, formed in 1977 as a folk rock duo featuring twin sisters Kim and Kelley Deal of Dayton, Ohio which played country covers at truck stops and bars and dissipated in the early 80s, only to be revived as a side project in... So Sad About Us is a 1966 song by British rock band The Who, first released on the bands second album A Quick One. ... This article is about the rock group. ... For other bands named The Scorpions or other meanings of scorpion, see scorpion. ... W.A.S.P. is an American heavy metal band formed in 1982. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Live: Right Here, Right Now is the first live album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1993 (see 1993 in music). ... This article is about the band. ... Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Live Phish Vol. ... Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... The Seeker is a song written by Pete Townshend and performed by English rock band The Who, and featured on their 1971 compilation album Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy. ... For other uses, see Feedback (disambiguation). ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Limp Bizkit is a nu metal band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Behind Blue Eyes is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who for his Lifehouse project. ... Results May Vary is the fourth album by Limp Bizkit, released on September 23, 2003. ... For the characters of Back to the Future, see McFly family. ... Tommy track listing Fiddle About (12) Pinball Wizard (13) Theres a Doctor (14) Pinball Wizard is a song written by Pete Townshend and performed by the English rock band The Who, and featured on their 1969 rock opera Tommy. ... Ill Be OK is the sixth single from the British Pop band McFly. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Marillion is a British Rock group. ... Songs from the Mirror is the third solo album by singer Fish. ... Bernard Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 Brooklyn, New York – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Petra Haden Petra Haden (born New York City, October 11, 1971) is an American violinist and singer. ... Back cover The back cover of The Who Sell Out The Who Sell Out is The Whos third album, released in 1967. ...


The music of The Who is still performed in public by many tribute bands, such as (in alphabetical order): Bargain, The Ohm, The Relay, The Substitutes, The Whodlums (UK), The Wholigans, The Who Show, Who's Next USA, Who's Next UK, Who's Who UK. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


All three versions of the American forensic drama CSI (CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, CSI: Miami, and CSI: NY) feature songs written and performed by The Who as their theme songs, "Who Are You", "Won't Get Fooled Again" and "Baba O'Riley" respectively. The CBS sitcom Two and a Half Men once did a brief CSI spoof called Stiffs with the theme song "Squeeze Box". CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... CSI: Miami is a spinoff of the popular CBS network series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. ... CSI: NY (working title CSI: New York) is an American police procedural television series which premiered on September 22, 2004. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the Farscape episode of the same name, see Wont Get Fooled Again (Farscape episode). ... Teenage Wasteland redirects here. ... Two and a Half Men is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American television sitcom, which premiered CBS on Monday, September 22, 2003, at 9:30 p. ... Squeeze Box is a song by The Who. ...


Awards

The Who were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990,[30] the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005[31] and won the first annual Freddie Mercury Lifetime Achievement in Live Music Award in 2006.[32] They received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the British Phonographic Industry in 1988,[33] and from the Grammy Foundation in 2001,[34] for creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording. Tommy was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998, "My Generation" in 1999 and Who's Next in 2007.[35] The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... The Grammy Hall of Fame Award is a special Grammy award established in 1973 to honor recordings that are at least twenty-five years old and that have qualitative or historical significance. Alphabetical listing by title: List of Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipients A-D List of Grammy Hall... This article is about the song. ... For the song by Tom Lehrer, see That Was the Year That Was. ...


Band members

Main article: The Who personnel

This page is a list of the various members of The Who. ...

Discography

Main article: The Who discography

The following is a discography of albums and singles released by the UK rock band The Who. ...

See also

  • The Who's influence on musical equipment
  • The Who performances
  • The Who studio techniques

