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Encyclopedia > The Washington Post
The Washington Post

The September 22, 2005 front page of
The Washington Post
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Washington Post Company
Editor Leonard Downie, Jr.
Founded 1877
Headquarters 1150 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20071
Flag of the United States United States
Circulation 699,130 Daily[1]
929,921 Sunday[2]

Website: washingtonpost.com

The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the city's oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (464x800, 170 KB) Summary The frontpage of the Washington Post (23rd September 2005) from Newseum Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Washington Post Company (NYSE: WPO) is an American media company, best known for owning the newspaper it is named after, The Washington Post, and Newsweek magazine. ... Leonard Downie, Jr. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Perhaps the most notable incident in the Post's history was when, in the early 1970s, reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein began the media's investigation of Watergate. This played a major role in the undoing of the Nixon presidency. Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...

Contents

General overview

The Post is generally regarded among the leading daily American newspapers, along with The New York Times, which is known for its general reporting and international coverage, and The Wall Street Journal, which is known for its financial reporting. The Post has distinguished itself through its reporting on the workings of the White House, Congress, and other aspects of the U.S. government. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Congress in Joint Session. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ...


Unlike the Times and the Journal, however, it does not currently print a daily national edition for distribution away from the East Coast. However, a "National Weekly Edition", combining stories from a week of Post editions, is published. The majority of its newsprint readership is in the District of Columbia, as well as its suburbs of Maryland and Northern Virginia. Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


As of April 2007, its average weekday circulation was 699,130 and its Sunday circulation was 929,921, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, making it the seventh largest newspaper in the country by circulation, behind USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Post and the New York Daily News.[2] While its circulation, like that of almost all newspapers, has been slipping, it has one of the highest market-penetration rates of any metropolitan news daily. The Audit Bureau of Circulations is one of the several organizations of the same name operating in different parts of the world. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


History

The paper was founded in 1877 by Stilson Hutchins and in 1880 added a Sunday edition, thus becoming the city's first newspaper to publish seven days a week. In 1889, Hutchins sold the paper to Frank Hatton, a former Postmaster General, and Beriah Wilkins, a former Democratic congressman from Ohio. To promote the paper, the new owners requested the leader of the Marine Band, John Philip Sousa, to compose a march for the newspaper's essay contest awards ceremony. Sousa composed The Washington Post, which remains one of his best-known works and is credited to have brought the newspaper to worldwide fame.[citation needed] 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Stilson Hutchins, between 1865 and 1880 Stilson Hutchins (1838 - 1912) was an American newspaper reporter and publisher, best known as founder of the Washington Post. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Portrait of John Philip Sousa taken in 1900 John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor known particularly for American military marches. ... The Washington Post is a patriotic march composed by John Philip Sousa in 1889. ...


In 1899, during the Spanish-American War, the Post printed Clifford K. Berryman's classic illustration Remember the Maine. Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares General Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino... In April 1949, around his eightieth birthday, Clifford K. Berryman received a letter from then-President Harry S. Truman. ...


Wilkins acquired Hatton's share of the paper in 1894 at Hatton's death. After Wilkins' death in 1903, his sons John and Robert ran the Post for two years before selling it in 1905 to Washington McLean and his son John Roll McLean, owners of the Cincinnati Enquirer. When John died in 1916, he put the paper in trust, having little faith that his playboy son Edward "Ned" McLean could manage his inheritance. Ned went to court and broke the trust, but, under his management, the paper slumped toward ruin. It was purchased in a bankruptcy auction in 1933 by a member of the Federal Reserve's board of governors, Eugene Meyer, who restored the paper's health and reputation. In 1946, Meyer was succeeded as publisher by his son-in-law Philip Graham. 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Washington McLean (1816 – 1890) was the owner and publisher of The Cincinnati Enquirer and The Washington Post. ... John Roll McLean (17 September 1848 – 9 June 1916) was the owner and publisher of The Washington Post and The Cincinnati Enquirer. ... The Cincinnati Enquirer is a daily morning newspaper published at Cincinnati, Ohio. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Edward Beale McLean (1889-1941) was the publisher and owner of the Washington Post from 1916 until 1933. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... Eugene Isaac Meyer (October 31, 1875 – July 17, 1959) was an American financier, public official, publisher of the Washington Post newspaper, and the father of Katharine Graham. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Philip L. Graham & Eugene I. Meyer Philip Leslie Graham (July 18, 1915 – August 3, 1963) was publisher of The Washington Post from 1946 to 1963. ...


