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Encyclopedia > The Waterboys
The Waterboys
The Waterboys, performing a concert in Antwerp in 2003. Members, from left to right, Mike Scott, Geoff Dugmore, Steve Wickham, and Brad Weissman, are shown.
The Waterboys, performing a concert in Antwerp in 2003. Members, from left to right, Mike Scott, Geoff Dugmore, Steve Wickham, and Brad Weissman, are shown.
Background information
Origin London, England
Genre(s) Rock
Celtic
Years active 1983 – 1993, 2000 – Present
Associated
acts
World Party
Website Official site

The Waterboys are a band formed in 1983 by Mike Scott. The band's membership, past and present, has been composed mainly of musicians from Scotland and Ireland. London, Dublin, Spiddal, New York and Findhorn have all served as homes for the group. The band has played in a number of different styles, but most often their music can be described as a mix of Celtic folk music with rock and roll, or folk rock. After ten years of recording and touring, the band dissolved in 1993 and Scott pursued a solo career. The band reformed in 2000, and continues to release albums and tour worldwide. Scott himself emphasizes a continuity between The Waterboys and his solo work, saying that "To me there's no difference between Mike Scott and the Waterboys; they both mean the same thing. They mean myself and whoever are my current travelling musical companions."[1] Image File history File links The_Waterboys_in_Antwerp_2003_5. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rock and roll. ... Celtic music is a term utilized by record companies, music stores and music magazines to describe a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Western Europe. ... World Party is a successful British pop/rock band, which is essentially the solo project of its multi-talented only member, Karl Wallinger. ... Mike Scott performs at a concert in The Hague 2002. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots3 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  -  First Minister Jack McConnell... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... Spiddal (Irish: Bud Asal ) is a village on the shore of Galway Bay in County Galway in the Republic of Ireland, home to the stuff of lengends Diarmaid O Connor. ... NY redirects here. ... The Findhorn Foundation is a Scottish charitable trust registered in 1972 to act as a focal point for the work of the community that grew up around Eileen and Peter Caddy and Dorothy Maclean near Findhorn, Scotland, from 1962 onwards. ... “Folk song” redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ...


The early Waterboys sound was dubbed "The Big Music" after a song on their second album, A Pagan Place. This musical style was described by Scott as "a metaphor for seeing God's signature in the world."[2] It either influenced or was used to describe a number of other bands, including Simple Minds, The Alarm, In Tua Nua, Big Country, the Hothouse Flowers[3] and World Party, the last of which was made up of former Waterboys members.[4] In the late 1980s the band became significantly more folk influenced. The Waterboys eventually returned to rock and roll, and have released both rock and folk albums since reforming. Their songs, largely written by Scott, often contain literary references and are frequently concerned with spirituality. Both the group and its members' solo careers have received much praise from both rock and folk music critics, but The Waterboys as a band has never received the commercial success that some of its members have had independently. Aside from World Party, The Waterboys have also influenced musicians such as Colin Meloy of The Decemberists[5] Grant Nicholas of Feeder[6] and Miles Hunt of The Wonder Stuff;[7] both Bono[8] and The Edge[9] from U2 are fans of the band. For the book by Edna OBrien, see A Pagan Place (book). ... A Pagan Place was an album released in June 1984 by The Waterboys. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... The Alarm are a Welsh alternative rock band, who were most popular in the 1980s. ... In Tua Nua (roughly translated from the Irish as Into The New) was an Irish rock group who achieved a modicum of fame and success in both Ireland and Europe throughout the late 1980s. ... For other uses, see Big Country (disambiguation). ... The Hothouse Flowers is an Irish rock group that combines traditional Irish music with influences from soul, gospel and rock. ... World Party is a successful British pop/rock band, which is essentially the solo project of its multi-talented only member, Karl Wallinger. ... Colin Meloy, center, in a promotional photo of his band The Decemberists. ... The Decemberists are a five-piece indie pop band from Portland, Oregon, fronted by singer/songwriter Colin Meloy. ... Feeder - 1 December 2005 - Cardiff CIA Grant Nicholas is the lead singer of the Indie band Feeder, along with bassist Taka Hirose and drummers Jon Lee and later Mark Richardson. ... Feeder are a British rock band who formed in Newport, South Wales during 1992. ... Miles Hunt (born 29th July 1966) was the singer / guitarist and songwriter for the Stourbridge (West Midlands UK), based pop band The Wonder Stuff. ... The Wonder Stuff are a band originally based in Stourbridge, West Midlands, in the Black Country, England. ... Paul David Hewson, KBE[1] (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono, is the lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... For other persons named David Evans, see David Evans (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...

Contents

History

The Waterboys have gone through three distinct phases. Their early years, or "Big Music" period, were both productive and defined a new sound in British rock and roll.[citation needed] The following folk music period was characterized by an emphasis on touring over album production and by a remarkably large band membership, leading to the description of the group as a "Raggle Taggle band".[10] After a brief return to the "Big Music" for one tour[11] and the release of a mainstream rock and roll album with Dream Harder, the band dissolved until its rebirth in 2000. In the years since, the band has revisited both rock and folk music, and continues to tour and release studio albums. Dream Harder was an album released in 1993 by The Waterboys. ...


