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Encyclopedia > The Wall Street Journal
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Dow Jones & Company
(Sale Pending to News Corp.)
Publisher L. Gordon Crovitz
Editor Marcus Brauchli
Founded July 8, 1889
Headquarters 200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
Flag of the United States United States
Circulation 2,062,312 in 2006[1]
ISSN 0099-9660

Website: WSJ.com

The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers.[2] This work is copyrighted. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... Dow Jones redirects here. ... News Corporation (NYSE: NWS) is a media conglomerate that operates world-wide. ... Louis Gordon Crovitz is the publisher of The Wall Street Journal and executive vice-president of Dow Jones. ... Marcus Brauchli is the managing editor of the Wall Street Journal. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... NY redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Dow Jones redirects here. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... NY redirects here. ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. ...


It was the largest-circulation newspaper in the United States until November 2003, when it was surpassed by USA Today. Its main rival as a daily financial newspaper is the London-based Financial Times, which also publishes several international editions. USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ...


The Journal newspaper primarily covers U.S. and international business and financial news and issues—the paper's name comes from Wall Street, the street in New York City which is the heart of the financial district. It has been printed continuously since being founded July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser. The newspaper has won the Pulitzer Prize thirty-three times[3], including 2007 prizes for backdated stock options and for the adverse impact of China's booming economy.[4][5] Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Henry Dow (November 6, 1851 – December 4, 1902) was an American journalist who co-founded Dow Jones & Company with Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. ... Edward David Jones (1856 - 1920) was a U.S. statistician. ... Charles Bergstresser was an American journalist and, with Charles Dow and Edward Jones, one of the founders of Dow Jones & Company at 15 Wall Street in 1882. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Pulitzer Prizes for 2007 were announced on April 16, 2007. ... Options backdating is the process of granting an employee stock option that is dated prior to the date that the company granted that option. ... Chinese Economic Reform (Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) refers to the program of economic changes called Socialism with Chinese characteristics in the mainland of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) that were started in 1978 by pragmatists within the Communist Party of China (CPC) led by Deng Xiaoping and are ongoing...

Contents

History

Beginnings

Dow Jones & Company, publisher of the Journal, was founded in 1882 by reporters Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Jones converted the small Customers' Afternoon Letter into The Wall Street Journal, first published in 1889,[6] and began delivery of the Dow Jones News Service via telegraph. The Journal featured the Jones 'Average', the first of several indexes of stock and bond prices on the New York Stock Exchange. Dow Jones redirects here. ... Charles Henry Dow (November 6, 1851 – December 4, 1902) was an American journalist who co-founded Dow Jones & Company with Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. ... Edward David Jones (1856 - 1920) was a U.S. statistician. ... Charles Bergstresser was an American journalist and, with Charles Dow and Edward Jones, one of the founders of Dow Jones & Company at 15 Wall Street in 1882. ...


Journalist Clarence Barron purchased control of the company for US$130,000 in 1902; circulation was then around 7,000 but climbed to 50,000 by the end of the 1920s. Barron and his predecessors were credited with creating an atmosphere of fearless, independent financial reporting -- a novelty in the early days of business journalism.[7] Clarence W. Barron is one of the most influential figures in the history of Dow Jones & Company. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


Barron died in 1928, a year before Black Tuesday, the stock market crash that triggered the Great Depression in the United States. Barron's descendants, the Bancroft family, would continue to control the company until 2007.[7] Crowd gathering on Wall Street. ... The Great Depression was the result of the economic downturn that started with the Stock Market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ...


Later on, the Woodworths published the paper. Mrs. Teresa "Teddy" Woodworth was a prominent socialite of her day. The Woodworths resided at New York's Sherry-Netherland, sharing the penthouse floor with Cole Porter.[citation needed] Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Indiana. ...


