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Encyclopedia > The Washington Times
The Washington Times
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Unification Church via News World Communications
Editor John F. Solomon
Founded 1982
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Circulation 102,258[1]

Website: www.washingtontimes.com

The Washington Times is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. It was co-founded in 1982 by Unification Church founder Sun Myung Moon and Bo Hi Pak, one of his main assistants.[2] As of March 31, 2007, the Times had an average daily circulation of 102,351,[3] about one-seventh that of its chief competitor, The Washington Post. The Times has several prominent writers. The Washington Times-Herald was an American daily newspaper once published in Washington, D.C.. The Times-Herald was created by the 1939 merger of two former Hearst dailies, the Times (not to be confused with the current Washington Times) and the Herald. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (336x612, 85 KB) Summary source: washtimes. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ... News World Communications, Inc. ... ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... ... The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ... Sun Myung Moon (born February 25, 1920; lunar: January 6, 1920) founded the Unification Church (later renamed Family Federation for World Peace and Unification) on May 1, 1954, in Seoul, South Korea. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...

Contents

Founding

The Times is a publication of News World Communications, Inc., described by the Columbia Journalism Review as "the media arm of Reverend Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church".[4] News World was founded by Moon and Bo Hi Pak, and its board of directors are members of the Unification Church. News World Communications, Inc. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... Sun Myung Moon (born February 25, 1920; lunar: January 6, 1920) founded the Unification Church (later renamed Family Federation for World Peace and Unification) on May 1, 1954, in Seoul, South Korea. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ...


Investigative journalist Robert Parry, who also called the Times a "$3 Billion Propaganda Organ" for the Republican Party, wrote about the founding of the Times: Robert Parry is an American investigative journalist who has written extensively about the Iran-Contra scandal. ... For political parties named Republican Party in other countries, see Republican Party. ...

By the 1980s, the likes of South Korean theocrat Rev. Sun Myung Moon and Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch were pouring billions of dollars into a rapidly expanding right-wing media. From these investments came a plethora of well-financed think tanks, year-round attack groups, and a vertically integrated conservative news media – from books, magazines and newspapers to radio, TV and eventually the Internet. Right-wing activists flocked to Washington and New York for good-paying jobs as journalists and pundits.[5][6]

In December of 2000, Moon said: Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...

"We even have to utilize the media for the sake of church development. The church is the mind and the media is the body, to reach the external world. We should begin that movement and activity in the United States, because the Washington Times and UPI are headquartered there. Once we establish our organization in the United States, it can be expanded to the world without much alteration."[7][8]

By 2002, the Unification Church had spent about $1.7 billion in subsidies for the Times. The paper has lost money every year that it has been in business.[9] In 2003, The New Yorker reported that a billion dollars had been spent since the paper's inception, as Rev. Moon himself had noted in a 1991 speech, "Literally nine hundred million to one billion dollars has been spent to activate and run the Washington Times"[10]. In 2002, Columbia Journalism Review suggested Moon had spent nearly $2 billion on the Times[11] and in 2006 Consortium News said that the figure was more than $3 billion.[12] For other uses, see New Yorker. ...


Through its ownership and subsidies of News World, the Unification Church also funds Insight Magazine, formerly a print publication but since 2004 a solely online publication. Unification Church subsidies also cover the operating losses of United Press International, another News World property. News World Communications also owns the Middle East Times, Tiempos del Mundo, Segye Ilbo, Sekai Nippo, the Zambezi Times, and magazines GolfStyles (formerly the Washington Golf Monthly) and The World and I. The newsmagazine Insight (more fully, Insight on the News), is published by The Washington Times Corporation. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ... Middle East Times is a daily newspaper published in Cairo, Egypt. ...