Formation

Scott, the founder and only permanent member of The Waterboys, made a number of solo recordings in late 1981 and early 1982 while in a band named Another Pretty Face (later called Funhouse). These sessions at Redshop Studio are the earliest recordings that would be released under The Waterboys name. During the same period, Scott formed the short-lived band The Red and the Black, with saxophone player Anthony Thistlethwaite, after hearing him play on Waiting on Egypt, a Nikki Sudden album. The Red and the Black performed nine concerts in London.[12] Thistlethwaite introduced Scott to drummer Kevin Wilkinson, who joined The Red and the Black. During 1982, Scott made a number of recordings, both solo and with Thistlethwaite and Wilkinson. These recording sessions, both of Scott's solo work and the group performances, would later be divided between The Waterboys' first and second albums. The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family, usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece like the clarinet. ... Anthony Thistlethwaite born 1955 was a member of 1980s folk rock group The Waterboys. ... Nikki Sudden (July 19, 1956 – March 26, 2006) born Adrian Nicholas Godfrey in London, was a prolific British singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Kevin Wilkinson (1958 - July 17, 1999) was a musician from Swindon, England. ...


In 1983, even though Scott's record label, Ensign Records, expected his first album to be a solo effort,[13] Scott decided to start a new band. He chose The Waterboys as its name from a line in the Lou Reed song "The Kids" on the album Berlin.[10] In March 1983, Ensign released the first recording under the new band name, a single titled A Girl Called Johnny, the A-side of which was a tribute to Patti Smith. This was followed in oWaterboys' first performance as a group, on the BBC's Old Grey Whistle Test. The BBC performance included a new member, keyboard player Karl Wallinger.[12] The Waterboys released their self-titled debut, The Waterboys, in July 1983. Their music, influenced by Patti Smith, Bob Dylan and David Bowie, was compared by critics to U2 in its cinematic sweep.[14] Ensign Records was started in 1976 by Nigel Grainge and Chris Hill as an independent Phonogram subsidiary. ... Lewis Allan Lou Reed[1] (born March 2, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Berlin is a 1973 album by Lou Reed, his third solo album and the follow-up to the widely accessible and upbeat glam rock classic Transformer. ... Alternate meanings: Single In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-sides, often accompanied by several B-sides—usually remixes or other songs. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... The Old Grey Whistle Test was an influential BBC2 television music show that ran from September 1971 until 1987. ... Karl Wallinger (born October 19, 1957 in Prestatyn, Wales), is a Welsh musician. ... This eponymously named debut album from The Waterboys was recorded between December 1981 and November 1982 at Redshop Studio, London and Farmyard Studio, Little Chalfont. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is a Grammy, Golden Globe and Academy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


Early years: the Big Music

Cover for the single of "The Big Music", whose title song would define The Waterboys' early sound. The album cover depicts members Scott, Thistlethwaite and Wilkinson.
Cover for the single of "The Big Music", whose title song would define The Waterboys' early sound. The album cover depicts members Scott, Thistlethwaite and Wilkinson.

After the release of their debut The Waterboys began touring. Their first show was at the Batschkapp Club in Frankfurt in February 1984. The band then consisted of Mike Scott on vocals and guitar, Anthony Thistlethwaite on saxophone and mandolin, Wallinger on keyboards, Roddy Lorimer on trumpets, Martyn Swain on bass and Kevin Wilkinson on drums. John Caldwell from Another Pretty Face also played guitar, and Scottish singer Eddi Reader sang backing vocals for the band's first two concerts.[12] The band made some new recordings and over-dubbed old material in late 1983 and the spring of 1984 which would be released as The Waterboys' second album. A Pagan Place was released in June 1984 preceded by the single The Big Music. "The Big Music", the name of the single's A-side track, was adopted by some commentators as a description of The Waterboys' sound, and is still used to refer to the musical style of their first three albums.[citation needed] The release of the album was followed by further touring including support for The Pretenders and U2 and a show at the Glastonbury Festival. Image File history File links The_Big_Music_Waterboys_Single_Cover. ... Image File history File links The_Big_Music_Waterboys_Single_Cover. ... Alternate meanings: Single In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-sides, often accompanied by several B-sides—usually remixes or other songs. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A mandolin is a small, stringed musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... Roddy Lorimer (b. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium and tuba. ... Martin EB18 Bass Guitar in flight case. ... Bass drum made from wood, rope, and cowskin A drum is a musical instrument in the percussion group, technically classified as a membranophone. ... Eddi Reader is a Scottish singer, known both for her work with Fairground Attraction and for her solo career. ... A Pagan Place was an album released in June 1984 by The Waterboys. ... The Pretenders are an Anglo-American rock band. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury Festival or Glasto, is the largest [1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ...