The Journal took its modern shape and prominence in the 1940s, a time of industrial expansion for the United States and its financial institutions in New York. Bernard Kilgore was named managing editor of the paper in 1941, and company CEO in 1945, eventually compiling a 25-year career as the head of the Journal. Kilgore was the architect of the paper's iconic front-page design, with its "What's News" digest, and its national distribution strategy, which brought the paper's circulation from 33,000 in 1941 to 1.1 million at the time of Kilgore's death in 1967. It was also on Kilgore's watch, in 1947, that the paper won its first Pulitzer Prize, for editorial writing.[7] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Bernard (Barney) Kilgore was the Wall Street Journals dominant personality practically from the moment he was appointed managing editor in 1941, at the age of 32, until his death in 1967, at the untimely age of 59. ...


Its reputation secure as the nation's preeminent business news and conservative opinion newspaper, The Wall Street Journal nevertheless fell on uncertain times in the 1990s, as declining advertising and rising newsprint costs -- contributing to the first-ever annual loss at Dow Jones in 1997 -- raised speculation that the paper might have to drastically change, or be sold.[7] For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Internet expansion

Both came to pass. A complement to the print newspaper, The Wall Street Journal Online was launched in 1996. In 2003, Dow Jones began to integrate reporting of the Journal's print and online subscribers together in Audit Bureau of Circulations statements.[8] It is commonly held to be the largest paid-subscription news site on the Web, with 980,000 paid subscribers in mid-2007.[7] As of November 2006, an annual subscription to the online edition of the Wall Street Journal cost $99 for those who do not have subscriptions to the print edition.[9] The Audit Bureau of Circulations is one of the several organizations of the same name operating in different parts of the world. ...


The paper's paid content is available free, on a limited basis, to America Online subscribers[citation needed], and through the free Congoo Netpass. Many Wall Street Journal news stories are available free online through free online newspapers that subscribe to the Dow Jones syndicate. Pulitzer-prize winning stories from 1995 are available free on the Pulitzer web site.


In September 2005, the Journal launched a weekend edition, delivered to all subscribers, which marked a return to Saturday publication after a lapse of some 50 years. The move was designed in part to attract more consumer advertising.[7] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2005 the Journal reported a readership profile of about 60 percent top management, an average income of $191,000, an average household net worth of $2.1 million, and an average age of 55.[10]


In 2007 the Journal launched a worldwide expansion of its website, to include major foreign-language editions. The paper has also shown an interest in buying the rival Financial Times.[11] The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ...


Design changes

In 2006, the Journal began including advertising on its front page for the first time. This followed the introduction of front-page advertising on the Journal's European and Asian editions in late 2005.[12]


After presenting nearly identical front-page layouts for half a century -- always six columns, with an "A-hed" feature story in the first column, "What's News" digest in the second and third, and the day's top stories in three rigid columns on the right side of the page -- the paper in 2007 decreased its broadsheet width from 15 to 12 inches while keeping the length at 22 3/4 inches, in order to save newsprint costs. Dow Jones said it would save US$18 million a year in newsprint costs across all the Wall Street Journal papers.[13] This move resulted in the loss of one column of print, pushing the "A-hed" out of its traditional location (although the paper now usually includes a feature story on the right side of the front page). Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... Newsprint is low-cost, low-quality, non-archival paper. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


The paper still uses ink dot drawings called hedcuts, introduced in 1979,[14], rather than photographs of people, a practice unique among major newspapers. This method of illustration is a consistent visual signature of the paper and reflects editorial imperatives by allowing these illustrations to be somewhat flattering, and in their consistency, clannish.[citation needed] Nevertheless, the use of color photographs and graphics has become increasingly common in recent years with the addition of more "lifestyle" sections. Hedcut is a style of drawing, primarily of people, pioneered and used by the Wall Street Journal. ...


News Corp. takeover

On May 2, 2007, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. made an unsolicited takeover bid for Dow Jones, offering US$60 a share for stock that had been selling for US$33 a share. The Bancroft family, which controls more than 60% of the voting power, at first rejected the offer, but later reconsidered its position. May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... News Corporation (NYSE: NWS) is a media conglomerate that operates world-wide. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Clarence W. Barron (born July 2, 1855, in Boston, Massachusetts; died October 2, 1928) is one of the most influential figures in the history of Dow Jones & Company. ...


