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Encyclopedia > The Truman Show
The Truman Show
Directed by Peter Weir
Produced by Scott Rudin
Andrew Niccol
Adam Schroeder
Edward S. Feldman
Written by Andrew Niccol
Starring Jim Carrey
Laura Linney
Ed Harris
Noah Emmerich
Natascha McElhone
Music by Burkhard Dallwitz
Phillip Glass
Cinematography Peter Biziou
Editing by William M. Anderson
Lee Smith
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date(s) June 5, 1998
Running time 103 min.
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $60 million
Gross revenue $264,118,201
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

The Truman Show is a 1998 science fiction comedy-drama film directed by Peter Weir and written by Andrew Niccol. The cast includes Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank, as well as Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich, Ed Harris and Natascha McElhone. The film chronicles the life of a man who does not know that he is living in a constructed reality soap opera, televised 24/7 to billions across the globe. The Truman Show Poster This is a copyrighted poster. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... Scott Rudin (born July 14, 1958) is an American motion picture producer and theatre producer known for his award-winning films and Broadway plays and also for his legendary temper. ... Andrew M. Niccol (born 1964) is a screenwriter, producer, and director. ... Adam Schroeder is a self producor who has made a big difference in hollywood. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Laura Leggett Linney[1][2] (born February 5, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning American actress, active in movies, television, and theatre. ... For other persons of the same name, see Edward Harris. ... Noah Nicholas Emmerich (born in February 27, 1965 in New York City) is an American film actor who first broke out in the cult hit Beautiful Girls. ... Natascha McElhone (born Natascha Taylor, December 14, 1971 in Hampstead, London, England) is a British television and movie actress, best known for her roles in Solaris and as Lady Mary Boleyn in the original adaptation of the controversial novel The Other Boleyn Girl. ... Burkhard Dallwitz was born near Frankfurt, Germany in 1959 and began ten years of classical piano training at the age of eight. ... Philip Glass looks upon sheet music in a portrait taken by Annie Leibovitz. ... Peter Biziou (born August 8, 1944 in Wales, United Kingdom) is a British cinematographer. ... Lee Smith is an ACE-certified film editor. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... Andrew M. Niccol (born 1964) is a screenwriter, producer, and director. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Laura Leggett Linney[1][2] (born February 5, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning American actress, active in movies, television, and theatre. ... Noah Nicholas Emmerich (born in February 27, 1965 in New York City) is an American film actor who first broke out in the cult hit Beautiful Girls. ... For other persons of the same name, see Edward Harris. ... Natascha McElhone (born Natascha Taylor, December 14, 1971 in Hampstead, London, England) is a British television and movie actress, best known for her roles in Solaris and as Lady Mary Boleyn in the original adaptation of the controversial novel The Other Boleyn Girl. ... Simulated reality is the idea that reality could be simulated — often computer-simulated — to a degree indistinguishable from true reality. ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ... 24/7 is an abbreviation which stands for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, usually referring to the availability of a service. ...


The genesis of The Truman Show started out as a spec script by Niccol. The original draft was more in tone of a science fiction thriller, with the story set in New York City. Scott Rudin purchased the script, and instantly set the project up at Paramount Pictures. Brian de Palma was in contention to direct before Weir took over, managing to make the film for $60 million against the estimated $80 million budget. Niccol rewrote the script simultaneously as the filmmakers were waiting for Carrey's schedule to be open for filming. The majority of filming took place at Seaside, Florida, a master-planned community located in the Florida Panhandle. A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... Scott Rudin (born July 14, 1958) is an American motion picture producer and theatre producer known for his award-winning films and Broadway plays and also for his legendary temper. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... Seaside, Florida is an unincorporated master-planned community on the Florida panhandle roughly midway between Fort Walton Beach, Florida and Panama City, Florida. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... The Florida Panhandle is the region of the state of Florida which includes the westernmost 16 counties in the state. ...


