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Encyclopedia > The Two Towers
The Lord of the Rings
Volume I - Volume II - Volume III

The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. It is preceded by The Fellowship of the Ring and followed by The Return of the King. The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the British academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the British academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ...

Middle-earth Portal

Contents

Image File history File links Arda. ...

Title

The title was created when The Lord of the Rings was broken into three volumes due to a belief by Tolkien's editor that the average reader would have a difficult time accepting a novel of over a thousand pages.[citation needed] Tolkien wrote, "The Two Towers gets as near as possible to finding a title to cover the widely divergent Books 3 & 4; and can be left ambiguous."[1]. A note at the end of The Fellowship of the Ring and Tolkien's final illustration of the towers states them as Minas Morgul and Orthanc.[2] but in a letter to Rayner Unwin Tolkien mentions Orthanc and the Tower of Cirith Ungol.[3]


Loosely, any pair from a set of five towers in the story could plausibly fit the title: Cirith Ungol, Orthanc (Isengard), Minas Tirith, Barad-dûr and Minas Morgul. For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ...


Trivia

Before it was decided to publish The Lord of the Rings in three volumes, Tolkien had hoped to publish the novel in one volume, or combined with The Silmarillion. At this stage he planned to title the individual books. The discarded title for Book III was The Treason of Isengard. Book IV was titled The Journey of the Ringbearers or The Ring Goes East. The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ...


Structure

Because The Two Towers is the central portion of a longer work, its structure differs from that of a conventional novel. It begins and ends abruptly, without introduction to the characters, explanations of major plot elements or a satisfying conclusion. This is characteristic of the technical classification novel sequence, not a book series - though it and the other two volumes are not individual novels themselves. The first section follows the divergent paths of several important figures from The Fellowship of the Ring, but tells nothing of its central character, on whose fate so much depends, enabling the reader to share in the suspense and uncertainty of the characters themselves. The narrative of the second part returns to the hero's quest to destroy the evil that threatens the world. While the first section tells of an epic battle, the struggles in much of the second section are internal. A novel sequence is a set or series of novels which share common themes, characters, or settings, but where each novel has its own title and free-standing storyline, and can thus be read independently or out of sequence. ... A book series is a sequence of books with common characteristics, typically marketed as a group by a particular author or publisher. ...


Plot summary

Book III

As Aragorn searched for Frodo, he heard Boromir's horn blowing. He found him mortally wounded by arrows, and his assailants gone. Before Boromir died, he revealed that Merry and Pippin had been captured by Orcs in spite of his efforts to defend them, and that Frodo had disappeared because he had tried to take the Ring from him. In his last moments, he charged Aragorn to defend his city Minas Tirith from Sauron. With Legolas and Gimli, who had been fighting Orcs by themselves, he paid his last respects to the fallen man and sent him away on a funeral boat. The three then resolved to follow the Orc captors. However after hardship the Hobbits escaped when the Orcs themselves were attacked by the horsemen of Rohan. Merry and Pippin headed into nearby Fangorn Forest where they encountered giant treelike creatures called Ents. The Ents resembled real trees in every way, except for the fact that they could see, talk, and move. These guardians of the forest generally kept to themselves, but their leader Treebeard persuaded them to oppose the menace posed to the trees by the wizard Saruman, who had chopping these down to fuel fires for his furnaces. Aragorn (II., son of Arathorn II.) is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... Frodo Baggins is one of the most significant characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Orcs in Moria, from the 1978 animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... Legolas is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, a Hobbit is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... The banner of Rohan, as rendered in Peter Jacksons movies; the sun is an embellishment on the books description of a white horse upon green. Rohan (from Sindarin Rochand), is a fictional realm in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy era of Middle-earth. ... An Ash Ent in the Lord of the Rings movie series Ents are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Treebeard or (Sindarin) Fangorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... Saruman is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Aragorn, Gimli the Dwarf and Legolas the Elf came across the Riders of Rohan who told them that they attacked the Orcs the previous night and left no survivors. However, Aragorn was able to find small prints and they follow these into Fangorn, where they met a wizard dressed in white who they at first believed to be Saruman, but who turned out to be their wizard friend Gandalf, whom they believed had perished in the mines of Moria. He told them of his fall into the abyss, his battle to the death with the Balrog and his ressurection with enhanced power. The four rode to Rohan's capital Edoras, where Gandalf roused King Théoden from inaction against the threat Saruman poses. In the process, Saruman's agent in Edoras, Gríma Wormtongue, is expelled from the city. Aragorn, Gimli and Legolas then travel with Théoden's troops to the defensive fortress called the Hornburg in the valley Helm's Deep, while Gandalf goes away to Isengard to talk to Treebeard. At the Hornburg, they resisted an onslaught of Orcs and Men sent by Saruman, and Gandalf arrived the next morning with the remains of the army of Westfold that Saruman's forces had previously routed. The orcs fled into a forest of Huorns, creatures similar to Ents, and none escaped. The heroes and the Rohirric army then head to Saruman's stronghold in Isengard. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria, was an ominous name given to what had once been an enormous underground city in Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through the Misty Mountains. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... Edoras is the grand mountain top capital city of Rohan. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens novel The Lord of the Rings, Gríma (Wormtongue) is the chief advisor to King Théoden of Rohan. ... Hornburg is a city of 2. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Helms Deep was a large valley in the north-western Ered Nimrais (White Mountains). ... The Huorns are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