Three months later, August 1, 2007, News Corp. and Dow Jones entered into a definitive merger agreement.[15] is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


In an editorial page column, publisher L. Gordon Crovitz said the Bancrofts and News Corp. had agreed that the Journal's news and opinion sections would preserve their editorial independence from their new corporate parent:[16]

Mr. Murdoch told the Bancrofts that 'any interference -- or even hint of interference -- would break the trust that exists between the paper and its readers, something I am unwilling to countenance.' ... Mr. Murdoch and the Bancrofts agreed on standards modeled on the longstanding Dow Jones Code of Conduct.

Features

Since 1980, the Journal has published in several sections. On average, The Journal is about 96 pages long. For the year 2007, the inclusion of 44 additional Journal Reports (special sections focusing on a single issue each) was planned. Regularly scheduled sections are: Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

  • Section One – every day; corporate news, as well as political and economic reporting and the opinion pages
  • Marketplace – every day; coverage of health, technology, media, and marketing industries (the second section was launched June 23, 1980)
  • Money and Investing – Monday through Friday; covers and analyzes international financial markets (the third section was launched October 3, 1988)
  • Personal Journal – published Tuesday through Thursday; covers personal investments, careers and cultural pursuits (the section was introduced April 9, 2002)
  • Weekend Journal – published Fridays; explores personal interests of business readers, including real estate, travel, and sports (the section was introduced March 20, 1998)
  • Pursuits – published Saturdays; focuses on business readers' leisure-time decisions, including food and cooking, entertainment and culture, books, fashion and shopping, travel, sports and recreation, and the home (the section was introduced September 17, 2005, with the introduction of the paper's Weekend Edition)

In addition, several columnists contribute regular features to the Journal opinion page and OpinionJournal.com: Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... OpinionJournal. ...

James Taranto (born 1966) is a Manhattan-based columnist for The Wall Street Journal and editor of its online editorial page, OpinionJournal. ... Mary OGrady is an editor of the Wall Street Journal and member of the Wall Street Journal Editorial Board since 2005. ... Bret Stephens is a writer, editorialist and member of the Wall Street Journal Editorial Board. ... Holman W. Jenkins, Jr. ... Daniel Henninger is Deputy Editorial Page Director of the Wall Street Journal. ... On April 26, 2006, Strassel appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. ... Peggy Noonan (born Margaret Ellen Noonan on September 7, 1950 in Brooklyn, New York) is an author of seven books on politics, religion and culture, a weekly columnist for The Wall Street Journal, and was a Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan. ...

Opinions

Editorial page

The editorial page of the Journal summarizes its philosophy as being in favor of "free markets and free people". It is typically viewed as adhering to American conservatism and economic liberalism.[citation needed] The page takes a free-market view of economic issues and an often neoconservative view of American foreign policy.[citation needed] American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... The liberal theory of economics is the theory of economics begun in the Englightenment, and believed to be first fully forumulated by Adam Smith. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ...


The Journal won its first two Pulitzer Prizes for its editorial writing, in 1947 and 1953. It describes the history of its editorials:

They are united by the mantra "free markets and free people," the principles, if you will, marked in the watershed year of 1776 by Thomas Jefferson's Declaration of Independence and Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations. So over the past century and into the next, the Journal stands for free trade and sound money; against confiscatory taxation and the ukases of kings and other collectivists; and for individual autonomy against dictators, bullies and even the tempers of momentary majorities. If these principles sound unexceptionable in theory, applying them to current issues is often unfashionable and controversial.

Its historical position was much the same, and spelled out the conservative foundation of its editorial page: Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... Adam Smith FRSE (baptised June 5, 1723 O.S. / June 16 N.S. – July 17, 1790) was a Scottish moral philosopher and a pioneering political economist. ... Adam Smith An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations is the magnum opus of the Scottish economist Adam Smith, published on March 9, 1776 during the Scottish Enlightenment. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Administrators, remember to check if anything links here, the page history (last edit) and any revisions of CSD before deleting. ... Ukase (Russian: указ, ukaz) in Imperial Russia was a proclamation of the tsar government, or a religions leader patriarch that had the force of law. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

On our editorial page, we make no pretense of walking down the middle of the road. Our comments and interpretations are made from a definite point of view. We believe in the individual, his wisdom and his decency. We oppose all infringements on individual rights, whether they stem from attempts at private monopoly, labor union monopoly or from an overgrowing government. People will say we are conservative or even reactionary. We are not much interested in labels but if we were to choose one, we would say we are radical. (William H. Grimes, 1951)