Early history

The Times was founded the year after the Washington Star, the previous "second paper" of D.C., went out of business, after operating for over 100 years. A large percentage of the staff came from the recently defunct Washington Star. Each day on page 2 the Washington Times prints a list of all its front page headlines side by side with those of the Washington Post to let readers compare what stories each paper is emphasizing and how. Some see the Times' coverage of local politics in particular as stronger than the Post's; Post veteran Ben Bradlee has said "I see them get some local stories that I think the Post doesn’t have and should have had."[13] As of March, 2008, if not earlier, this listing of other paper's headlines had been discontinued. The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. between 1852 and 1982. ... Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (born August 26, 1921) is the vice president of the Washington Post. ...


When the Times began, it was unusual among American broadsheets in publishing a full color front page, along with full color front pages in all its sections and color elements throughout. USA Today used this approach Rev Daugherty to an even greater degree. It took several years for the Washington Post, New York Times and others to follow suit. The Times originally published its editorials and opinion columns in a physically separate "Commentary" section, rather than at the end of its front news section as is common practice in U.S. newspapers. It ran television commercials highlighting this fact. Later, this practice was abandoned (except on Sundays, when many other newspapers, including the Post, also do it). The Washington Times also used ink that it advertised as being less likely to come off on the reader's hands than the Post's. Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


Dante Chinni wrote in the Columbia Journalism Review: The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ...

In addition to giving voice to stories that, as Pruden says, “others miss,” the Times plays an important role in Washington’s journalistic farm system. The paper has been a springboard for young reporters to jobs at The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, even the Post. Lorraine Woellert, who worked at the Times from 1992 to 1998, says her experience there allowed her to jump directly to her current job at Business Week. “I got a lot of opportunities very quickly. They appreciated and rewarded talent and, frankly, there was a lot of turnover.”[11]

During the 1988 United States presidential election, the Times printed a false rumor about candidate Michael Dukakis's mental health. [14] Wesley Pruden is the editor-in-chief of The Washington Times, a position he has held for 13 years. ... The United States presidential election of 1988 featured an open primary for both major parties. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ...


Political leanings

The Times is politically conservative. It was President Ronald Reagan's preferred newspaper. Some have cited it along with the Fox News Channel and talk radio as epitomizing the conservative media.[11][15][16][17] It also prints op-ed and opinion articles that include liberal and Democratic party voices; liberal columnist Clarence Page is a regular contributor.[18] Also featured are libertarian opinion pieces, almost always from scholars at the DC-located Cato Institute.[19][20] Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Fox News redirects here. ... For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... Media bias in the United States is the description of systematically non-uniform selection or coverage of news stories in the United States media. ... Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... Clarence Page (born June 2, 1947) is a journalist, syndicated columnist and member of the editorial board for the Chicago Tribune. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace by striving to achieve greater involvement...


Conservative commentator Paul Weyrich has called the Washington Times an antidote to its liberal competitor: Paul M. Weyrich (born October 7, 1942, in Racine, Wisconsin) is a US conservative political activist and commentator. ...

The Washington Post became very arrogant and they just decided that they would determine what was news and what wasn't news and they wouldn't cover a lot of things that went on. And the Washington Times has forced the Post to cover a lot of things that they wouldn't cover if the Times wasn't in existence.[21]

According to the Columbia Journalism Review, "Because of its history of a seemingly ideological approach to the news, the paper has always faced questions about its credibility."[22] Salon.com[23][24] and The Daily Howler[25][26][27][28] have published analyses of what they believe are serious factual errors and examples of bias in the paper's news coverage. Conservative-turned-liberal writer David Brock, who worked for the Times' sister publication Insight, said in his book Blinded by the Right that the news writers at the Times were encouraged and rewarded for giving news stories a conservative slant. In Right-Wing Media and How It Corrupts Democracy Brock wrote "the Washington Times was governed by a calculatedly unfair political bias and that its journalistic ethics were close to nil."[29] The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... Salon. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... David Brock b. ... Blinded by the Right: The Conscience of an Ex-Conservative (ISBN 1400047285) is a 2002 book written by former conservative journalist David Brock detailing his departure from the conservative movement. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Racism scandals