There, they reunited with Merry and Pippin and found the city overrun by Ents, who had flooded it with the nearby river, and the central tower of Orthanc besieged, with Saruman and Gríma in it. After giving Saruman a chance to repent, Gandalf cast him out of the order of Wizards. Gríma threw something from a window at Gandalf and those with him. This turnedout to be one of the palantíri, seeing-stones. Pippin, unable to resist the urge, looked into it and had an encounter with Sauron. Gandalf and Pippin then headed for Minas Tirith in preparation for the upcoming war. A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ...


Chapters

  • I - The Departure of Boromir - Aragorn finds Boromir wounded by many arrows, who tells him that orcs took the Hobbits, and they were still alive. Boromir does not tell Aragorn which Hobbits were taken. Boromir dies, and his body is set down the stream on a 'funeral boat.'; Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli decide to follow the orcs who had captured Merry and Pippin, rather than following Frodo and Sam. The three of them set off to chase the orcs.
  • II - The Riders of Rohan - They follow the trail of the orcs and find several clues as to what happened with the hobbits, then meet a company of Rohirrim led by Éomer, who tell them that the orcs were destroyed and none were left alive. They camp near the site of the orc massacre.
  • III - The Uruk-hai - This chapter begins further back in time, telling the story of Merry and Pippin being captured by the orcs, who are lead by Uglúk from Saruman's army, and Grishnákh from Mordor. The two sides of orcs are constantly arguing. The orcs camp near Fangorn, and Grishnákh attempts to take the hobbits away with him. The hobbits escape as Grishnákh is killed by an arrow. They flee into Fangorn Forest as the orcs are attacked by the men of Rohan.
  • IV - Treebeard - Merry and Pippin meet Treebeard the Ent, who calls an Entmoot, a gathering of Ents in Derndingle. The hobbits meet another Ent, Quickbeam. The ents decide at the entmoot after three days, to attack Isengard.
  • V - The White Rider - The chapter goes back to the story of Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli, who discover signs that the hobbits escaped the orcs into the forest. They meet an old man, who they at first presume to be Saruman, but who turns out to be Gandalf. They set off for Edoras.
  • VI - The King of the Golden Hall - The four of them reach Edoras and talk with King Théoden. Wormtongue is kicked out of the city. Théoden gives Gandalf the horse Shadowfax.
  • VII - Helm's Deep - Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli are at Helm's Deep with the Rohan army, defending the people of Rohan from attack by the army of Saruman.
  • VIII - The Road to Isengard - They travel to Isengard, and see that it has been destroyed. At Isengard they find Merry and Pippin.
  • IX - Flotsam and Jetsam - Merry and Pippin tell the story of how the Ents attacked Isengard, in amongst the ruins or 'flotsam and jetsam' of Saruman's fortress.
  • X - The Voice of Saruman - Saruman has a very persuasive voice, which he almost uses to persuade Théoden and the others until Gandalf casts him from the order of wizards. Wormtongue throws the palantír of Orthanc from the tower, which misses Gandalf, and is picked up by Pippin.
  • XI - The Palantír - Pippin picks up the palantír and is seen by Sauron. Gandalf explains the origin of the palantír; Gandalf sets off with Pippin for Minas Tirith, riding on Shadowfax.