Every Thanksgiving the editorial page prints two famous articles that have appeared there since 1961. The first is titled "The Desolate Wilderness" and describes what the Pilgrims saw when they arrived at the Plymouth Colony. The second is titled "And the Fair Land" and describes in romantic terms the "bounty" of America. It was penned by a former editor Vermont Royster, whose Christmas article "In Hoc Anno Domini," has appeared every December 25 since 1949. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A monopoly (from the Greek language monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a product or service, in other words a firm that has no competitors in its industry. ... A trade union or labor union is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. ... The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... Pilgrims is the name commonly applied to early settlers of the Plymouth Colony in present-day Plymouth, Massachusetts. ... Seal of Plymouth Colony Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations Capital Plymouth Language(s) English Religion Puritan, Separatist Government Monarchy Legislature General Court History  - Established 1620  - First Thanksgiving 1621  - Pequot War 1637  - King Philips War 1675–1676  - Part of the Dominion of New England 1686–1688  - Disestablished 1691... Vermont Connecticut Royster (April 30, 1914 - July 22, 1996) was the editor of the Wall Street Journal. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ...


Economic issues

During the Reagan administration, the newspaper's editorial page was particularly influential as the leading voice for supply-side economics. Under the editorship of Robert Bartley, it expounded at length on such economic concepts such as the Laffer curve and how a decrease in certain marginal tax rates and the capital gains tax can increase overall tax revenue by generating more economic activity, many of which have now entered the mainstream of economic academia.[citation needed] President Reagan, with his Cabinet and staff, in the Oval Office (February 4, 1981) Headed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1989, the Reagan Administration was conservative, steadfastly anti-Communist and in favor of tax cuts and smaller government. ... Supply-side economics is a school of macroeconomic thought that argues that economic growth can be most effectively managed using incentives for people to produce (supply) goods and services, such as adjusting income tax and capital gains tax rates. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the economic argument of exchange rate regimes (one of the most divisive issues among economists), the Journal has a tendency to support fixed exchange rates over floating exchange rates in spite of its support for the free market in other respects. For example, the Journal was a major supporter of the Chinese yuan's peg to the dollar, and strongly disagreed with American politicians who were criticising the Chinese government about the peg. It opposed the moves by China to let the yuan gradually float, arguing that the fixed rate benefited both the United States and China. The exchange rate regime is the way a country manages its currency in respect to foreign currencies and the foreign exchange market. ... A fixed exchange rate, sometimes (less commonly) called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. ... A floating exchange rate or a flexible exchange rate is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is allowed to fluctuate according to the foreign exchange market. ... Collection of Chinese yuan (renminbi) paper currency. ... State power within the government of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is divided among three bodies: the Communist Party of China, the state, and the Peoples Liberation Army, (PLA). ...


Its views are somewhat similar to those of the British magazine The Economist with its emphasis on free markets. However, the Journal does have important differences with respect to European business newspapers, most particularly with regard to the relative significance of, and causes of, the American budget deficit. (The Journal generally blames the lack of foreign growth and other related things, while most business journals in Europe and Asia blame the very low savings rate and concordant high borrowing rate in the United States). The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ...


Political issues

The editorial board has long argued for a less restrictive immigration policy. In a July 3, 1984 editorial, the board wrote: If Washington still wants to 'do something' about immigration, we propose a five-word constitutional amendment: There shall be open borders.' This stand on immigration reform has placed the Journal as an opponent of most conservative activists and politicians, for example National Review, who favor border security measures.[1] The editorial page commonly publishes pieces by U.S. and world leaders in academia, business, government and politics. is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ...


Regarding personal freedoms, the Journal editorial page stops short of agreeing with such Economist-backed opinions as the illegitimacy of the Guantanamo Bay detainment camp. The Journal has published articles from influential academic defenders of this Bush Administration policy. It has argued extensively through editorials and guest articles (from writers such as Berkeley Law's Dr. John Yoo) that the prisoners are treated justly, and that the camp is a necessary component in the war on terrorists. Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Guantánamo Bay detainment camp serves as a joint military prison and interrogation center under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), has occupied a portion of the United States Navys base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba since 2002. ... John Yoo is a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley (Boalt Hall), and is best known for his work from 2001 to 2003 in the United States Justice Departments Office of Legal Counsel. ...