The band began to record new material in the spring of 1985 for a new album. Late in the sessions Steve Wickham joined the group and added his violin to the track The Pan Within. Wickham had been invited after Scott had heard him on a Sinéad O'Connor demo recorded at Karl Wallinger's house.[12] The Waterboys released their third album This Is the Sea in October 1985. It sold better than either of the two earlier albums, and managed to get into the Top Forty. A single from it, The Whole of the Moon, reached number 26 in the UK. Promotion efforts were hampered by Scott's refusal to perform on Top of the Pops, which insisted that its performers lip sync.[11] Director Meiert Avis addressed this issue when shooting a music video for "Whole of the Moon" by recording Scott's vocals live. The album release was followed by successful tours of the UK and North America with Marco Sin replacing Martyn Swain on bass, and Chris Whitten replacing Kevin Wilkinson on drums. Towards the end of the tour Wallinger left to form his own band, World Party, and was replaced by Guy Chambers. At the same time, drummer Dave Ruffy replaced Chris Whitten. Steve Wickham playing the fiddle at a concert in The Hague 2002. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... Sinéad Marie Bernadette OConnor (born December 8, 1966) is a Grammy Award winning Irish singer and songwriter. ... This Is The Sea was The Waterboys third and last of their Big Music era albums. ... Top of the Pops, also known as TOTP, is a long-running British music chart television programme, made and broadcast by the BBC. It was originally shown each week, mostly on BBC One, from 1 January 1964 to 30 July 2006. ... Lip synchronization is the synchronization of audio signals (sometimes with corresponding video signals) so that there is no noticeable lack of simultaneity between them. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... World Party is a successful British pop/rock band, which is essentially the solo project of its multi-talented only member, Karl Wallinger. ... Guy Chambers (born January 12, 1963 in London) is an English songwriter and record producer best known for his long partnership with Robbie Williams. ...


Late 1980s: The Raggle Taggle band

At the invitation of new member Steve Wickham, Mike Scott moved to Dublin and quickly became influenced by the traditional Irish music there as well as by country and gospel.[15] The band's lineup changed once again with Scott, Wickham and Thistlethwaite now joined by Trevor Hutchinson on bass and Peter McKinney on drums. The new band, which the official Waterboys' website refers to as the "Raggle Taggle band" lineup,[10] spent 1986 and 1987 recording in Dublin and touring the UK, Ireland, Europe and Israel. Some of these performances were released in 1998 on The Live Adventures of the Waterboys, including a famous Glastonbury performance in 1986. An Irish band playing in the Hetzel Union Building, Penn State University. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Gospel music refers to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the first quarter of the twentieth century or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by predominately white Southern Gospel artists. ... Trevor Hutchinson with Lúnasa Trevor Hutchinson is the bass player and a founding member of Lúnasa. ... The Live Adventures of the Waterboys is a concert recording, released by The Waterboys in 1998. ...


In 1988 Scott took the band to Spiddal in the west of Ireland where they set up a recording studio in Spiddal House to finish recording their new album. Fisherman's Blues was released in October of 1988 and showcased many guest musicians that had played with the band in Dublin and Spiddal. Critics and fans were split between those embracing the new influence of Scottish and Irish folk music and others disappointed after hoping for a continuation of the style of This Is the Sea. The album helped to increase the growing popularity of Irish music. World Music: The Rough Guide notes that "some cynics claim that Scotsman Mike Scott gave Irish music back to the Irish... his impact can't be underestimated",[16] but Scott himself explains that it was the Irish tradition that influenced him; "I was in love with Ireland. Every day was a new adventure, it was mythical... Being part of a brotherhood of musicians was a great thing in those days, with all the many musicians of all stripes we befriended in Ireland. I still have that connection to the Irish musicians and tap into it..."[17] Owing to the large number of tracks that were recorded in the three years between This Is the Sea and Fisherman's Blues, The Waterboys released a second album of songs from this period in 2001, titled Too Close to Heaven (or Fisherman's Blues, Part 2 in North America), and more material was released as bonus tracks for the 2006 reissue of the remastered Fisherman's Blues album. Spiddal (Irish: Bud Asal ) is a village on the shore of Galway Bay in County Galway in the Republic of Ireland, home to the stuff of lengends Diarmaid O Connor. ... The album Fishermans Blues marked a change in the sound of The Waterboys, abandoning their earlier grandiose rock sound for a mixture of traditional Irish music, country music and rock and roll. ... Too Close to Heaven is a collection of outtakes, alternative versions, and unreleased tracks from The Waterboys Fishermans Blues period, released January 2002. ...


After further touring the band returned to Spiddal in order to record a new album. The Waterboys now consisted of Mike Scott, Steve Wickham, Anthony Thistlethwaite, Colin Blakey on whistle, flute and piano, Sharon Shannon on accordion, Trevor Hutchinson on bass and Noel Bridgeman on drums. Their fifth album, Room to Roam was released in September, 1990. It is from Room to Roam that the "Raggle Taggle band" reference comes from. One of the album's tracks was a recording of the traditional folk ballad "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy". A whistle is a one-note woodwind instrument which produces sound from a stream of forced air. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Annika Johanssons promotional photo of Sharon Shannon captures the spirit of her lively accordion performances. ... This article is about the instrument as a whole. ... Room to Roam is an album by The Waterboys; it continued the folk-rock sound of 1988s Fishermans Blues, but was less of a commercial success, reaching one-hundred and eighty on the Billboard Top 200 after its release in September 1990 (see 1990 in music). ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... The Raggle Taggle Gypsy is a traditional folk ballad. ...