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ... Éomer is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Orc or Ork, an Old English word (orc-néas orc-corpses in Beowulf) for the zombie-like monsters of Grendels race was revived by J. R. R. Tolkien in his Middle-earth legendarium. ... Orc or Ork, an Old English word (orc-néas orc-corpses in Beowulf) for the zombie-like monsters of Grendels race was revived by J. R. R. Tolkien in his Middle-earth legendarium. ... The word moot has multiple meanings. ... Bregalad or Quickbeam is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... Horses are an important element in the fantasy world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

Book IV

Frodo and Sam discovered and captured Gollum stalking them as they tried to reach Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring. Gollum hoped to reclaim the Ring. Sam loathed and distrusted him, but Frodo pitied him. Gollum promised to lead them to a secret entrance to Mordor and for a time appeared to be a true ally. Upon reaching the Black Gate of Mordor, Gollum persuaded them not to go in, where they would have been surely caught. They headed south into Gondor's province of Ithilien, and were captured by Faramir, the brother of Boromir. Faramir learned from Frodo of his brother's death and of the plan to destroy the ring, and allowed them to go on their way. Gollum led them into the lair of Shelob, an enormous spider-like creature, who inflicted her poisonous bite on Frodo. Sam resolved to finish the quest himself and took the Ring. But when Orcs took Frodo's body, he followed them and learnt that Frodo was not dead, but unconscious and now their prisoner. The last line of the book is "Frodo was alive but taken by the enemy." Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... Secret passages are sometimes concealed using large items of furniture, such as this reconstruction of the bookcase that covered the entrance to Anne Franks secret room. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... Faramir, Steward of Gondor, Prince of Ithilien and Lord of Emyn Arnen (T.A. 2983 – F.A. 82) was a wise man of nobility and the second of Denethors two sons in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... Shelob is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional works of Middle-earth. ...


Chapters

  • I - The Taming of Sméagol - Gollum joins Frodo and Sam, after Sam captures him.
  • II - The Passage of the Marshes - They pass through the Dead Marshes
  • III - The Black Gate is Closed - They reach the gate of Mordor, Gollum persuades them not to go in, and to head south.
  • IV - Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit - They reach the pleasant country of Ithilien. Title refers to the rabbits Gollum catches that Sam cooks; the smoke from the fire causes them to be seen by men of Gondor led by Faramir, and they witness an attack on a Southron army, and an Oliphaunt.
  • V - The Window on the West - Frodo and Sam are captured by Faramir's men and they are blindfolded on their way to Henneth Annûn. Frodo and Faramir discuss Boromir's death.
  • VI - The Forbidden Pool - Faramir shows Frodo they have found Gollum at the Forbidden pool. Frodo saves him from being shot by Faramir's men.
  • VII - Journey to the Cross-roads - Frodo, Sam and Gollum leave Faramir. They travel to the crossroad of the road east between Osgiliath and Minas Morgul, and the north-south road from the Black Gate to the southlands.
  • VIII - The Stairs of Cirith Ungol - They witness an army leaving Minas Morgul.
  • IX - Shelob's Lair - encounter with Shelob the spider
  • X - The Choices of Master Samwise - Frodo is taken by the orcs. Sam listens to the orcs talking about him, which is how he finds out that he is still alive, having thought that Frodo had been killed by Shelob.