Former Times editor Robert Stacy McCain was accused of racism in a 2002 New York Press column by Michelangelo Signorile that reported on McCain's criticism of Abraham Lincoln, pro-slavery sympathies toward the Confederacy in the Civil War and McCain's membership in the neo-Confederate organization League of the South, which the Southern Poverty Law Center called "rife with white supremacists and racist ideology." Assistant National Editor for the Washington Times, Robert Stacy McCain has been involved in a number of controveries over his pro-Confederate and white nationalist views. ... New York Press is a free alternative weekly in New York City. ... Michelangelo Signorile Michelangelo Signorile (born December 19, 1960), is a gay American writer and a national radio host whose program is aired each weekday across the United States and Canada. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... The League of the South is a Southern nationalist organization whose ultimate goal is a free and independent Southern republic. ... The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal organization, whose stated purpose is to combat racism and promote civil rights through research, education and litigation. ...


Columnist Samuel Francis, after speaking at a conference hosted by American Renaissance, a self-described "pro-white" group, was subsequently fired by editor-in-chief Wesley Pruden. Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947 – February 15, 2005) was a nationally syndicated paleoconservative columnist known for his opposition to immigration, multiculturalism, and his involvement in debates concerning other controversial issues of the day. ... American Renaissance (AR) is a monthly white separatist magazine published by the New Century Foundation. ... Wesley Pruden is the editor-in-chief of The Washington Times, a position he has held for 13 years. ...


Former Editor in Chief Pruden has been described by former Times writer George Archibald as an "an unreconstructed Confederate" who "still believes the South and slavery were right". Archibald also confirmed and corrobrated a report by The Nation that described former Managing Editor Fran Coombs as a "raging racist who despises blacks, Jews, and Hispanic immigrants, and looks down on women...".[30] Coombs's wife Marion subsequently confirmed charges of racism about her and her husband during an interview by The Nation's Max Blumenthal[31] The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... Max Blumenthal is a blogger and journalist whose work has appeared in The Nation, The Huffington Post, and Media Matters. ...


Recent changes

In 2006 Blumenthal reported in The Nation that Sun Myung Moon's son Hyun Jin Moon (sometimes called Preston Moon) and editor at large Arnaud de Borchgrave wanted to remove control of the Times from Pruden and Coombs, to "shift the paper away from their brand of conservatism, which is characterized by extreme racial animus and connections to nativist and neo-Confederate organizations"[32] In February 2007, former Times reporter George Archibald wrote that long time Unification Church leader Tom McDevitt would soon be taking office as president of the Washington Times Corporation and expressed hope that he would bring about needed changes in the Times organization.[33] In March 2007 McDevitt became the corporation's president.[34] In November 2007, the Washington Post reported that Pruden planned to step down soon and that the Times was looking for a new editor in chief.[35] The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... Hyun Jin Preston Moon (Born 4/10/1969), third son of Unification Church founder Sun Myung Moon and Hak Ja Han. ... Arnaud de Borchgrave is a conservative journalist of Flemish extraction who focuses on international politics. ... Tom McDevitt is the president of the Washington Times, a newspaper in Washington DC, United States. ...


On January 14, 2008, it was announced that Executive Editor Wes Pruden would retire, effective January 24. In a surprise move, Times Managing Editor Fran Coombs, who had long been presumed to be Mr. Pruden's heir as top editor at the Times, resigned the same day Pruden's retirement was announced. is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


On January 28, 2008, John F. Solomon began work as executive editor of the Times. He is known for his work as an investigative journalist for AP and the Washington Post, and was most recently head of investigative reporting and mixed media development at the Post.[36][37] Solomon is quoted as saying: is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

The only point I have made with the reporters and editors who write for the news pages is there must be a bright line between opinion and editorializing that rightfully belongs on the op-ed and commentary pages and the fair, balanced, accurate, and precise reporting that must appear in the news sections of the paper.[38]