The film was a financial and critical success, and Paramount's marketing approach for the film was similar to Forrest Gump. The Truman Show earned numerous nominations at the 71st Academy Awards, 56th Golden Globe Awards, 52nd British Academy Film Awards and The Saturn Awards. The Truman Show has been analyzed as a thesis on Christianity, simulated reality and existentialism. Many have noted the film predicted the rise of reality television. Forrest gump redirects here. ... The 71st Academy Awards ceremony was the last to take place at Los Angeles County Music Center, and was Whoopi Goldbergs third time hosting the Awards. ... 56th Golden Globe Awards - 24 January 1999 Picture, Drama Picture, Comedy/Musical Series, Drama Series, Comedy/Musical The 56th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1998, were held on January 24, 1999 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California. ... 52nd BAFTA Awards April 11, 1999 Best Film: Best British Film: The 52nd BAFTA Awards, given by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts on 11 April 1999, honored the best in film for 1998. ... Religious perspectives on Jesus is the specific significance some religions place on Jesus. ... Simulated reality is the idea that reality could be simulated — often computer-simulated — to a degree indistinguishable from true reality. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... // This article is about the genre of TV shows. ...

Contents

Plot

The film is set in a hypothetical world, called Seahaven, where an entire town is dedicated to a continually running television show. All of the participants are actors, except for Truman Burbank, who is unaware that he lives in a constructed reality for the entertainment of those outside. Central characters fake friendship to Truman, and in the case of his "wife", bury their real feelings of disgust. A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Simulated reality is the idea that reality could be simulated — often computer-simulated — to a degree indistinguishable from true reality. ...


Truman was chosen out of five unwanted babies to be a TV star. Producers built a gigantic studio to encapsulate Seahaven, the artificial town in which he lives. To prevent Truman from trying to escape, his father is "killed" in a staged boating incident to make him afraid of water. Despite Truman's staged relationship with his wife Meryl, he is actually obsessed in finding a girl he met in college who was caught by the producers while trying to explain to Truman the true nature of his life. Eventually, in the thirtieth year of his life, Truman begins to figure out that it is all fake. Everyone tries to reassure him, but Truman has already reached the point of no return, and tries to escape Seahaven. The point of no return, or the Rubicon, is the point beyond which someone, or some group of people, must continue on their current course of action. ...


Along his path to truth and escape Truman encounters obstacles placed in his way, including choreographed traffic jams, the inability to book any trips, buying a bus ticket out of town where the bus suddenly breaks down, a "leak at the plant", a long bridge to cross, and an artificially created hurricane-force storm on the "ocean". He finally reaches the edge of the constructed reality and exits via a door in the wall, to an audience of millions. Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station consisted of two pressurized water reactors manufactured by Babcock & Wilcox each inside its own containment building and connected cooling towers. ...