The Journal in recent years has strongly defended Lewis Libby, whom it portrays as the victim of a political witchhunt.[17] It has also published editorials opposing the attacks by Lyndon LaRouche, Seymour Hersh, and The New York Times on Leo Strauss and his alleged influence in the George W. Bush administration.[18] I. Lewis Scooter Libby Irve Lewis Scooter Libby, Jr. ... Lyndon LaRouche at a news conference in Paris in February 2006. ... Seymour Myron Sy Hersh (born April 8, 1937 Chicago) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author based in Washington, DC. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker magazine on military and security matters. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Leo Strauss (September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973), was a German-born political philosopher who specialized in the study of classical political philosophy. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


The editorial page routinely publishes articles by scientists skeptical of the theory of global warming, including several influential essays by Richard Lindzen of MIT. Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... Richard Siegmund Lindzen (born 1940) is an atmospheric physicist and a professor of meteorology at MIT renowned for his research in dynamic meteorology - especially atmospheric waves. ... Richard Siegmund Lindzen (born 1940) is an atmospheric physicist and a professor of meteorology at MIT renowned for his research in dynamic meteorology - especially atmospheric waves. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ...


News and opinion

Despite the Journal's reputation as a conservative newspaper, the paper's editors stress the independence and impartiality of their reporters[16] and at least one study of media bias has found the paper's news bias is left-leaning, if anything. "A Measure of Media Bias," a December 2004 study conducted by Tim Groseclose of the University of California, Los Angeles and Jeff Milyo of the University of Missouri, stated that: This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, generally known as UCLA, is a public university whose main campus is located in the affluent Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The University of Missouri System is the designated public research and land-grant university system of the state of Missouri. ...

One surprise is the Wall Street Journal, which we find as the most liberal of all 20 news outlets [studied]. We should first remind readers that this estimate (as well as all other newspaper estimates) refers only to the news of the Wall Street Journal; we omitted all data that came from its editorial page. If we included data from the editorial page, surely it would appear more conservative. Second, some anecdotal evidence agrees with our result. For instance, Reed Irvine and Cliff Kincaid (2001) note that "The Journal has had a long-standing separation between its conservative editorial pages and its liberal news pages." Paul Sperry, in an article titled the "Myth of the Conservative Wall Street Journal," notes that the news division of the Journal sometimes calls the editorial division "Nazis." "Fact is," Sperry writes, "the Journal's news and editorial departments are as politically polarized as North and South Korea."[19]

The methods used to calculate this bias have been challenged by Mark Liberman, professor of computer science and the director of Linguistic Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania.[20] Liberman says "that many if not most of the complaints directed against G&M are motivated in part by ideological disagreement -- just as much of the praise for their work is motivated by ideological agreement. It would be nice if there were a less politically fraught body of data on which such modeling exercises could be explored."[21] This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


Notable reporting

The Journal has had several series of articles which have gone on to have significant impact. They have won many Pulitzer prizes. [2] Search Many of these have been transformed into books. Searching is the act of trying to find something or someone. ...


1987: RJR Nabisco buyout

In 1987, a bidding war ensued between several financial firms for tobacco and food giant RJR Nabisco. Bryan Burrough and John Helyar documented the events in several Journal articles. Burrough and Helyar later used these articles as the basis of a bestselling book, Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco, which was turned into a film for HBO.[22] RJR Nabisco, Inc. ... Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco (ISBN 0060161728) is a book by Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, about the leveraged buyout (LBO) of RJR Nabisco. ... Barbarians at the Gate is a made-for-TV movie based upon the book by Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, about the leveraged buyout (LBO) of RJR Nabisco. ...