Just before Room to Roam was released Wickham left over a disagreement with Scott and Thistlethwaite regarding the future direction of the band's sound. Scott and Thistlethwaite wanted to move the band back to a more rock and roll style, and Wickham disagreed.[10] His departure started the band's dissolution, and in his wake Shannon and Blakey both left. Scott, Thistlethwaite and Hutchinson recruited Ken Blevins on drums to fulfil the group's tour dates.


End and return of the Waterboys

Trevor Hutchinson left the band in 1991, a momentous year for the group that also saw a re-release of the single The Whole of the Moon from This Is the Sea. The single reached number three on the United Kingdom charts. Scott spent the rest of the year writing new material and moved to New York. Thistlethwaite left the band in December, leaving Mike Scott as The Waterboys' only member. The next album was completed with session musicians and was released in 1993 as Dream Harder with a new hard rock-influenced sound. Frustrated by not being able to get a new touring Waterboys band together, Scott left New York, abandoning the "Waterboys" name and embarking upon a solo career. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


However, Scott later resurrected the Waterboys name, citing its recognition amongst fans, for the 2000 album A Rock in the Weary Land. The album had a new, experimental rock sound, inspired by contemporary bands Radiohead and Beck that "shocked" some listeners.[15] Scott described the new sound as "Sonic Rock".[1] A number of old Waterboys guested on the album including Thistlethwaite and Wilkinson. By 2001 the core of the new Waterboys included Mike Scott on vocals and guitar, Richard Naiff on keyboards and organs and Wickham, who had returned to the band, on violin. The group changed direction once again in 2003 and released Universal Hall a mostly acoustic album with a return of some Celtic influences from the Fisherman's Blues era. The album was followed by a tour of the UK and then Europe. Their first official live album, Karma to Burn, was released in 2005. A new studio album, Book of Lightning, was released April 2, 2007. A Rock in the Weary Land was an album released in 2000 by The Waterboys. ... Radiohead are an English rock band from Oxfordshire, initially formed in the mid-1980s under the name On a Friday. ... Beck Hansen (born Bek David Campbell, July 8, 1970) is an American musician, singer-songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, known by his simple stage name of Beck. ... Richard Naiff plays keyboards with The Waterboys in Antwerp, 2003. ... A keyboard instrument is a musical instrument played with a musical keyboard. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Universal Hall is a 2003 (see 2003 in music) album released by The Waterboys. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... Karma to Burn is the first official live album from The Waterboys. ... Book of Lightning is the ninth studio album by The Waterboys, scheduled for release April 2, 2007 through W14/Universal Records. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...


Music

The Waterboys' lyrics and arrangements reflect Scott's current interests and influences,[18] the latter including the musical sensibilities of other members. Wickham in particular had a tremendous impact on the band's sound after joining the group.[19] In terms of arrangement and instrumentation, rock and roll and celtic folk music[20] have played the largest roles in the band's sound. Two of the greatest influences on Scott's lyrics are literature and spirituality.[citation needed] Other contributing factors include punk music's DIY ethic,[11] the British poetic tradition, and Scott's experiences at Findhorn,[21] where he has lived for some years. See also: DIY Network, a cable TV network. ... The Findhorn Foundation is a Scottish charitable trust registered in 1972 to act as a focal point for the work of the community that grew up around Eileen and Peter Caddy and Dorothy Maclean near Findhorn, Scotland, from 1962 onwards. ...


Sound

The Waterboys' music can be divided into three distinct styles. The first is represented by the first three albums, released between 1983 and 1985. The band's arrangements during this period, described by All Music Guide as a "rich, dramatic sound... majestic",[22] and typically referred to as "The Big Music", combined the rock and roll sound of early U2 with elements of classical trumpet (Lorimer), jazz saxophone (Thistlethwaite) and contemporary keyboards (Wallinger). Scott emphasized the arrangement's fullness by using production techniques similar to Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound". The archetypal example, the song "The Big Music", gave the style its name, but the best-selling example was "The Whole of the Moon", the song that the early-1980s Waterboys are best known for and that demonstrates both Wallinger's synthpop keyboard effects and the effectiveness of the brass section of the band. Harvey Phillip Spector (born December 26, 1940) is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. ... Wall of Sound is a phrase used to describe the effect created by the music production techniques of record producer Phil Spector. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A brass instrument is a musical instrument whose tone is produced by vibration of the lips as a player blows into a tubular resonator. ...

  • The Whole of the Moon ( file info) — play in browser (beta)
    • The album version of "The Whole of the Moon" demonstrates the sound of The Big Music period.
    • Problems listening to the file? See media help.