Within a month the Times changed some of its style guide to conform more to mainstream media usage. The Times announced that it would no longer use words like "illegal aliens" and "homosexual," and in most cases opt for "more neutral terminology" like "illegal immigrants" and "gay," respectively. The paper also decided to stop using "Hillary" when referring to Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, and the word "marriage" in the expression "gay marriage" will no longer appear in quotes in the newspaper. These changes in policy drew criticism from some conservatives[39] An Identity Standards Manual page—for the graphic design branch of corporate identity design and branding. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ...


Former Times editor Josette Shiner has said, "We are told by the Associated Press that we are the third most quoted newspaper in the world after The New York Times and the Washington Post."[dubious ] The current version of this biographical article or section reads like a résumé. Ambassador Josette Sheeran Shiner has served since August 2005 as Under Secretary for Economic, Business, and Agricultural Affairs for the United States Department of State, responsible for spearheading the Administration’s economic diplomacy efforts through global... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...

As of 2007, home delivery of the paper in its local area is made in bright orange plastic bags, with the words, "Brighter. Bolder. The Washington Times" and a slogan which changes. Two of the slogans are "The voice and choice of discerning readers" and "You're not getting it all without us," which may be a response to the current slogan used by its much larger competitor, The Washington Post, which uses the slogan, "If you don't get it, you don't get it." Starting in 2008, the paper has apparently discontinued the "all without us" slogan and has focused on the "voice and choice" logo for its bags. 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Criticism and controversies

Editorial independence from Unification Church

In 1984, two years after founding the Times, Moon said:

"The means of doing battle around the world have changed markedly. Instead of the conventional warfare of military forces, we have three major types of warfare today. First of all is ideological warfare; secondly is the warfare between intelligence forces; and thirdly, the warfare of propaganda."..."In today's warfare of ideology, intelligence and propaganda, nobody can compete with Reverend Moon."[1]

Commenting in 1996 about Unification Church ownership of the Times and other news outlets, Moon said:

"That is why Father has been combining and organizing scholars from all over the world, and also newspaper organizations, in order to make propaganda."[2][3][4][40]

In 2002, during the 20th anniversary party for the Times, Moon declared, "The Washington Times will become the instrument in spreading the truth about God to the world."[41]


Journalism experts have said that the Church has significant influence on the Times editorial content and story selection,[42] [43] In 1982 editor-in-chief James Whelan said, "The one constant would be our editorial independence. We would never be told to put anything in the paper; more important, perhaps, we would never be asked to leave anything out." Two years later Whelan told those attending the Heritage Foundation's 'Second Annual Distinguished Journalist Lecture' that he resigned from the Times rather than accepting what he saw as church interference with his operation of the paper, saying "I have blood on my hands."[44]


NEA "blame America" controversy

On September 5, 2002 Salon.com writer Brendan Nyhan published "The big NEA-Sept. 11 lie; How the Washington Times helped create a myth about the teachers' union and Sept. 11",[45] The controversy was created shortly before the first anniversary of the September 11 attacks by Ellen Sorokin in Page 1 article of the Washington Times. Journalist Nyhan says that Sorokin falsely attributed statements and "lesson plans" to the NEA, and was "intentionally deceptive" in her use of out of context quotes selectively "farmed" from an essay written by Brian Lippincott of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the John F. Kennedy University in California.[46] is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Salon. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... John F. Kennedy University is a private university located in Pleasant Hill, California, and an annex located in an office park in Berkeley in the San Francisco Bay Area. ...