1988: Insider trading

In the 1980s, Journal reporter James B. Stewart brought national attention to the illegal practice of insider trading. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in explanatory journalism in 1988, which he shared with Daniel Hertzberg,[23] who now serves as the paper's senior deputy managing editor. Stewart expanded on this theme in his book, Den of Thieves. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... James Brewer Stewart (born c. ... Insider trading is the trading of a corporations stock or other securities (e. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Den of Thieves is a 1991 non-fictional bestselling work by Pulitzer prize-winning writer James B. Stewart. ...


1997: AIDS treatment

David Sanford, a Page One features editor who was infected with HIV in 1982 in a bathhouse from "a man whose name I didn't catch", wrote a front-page personal account of how, with the assistance of improved treatments for HIV, he went from planning his death to planning his retirement.[24] He and other reporters wrote about the new treatments, political and economic issues, and won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting about AIDS.[25]


2000: Enron

Jonathan Weil, a reporter at the Dallas bureau of The Wall Street Journal, is credited with first breaking the story of financial abuses at Enron in July 2000[26], although Weil himself disavows credit[27]. Rebecca Smith and John R. Emshwiller reported on the story regularly[28], and wrote a book, 24 Days. Enron Corporation (Former NYSE ticker symbol: ENE) was an American energy company based in Houston, Texas. ... Rebecca Smith is a reporter in the Los Angeles, Calif. ... John R. Emshwiller is a senior national correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, the pre-eminent newspaper of the financial community in the United States. ...


2001: 9/11

The Wall Street Journal claims to have sent the first news report,[citation needed] on the Dow Jones wire, of a plane colliding into the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Its headquarters office was facing the World Trade Center across the street, and was demolished within minutes after the World Trade Center itself collapsed [29] Top editors worried that they might miss publishing the first issue for the first time in 100 years. They relocated to a makeshift office at an editor's home, and the paper was on the stands the next day. The Journal won a 2002 Pulitzer prize in Breaking News Reporting for that day's stories.[30] “WTC” redirects here. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


The Journal subsequently conducted a world-wide investigation of the causes and significance of 9/11, using contacts it had developed during its business coverage of the Arab world. In Kabul, Afghanistan, a Wall Street Journal reporter bought a pair of looted computers which had been used by leaders of Al Qaeda to plan assassinations, chemical and biological attacks, and mundane daily activities. The encrypted files were decrypted and translated.[31] It was during this coverage that Journal reporter Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and killed by terrorists. Kabul (Kâbl, in Persian کابل) is the capital and largest city of Afghanistan with a population variously estimated at 2 to 4 million. ... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of militant Sunni jihadist organizations. ... Daniel Pearl (October 10, 1963 – February 1, 2002) was an American journalist who was kidnapped and murdered in Karachi, Pakistan. ...


See also

The Wall Street Journal Europe is a version of The Wall Street Journal with daily news and analysis of global business developments for a European audience. ... The Wall Street Journal Asia is a version of The Wall Street Journal that provides news and analysis of global business developments for an Asian audience. ... The Wall Street Journal Special Editions is a venture launched in 1994 by The Wall Street Journal to expand its readership abroad, especially in the Americas. ... OpinionJournal. ... Barrons magazine is an American weekly newspaper covering U.S. financial information, market developments, and relevant statistics. ... A cover of the then-weekly Far Eastern Economic Review in September 2003 The Far Eastern Economic Review (Chinese: 遠東經濟評論; also referred to as FEER) is an English language Asian news magazine. ... Map of Economic Freedom released by the Heritage Foundation. ... The Heritage Foundation is a public policy research institute based in Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... Karen Elliott House is the publisher of the Wall Street Journal, and a senior vice president of Dow Jones. ... Daniel Pearl (October 10, 1963 – February 1, 2002) was an American journalist who was kidnapped and murdered in Karachi, Pakistan. ... Lucky Duckies is a term that was used in Wall Street Journal editorials starting on 20 November 2002 to refer to Americans who pay no federal income tax because they are at an income that is below the tax line (after deductions and credits). ... The media of New York City is internationally influential, with some of the most important newspapers, largest publishing houses, most prolific television studios, and biggest record companies in the world. ... Wall Street Journal Editorial Board members oversee the journals editorial page and represent the newspaper and its editorial page publically. ...