After Wickham's joining and the move to Ireland, the band went three years before releasing another album. Fisherman's Blues, and more particularly Room to Roam, traded "The Big Music"'s keyboards and brass for traditional instruments such as tin whistle, flute, fiddle, accordion, harmonica, and bouzouki. Celtic folk music replaced rock as the main inspiration for song arrangements on both albums. Rolling Stone describes the sound as "an impressive mixture of rock music and Celtic ruralism..., Beatles and Donovan echoes and, of course, lots of grand guitar, fiddle, mandolin, whistle, flute and accordion playing".[23] Traditional folk songs were recorded along with those written by Scott. "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy", a British folk ballad at least two hundred years old, was recorded on Room to Roam. It became closely associated with the band, much as the song "The Big Music" did, and also gave its name to describe the band's character. The recording emphasizes how distinctly different the band's music had become in the five years since the last of "The Big Music" albums. Image File history File links The_Whole_of_the_Moon_The_Waterboys_19_sec. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Greek (tetrachordo) Bouzouki The bouzouki (gr. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Donovan (Donovan Philips Leitch, born May 10, 1946, in Maryhill, Glasgow) is a Scottish popular singer, songwriter and guitarist. ...

  • The Raggle Taggle Gypsy ( file info) — play in browser (beta)
    • The Waterboys' Room to Roam version of the folk song "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy".
    • Problems listening to the file? See media help.


After the break-up of the "Raggle Taggle band", Scott used The Waterboys' name for Dream Harder and A Rock in the Weary Land. These two albums, separated by seven years and bookending Scott's solo album releases, were both rock albums but with distinctive approaches to that genre. Dream Harder was described as "disappointingly mainstream",[24] whereas the sound of the A Rock in the Weary Land was inspired by alternative music and was praised by critics.[1] For 2003's Universal Hall, however, Wickham had once again rejoined the band, and that album saw a return of the acoustic folk instrumentation of the late 1980s Waterboys, with the exception of the song "Seek the Light", which is instead an idiosyncratic EBM track. Image File history File links The_Raggle_Taggle_Gypsy_The_Waterboys_13_sec. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Electronic body music (acronymed and mainly known as EBM) is a music genre that combines elements of industrial music and electronic punk music. ...


Literary influences

Scott reads aloud from Hafez' The Gift at a Waterboys concert in Antwerp in 2004. Waterboys' concerts often feature readings from the Sufi poet's work.
Scott reads aloud from Hafez' The Gift at a Waterboys concert in Antwerp in 2004. Waterboys' concerts often feature readings from the Sufi poet's work.[25]

Scott, who briefly studied literature and philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, has made heavy use of English literature in his music. "The Whole of the Moon", one of The Waterboys' signature songs, is partially a tribute to writer C.S. Lewis. Lewis' work is also referenced in other Waterboys' songs, such as "Church Not Made With Hands" and "Further Up, Further In". Image File history File links Mike_Scott_with_book_in_Antwerp_2004. ... Image File history File links Mike_Scott_with_book_in_Antwerp_2004. ... Hafez, detail of an illumination in a Persian manuscript of the Divan of Hafez, 18th century. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ...


The Waterboys have recorded poems set to music by writers including William Butler Yeats ("The Stolen Child" and "Love and Death"), George MacDonald ("Room to Roam"), and Robert Burns ("Ever To Be Near Ye"). A member of the Academy of American Poets writes that "The Waterboys' gift lies in locating Burns and Yeats within a poetic tradition of song, revelry, and celebration, re-invigorating their verses with the energy of contemporary music". So close is the identification of The Waterboys with their literary influences that the writer also remarks that "W.B.", the initials to which Yeats' first and middle names are often shortened, could also stand for "Waterboys".[2] W.B. Yeats in Dublin on 24 January 1908. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Stolen Child The Stolen Child is a poem by William Butler Yeats, published in 1889 in The Wanderings of Oisin and Other Poems. ... George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... Robert Burns, foremost Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and a lyricist. ... The Academy of American Poets is the largest organization in the United States dedicated to the art of poetry. ...


Scott has also used a number of poetic tropes in lyrics, including anthropomorphism (eg. "Islandman"), metaphor (eg. "A Church Not Made with Hands", "The Whole of the Moon"), and metonymy (eg. "Old England"). The latter song quotes from both Yeats and James Joyce. While the lyrics of the band have explored a large number of themes, symbolic references to water are especially prominent. Water is often referenced in their songs (eg. "This Is the Sea", "Strange Boat", "Fisherman's Blues"). The Waterboys' logo, first seen on the album cover of The Waterboys, symbolizes waves.[10] The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... An anthropomorphic character; a cat ascribed human characteristics. ... Look up metaphor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In rhetoric, metonymy is the substitution of one word for another word with which it is associated. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish writer and poet, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ...