In 1954, the Post consolidated its position by acquiring its last morning rival, the Washington Times-Herald, leaving as its remaining competitors two afternoon papers, the Washington Star (Evening Star) (until that paper's demise in 1981) and The Washington Daily News, which was bought and merged into the Star in 1972. More recently, The Washington Times, established in 1982, has been a local rival with a circulation (in 2005) about one-seventh that of the Post[3]. The Washington Times-Herald was an American daily newspaper once published in Washington, D.C.. The Times-Herald was created by the 1939 merger of two former Hearst dailies, the Times (not to be confused with the current Washington Times) and the Herald. ... The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. between 1852 and 1982. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Times[1] is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C., United States. ...


After Graham's death, in 1963, control of the Washington Post Company passed to Katharine Graham, his wife and Meyer's daughter. No woman before had ever run a nationally prominent newspaper in the United States. She described her own anxiety and lack of confidence based on her gender in her autobiography, and she did not assign duties to her daughter at the paper as she did to her son. She served as publisher from 1969 to 1979 and headed the Washington Post Company into the early 1990s as chairman of the board and CEO. After 1993, she retained a position as chairman of the executive committee until her death in 2001. Katharine Meyer Graham (June 16, 1917 – July 17, 2001) was the head of The Washington Post newspaper for more than two decades, overseeing its most famous period, the Watergate coverage that helped bring down President Richard Nixon. ...


Her tenure is credited with seeing the Post rise in national stature through effective investigative reporting, most notably to assure The New York Times did not surpass its Washington reporting of the Pentagon Papers and Watergate scandal. Executive editor Ben Bradlee put the paper's reputation and resources behind reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who, in a long series of articles, chipped away at the story behind the 1972 burglary of Democratic National Committee offices in the Watergate Hotel complex in Washington. The Post's dogged coverage of the story, the outcome of which ultimately played a major role in the resignation of President Richard Nixon, won the paper a Pulitzer Prize in 1973. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (born August 26, 1921) is the vice president of the Washington Post. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... The Watergate complex is an office-apartment-hotel complex built in 1967 in northwest Washington, D.C., best known for being the site of burglaries that led to the Watergate scandal and the resignation of President Richard Nixon. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Also in 1972, the "Book World" section was introduced.[4] Book World or Bookworld may refer to: The book publishing industry Book World, a defunct Chicago Tribune entertainment section Book World, a Washington Post entertainment section established in 1972 B.C. BookWorld, a British Columbia, Canada-based quarterly newspaper Book World, Inc. ...


In 1980, the Post published a dramatic story called 'Jimmy's World', describing the life of an eight-year-old heroin addict in Washington, for which reporter Janet Cooke won acclaim and a Pulitzer Prize. Subsequent investigation, however, revealed the story to be a fabrication. The Pulitzer Prize was returned. Heroin (INN: diacetylmorphine, BAN: diamorphine) is an opioid synthesized directly from the extracts of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. ... Janet Cooke (born 1958) was an American journalist who became infamous when she won a Pulitzer Prize for a fabricated story that she wrote for The Washington Post. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Donald Graham, Katherine's son, succeeded her as publisher in 1979 and in the early 1990s became chief executive officer and chairman of the board, as well. He was succeeded in 2000 as publisher and CEO by Boisfeuillet Jones, Jr., with Graham remaining as chairman. Donald E. Graham Donald E. Graham is chief executive officer and chairman of the board of The Washington Post Company. ... Boisfeuillet Jones, Jr. ...