References

  1. ^ "Circulation at the Top 20 Newspapers", The Associated Press, 2007-04-30. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  2. ^ Hussman, Walter E. Jr. "Commentary: How to Sink a Newspaper". WSJ Online (New York). May 7, 2007.
  3. ^ Wall Street Journal Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 23 April 2007.
  4. ^ 2007 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  5. ^ 2007 Pulitzer Prize Winners - International Reporting. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  6. ^ Dow Jones & Co. Inc. "Dow Jones History - The Late 1800s". Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Crossen, Cynthia. "It All Began in the Basement of a Candy Store". The Wall Street Journal (New York), page B1, August 1, 2007.
  8. ^ "The Wall Street Journal Announces New Integrated Print and Online Sales and Marketing Initiatives". Press release. 3 November 2003.
  9. ^ Subscribing to the Wall Street Journal, WSJ.com
  10. ^ Mitchell, Bill. "The Wall Street Journal Weekend Edition: Expectations, Surprises, Disappointments". Poynter Online, 21 September 2005. Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  11. ^ Wray, Richard. "How the word on Wall Street will spread around the world", The Guardian, 2007 February 1. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. 
  12. ^ "Wall Street Journal Introduces New Front Page Advertising Opportunity". Press release, 18 July 2006. Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  13. ^ Ahrens, Frank. "Wall Street Journal To Narrow Its Pages". Washington Post, 12 October 2005. Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  14. ^ "Picturing Business in America". Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  15. ^ "Murdoch wins Control of Dow Jones", BBC, 2007-08-01. Retrieved on 2007-08-01. 
  16. ^ a b Crovitz, L. Gordon. "A Report to Our Readers". The Wall Street Journal (New York), page A14, August 1, 2007.
  17. ^ ""The Libby Injustice". Editorial, The Wall Street Journal (New York), January 20, 2007.
  18. ^ Bartley, Robert. "Joining LaRouche in the Fever Swamps". The Wall Street Journal (New York), June 9, 2003.
  19. ^ Groseclose, Tim, and Jeff Milyo. "A Measure of Media Bias". December 2004. Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  20. ^ Liberman, Mark (2005-12-22). Linguistics, Politics, Mathematics. Language Log. Retrieved on 2006-11-06.
  21. ^ Lieberman, Mark (2005-12-23). Multiplying ideologies considered harmful. Language Log. Retrieved on 2006-11-06.
  22. ^ Barbarians at the Gate at the Internet Movie Database
  23. ^ 1988 Pulitzer Prize Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  24. ^ Sanford, David. "Back to the Future: One Man's AIDS Tale Shows How Quickly Epidemic Has Turned". The Wall Street Journal (New York), November 8, 1997.
  25. ^ Pulitzer Prize Winners: 1997 - National Reporting, retrieved August 8, 2007.
  26. ^ Gladwell, Malcolm. "Open Secrets". The New Yorker, January 8, 2007.
  27. ^ Sung, Ellen W. "The Enron Collapse: Enron and the Media". Poynter Institute, March 8, 2002.
  28. ^ Enron CFO's Partnership Had Milions in Profit, The Wall Street Journal (New York), 19 October 2001. Retrieved 19 August 2006. (PDF)
  29. ^ Bussey, John. "The Eye of the Storm: One Journey Through Desperation and Chaos". The Wall Street Journal, page A1, September 12, 2001. Retrieved August 8, 2007.
  30. ^ Pulitzer Prize Winners: 2002 - Breaking News, retrieved August 8, 2007.
  31. ^ Cullison, Alan, and Andrew Higgins. "Forgotten Computer Reveals Thinking Behind Four Years of Al Qaeda Doings". The Wall Street Journal (New York), December 31, 2001.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Wall Street Journal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1801 words)
The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with a worldwide average daily circulation of more than 2.6 million as of 2005.
The Journal newspaper primarily covers U.S. and international business and financial news and issues—the paper's name comes from Wall Street, the street in New York City which is the heart of the financial district.
In 2001, the Journal was ahead of most of the journalistic pack in appreciating the importance of the accounting abuses at Enron, and two of its reporters in particular, Rebecca Smith and John R. Emshwiller, played a crucial role in bringing these abuses to light.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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