Spirituality

The Waterboys' lyrics show influences from different spiritual traditions. The first is the romantic Neopaganism and esotericism of authors such as Yeats and Dion Fortune, which can be observed in the repeated references to the ancient Greek deity Pan in both "The Pan Within" and "The Return of Pan". Pan was also featured on the album art for Room to Roam. "Medicine Bow", a song from the recording sessions for This Is the Sea, refers to Native American spirituality in its use of the word "medicine" to mean spiritual power. Scott's interest in Native American issues is also demonstrated in his preliminary recordings for the group's debut album, which included the songs "Death Song of the Sioux Parts One & Two" and "Bury My Heart". "Bury My Heart" is a reference to Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.[26] a history of Native Americans in the western United States. Scott took the traditional Sioux song "The Earth Only Endures" from Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, and set it to new music; the arrangement appears on The Secret Life of the Waterboys. Christian imagery can be seen in the songs "December" from The Waterboys, "The Christ in You" on Universal Hall, and indirectly in the influence of Lewis in a number of other songs, but Scott writes that his lyrics are not influenced by Christianity.[27] Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... The term Esotericism refers to the doctrines or practices of esoteric knowledge, or otherwise the quality or state of being described as esoteric, or obscure. ... Dion Fortune Dion Fortune - Violet Mary Firth Evans (1890 - 1946), (D.O.B December 6, 1890) born Violet Mary Firth, was a British magician and author who was born at Bryn-y-Bia in Llandudno, Wales. ... The Temple to Athena, the Parthenon Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around three thousand years. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of nature who watches over shepherds and their flocks: paein means to pasture. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... Dee Brown (February 29, 1908---December 12, 2002) was an American novelist and historian. ... Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (1970). ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... The Sioux are a diverse group of Native Americans generally divided into three subgroups: Lakota, Dakota and Nakota. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


Scott has also said, "I've always been interested in spirituality, and I've never joined any religion. And it really turns me off when people from one religion say theirs is the only way. And I believe all religions are just different ways to spirituality. And if you call that universality, well, then I'm all for it."[28] Despite Scott's pluralist perspective, The Waterboys have been labelled as "Christian rock" by some reviewers.[29] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Universality (philosophy). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ...


Membership

Steve Wickham, The Waterboys' fiddler, has played an especially important role in the band's direction.
Steve Wickham, The Waterboys' fiddler, has played an especially important role in the band's direction.

More than thirty musicians have performed live as a Waterboy.[30] Some have spent only a short time with the band, contributing to a single tour or album, while others have been long-term members with significant contributions. Scott has been the band's lead vocalist, motivating force, and principal songwriter throughout the group's history, but a number of other musicians are closely identified with the band. Image File history File links Steve_Wickham_The_Hague_2002_3. ... Image File history File links Steve_Wickham_The_Hague_2002_3. ...


Anthony Thistlethwaite was an original member of the band, and remained a member until 1991 when the band broke up, although he also joined a few recording sessions for A Rock in the Weary Land. After Scott and Wickham, Thistlethwaite has more songwriting credits than any other Waterboy. His saxophone, regularly featured in solos, was one half of the early group's distinctive brass section, but he has also played guitar, keyboards and a number of other instruments for the band. He pressed to return The Waterboys to a rock music sound after Room to Roam, but did not appear on Dream Harder, the result of that decision. He is now a member of The Saw Doctors, and has also released three solo albums. Anthony Thistlethwaite born 1955 was a member of 1980s folk rock group The Waterboys. ... The Saw Doctors are a folk-rock band from Tuam, County Galway in the west of Ireland. ...


Kevin Wilkinson, another original member, was The Waterboys' drummer from 1983-1984, and continued to play in some studio sessions afterwards. His last appearance was onA Rock in the Weary Land. He led the rhythm section of the group during its "Big Music" phase, sometimes without the assistance of any bass guitar. Scott describes Wilkinson's drumming as "bright and angular, an unusual sound".[18] Kevin Wilkinson (1958 - July 17, 1999) was a musician from Swindon, England. ...


Karl Wallinger joined the group in 1983, shortly after its formation. He left the group two years later, but in that relatively short period made important contributions to both A Pagan Place and This is the Sea. He co-wrote "Don't Bang the Drum", the environmentalism anthem on This is the Sea. His keyboards and synthesizer work expanded the group's sound, and he also did some studio work for demo sessions. Wallinger's World Party project was heavily influenced by his work with The Waterboys. Karl Wallinger (born October 19, 1957 in Prestatyn, Wales), is a Welsh musician. ... For the psychology topic, see Environmental psychology. ... World Party is a successful British pop/rock band, which is essentially the solo project of its multi-talented only member, Karl Wallinger. ...


Roddy Lorimer's participation in the group began in 1983, contributing his trumpet playing "on and off"[10] through 1990. He and Thistlethwaite took turns leading the brass section of the band, and Lorimer was also a featured soloist, most famously on "The Whole of the Moon". He further contributed backing vocals to the song. His trumpet style is a combination of his classical training with an experimental approach encouraged by Scott.[31] Lorimer returned for some studio work in 2006.[10] Roddy Lorimer (b. ...