Nyhan described Sorokin's reporting of Lippincott's statements as "intentionally deceptive", and Janet Bass of the American Federation of Teachers claimed that Sorokin had distorted her statements for the article, charging that the Times left out a sentence making it clear that Bass was referring solely to Lippincott's lesson plan; a wire story published two days before the Times article quoted Bass as saying that the AFT had no problem with any of the other links or materials on the NEA's site.[47] Nyhan documents how the "media echo chamber" picked up the story, and provides several instances of the Times echoing it's own discredited story, as the Times added further distortions in the following days. Nyhan said the Times had "lied" as "refined the myth even further" on Aug. 20, by "framing direct quotes from Lippincott as NEA creations with false phrases like 'the NEA disgustingly lectures' and 'the NEA urges teachers...'. Nyhan says that the Times repeated the process again on Aug. 22, and that the Times was "feeding off its own spin". This article is about the technological device. ...


The Boston Globe criticized both the Times' distorted portrayal of the Lippencott essay, and its attributions of that portrayal to the NEA. About the essay, saying "even Lippincott does not suggest that we brought the attacks on ourselves - or that we don't know who the perpetrators are. In context, any group clearly does not mean Al Qaeda or the Taliban, but all Arab-Americans". The Globe pointed out that the NEA's site "offers links to provide an overview on Afghanistan, Osama bin Ladin, the terrorists who killed innocent Americans on Sept. 11, and the Qaeda network," and that the NEA also featured links to "the CIA and the Department of Defense, a speech by President Bush, and materials on the Constitution of the United States," and said, "the charges of anti-Americanism flung at the NEA are wildly exaggerated and sometimes disturbingly akin to a smear."[47] On August 20, 2002 NEA President Bob Chase refuted the story, saying that the Sorokin article had been written before the NEA's "Remember 9/11" website went live.[48] | Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Notable current and former writers

News

  • Stephen Dinan (Immigration and political reporter)
  • Bill Gertz (Defense and foreign policy reporter)
  • Ralph Z. Hallow
  • Donald Lambro
  • John McCaslin
  • Jerry Seper (Investigative reporter)

Opinion Bill Gertz (b. ... Donald Lambro is the chief political correspondent of The Washington Times and a nationally syndicated columnist. ...

Sports Lawrence (Larry) Kudlow (born August 19, 1947), is an American conservative, supply-side economics enthusiast and television personality. ...

  • Dan Daly (columnist)
  • Dick Heller (columnist)
  • Tom Knott (columnist)
  • Thom Loverro (columnist)

Computers This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...

  • Mark Kellner

Metro

  • Adrienne T. Washington (columnist)
  • Tom Knott (columnist)
  • Fred Reed (police beat, later took on a broader purview)

Former This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Fred Reed is a columnist for The Washington Times. ...

David Brooks, conservative commentator for the New York Times and other publications. ... Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947 – February 15, 2005) was a nationally syndicated paleoconservative columnist known for his opposition to immigration, multiculturalism, and his involvement in debates concerning other controversial issues of the day. ... Jeremiah OLeary (d. ... Bill Sammon is senior White House correspondent for the Washington Examiner (having left the same position at The Washington Times in February 2006), a political analyst for Fox News Channel, and the author of four New York Times bestsellers: At Any Cost: How Al Gore Tried to Steal the Election... Rowan Scarborough is a Washington Times reporter who writes a weekly column with fellow reporter Bill Gertz called Inside the Ring. ... David Brock b. ...

Executives, editors and managers, present and past

Editors-in-chief

US ambassador to Kenya 1989-1993, Smith Hempstone was one of the few people in the country at the time to publicly voice criticism of President Daniel arap Moi and his party KANU. He was instrumental in the fight for multipartyism in Kenya, primarily by lending his substantial support to... Arnaud de Borchgrave is a conservative journalist of Flemish extraction who focuses on international politics. ... Wesley Pruden is the editor-in-chief of The Washington Times, a position he has held for 13 years. ...

Managing editors

  • Josette Sheeran Shiner (1992-1997)
  • William Giles (1997-2002)
  • Fran Coombs (2002-2008)
  • David W. Jones (2008-present)

Josette Sheeran is the eleventh Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP). ...