Like The New York Times, the Post was slow in moving to color photographs and features. On January 28, 1999 its first color front-page photograph appeared. After that, color slowly integrated itself into other photographs and advertising throughout the paper. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


The newspaper established a web site in 1996, http://www.washingtonpost.com/


As of 2006 the Post had been honored with 22 Pulitzer Prizes, 18 Nieman Fellowships, and 368 White House News Photographers Association awards, among others. This article or section needs to be wikified. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Nieman Fellowship is an award given to mid-career journalists by The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. ...


The paper is part of The Washington Post Company, which owns a number of other media and non-media companies, including Newsweek magazine, the online magazine Slate, and the education company Kaplan. The Washington Post Company is an American media company, best known for owning the newspaper it is named after, The Washington Post, and Newsweek magazine. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... Kaplan, Inc. ...


The paper runs its own syndication service for its columnists and cartoonists, The Washington Post Writers Group. Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ...


The Post has its main office at 1150 15th St, N.W., and the newspaper has the exclusive zip code 20071. Mr. ...


Political leanings

Beginning with Nixon[5], conservatives often cite the Post, along with The New York Times, as exemplars of "liberal media bias." As late publisher Katherine Graham noted in her memoirs Personal History, the paper long had a policy of not making endorsements for presidential candidates. In 2004, however, the Post endorsed John Kerry[6]. It also has endorsed Republican politicians, such as Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich[7]. In 2006 it repeated its historic endorsements of every Republican incumbent for Congress in Northern Virginia[8]. There have also been times when the Post has specifically chosen not to endorse any candidate, such as in 1988 when it refused to endorse then Governor Michael Dukakis or then Vice President George Bush[9]. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Media bias is a real or perceived tendency of journalists and news producers within the mass media to approach both the presentation of particular stories, and the selection of which stories to cover, with an unbalanced perspective. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... For the entrepreneur and businessman, see Robert Ehrlich. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ...


It has regularly published a political mixture of op-ed columnists, some of them left-of-center (including E.J. Dionne and Richard Cohen) and a few right-of-center (including George Will and Charles Krauthammer) E.J. Dionne, Jr. ... Richard Cohen, a syndicated columnist for the Washington Post, is a graduate of Far Rockaway High School and attended Hunter College, NYU and Columbia. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... Charles Krauthammer Charles Krauthammer (born 13 March 1950), is a neoconservative, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, and commentator. ...


In "Buying the War" on PBS, Bill Moyers noted 27 editorials supporting the President's ambitions to invade Iraq. National security correspondent Walter Pincus reported that he had been ordered to cease his reports that were critical of Republican administrations[10]. Walter Haskell Pincus (born December 24, 1932) is a national security journalist for The Washington Post. ...


Its editorial positions have taken both liberal and conservative stances: it has steadfastly supported the 2003 invasion of Iraq, warmed to President George W. Bush's proposal to partially privatize Social Security, opposed a deadline for U.S. withdrawal from the Iraq War, and advocated free trade agreements, including, among others, CAFTA. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) is a free trade agreement between the United States and the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and Canada, and Mexico. ...


In 1992 the PBS investigative news program Frontline suggested that the Post had moved to the right in response to its smaller, more conservative rival the Washington Times. The program quoted Paul Weyrich, one of the founders of the conservative activist organization the Moral Majority, as saying "The Washington Post became very arrogant and they just decided that they would determine what was news and what wasn't news and they wouldn't cover a lot of things that went on. And the Washington Times has forced the Post to cover a lot of things that they wouldn't cover if the Times wasn't in existence."[11] Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... FRONTLINE is a public affairs television program of varying length produced at WGBH in Boston, Massachusetts, and distributed through the Public Broadcasting Service network in the United States. ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


On March 26, 2007, Chris Matthews said on his television program, "Well, The Washington Post is not the liberal newspaper it was, Congressman, let me tell you. I have been reading it for years and it is a neocon newspaper,"[12] referring to neoconservatism. Christopher John Matthews (born December 17, 1945) is a self-described conservative, television talk show host, and former political aide. ... Neoconservatism is a political movement that emerged as a rejection of liberalism and the New Left counter-culture of the 1960s. ...