Notes

  1. ^ Vedder, Eddie (15 April 2004). The Greatest Artists of All Time: The Who. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2008-05-16.
  2. ^ 2006 Vodafone Live Music Awards. Vodafone. Retrieved on 2008-05-16.
  3. ^ The Who. Brittanica Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2008-05-16.
  4. ^ The Who. The Rock And Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc.. Retrieved on 2008-05-16.
  5. ^ Rock and Roll: A Social History
  6. ^ The Marquee Club
  7. ^ 50 Moments That Changed the History of Rock 'n' Roll
  8. ^ Local DJ - A Rock 'n' Roll History
  9. ^ The Who at progarchives.com
  10. ^ a b The Who. Sanctuary Group, Artist Management. Retrieved on January 3, 2007.
  11. ^ "Hope I don't have a heart attack". Telegraph.co.uk (June 22, 2006). Retrieved on January 3, 2007.
    * Live at Leeds: Who's best... The Independent (June 7, 2006). Retrieved on January 3, 2007.
    * Hyden, Steven. THE WHO: Live at Leeds. PopMatters.com (January 29, 2003)
    * The Who: Live at Leeds. BBC - Leeds - Entertainment (August 18, 2006). Retrieved on January 3, 2007
    * 170) Live at Leeds. Rolling Stone Magazine (November 1, 2003). Retrieved on January 3, 2007
  12. ^ Pete's Equipment | Lowrey Berkshire Deluxe TBO-1 | Whotabs | Pete Townshend
  13. ^ Quadrophenia.net
  14. ^ The Who By Numbers liner notes
  15. ^ http://www.thewho.org/images/times2.jpg Time Magazine
  16. ^ The Who Concerts Guide 1982.
  17. ^ The Who Concerts Guide 1989
  18. ^ The Who Concerts Guide Newspaper Review.
  19. ^ Wolfson, Richard (2004-06-14). "Sheer genius" (English). Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  20. ^ "The Immortals: The First Fifty", Rolling Stone Issue 946, Rolling Stone Magazine, March 24, 2004. Retrieved on [[January 3, 2007]]. 
  21. ^ 2006 Vodaphone Live Music Awards
  22. ^ Billboard.com: Daltrey: The Who Returning To Road In '08
  23. ^ Billboard.com: The Who Mulls Next Album, Revisits Classics
  24. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080325/ap_en_ot/music_vh1_rock_honors
  25. ^ LA Phil Presents Hollywood Bowl | About the Performer - Roger Daltrey
  26. ^ The New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock and Roll
  27. ^ rock'sbackpageslibrary
  28. ^ PopMatters interview with Eric Carmen
  29. ^ Acoustic Sounds Inc
  30. ^ Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
  31. ^ UK Music Hall of Fame
  32. ^ 2006 Vodaphone Live Music Awards
  33. ^ BRIT Awards
  34. ^ Grammy Lifetime Achievement Awards
  35. ^ Grammy Hall of Fame

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

References

  • Marsh, Dave (1983). Before I Get Old: The Story of The Who. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-07155-8.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Dave Marsh (born 1950) is an American music critic. ...