Cast

  • Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank: Chosen out of five unwanted pregnancies and the first child to be legally adopted by a corporation. He is unaware that his daily life is broadcast 24-hours-a-day around the world. He has a job in insurance business, a lovely wife, but eventually notices the environment is not what it usually seems. Robin Williams was considered for the role, but Weir cast Carrey seeing him in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, because his performance reminded him of Charlie Chaplin.[1] Carrey took the opportunity to proclaim himself as a dramatic actor, rather than being typecast in comedic roles.[2] Carrey, who is normally paid $20 million per film, agreed to do The Truman Show for $12 million.[3] Carrey and Weir initially found working together on set difficult (Carrey's contract gave him the power to demand rewrites), but Weir was impressed with Carrey's improvisational skills, and the two became more interactive.[1] The scene where Truman declares "this land Trumania of the Burbank galaxy" in the bathroom mirror was Carrey's idea.[4]
  • Laura Linney as Hannah Gill / Meryl Burbank: Truman's "wife" who holds a profession as a nurse at the local hospital. She daily expresses product placements, one of the many occurrences making Truman curious about life. Linney explained, "she was a child actress who never made it, and now she's really ambitious. Mostly she's into negotiating her contract. Every time she sleeps with Truman she gets an extra $10,000."[1] Linney heavily studied Sears catalogs from the 1950s for her character's poses.[5]
  • Noah Emmerich as Louis Coltrane / Marlon: Truman's best friend since early childhood. Marlon is a vending machine operator for the company Goodies who promises Truman he would never lie to him, despite the latest events going on in Truman's life. Emmerich felt, "My character is in a lot of pain. He feels really guilty about deceiving Truman. He's had a serious drug addiction for many years. Been in and out of rehab."[1]
  • Ed Harris as Christof: The creator of The Truman Show, who rarely feels any empathy or compassion for his star. Dennis Hopper was originally cast in the role, but he left in April 1997 (during filming) because of "creative differences". Harris was a last minute replacement.[3] A number of other actors had turned down the role after Hopper's departure.[4] Harris had an idea of making Christof a hunchback but Weir did not like the idea.[1]
  • Natascha McElhone as Sylvia / Lauren Garland: A girl who became romantically involved with Truman for one night during college, and tried to reveal to him the truth about his life; she was arrested and thrown out of the show before she could tell him. As an adult, she protests against The Truman Show.
  • Brian Delate as Walter Moore / Kirk: An actor who portrays Truman's father. When Truman was a boy, he was killed off to install a fear of water in his son to help keep him on the island; he sneaks back into the show when Truman is an adult, and the writers are forced to write a plot in which his father returns despite having apparently drowned.
  • Holland Taylor as Alanis Montclair / Truman's mother: Christof makes her attempt to convince Truman to have children.

Harry Shearer cameos as Mike Michaelson, news anchor host of TruTalk, an affiliate of The Truman Show. Paul Giamatti, who was at the time an unknown actor, plays a control room director. Peter Krause portrays Truman's boss at his office. James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company is one of the largest New York based life insurance companies Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... This article is about the American actor and comedian; for other people named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Ace Ventura, Pet Detective is a 1994 wacky comedy movie, directed by Tom Shadyac. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... The word typecasting (past participle typecast) can mean more than one thing: typecasting (programming) typecasting (acting) in acting This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Laura Leggett Linney[1][2] (born February 5, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning American actress, active in movies, television, and theatre. ... Wikibooks [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject: Marketing Product placement advertisements are promotional ads placed by marketers using real commercial products and services in media, where the presence of a particular brand is the result of an economic exchange. ... Sears, Roebuck and Co. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years of 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Noah Nicholas Emmerich (born in February 27, 1965 in New York City) is an American film actor who first broke out in the cult hit Beautiful Girls. ... A typical U.S. snack vending machine A vending machine is a machine that provides various snacks, beverages and other products to consumers. ... For other persons of the same name, see Edward Harris. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Kyphosis (Greek - kyphos, a hump), in general terms, is a curvature of the upper spine. ... Natascha McElhone (born Natascha Taylor, December 14, 1971 in Hampstead, London, England) is a British television and movie actress, best known for her roles in Solaris and as Lady Mary Boleyn in the original adaptation of the controversial novel The Other Boleyn Girl. ... Brian Delate (April 8,1949) is an American actor. ... Holland Taylor (b. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... A news anchor (US,Can. ... Below is a list of television shows that have been made up in real television shows or other media. ... Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (born June 6, 1967) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Control Room is a 2004 documentary film about Al Jazeera and its relations with the US Central Command (CENTCOM), as well as the other news organizations that covered the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... Peter Krause as Nate Fisher on Six Feet Under Peter Krause (born 12 August 1965) is an American film and television actor. ...