Steve Wickham transformed the group with his joining in 1985. His strong interest in folk music directly resulted in the band's change of direction. His initial involvement with The Waterboys ended in 1990 when Scott and Thistlethwaite wanted to return to rock and roll, but Wickham rejoined the group again in 2000, and, as of 2007, continues to perform with the band. Described by Scott as "the world's greatest rock fiddle player",[32] he has written more songs for the band than anyone other than Scott, including the group's handful of instrumental recordings. Steve Wickham playing the fiddle at a concert in The Hague 2002. ...

After 2000, Richard Naiff became one of the three core Waterboys members.
After 2000, Richard Naiff became one of the three core Waterboys members.

Richard Naiff first recorded with the band in 1999, and joined permanently in 2000. As of 2007, he is a core member, along with Scott and Wickham. He is a classically-trained pianist and flautist, and plays keyboards for The Waterboys. Ian McNabb described him as Scott's "find of the century"[33] and reviewers have described him as "phenomenally talented".[34] Image File history File links Richard_Naiff_in_Antwerp_2003_1. ... Image File history File links Richard_Naiff_in_Antwerp_2003_1. ... Richard Naiff plays keyboards with The Waterboys in Antwerp, 2003. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... A flautist demonstrates flute-playing technique A flautist or flutist is a musician who plays the flute. ... Robert Ian McNabb (born 3 November 1962) is known both for his work as leader and songwriter-in-chief of the Icicle Works in the 1980s, and his critically-acclaimed solo career throughout from the early 1990s to date. ...


Other notable members of the band include bassist McNabb, leader of Icicle Works; Sharon Shannon, who became Ireland's all-time best-selling traditional musician;[35] the experimental musician Thighpaulsandra, producer Guy Chambers, and Patti Smith Group drummer Jay Dee Daugherty. Named after a novel, The Icicle Works joined Liverpools early 1980s neo-psychedelia wave, which also propelled Echo & the Bunnymen and The Teardrop Explodes to stardom. ... Annika Johanssons promotional photo of Sharon Shannon captures the spirit of her lively accordion performances. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... Thighpaulsandra (born Tim Lewis to retired opera singer Dorothy Lewis) is a Welsh experimental musician. ... Guy Chambers (born January 12, 1963 in London) is an English songwriter and record producer best known for his long partnership with Robbie Williams. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ...


Discography

The Waterboys have released several albums and singles. The group's releases have received a great deal of praise from critics, but have had less commercial success than some of their contemporaries. In terms of music charts, the group's greatest success was with the 1991 re-release of the single for "The Whole of the Moon", which reached number three on the UK singles chart[36] and won the Ivor Novello Award. Fisherman's Blues was the group's best-selling studio album, reaching number thirteen on the UK album charts upon its release in 1988. The highest chart position of any album was for The Best of the Waterboys 81–90. The compilation album reached position two in the UK. A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... The Ivor Novello Awards, named after the entertainer Ivor Novello, are awards awarded for songwriting and composing. ...


Studio albums

This eponymously named debut album from The Waterboys was recorded between December 1981 and November 1982 at Redshop Studio, London and Farmyard Studio, Little Chalfont. ... A Pagan Place was an album released in June 1984 by The Waterboys. ... This Is The Sea was The Waterboys third and last of their Big Music era albums. ... The album Fishermans Blues marked a change in the sound of The Waterboys, abandoning their earlier grandiose rock sound for a mixture of traditional Irish music, country music and rock and roll. ... Room to Roam is an album by The Waterboys; it continued the folk-rock sound of 1988s Fishermans Blues, but was less of a commercial success, reaching one-hundred and eighty on the Billboard Top 200 after its release in September 1990 (see 1990 in music). ... Dream Harder was an album released in 1993 by The Waterboys. ... A Rock in the Weary Land was an album released in 2000 by The Waterboys. ... Too Close to Heaven is a collection of outtakes, alternative versions, and unreleased tracks from The Waterboys Fishermans Blues period, released January 2002. ... Universal Hall is a 2003 (see 2003 in music) album released by The Waterboys. ... Book of Lightning is the ninth studio album by The Waterboys, scheduled for release April 2, 2007 through W14/Universal Records. ...

Live albums and compilations

Mike Scott is alone on the album cover for The Whole of the Moon: the Music of Mike Scott and the Waterboys, a compilation album containing both Waterboys and Mike Scott solo material.
Mike Scott is alone on the album cover for The Whole of the Moon: the Music of Mike Scott and the Waterboys, a compilation album containing both Waterboys and Mike Scott solo material.

Image File history File links The_Whole_Of_The_Moon_Waterboys_Album_Cover. ... Image File history File links The_Whole_Of_The_Moon_Waterboys_Album_Cover. ... The Live Adventures of the Waterboys is a concert recording, released by The Waterboys in 1998. ... Karma to Burn is the first official live album from The Waterboys. ...