External links

Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944), is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... John Alec Entwistle (October 9, 1944 – June 27, 2002) was an English bass guitarist, songwriter, singer, and horn player, who was best known as the bass guitarist for the rock band The Who. ... Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ... Kenneth Thomas Kenney Jones (born 16 September 1948, Stepney, East London) is a veteran English rock drummer best known for his work in Small Faces, Faces, and The Who. ... John Rabbit Bundrick (born November 21, 1948) is a prominent American-born rock keyboardist, pianist, and organist, having played on albums by The Who, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Roger Waters, Free, and Crawler, among several others. ... Pino Palladino (born on October 17, 1957 in Cardiff, Wales, UK) is a noted rock and rhythm and blues electric bass player of Italian ancestry, related to the famous Angelo Palladino, from The Palladinos. ... Zak Starkey (born 13 September 1965 at Queen Charlottes Maternity Hospital in London) is an British drummer, is well-known as the first-born child of The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (whose real name is Richard Starkey) and his first wife, Maureen Cox. ... Simon Townshend is a British guitarist, singer and songwriter. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A Quick One (1966) is the second album released by British rock band The Who. ... Back cover The back cover of The Who Sell Out The Who Sell Out is The Whos third album, released in 1967. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... For the song by Tom Lehrer, see That Was the Year That Was. ... Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ... The Who By Numbers (1975) is an album by British rock band The Who. ... For other uses, see Who Are You (disambiguation). ... Face Dances is an album by British rock band The Who originally released in 1981 in the US on Warner Bros. ... Its Hard is the 10th studio album by British rock band The Who and the second album after drummer Keith Moon died. ... Endless Wire is a studio album by The Who, and their first new studio album of original material in twenty-four years following the release of Its Hard in 1982. ... A live album – commonly contrasted with a studio album – is a recording consisting of material (usually music) recorded during stage performances. ... Live at Leeds (1970) is The Whos first live album, and indeed is their only live album that was released while the band was still recording and performing regularly. ... A live album by The Who recorded during the 1982 farewell tour My Generation I Cant Explain Substitute Behind Blue Eyes Baba ORiley Boris The Spider Who Are You Pinball Wizard See Me, Feel Me Love Reign Oer Me Long Live Rock Wont Get Fooled Again... Join Together is a box set of live material released from The Whos 1989 25th Anniversary Tour, including performance from Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey and John Entwistle with Simon Phillips on drums. ... Live at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970 (1970) is an album by The Who which was released in 1996. ... BBC Sessions by The Who was released 15 February 2000 on Polydor Records. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Who, at the time (2002) consisting of John Entwistle, Roger Datlrey, Pete Townshend, Zak Starkey, and John Rabbit Bundrick, performed a concert at the Royal Albert Hall for the Teenage Cancer Trust. ... This is the last concert of the Its Hard tour at the Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto, December 17, 1982. ... Encore Series 2002 is a series of recordings from The Whos 2002 American Tour. ... Encore Series 2004 is a series of recordings from The Whos 2004 tour to Japan, Australia, the UK and the U.S. It contains soundboard recordings of all 18 concerts from the tour, available as 2-CD individual shows or as part of a box set. ... Encore Series 2006 is a series of recordings from The Who Tour 2006-2007. ... A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ... Magic Bus: The Who on Tour is an album by British rock band The Who, released in the United States on November 30, 1968. ... Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy is a compilation album by British rock band The Who. ... Odds and Sods is a compilation album by British rock band, The Who. ... Hooligans is a two-disc compilation album of The Who. ... Whos Greatest Hits is a 1983 condensed compilation album from The Who. ... Whos Missing is a compilation of rare and previously unreleased songs by The Who. ... Twos Missing is a compilation of rare and previously unreleased songs by The Who. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thirty Years of Maximum R&B is a box set by British rock band, The Who. ... The Ultimate Collection (2002) by The Who is a two disc greatest hits set with both singles and top hits from albums, all of which have been remastered. ... Then and Now (2004) is an album by The Who aimed to support their comeback singles, Real Good Looking Boy and Old Red Wine. The set includes hit singles from the 60s, 70s, and 80s. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... The Kids Are Alright (soundtrack) is an album by British rock band The Who. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Monterey Pop is a 1968 film by D.A. Pennebaker that documents the Monterey Pop Festival of 1967. ... Woodstock (subtitled 3 Days of Peace & Music) is a 1970 documentary on the Woodstock Festival in 1969. ... Roger Daltrey as Tommy Tommy was a 1975 musical film, based on The Whos 1969 rock opera concept album Tommy. ... Quadrophenia is a 1979 British film based on the 1973 rock opera album Quadrophenia by The Who. ... Soundtrack album cover. ... McVicar is a dramatic British film issued in 1980 by The Who Films, Ltd. ... Buddys Song (1990) is a film starring Chesney Hawkes, Billy Murray, Lee Ross, Nick Moran, Sharon Duce, Emma Amos and Roger Daltrey, based on the novel by Nigel Hinton. ... For the album of the same name, see The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus (album) The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus is a film released in 1996 of a December 11, 1968 event put together by The Rolling Stones. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Boy Who Heard Music is a internet novella written by Pete Townshend. ... The following is a discography of albums and singles released by the UK rock band The Who. ... The Lifehouse Method is an Internet site where applicants can sit for an electronic musical portrait made up from data they enter into the website. ... This page is a list of the various members of The Who. ... Track Records is a record label founded by The Who to distribute artists and projects they wanted to support. ... The Who Tour 2006-2007 is The Whos first worldwide concert tour in several years. ... Brian Kehew is a Los Angeles-based musician and music producer. ... Doug Sandom (b. ... Bill Curbishley is a music producer, best known for his work with English rock group The Who. ... Kit Lambert (May 11, 1935 – April 7, 1981) was a record producer and the manager for The Who. ... Peter Meaden was a 1960s Mod and short time manager of the band The Who during their early days. ... Duncan Nimmo is a technical manager from New Zealand. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Who. ... Chris Stamp, a former filmmaker, was the co-manager (with Kit Lambert) and executive producer of The Who until 1973, at which point tensions between Pete Townshend and Lambert caused the management team to be replaced by former assistant Bill Curbishley. ... A Tale of Two Springfields is an episode from season twelve of the animated TV series The Simpsons. ...


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