The conservative leadership of Donald Graham and editorial page editor Fred Hiatt has been seen as a catalyst of these changes. Donald E. Graham Donald E. Graham is chief executive officer and chairman of the board of The Washington Post Company. ... Fred Hiatt is the editorial page editor of The Washington Post newspaper. ...


Ombudsmen

In 1970 the Post became one of the first newspapers in the United States to establish a position of "ombudsman," or readers' representative, assigned to address reader complaints about Post news coverage and to monitor the newspaper's adherence to its own standards. Ever since, the ombudsman's commentary has been a frequent feature of the Post editorial page. An ombudsman (English plural: ombudsmans or ombudsmen) is an official, usually (but not always) appointed by the government or by parliament, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. ...


Notable contributors

Joel Achenbach is a staff writer for The Washington Post and the author of six books, including The Grand Idea, Captured by Aliens and Why Things Are. ... Anne Applebaum (born 1964) is a journalist and author who has written extensively about issues related to communism and the development of civil society in Eastern Europe and the USSR / Russia. ... Marie Arana is the author of a memoir about a bicultural childhood American Chica: Two Worlds, One Childhood (finalist for the 2001 National Book Award); editor of a collection of Washington Post essays about the writers craft, The Writing Life (2002); and the author of Cellophane (a satirical novel... Image of Cathy Areu Issue of CATALINA featuring supermodel Daisy Fuentes Media entrepreneur Cathy Areu is the creator, owner, and publisher of Catalina magazine, a multi-platform media company for the mind, body, and soul of todays Latina. ... Dan Balz is a journalist at the Washington Post, where he has been a political correspondent since 1978. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... Andrew Beyer is an American expert on horse race betting who designed what has become known as the Beyer Speed Figure. ... Herbert Lawrence Block, called Herblock (October 13, 1909 - October 7, 2001), was a U.S. editorial cartoonist. ... Thomas Boswell (born 1948) is a sports columnist for the Washington Post. ... David S. Broder (born September 11, 1929) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author, television talk show pundit, and university professor. ... Tina Brown (born Christina Hambley Brown on November 21, 1953, in Maidenhead, England) is a British-born American magazine editor, columnist, and talk-show host. ... Arthur Buchwald (October 20, 1925 – January 17, 2007) was an American humorist best known for his long-running column that he wrote in The Washington Post, which in turn was carried as a syndicated column in many other newspapers. ... The Fix is an American political weblog written daily by Chris Cillizza for The Washington Post website. ... The Fix is an American political weblog written daily by Chris Cillizza for The Washington Post website. ... Libby Copeland (born 1976) is a racist staff writer for the Washington Post. ... Richard Livingston Coe (1914-1995) was a longtime theatre critic for The Washington Post. ... Richard Cohen, a syndicated columnist for the Washington Post, is a graduate of Far Rockaway High School and attended Hunter College, NYU and Columbia. ... Steve Coll (born October 8, 1958 in Washington, DC) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and writer. ... Lisa de Moraes is a noted television columnist. ... E.J. Dionne, Jr. ... Michael Dirda, a Fulbright Fellowship recipient, is an award-winning book critic for the Washington Post. ... Leonard Downie, Jr. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Dan Froomkin is a journalist for the Washington Post. ... Barbara Garson (born July 7, 1941 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American playwright best known for MacBird, a notorious 1966 counterculture drama which satirically depicts President Lyndon Johnson as Macbeth. ... Meg Greenfield (December 27, 1930 - May 13, 1999) was a Washington Post and Newsweek editorial writer and a Washington insider known for her wit and for being reclusive. ... Jim Hoagland is an American journalist and two-time recipient of the Pulitzer Prize. ... Colbert I. King (born 1939-09-20) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post. ... Anthony Irwin Kornheiser (born July 13, 1948) is an American sportswriter and columnist for The Washington Post, as well as a radio and television talk show host. ... Charles Krauthammer Charles Krauthammer (born 13 March 1950), is a neoconservative, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, and commentator. ... Howard Alan Kurtz (born 1953, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American journalist, blogger, author and media critic. ... Charles Chuck Lane is a journalist who is currently a staff writer for the Washington Post. ... Colman McCarthy is an anarchist, peace activist and animal rights advocate. ... Mary McGrory (August 22, 1918 – April 20, 2004) was an American journalist and columnist. ... Dana T. Milbank (born 27 April 1968) is an American political reporter for the Washington Post. ... For details of Tim Page - the Australian based actor, please see Tim Page (actor) For details of Tim Page - the American music critic, editor, producer and biographer, please see Tim Page (music critic) Tim Page (born May 25, 1944) in Tonbridge Wells, Kent is an award-winning British photographer who... Shirley Lewis Povich (July 15, 1905 – June 4, 1998) became a sports columnist and reporter for the Washington Post in 1923. ... Dana Priest is an author and a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. ... William Raspberry is the Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated urban affairs columnist at The Washington Post, as well as the Knight Professor of the Practice of Communications and Journalism at the Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University. ... Eugene Robinson (born 1955) is a newspaper columnist and assistant managing editor for The Washington Post. ... Christine Sadler (1903–1983), born in Silver Point, Tennessee, was an American author, journalist, and magazine editor. ... Tom Shales (born November 3, 1944) is an American critic of television programming and operations. ... Michael Specter (born 1955) is an American journalist who has been a staff writer, focusing on science and technology, at The New Yorker since September 1998. ... This page is about the Washington Post editor. ... Thomas Gregory Toles (born October 22, 1951) is a United States political cartoonist. ... Jim VandeHei (1972- ) is a US political reporter. ... Gene Weingarten Gene Weingarten, born in New York in 1951, is a humor writer and journalist. ... James Russell Wiggins (December 4, 1903 in Luverne, Minnesota – November 19, 2000 in Brooklin, Maine) was the managing editor of The Washington Post from 1947 to 1966 and the United States ambassador to the United Nations from 1968 to 1969 during the Lyndon Johnson presidency. ... Michael R. Wilbon (born November 19, 1958) is an American sportswriter and columnist. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ...

