FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Twelve Chairs (1970 film)
The Twelve Chairs

Video cover for The Twelve Chairs
Directed by Mel Brooks
Produced by Michael Hertzberg
Written by Ilf and Petrov (novel),
Mel Brooks
Starring Frank Langella,
Dom DeLuise,
Ron Moody
Distributed by Universal Marion Corporation
Released 1970
Running time 94 min.
Language English
IMDb profile

The Twelve Chairs is a 1970 film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Frank Langella, Dom DeLuise and Ron Moody . The screenplay was written by Brooks. The film is a based on a novel, The Twelve Chairs (Двенадцать Стульев) (1928) written by Ilf and Petrov. Image File history File links TwelveChairsVHS.png Summary VHS cover for film The Twelve Chairs Licensing This image is of a videotape cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the videotape or the studio which produced the videotape in question. ... Mel Brooks on the talk show Parkinson. ... Ilf and Petrov Ilya Ilf (Ilya Arnoldovich Faynzilberg, 1897-1937) and Evgeny or Yevgeny Petrov (Yevgeniy Petrovich Kataev or Katayev, 1903-1942) were two Soviet prose authors of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Mel Brooks on the talk show Parkinson. ... Frank Langella (born January 1, 1940 in Bayonne, New Jersey) is an American stage and film actor. ... Dom DeLuise Dominick Dom DeLuise (born August 1, 1933) is an American actor of Italian extraction. ... Ron Moody (born January 8, 1924) is a British actor. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Mel Brooks on the talk show Parkinson. ... Frank Langella (born January 1, 1940 in Bayonne, New Jersey) is an American stage and film actor. ... Dom DeLuise Dominick Dom DeLuise (born August 1, 1933) is an American actor of Italian extraction. ... Ron Moody (born January 8, 1924) is a British actor. ... The Twelve Chairs The Twelve Chairs (Russian: ) (1928) is a famous satirical novel by the Soviet authors Ilf and Petrov. ... Ilf and Petrov Ilya Ilf (Ilya Arnoldovich Faynzilberg, 1897-1937) and Evgeny or Yevgeny Petrov (Yevgeniy Petrovich Kataev or Katayev, 1903-1942) were two Soviet prose authors of the 1920s and 1930s. ...


Plot

At the start, Ippolit Matveevich Vorobyaninov, a buffoon from an erstwhile noble family in Czarist Russia, is summoned, along with the family priest, to the deathbed of a relative who reveals before passing that a set of jewels had been hidden from the Bolsheviks in one of the twelve chairs from the family's dining room set. Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Leaders of the Bolshevik Party and the Communist International, a painting by Malcolm McAllister on the Pathfinder Mural in New York City and on the cover of the book Lenin’s Final Fight published by Pathfinder. ...


After hearing the dying confession, the orthodox priest, played by Dom DeLuise, decides to leave the church and attempt to beat the scion to the treasure. Dom DeLuise Dominick Dom DeLuise (born August 1, 1933) is an American actor of Italian extraction. ...


Shortly thereafter, a vagabond con-artist, Ostap Bender, meets the dispossessed nobleman and forces his way into a partnership with him in his search for the family riches. Although Ostap is an unwelcome addition at first, later, it is mostly through his cunning, intellect and charm that the pair manage to accomplish anything. Ostap Bender played by Andrei Mironov, 1976 Ostap Bender is a misanthropic con man and comic hero in the novel The Twelve Chairs (January 1928 - Russian: Двенадцать стульев). Ostap Bender searches in the Soviet Union during the New Economic Policy era in order to find a diamond treasure which was hidden into...


The chairs (one of which contains the precious stones secretly sewn into the seat) along with all other personal property, had been expropriated by the government after the Russian Revolution. The two set off together to locate the chairs and recover the fortune, but are stymied by a series of false leads and other trying events. The October Revolution, also known as the Bolshevik Revolution or November Revolution, was the second phase of the Russian Revolution of 1917, the first having been instigated by the events around the February Revolution. ...


Early on, they find that the chairs have been split up and sold individually and so their hunt ends up requiring lots of travel to track down and open up each piece of the set in order to eliminate it as a possible location of the booty.


Along the way they meet "comrades" from every walk of life in Soviet Russia with much humor resulting as the two get into and then extricate themselves from many outrageous situations as they attempt to locate, open up (read utterly destroy), and thus rule out each chair in turn as the one that held the gems. Comrade is a term meaning friend, colleague, or ally. ... State motto: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Workers of the world, unite!) Official language None (Russian in practice) Capital Moscow (last) Chairman of the Supreme Council Boris Yeltsin Established In the USSR:  - Since  - Until November 7, 1917 December 30, 1922 December 12, 1991 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 1st in former Soviet Union 17,075,200...


Eventually, but only after perpetrating plenty of cons to pay for the enterprise (while simultaneously attempting to keep ahead of the former priest that is in competition with them), the duo discovers, in a recreation center, the last, 12th chair, that must - through process of elimination - contain the treasure. The two hide in the building until after closing so they can open up the last chair in peace, after everyone has gone.


At the moment of discovery, but only after completely and comically demolishing the chair with the pent up anticipation and lust the long trial has built up within them, their hopes are dashed as it is found to be completely empty.


They learn from an officer who had come into the center to investigate the din how the jewels had been unexpectedly found and how the windfall from their sale had been spent on building of the new, grand public building they were now sitting in.


Hearing this "inspiring" story sends Vorobyaninov over the edge and he assaults the officer, knocking him out. After admonishing him for hitting a policeman, Ostap leads the way as the two make their escape into the night. Now without funds or purpose, Ostap proposes that the dejected pair split-up and go their separate ways.


In the end, the two, who could not have had more different backgrounds, and who have regularly antagonized one another, realize that they have grown to depend on, and maybe even like one another.


The movie ends with the former nobleman on the ground in a park, feigning an epileptic seizure (previously he had proclaimed to Ostap that "a Vorobyaninov never begs!"). Ostap calls out for attention while encouraging the passers-by to give generously to this sad, stricken man, thus cementing their partnership and averting their parting.


Although this film is has some amusing sequences and a fun opening number written by Mel Brooks, it is considered by fans of the novel to be a very poor and embarrassing adaptation that doesn't capture its Soviet satirical flair or the bleakness and earnest social criticism in its humor.


Awards

Frank Langella won the NBR (National Board of Review) award for Best Supporting Actor. Mel Brooks was nominated for the WGA (Writers Guild of America) for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium. The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George McClennans revocation of moving-picture exhibition licenses on Christmas Eve 1908. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ...


External links


The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ...

Films Directed by Mel Brooks
The Producers | The Twelve Chairs | Young Frankenstein | Blazing Saddles | Silent Movie | High Anxiety
History of the World, Part I | Spaceballs | Life Stinks | Robin Hood: Men in Tights | Dracula: Dead and Loving It

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m