The Dead Marshes is a fictional place from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... One interpretation of a mûmak from Peter Jacksons The Two Towers. ... In JRR Tolkiens Lord of the Rings trilogy, Henneth Annûn was a hidden Gondorian outpost in North Ithilien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ... Shelob is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional works of Middle-earth. ...

Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

Some of the events of The Two Towers and Fellowship of Ring were depicted in a 1978 film of The Lord of the Rings by Ralph Bakshi. J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ...


In 1999, The Lifeline Theatre in Chicago presented the world premiere of The Two Towers, adapted for the stage by James Sie and Karen Tarjan, directed by Ned Mochel.


In 2002 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers film by Peter Jackson was released. Both The Two Towers and Return of the King films abandoned the parallel storytelling of the book in favour of a more chronological presentation. The first chapter from the book actually appears at the end of Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. Later events of The Two Towers were filmed for Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. There was initial concern over using the title "The Two Towers" due to the real-life association with the World Trade Center and the terrorist attacks the previous year. The WTC was also commonly called The Twin Towers and due to that similarity, the filmakers were reportedly considering alternate titles. It was decided, eventually, to retain the original title. Various games also adapt The Two Towers, including online role-playing games like The Two Towers Mud and graphically-oriented console games. Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a three-time Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA winning New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novels... This article is about the former World Trade Center (Twin Towers) in New York City. ... The Two Towers mud is a fantasy multiplayer text based online role-playing game set in Tolkien’s universe at the time of events in the second volume of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Carpenter, Humphrey and Tolkien, Christopher (eds.) (1981). The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, #140. ISBN 0-395-31555-7. 
  2. ^ "The second part is called The Two Towers, since the events recounted in it are dominated by Orthanc, ..., and the fortress of Minas Morgul"
  3. ^ Carpenter, Humphrey and Tolkien, Christopher (eds.) (1981). The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, #143. ISBN 0-395-31555-7. 
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:



Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and the biographer Humphrey Carpenter. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and the biographer Humphrey Carpenter. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

