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Encyclopedia > The Village Voice

The 2006-01-04 front page of
The Village Voice
Type Alternative weekly
Format Tabloid

Owner Village Voice Media
Publisher Michael Cohen
Editor-in-Chief Tony Ortega
Founded 1955
Headquarters 36 Cooper Square
New York, NY 10003
Flag of the United States United States
Circulation 247,417[1]

Website: villagevoice.com
This article is about a New York newspaper. For the Ottawa Hills, Ohio magazine, see The Village Voice of Ottawa Hills.

The Village Voice is a free weekly newspaper in New York City featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. It is also distributed throughout the United States on a pay basis. Image File history File links Voicelogo-181. ... Image File history File links Printcover. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Village Voice Media is a privately held corporation that owns the Village Voice, the nations oldest (founded in 1955) and largest alternative weekly newspaper, as well as LA Weekly, OC (Orange County) Weekly in Santa Ana, California, Seattle Weekly, Minneapolis City Pages, and Nashville Scene. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Village Voice of Ottawa Hills is a monthly community magazine that serves the village of Ottawa Hills, Ohio a suburb of Toledo, Ohio. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


It was the first and is arguably the best known of the arts-oriented tabloids that have come to be known as alternative weeklies, though its reputation has been unstable since a recent buyout by publishing conglomerate New Times Media. The turbulent times its writers have covered has often been matched by the intrigue in its own offices, most recently including the firing of several high-profile contributors and a scandal over a forged story in 2005, the year the paper turned 50. The Voice's spirit can be captured in its 1980s advertising slogan: "Some people swear by us...other people swear AT us." This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... The New Times Media corporation was a national publisher of alternative weekly newspapers. ...

Contents

History

The Voice was launched by Dan Wolf, Ed Fancher and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955, from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village, its initial coverage area, expanding to other parts of the city by the 1960s. The offices in the 1960s were located at Sheridan Square; they are now at Cooper Square in the East Village. Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and film director. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Cooper Square is a junction of streets in Manhattan, New York City. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ...


The Voice has published groundbreaking investigations of New York City politics, as well as reporting on local and national politics, with arts, culture, music, dance, film, and theater reviews. The Voice has received three Pulitzer Prizes, in 1981 (Teresa Carpenter), 1986 (Jules Feiffer) and 2000 (Mark Schoofs). Almost since its inception the paper has recognized alternative theater in New York through its Obie Awards. From the early 1970s to 2005 music critic Robert Christgau ran a highly influential music poll known as "Pazz & Jop" every February from the "top ten" lists submitted by music critics from around the country. In 1999, film critic J. Hoberman and film section editor Dennis Lim began a similar Village Voice Film Poll for the year's movies. In 2001 the paper sponsored its first Siren Festival indie rock festival, a free annual event every summer held at Coney Island. For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Teresa Carpenter is a Pulitzer prize winning, bestselling American author. ... Jules Feiffer (1958) Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is an American syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... The Pazz & Jop critics poll is a highly influential poll of music critics run by The Village Voice newspaper. ... A music critic is someone who reviews music (including printed music, performances and recorded music) and publishes writing on them in books or journals (or on the internet). ... J. Hoberman (Jim Hoberman) is the lead film critic for The Village Voice. ... The Village Voice Film Poll is an annual polling by The Village Voice film section of more than 100 major film critics for alternative media sources. ...


The Voice has published many well-known writers, including Ezra Pound, Henry Miller, Barbara Garson, Katherine Anne Porter, James Baldwin, E.E. Cummings, Nat Hentoff, Ted Hoagland, Tom Stoppard, Lorraine Hansberry, Ron Rosenbaum, Paul Levinson, Jerry Tallmer, Allen Ginsberg, Lester Bangs, Murray Kempton, I.F. Stone, Pete Hamill, Roger Wilkins and Joshua Clover. Former editors have included Dan Wolf, Clay Felker, Tom Morgan, Marianne Partridge, David Schneiderman, Diane Fischer, Robert Friedman, Marty Gottlieb, Jonathan Larson, and Karen Durbin. Ezra Pound in 1913. ... Henry Miller photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1940 Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 – June 7, 1980) was an American writer and, to a lesser extent, painter. ... Barbara Garson (born July 7, 1941 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an American playwright, author and social activist. ... Katherine Anne Porter (15 May 1890 – 18 September 1980) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist, essayist, short story writer, novelist, and political activist. ... James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, poet, and essayist, best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. ... Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 - September 3, 1962) was an American poet and writer. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... Edward Hoagland (born December 21, 1932 in New York, New York, USA) is an author best known for his nature and travel writing. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Lorraine Hansberry (May 19, 1930 - January 12, 1965) was an American playwright and litigant in the United States Supreme Court case, Hansberry v. ... Ron Rosenbaum (born on November 27, 1946, New York, New York) is an American journalist and author. ... Paul Levinson, 2002 Paul Levinson (b. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... Murray Kempton (b. ... Isador Feinstein Stone (better known as I.F. Stone) (December 24, 1907 – July 17, 1989) was an iconoclastic American investigative journalist best known for his influential political newsletter, . Stone was born in Philadelphia. ... Pete Hamill Pete Hamill (born June 24, 1935) is a prominent American journalist, novelist, and short story writer. ... Roger Wilkins (born 1932) is an American civil rights leader, professor of history, and journalist. ... Joshua Clover (b. ... Clay Felker is a magazine editor and journalist who founded New York Magazine in 1968. ... Tom Morgan (born 1970) is an Australian musician and songwriter best known for fronting 90s indie pop group Smudge. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ...