Production

The genesis of The Truman Show started out as a spec script by Andrew Niccol. The original draft was more in tone of a science fiction thriller, with the story set in New York City.[5] Niccol stated, "I think everyone questions the authenticity of their lives at certain points. It's like when kids ask if they're adopted."[6] In the fall of 1993,[7] producer Scott Rudin purchased the script for slightly above $1 million.[8] Paramount Pictures instantly agreed to distribute. Part of the deal called for Niccol to have his directing debut, though Paramount felt the estimated $80 million budget would be too high for him.[9] In addition, Paramount wanted to go with an A-list director, paying Niccol extra money "to step aside". Brian de Palma was under negotiations to direct before he left United Talent Agency in March 1994.[7] Directors being considered after de Palma's departure included Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Barry Sonnenfeld and Steven Spielberg before Peter Weir signed on in early-1995,[1] following a recommendation of Niccol.[6] A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Andrew M. Niccol (born 1964) is a screenwriter, producer, and director. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Scott Rudin (born July 14, 1958) is an American motion picture producer and theatre producer known for his award-winning films and Broadway plays and also for his legendary temper. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... A Film distributor is an independent company, a subsidiary company or occasionally an individual, which acts as the final agent between a film production company or some intermediary agent, and a film exhibitor, to the end of securing placement of the producers film on the exhibitors screen. ... The A-list is the roster of the most bankable movie stars in Hollywood. ... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... The United Talent Agency (UTA) was founded in 1991 as the result of a merger between two medium-size talent agencies, Bauer-Benedek Agency and Leading Artists Agency, and is one of the worlds largest full-service talent and literary agencies. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark gothic atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Barry Sonnenfeld American film maker Barry Sonnenfeld (born New York City, April 1, 1953) worked as cinematographer for the Coen Brothers, then later he directed and produced big budget films such as Men in Black. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ...


Paramount was cautious about The Truman Show, which they dubbed "the most expensive art film ever made" because of its $60 million budget. They wanted the film to be funnier and less dramatic.[1] Weir also shared this vision, feeling that Niccol's script was too dark, and declaring "where he [Niccol] had it depressing, I could make it light. It could convince audiences they could watch a show in this scope 24/7." Niccol wrote sixteen drafts of the script before Weir considered the script ready for filming. Later on in 1995, Jim Carrey signed to star,[5] but due to commitments with The Cable Guy and Liar Liar, he would not be ready to start filming for at least another year.[1] Weir felt Carrey was perfect for the role and opted to wait for another year rather than recast the role.[5] Niccol rewrote the script twelve times,[1] while Weir created a fictionalized book about the show's history. He envisioned backstories for the characters, and encouraged actors to do the same.[5] Andrei Tarkovskys The Mirror Le Fantôme de la liberté, one of the last films by Luis Bunuel (1974), which depicts seemingly random events, disrupting the conventions of storytelling in film. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... For the comedian, see Larry the Cable Guy. ... Liar Liar (1997) is an American comedy film starring Jim Carrey. ...


Weir scouted locations in Eastern Florida, but was unsatisfied with the landscapes. Sound stages at Universal Studios were reserved for the story's setting of Seahaven before Weir's wife introduced him to Seaside, Florida, a master-planned community located in the Florida Panhandle. Pre-production offices were instantly opened in Seaside, where the majority of filming took place. Other scenes were shot at Paramount Studios in Los Angeles, California.[4] Norman Rockwell paintings and 1960s postcards were used as inspiration for the film's design.[10][11] Weir, Peter Biziou and Dennis Gassner researched surveillance techniques for certain shots.[10] This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Soundstage redirects here. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Seaside, Florida is an unincorporated master-planned community on the Florida panhandle roughly midway between Fort Walton Beach, Florida and Panama City, Florida. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... The Florida Panhandle is the region of the state of Florida which includes the westernmost 16 counties in the state. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... Peter Biziou (born August 8, 1944 in Wales, United Kingdom) is a British cinematographer. ... For other uses, see Surveillance (disambiguation). ...