J. R. R. Tolkien
Bibliography
Fiction: Songs for the Philologists (1936) • The Hobbit or There and Back Again (1937) • Leaf by Niggle (1945) • The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun (1945) • Farmer Giles of Ham (1949) • The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son (1953) • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (1954), The Two Towers (1954), The Return of the King (1955) • The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and Other Verses from the Red Book (1962) • The Road Goes Ever On (1967) • Tree and Leaf (1964) • The Tolkien Reader (1966) • Smith of Wootton Major (1967)
Posthumous publications : The Father Christmas Letters (1976) • The Silmarillion (1977) • Unfinished Tales (1980) • Bilbo's Last Song (1990) • The History of Middle-earth (12 Volumes) (1983–1996) • Roverandom (1998) • The Children of Húrin (2007) • The History of The Hobbit (2007)
Academic Works : A Middle English Vocabulary (1922) • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (trans. 1925) • Some Contributions to Middle-English Lexicography (1925) • The Devil's Coach Horses (1925) • Ancrene Wisse and Hali Meiðhad (1929) • The Name 'Nodens' (1932) • Sigelwara Land parts I and II, in Medium Aevum (1932-34) • Chaucer as a Philologist: The Reeve's Tale (1934) • Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics (1937) • The Reeve's Tale: version prepared for recitation at the 'summer diversions' (1939) • On Fairy-Stories (1939) • Sir Orfeo (1944) • Ofermod and Beorhtnoth's Death (1953) • Middle English "Losenger": Sketch of an etymological and semantic enquiry (1953) • Ancrene Wisse: The English Text of the Ancrene Riwle (1962) • English and Welsh (1963) • Introduction to Tree and Leaf (1964) • Contributions to the Jerusalem Bible (as translator and lexicographer) (1966) • Tolkien on Tolkien (autobiographical) (1966) • Finn and Hengest (1982)
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John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Songs for the Philologists is a collection of poems by E.V. Gordon and J. R. R. Tolkien as well as traditional songs. ... The Hobbit is a fantasy novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien in the tradition of the fairy tale. ... Leaf by Niggle is a short story written by J. R. R. Tolkien in 1938-39 and first published in the Dublin Review in January 1945. ... The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun is a poem of 508 lines, written by J. R. R. Tolkien in 1930, and published in Welsh Review in December, 1945. ... Farmer Giles of Ham (written in 1947, published in 1949) is a short story written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelms Son is the title of a work by J. R. R. Tolkien that was originally published in 1953 in volume 6 of the scholarly journal Essays and Studies by Members of the English Association. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the British academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... The Adventures of Tom Bombadil is a collection of poetry by J. R. R. Tolkien, published in 1962. ... The Road Goes Ever On is a walking song by J. R. R. Tolkien, fictionally written by Bilbo Baggins; verses of it are sung at various places in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Tree and Leaf is a collection of works by J. R. R. Tolkien including an essay called On Fairy-Stories, a short story called Leaf by Niggle and a poem called Mythopoeia. The book was originally illustrated by Pauline Baynes. ... Contents The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorthelms Son On Fairy Stories Ofermod Leaf by Niggle Farmer Giles of Ham The Adventures of Tom Bombadil ... Smith of Wootton Major, first published in 1967, is a short story by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Father Christmas Letters is a collection of letters written by Father Christmas to J.R.R Tolkiens children. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... Bilbos Last Song is a poem by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books published from 1983-1996, that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... Roverandom is a story written by J.R.R. Tolkien, originally told in 1925. ... The Children of Húrin (2007) is a completion of a tale by J. R. R. Tolkien begun in 1918. ... The History of The Hobbit, a new study of J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, is to be published by Houghtin Mifflin in May and June 2007. ... The original Gawain Manuscript, Cotton Nero A.x. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Ancrene Wisse and Hali Meiðhad is a 1929 essay by J. R. R. Tolkien on the 13th century early Middle English treatise Ancrene Wisse The Anchoresses Rule, and on the tract on virginity Hali Meiðhad Holy Maidenhood. The essay has been called the most perfect of Tolkiens... Sigelwara Land is the title of an essay in two parts by J. R. R. Tolkien, appeared in Medium Aevum Vol. ... The Reeves Prologue and Tale is the third story to be told in Geoffrey Chaucers The Canterbury Tales. ... On Fairy-Stories is an essay written by J. R. R. Tolkien, first published in Essays Presented to Charles Williams, Oxford University Press, 1947. ... Sir Orfeo is an anonymous Middle English narrative poem. ... Ancrene Wisse (also Ancrene Riwle) or Guide for Anchoresses is a monastic rule (or manual) for anchorite nuns, written in the early 13th century in Middle English. ... English and Welsh is the title of J. R. R. Tolkiens valedictory address to the University of Oxford of 1955, explaining the origin of the word Welsh. In a lengthy sidenote, Tolkien discusses his notions of native tongue as opposed to cradle tongue, and of an inherited taste of... Tree and Leaf is a collection of works by J. R. R. Tolkien including an essay called On Fairy-Stories, a short story called Leaf by Niggle and a poem called Mythopoeia. The book was originally illustrated by Pauline Baynes. ... The Jerusalem Bible (JB) is a Catholic translation of the Bible which first was introduced to the English-speaking public in 1966. ... Finn and Hengest is a study by J.R.R Tolkien, published posthumously in book form in 1982. ...


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The Two Towers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1811 words)
The Two Towers is the second volume of J.
Some of the events of The Two Towers were depicted in a 1978 film of The Lord of the Rings by Ralph Bakshi and the 2002 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers by Peter Jackson.
Later events of The Two Towers were filmed for Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.
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