Village Voice columnists have included Rachel Kramer Bussel, Tristan Taormino, Alexander Cockburn, Nina Lalli, Michael Musto, Joy Press, Tricia Romano, Andrew Sarris, Dan Savage, Sydney H. Schanberg, Toni Schlesinger, Robert Sietsema, Silke Tudor and Corina Zappia. Rachel Kramer Bussel (b. ... Tristan Taormino (born 9 May 1971) is an award-winning author, columnist, editor, and self-styled anal sexpert. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with her Bachelors degree in American Studies from Wesleyan University in 1993. ... Alexander Claud Cockburn (pronounced , co-burn), born June 6, 1941, is a self-described radical Irish journalist who has lived and worked in the United States since 1973. ... Michael Musto Michael Musto is an American Manhattan-based writer who began his career at The Village Voice, where he writes the weekly ([1]) La Dolce Musto celebrity and gossip column. ... Joy Press is a freelance writer and co-author of The Sex Revolts: Gender, Rebellion and RockNRoll (along with husband Simon Reynolds). ... Andrew Sarris is a film critic and a leading proponent of the Auteur theory of criticism. ... Dan Savage speaking at Bradley University Daniel Keenan Savage (born October 7, 1964[1] near Chicago, Illinois, United States) is an openly gay American sex advice columnist, author, media pundit, journalist, and newspaper editor. ... Sydney H. Schanberg (born January 17, 1934 in Clinton, Massachusetts) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. ...

Village Voice columnist Nat Hentoff. Photo by Tom Pich
Village Voice columnist Nat Hentoff. Photo by Tom Pich

Early columnists of the 1950s and 1960s included Jonas Mekas, who explored the underground film movement in his "Film Journal" column; Linda Solomon, who reviewed the Village club scene in the "Riffs" column; and Sam Julty, who wrote a popular column on car ownership and maintenance. Another regular from that period was the cartoonist Kin Platt, who did weekly theatrical caricatures. Other prominent regulars have included Peter Schjeldahl, Ellen Willis, Leslie Savan, C. Carr, Simon Firth, Tom Carson, Mim Udovitch, Wayne Barrett and Ross Wetzsteon. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... Jonas Mekas (1922 - ) is a Lithuanian filmmaker, writer, and curator who has often been called the godfather of American avant-garde cinema. ... In 1979, Linda Solomon surveys life in Greenwich Village from the roof of 95 Christopher Street. ... Kin Platts self-caricature Kin Platt (August 12, 1911-November 30, 2003) was an American writer-artist who wrote radio comedy (for Stoopnagle and Budd, George Burns, Jack Benny, The National Bisquit Comedy Hour), did artwork for Fantasia and created the first animal superhero, Supermouse. ... Peter Schjeldahl was born in 1942 in Fargo, North Dakota. ... Ellen Willis is best known as the first pop music critic for the New Yorker, working there during the 1960s. ... Wayne Barrett is a writer for the Village Voice. ...


The newspaper has also been a host to promising underground cartoonists. In addition to mainstay Jules Feiffer, whose cartoon ran for decades in the paper until its cancellation in 1996, well-known cartoonists featured in the paper have included Matt Groening, Lynda Barry, Stan Mack, Mark Alan Stamaty, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Ward Sutton and Ruben Bolling. Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Lynda Barry (born January 2, 1956) is an American cartoonist and author. ... Stanley Mack is a cartoonist and reporter best known for his series, Stan Macks Real Life Funnies, which ran in The Village Voice for over 20 years. ... Mark Alan Stamaty is an American cartoonist and childrens book writer and illustrator. ... A Ted Rall cartoon depicting John Kerry and George W. Bush. ... Dan Perkins (born 1961 in Wichita, Kansas), better known by the pen name Tom Tomorrow, is an editorial cartoonist. ... Ward Sutton is an illustrator and writer born in Minneapolis and based in New York City, whose comic strip, Sutton Impact (formerly Schlock n Roll), has been published in The Village Voice since 1995. ... Ruben Bolling is a pseudonym for Ken Fisher, a cartoonist, the author of Tom the Dancing Bug. ...