Weir saw The Truman Show as a chance to utilize the long-abandoned silent-era cinematic technique of vignetting the edges of the frame to emphasize the center. The overall look was influenced by television images, particularly commercials: many shots have characters leaning into the lens with their eyeballs wide open and the interior scenes are heavily lit, because Weir wanted to remind that "in this world, everything was for sale."[10] Those involved in visual effects work found the film somewhat difficult to work on since 1997 was the year many visual effects companies were trying to convert to computer-generated imagery.[11] Visual effects (or VFX for short) is the term given in which images or film frames are created and manipulated for film and video. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


Soundtrack

The Truman Show
Soundtrack by Burkhard Dallwitz
Phillip Glass
Released 1998
Genre Soundtrack
Length 56:32
Label Milan Records
Professional reviews
  • Score Reviews 4/5 stars link

The original music for The Truman Show was composed by Burkhard Dallwitz. Dallwitz was hired after Peter Weir received a tape of his work while in Australia for the post-production.[12] Some parts of the soundtrack were composed by Philip Glass, including four pieces which appeared in his previous works (Powaqqatsi, Anima Mundi, and Mishima). Glass also appears very briefly in the film as one of the in-studio composer/performers. In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Burkhard Dallwitz was born near Frankfurt, Germany in 1959 and began ten years of classical piano training at the age of eight. ... Philip Glass looks upon sheet music in a portrait taken by Annie Leibovitz. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Milan Records is a record label specializing in film scores and soundtrack albums. ... Image File history File links 4_stars. ... Burkhard Dallwitz was born near Frankfurt, Germany in 1959 and began ten years of classical piano training at the age of eight. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... Powaqqatsi: Life in Transformation is the 1988 sequel to the experimental 1983 documentary film Koyaanisqatsi, by Godfrey Reggio. ... Anima Mundi is a 1991 short documentary film directed by Godfrey Reggio. ... Mishima can refer to: Mishima, Shizuoka, a city in Japan Yukio Mishima, the penname of Kimitake Hiraoka, a Japanese author This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Also featured in the film are Frederic Chopin's "Romance-Larghetto" from his first piano concerto, performed by Artur Rubinstein, Wojciech Kilar's "Father Kolbe's Preaching" performed by the Orchestra Philharmonique National de Pologne and "20th Century Boy" performed by Rockabilly band The Big Six. Fr̩d̩ric-Fran̤ois Chopin as portrayed by Eug̬ne Delacroix in 1838. ... The Piano Concerto No. ... Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Artur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 РDecember 20, Polish pianist best known for his performances of Chopin and his championing of Spanish music. ... Photograph of Wojciech Kilar. ... 20th Century Boy is a song by T. Rex. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ...

20th Century Boy is a song by T. Rex. ...

Themes

See also: Religious perspectives on Jesus, Simulated reality, Existentialism, and Allegory of the cave

Religious perspectives on Jesus is the specific significance some religions place on Jesus. ... Simulated reality is the idea that reality could be simulated — often computer-simulated — to a degree indistinguishable from true reality. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Religious analogy

Benson Parkinson of Association for Mormon Letters noted that Christof represented Jesus as an "off-Christ" (Christ-off), or Antichrist. Parkinson further explained that Christof can be translated into Satan as megalomaniacal Hollywood producer. Truman and Sylvia are the only characters who use their real names on the show, which is to say their real names are also stage names.[13] Truman's search of evidence for the truth can be compared to a common man's opinion of life. Christof is willing to manipulate and use Truman for commercial gain, just like producers and directors are sometimes to use up their creative people, then discard them. A conversation between Truman and Marlon at the bridge was compared to one with Moses and God in the Bible.[13] This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In Christian eschatology, the Antichrist or anti-Christ means a person, office, or group recognized as fulfilling the Biblical prophecies about one who will oppose Christ and substitute himself in Christs place. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... For the Okkervil River album, see The Stage Names. ... The term common man emphasizes the similarities between a politician and the average citizen. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ...