Singles

This eponymously named debut album from The Waterboys was recorded in two studio sessions in December 1981 and November 1982. ... This eponymously named debut album from The Waterboys was recorded in two studio sessions in December 1981 and November 1982. ... For the book by Edna OBrien, see A Pagan Place (book). ... The album Fishermans Blues marked a change in the sound of The Waterboys, abandoning their earlier grandiose rock sound for a mixture of traditional Irish music, country music and rock and roll. ... For the book by Edna OBrien, see A Pagan Place (book). ... Dream Harder is an album released in 1993 credited to The Waterboys, but recorded by Mike Scott with session musicians. ... Dream Harder is an album released in 1993 credited to The Waterboys, but recorded by Mike Scott with session musicians. ... A Rock in the Weary Land was an album released in 2000 by The Waterboys. ... Book of Lightning is the ninth studio album by The Waterboys, scheduled for release April 2, 2007 through W14/Universal Records. ...

Further reading

A biography of Mike Scott & The Waterboys Strange Boat has been published.

  • Abrahams, Ian. Strange Boat (SAF publishing) ISBN 0-946719-92-6

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c A Rock in the Weary Land review. All Music Guide. Retrieved on October 22, 2005.
  2. ^ a b The "Big Music" of the Waterboys: Song, Revelry, and Celebration. Retrieved on October 22, 2005. This article appeared as part of the Academy of American Poets' web-based National Poetry Almanac's 2004 "Poetry and Music" series. The author is unidentified. See Poetry and Music. National Poetry Almanac. Retrieved on December 1, 2005. for more information about the series.
  3. ^ 6 Echoes of The Big Music. Retrieved on October 22, 2005.
  4. ^ Karl Wallinger formed the band, Guy Chambers and Chris Whitten later left The Waterboys to join World Party.
  5. ^ The Decembrists Biography. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.
  6. ^ Feeder Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved on October 26, 2005.
  7. ^ interviews: Howe Gelb. tastyfanzine.org. Retrieved on November 21, 2005.
  8. ^ News:Bono's Top Ten List. U2 station. Retrieved on January 11, 2007.
  9. ^ (December 2005) "Four Chancers From North Dublin". Word Magazine. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g FAQ. mikescottwaterboys. Retrieved on October 28, 2005.
  11. ^ a b c Peter Anderson. Mike Scott/Waterboys biography. Record Collector magazine. Retrieved on October 22, 2005.
  12. ^ a b c d Archive 1978-85. mikescottwaterboys.com. Retrieved on October 28, 2005.
  13. ^ Scott, Mike (2002). "Recording Notes", The Waterboys. EMI, 2. 
  14. ^ A comparison which continues to be made. See All Music Guide review. Retrieved on October 22, 2005.
  15. ^ a b Gerry Galipault. Mike Scott is The Waterboys and The Waterboys Are Mike Scott. Pause and Play. Retrieved on October 22, 2005.
  16. ^ Broughton, Simon; & Ellingham, Mark (1999). World Music: the Rough Guide Volume 1. Rough Guides, Ltd., 188. ISBN 1-85828-635-2. 
  17. ^ Mike Talks. mikescottwaterboys. Retrieved on December 1, 2005.
  18. ^ a b Scott, Mike (2004) Recording Notes in This is the Sea (p. 5) [CD liner notes] London: EMI
  19. ^ Findhorn. mikescottwaterboys. Retrieved on November 18, 2005.
  20. ^ Scott, Mike (2006) "Fisherman's Blues, Roots and the Celtic Soul" [CD liner notes] London: EMI
  21. ^ Too Close to Heaven history. mikescottwaterboys. Retrieved on November 18, 2005.
  22. ^ All Music Guide biography. Retrieved on November 3, 2005.
  23. ^ Room to Roam review. Rolling Stone.com. Retrieved on November 3, 2005.
  24. ^ Mike Scott. Chicago Other Voices Poetry. Retrieved on November 2, 2005.
  25. ^ One World peace concert. EdinburghGuide.com. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.
  26. ^ The phrase "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" is originally from Stephen Vincent Benet's poem "American Names".
  27. ^ Scott, Mike (2007). "Mike's world: Wikipedia" myspace.com Waterboys blog. URL accessed January 6, 2007.
  28. ^ Waterboys Express Spirituality. Chicago Innerview. Retrieved on October 29, 2005.
  29. ^ The Waterboys concert review. Pop Matters. Retrieved on October 29, 2005.
  30. ^ FAQ Who's Who. mikescottwaterboys. Retrieved on October 28, 2005.
  31. ^ Roddy Lorimer. Kick Horns Line Up. Retrieved on October 31, 2005.
  32. ^ Wickham agrees. An interview with Steve Wickham. Retrieved on October 22, 2005.
  33. ^ Karma to Burn reports. mikescottwaterboys. Retrieved on November 3, 2005.
  34. ^ Universal Hall, Findhorn, Scotland, January 2002. Cluas.com Irish music. Retrieved on October 30, 2005.
  35. ^ Sharon Shannon biography 2005. The Daisy Label. Retrieved on October 30, 2005.
  36. ^ Weller, Helen; Tony Brown (1997). Guinness Book of British Hit Singles, 11th ed.. ISBN 0-85112-027-X. 
  37. ^ a b Scott, Mike (2007). "New Waterboys Album Book of Lightning April 2" Myspace blog. URL accessed January 16, 2007.

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