The Voice is also known for containing adult content, including sex advice columns and many pages of advertising for "adult services" (escorts, prostitutes, etc.). This content is located at the back of the newspaper. The other large newspapers in New York City do not carry adult content.


The Voice's competitors in New York City include the New York Press, New York Observer and Time Out New York. After decades of carrying a cover price, the Voice responded to competition from the free New York Press by itself becoming free of charge on newsstands in the five boroughs -- in 1996. (It still carries a charge for home/mail delivery and for newsstands outside the city limits, such as on Long Island.) Its circulation as of June 2006 was 247,417.[1] New York Press is a free alternative weekly in New York City. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... The distinctive Time Out logo, seen on all its publications Time Out is a publishing company based in London. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ...


The Voice’s web site is a past winner of both the National Press Foundation’s Online Journalism Award and the Editor and Publisher EPPY Award for Best Overall US Weekly Newspaper Online. The National Press Foundation is a non-profit organization that provides training for journalists and awards excellence in journalism. ... Editor & Publisher (E&P) is a now-monthly journal covering the North American newspaper industry. ...


Seventeen alternative weeklies around the United States are owned by the Voice's parent company Village Voice Media. In 2005, the Phoenix alternative weekly chain New Times Media purchased the company and took the Village Voice Media name. Previous owners of Village Voice Media have included Felker, Rupert Murdoch, and Leonard Stern of the Hartz Mountain empire. Village Voice Media is a privately held corporation that owns the Village Voice, the nations oldest (founded in 1955) and largest alternative weekly newspaper, as well as LA Weekly, OC (Orange County) Weekly in Santa Ana, California, Seattle Weekly, Minneapolis City Pages, and Nashville Scene. ... The New Times Media corporation was a national publisher of alternative weekly newspapers. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Leonard Norman Stern is the Chairman and CEO of the privately owned Hartz Group based in New York City. ... Hartz Mountain Industries (HMI) is a private family owned and operated company known for its vast real estate holdings in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan Area. ...

See also: Media of New York City

The media of New York City is internationally influential, with some of the most important newspapers, largest publishing houses, most prolific television studios, and biggest record companies in the world. ...

Changes after 2005 New Times Media buyout

Since the buyout, the paper has made a number of broad-sweeping changes, becoming an increasingly mainstream publication. The Village Voice is now managed by two libertarians from Phoenix, Arizona, and some New York media critics perceive a loss of the paper's original iconoclastic, bohemian spirit.[1][2] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... For other uses, see Libertarianism (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ...


In April 2006, the Voice dismissed music editor Chuck Eddy.[3] Four months later the newspaper fired longtime music critic Robert Christgau. In January 2007, the newspaper fired sex columnist and erotica author Rachel Kramer Bussel. Chuck Eddy (born November 26, 1960 in Detroit, Michigan) is a music journalist, and is currently a senior editor at Billboard. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... Rachel Kramer Bussel (b. ...


The paper has experienced high turnover among its editorial leadership since 2005. Editor-in-chief Don Forst resigned in December 2005. Doug Simmons, his replacement, was fired in March 2006 after it was discovered a reporter had fabricated portions of an article. Simmons' successor, Erik Wemple, resigned after two weeks. His replacement, David Blum, was fired in March 2007. As of April 2007, Tony Ortega, former editor of the Broward-Palm Beach New Times, is editor. Broward County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Being largely seasonal, downtown Palm Beachs streets are virtually vacant in the summer. ...


References

  1. ^ a b The Village Voice. Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

News reports on the New Times buyout

  • Murphy, Jarrett. Village Voice Media, New Times Announce Merger: Deal to combine two largest alt-weekly chains would require Justice Department approval. Village Voice, October 24, 2005 issue. Retrieved April 13, 2006.

Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! Amy Goodman b. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Ridgeway is a prominent American investigative journalist. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... Sydney H. Schanberg (born January 17, 1934 in Clinton, Massachusetts) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. ... Mark Jacobson (b. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

On Pazz and Jop Poll after dismissal of Christgau

  • Sisario, Ben.

[4]. Meaty, Beaty, Big and Bloggy: An Online Poll Covets the Territory Once Owned by Pazz & Jop. November 30, 2006 edition of The New York Times. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


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Village Voice Bookshop: An American English Bookstore in Paris, France (441 words)
Village Voice Bookshop is open seven days a week, and carries approximately 18,000 titles from English-language literature.
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From the very beginning, the Village Voice Bookshop was a gathering place for Americans, British, and Anglophones and Anglophiles in general.
The Village Voice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (756 words)
The Village Voice is a weekly newspaper in New York City featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City.
The Voice was launched by Dan Wolf, Ed Fancher and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955, from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village, its initial coverage area, expanding to other parts of the city by the 1960s.
The voice is also recognized for its 18+ content usually in the back of the magazine and is the only newspaper to do so.
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