Media

"This was a dangerous film to make because it couldn't happen. How ironic."
—Director Peter Weir on The Truman Show predicting the rise of reality television[4]

In 2008, Popular Mechanics named The Truman Show as one of the ten most prophetic science fiction films. Journalist Erik Sofge argued the story reflects the falseness of reality television. "Truman simply lives, and the show's popularity is its straightforward voyeurism. And, like Big Brother, Survivor, and every other reality show on the air, none of his environment is actually real." While he deemed Big Brother debuting a year after the film's release an eerie coincidence, he also compared it to the 2003 program The Joe Schmo Show; "Unlike Truman, Matt Gould could see the cameras, but all of the other contestants were paid actors, playing the part of various reality-show stereotypes. While Matt eventually got all of the prizes in the rigged contest, the show's central running joke was in the same existential ballpark as The Truman Show."[14] Weir declared, "There has always been this question: is the audience getting dumber? Or are we film- makers patronizing them? Is this what they want? Or is this what we're giving them? But the public went to my film in large numbers. And that has to be encouraging."[6] The adolescent Internet. ... // This article is about the genre of TV shows. ... Big Brother a reality television show. ... This article is about general format of the international television show. ... The Joe Schmo Show was a reality TV show (actually a parody of reality game shows) on the American cable network Spike TV that began airing in September 2003. ... Matt Kennedy Gould was the victim of a television hoax by The Joe Schmo Show in 2003. ...


Ronald Bishop of Sage Journals Online felt The Truman Show showcased the power of the media. Truman's life inspires audiences around the world, meaning their lives are controlled by his. Bishop commented, "In the end, the power of the media is affirmed rather than challenged. In the spirit of Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony, these films and television programs co-opt our enchantment (and disenchantment) with the media and sell it back to us."[15] Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... Antonio Gramsci (IPA: ) (January 22, 1891 – April 27, 1937) was an Italian writer, politician and political theorist. ... Look up hegemony in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Psychological interpretation

An essay published in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis analyzed Truman as a prototypical adolescent at the beginning of the movie. He feels trapped into a familial and social world to which he tries to conform while being unable to entirely identify with it, believing that he has no other choice (other than through the fantasy of fleeing to a deserted island). Eventually, Truman gains sufficient awareness of his condition to 'leave home' – developing a more mature and authentic identity as a man, leaving his child-self behind and becoming a True-man.[16]


Utopian Connection

Parallels can be drawn from Sir Thomas Mores Utopia in which he describes an Island which has only one way in and one way out. Also, only those who belonged to this island knew how to navigate their way through the treacherous opening safely and unharmed. This is similar to the Truman Show because there are limited entryways into the World that Truman knows. Also, Truman really doesn’t belong to this Utopia which he has been implanted in and has been frightened by childhood trauma at the prospect of ever leaving this small community. Utopian models of the past tended to be full of like minded individuals who had a lot in common, some examples of this can been seen in Mores “Utopia”, The Shakers, The Dedham Covenants and the Oneida community. It is clear that everyone in Truman's World is like minded in the fact that they were all working to keep Truman oblivious to what was really going on. It is very important to notice the 1950’s suburban “picket fence” concept in which Truman has been living in. It is by no coincidence that Truman's World is set during the time period of “The American Dream” of the 1950’s in which everyone who worked hard could enjoy their own home and have a family.[17] “The American Dream” suburban concept in Trumans World serves two functions; keeping him happy as well as unaware.


Release

Reaction

The Truman Show's original theatrical release date was August 8, 1998, but Paramount Pictures considered pushing it back to around Christmas.[18] NBC purchased broadcast rights in December 1997, roughly eight months before the film's release.[19] In March 2000, Turner Broadcasting System purchased the rights and now often airs the film on TBS.[20] is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television network. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ... Turner Broadcasting logo Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. ... This article is about the U.S. television network. ...