Others

Tony Blankley Tony Blankley (born 1948 in London, United Kingdom) is the editorial page editor for The Washington Times, co-host of the nationally syndicated public radio program Left, Right & Center, and author of The Wests Last Chance: Will We Win the Clash of Civilizations? Additionally, Blankley is a... Robert Anthony Tony Snow (born June 1, 1955) was the third White House Press Secretary for President George W. Bush, succeeding Scott McClellan and Ari Fleischer in that role. ... Assistant National Editor for the Washington Times, Robert Stacy McCain has been involved in a number of controveries over his pro-Confederate and white nationalist views. ... Daniel Eli Wattenberg is an American journalist and musician. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ http://www.burrellesluce.com/top100/2007_Top_100List.pdf
  2. ^ Pak was founding president of the Washington Times Corporation (1982-1992), and founding chairman of the board (1982-1997). Bo Hi Pak, Appendix B: Brief Chronology of the Life of Dr. Bo Hi Pak, in Messiah: My Testimony to Rev. Sun Myung Moon, Vol I by Bo Hi Pak (2000), Lanham, MD: University Press of America.
  3. ^ http://www.accessabc.com/products/top200.htm
  4. ^ CJR : Resources : Who Owns What
  5. ^ Were the Republicans the "party of ideas"?
  6. ^ Consortiumnews.com
  7. ^ Sun Myung, Moon; Rev. Peter Kim and Dr. Chang Shik Yang (2000-12-06). Rev. Sun Myung Moon; Talks Given on His South American Tour, November 29-December 6, 2000. Unification Multimedia Ministries. Unification Church. Retrieved on 2008-03-07.
  8. ^ Johnson, Bridget (2008-02-03). "New Washington Times Editor Alters Loaded Style". About.com. Ed. Michael Daecher. New York, New York: About, Inc.,; The New York Times Company. Retrieved on 2008-03-07. “"We even have to utilize the media for the sake of church development. The church is the mind and the media is the body, to reach the external world. We should begin that movement and activity in the United States, because the Washington Times and UPI are headquartered there. Once we establish our organization in the United States, it can be expanded to the world without much alteration."” 
  9. ^ Moon Speech Raises Old Ghosts as the Times Turns 20 (washingtonpost.com)
  10. ^ Rev. Sun Myung Moon - Our Mission During The Time Of World Transition
  11. ^ a b c Washington 2002: The Other Paper
  12. ^ Consortiumnews.com
  13. ^ Washington 2002: Donald Graham's Washington Post
  14. ^ Obama, Clinton, & the GOP Attack Machine Robert Parry 02-02-2008
  15. ^ In the Northwest: Conservative media are setting political agenda
  16. ^ Al Gore threw in Fox News, the Washington Times and others
  17. ^ Consortiumnews.com
  18. ^ http://washtimes.com/commentary/
  19. ^ The Washington Times, America's Newspaper
  20. ^ The Washington Times, America's Newspaper
  21. ^ MediaChannel.org - Frontline: Reverend Moon
  22. ^ CJR - Washington's Other Paper
  23. ^ The big NEA-Sept. 11 lie - Salon.com
  24. ^ http://www.salon.com/politics/col/spinsanity/2002/09/18/nea/print.html
  25. ^ Have we ever used the words "liar" before? Today we do, of the Washington Times
  26. ^ Writing about those new Gore e-mails, the Washington Times showed its character problems
  27. ^ The Times concocted an ugly hoax. On CNN, pundits read from the script
  28. ^ Just how dumb is the Washington Times? Check today's front page on Kerry
  29. ^ http://www.thinkingpeace.com/Lib/lib099.html
  30. ^ George Archibald: Can The Washington Times Survive?
  31. ^ George Archibald: Top Washington Times Editor's Wife Confirms Racism Allegations - Media on The Huffington Post
  32. ^ Hell of a 'Times'
  33. ^ George Archibald: Unhinged
  34. ^ Points Of Light Executives to Lead Washington Times, Child Advocacy Group
  35. ^ The Washington Times, Hunting For a Bionic Editor in Chief
  36. ^ State Native to lead DC newspaper Connecticut Post January 26, 2008
  37. ^ Ex-Washington Post Reporter to Lead a Rival New York Times February 11, 2008
  38. ^ Erik Wemple, "Playing Center: John Solomon is pushing evenhandedness at the Washington Times, Washington City Paper, February 29, 2008
  39. ^ Washington Times updates style guide, conservatives up in arms
  40. ^ Sun Myung, Moon; Translator Peter Kim. "Rev. Sun Myung Moon Speaks at Leader's Conference", Unification Church website, Unification Church, 1996-01-02. Retrieved on 2008-02-24. 
  41. ^ "Moon Propaganda Machine". Retrieved on 2007-12-18. 
  42. ^ Washington 2002: The Other Paper
  43. ^ Washington Times: FAIR Resources
  44. ^ Wallis, David (2004). Killed: Great Journalism Too Hot to Print. Nation Books, 146. ISBN 1560255811. 
  45. ^ Nyhan, Brendan. "The big NEA-Sept. 11 lie; How the Washington Times helped create a myth about the teachers' union and Sept. 11", Salon, Salon, 2002-09-05. Retrieved on 2008-02-01. 
  46. ^ Lippincott, Brian (2002-03-22). Promoting Tolerance and Peace in Children. National Association of School Psychologists. Retrieved on 2008-02-03.
  47. ^ a b Young, Cathy. "An unfair attack on teachers union", The Boston Globe, 2002-09-02. Retrieved on 2008-02-15. 
  48. ^ Chase, Bob (2002-8-20). Letter to the Washington Times from NEA President. NEA Press Center. National Education Association. Retrieved on 2008-02-05.

Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Parry is an American investigative journalist who has written extensively about the Iran-Contra scandal. ... The Connecticut Post is a daily newspaper, serving the area of Southwestern Connecticut around Bridgeport, Connecticut. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington City Paper is a U.S. alternative weekly newspaper serving the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the United States, representing many of the countrys teachers along with other school personnel. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • The Washington Times official website
  • The Washington Times National Weekly Edition official website
  • InternationalReports.net - a periodical informational and advertising section of The Washington Times focused on one country or region at a time.
  • Washington's Other Paper: Is the time right for the Times?, Allan Freedman, Columbia Journalism Review, March/April 1995
  • Fear and Loathing on the Potomac: The Washington Times at Twenty, Wesley Pruden, Heritage Lecture No 757, August 15, 2002.
  • Defending Dixie: The Washington Times has always been conservative and error-prone -- now it's helping to popularize extremist ideas, Heidi Beirich and Bob Moser, Intelligence Report, Southern Poverty Law Center, undated.
  • Max Blumenthal, "Hell of a Times", The Nation, October 9, 2006 (publication date)
  • Wes Pruden and Fran Coombs, Response to "Hell of a Times."
  • Robert Parry, The GOP's $3 Billion Propaganda Organ Special report on Moon's funding of the Washington Times

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Washington Times - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1813 words)
The Times was founded in 1982 by Sun Myung Moon, leader of the Unification Church and the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, to be a conservative alternative to the larger Washington Post.
Times critics such as Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting assert significant influence by the Church on the paper and give the Church significant credit (or blame) for the Times' actions.
Washington Times editors firmly deny any Church influence on their news coverage and editorial policy, or that they have any interest in proselytizing directly for the Unification Church.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Washington Times (1184 words)
The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church.
It should not be confused with the Washington Times established in 1893, which became the Washington Times-Herald and was merged with the Washington Post in 1954.
While Times reporters have prided themselves on their independence from the church's position, this has occasionally put them at odds with the founder's claims of having direct influence on the Republican Party via his extravagant funding of the newspaper.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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