Executive Officers and Editors (past and present)

Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (born August 26, 1921) is the vice president of the Washington Post. ... Leonard Downie, Jr. ... Donald E. Graham Donald E. Graham is chief executive officer and chairman of the board of The Washington Post Company. ... Katharine Meyer Graham (June 16, 1917 – July 17, 2001) was the head of The Washington Post newspaper for more than two decades, overseeing its most famous period, the Watergate coverage that helped bring down President Richard Nixon. ... Philip L. Graham & Eugene I. Meyer Philip Leslie Graham (July 18, 1915 – August 3, 1963) was publisher of The Washington Post from 1946 to 1963. ... Fred Hiatt is the editorial page editor of The Washington Post newspaper. ... Stephen P. Hills, president of The Washington Post is a great guy. ... Boisfeuillet Jones, Jr. ... Colbert I. King (born 1939-09-20) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post. ... Eugene Isaac Meyer (October 31, 1875 – July 17, 1959) was an American financier, public official, publisher of the Washington Post newspaper, and the father of Katharine Graham. ...

References

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie Arana (born 1949) is an editor and author. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Washington Post - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1146 words)
The Washington Post is also a patriotic march by John Philip Sousa.
The Washington Post is the largest and oldest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.
She was publisher of the newspaper from 1969 to 1979, chairman of the board from 1973 to 1991 and chairman of the executive committee from 1993 until her death in 2001.
ASNE - The Washington Post Standards and Ethics (1476 words)
The Washington Post is pledged to an aggressive, responsible and fair pursuit of the truth without fear of any special interest, and with favor to none.
Washington Post reporters and editors are pledged to approach every assignment with the fairness of open minds and without prior judgment.
The Washington Post is vitally concerned with the national interest and with the community interest.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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