Paramount's marketing approach for The Truman Show was similar to the one employed for Forrest Gump.[6] The film opened in the United States on June 5, 1998, earning $31,542,121 in its opening weekend. It eventually became a financial success, grossing $125,618,201 in North America, and $138,500,000 in foreign countries, coming at a total of $264,118,201.[21] The Truman Show was the eleventh-highest grossing film of 1998.[22] Forrest gump redirects here. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Based on 83 reviews collected by Rotten Tomatoes, The Truman Show received an average 95% overall approval rating;[23] with a unanimous and highly rare 100% with 17 critics in Rotten Tomatoes' "Top Critics" poll.[24] By comparison, Metacritic gave the film an average score of 90 from the 30 reviews collected.[25] Roger Ebert felt the film had a right balance of comedy and drama, comparing it to Forrest Gump. He was also impressed with Jim Carrey's dramatic performance.[26] Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times wrote, "The Truman Show is emotionally involving without losing the ability to raise sharp satiric questions as well as get numerous laughs. The rare film that is disturbing despite working beautifully within standard industry norms."[27] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Kenneth Turan is an American film critic, currently writing for the Los Angeles Times. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ...


James Berardinelli liked the film's approach of "not being the casual summer blockbuster with special effects", and compared Carrey's performance to Tom Hanks and James Stewart.[28] Jonathan Rosenbaum of the Chicago Reader wrote, "Undeniably provocative and reasonably entertaining, The Truman Show is one of those high-concept movies whose concept is both clever and dumb."[29] Tom Meek of Film Threat said the film was not funny enough, but found "something rewarding in its quirky demeanor".[30] Fernando F. Croce of Slant Magazine described The Truman Show as highly "overrated, definitely not the-movie-of-the-decade as so many have claimed".[31] James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ... Thomas Jeffrey Tom Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American film actor, director, voice-over artist, writer and film producer. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Rosenbaum is a prominent American film critic. ... The Chicago Reader is an alternative newsweekly in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It was founded in 1971[2] by a group of friends who attended Carleton College. ... Tom Meek with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, 2002 Tom Meek (b. ... Film Threat is the name of a magazine and website devoted to coverage of independent film. ... Since its inception in 2001, Slant Magazine has grown exponentially in content, exposure, and readership. ...


Awards

At the 71st Academy Awards, The Truman Show was nominated for three categories, but failed to convert any of them into awards. Peter Weir received the nomination for Best Director while Ed Harris was nominated for Best Supporting Actor and Andrew Niccol was nominated for Best Original Screenplay.[32] Many believed Carrey would be nominated for Best Actor, but this never happened.[1] The film was an outstanding success at the 56th Golden Globe Awards. Carrey (Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama), Harris (Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture) and Burkhard Dallwitz and Philip Glass (Best Original Score) all won their respective categories. In addition The Truman Show received the nomination for Best Motion Picture - Drama, while Weir (Director - Motion Picture) and Niccol (Screenplay) received nominations.[33] The 71st Academy Awards ceremony was the last to take place at Los Angeles County Music Center, and was Whoopi Goldbergs third time hosting the Awards. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... For other persons of the same name, see Edward Harris. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Andrew M. Niccol (born 1964) is a screenwriter, producer, and director. ... The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... 56th Golden Globe Awards - 24 January 1999 Picture, Drama Picture, Comedy/Musical Series, Drama Series, Comedy/Musical The 56th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1998, were held on January 24, 1999 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... Burkhard Dallwitz was born near Frankfurt, Germany in 1959 and began ten years of classical piano training at the age of eight. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Drama has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ...


At the 52nd British Academy Film Awards, Weir (Direction), Niccol (Original Screenplay) and Dennis Gassner (Production Design) received awards. In addition, the film was nominated for Best Film and Best Visual Effects. Harris was nominated for Best Supporting Actor while Peter Biziou was nominated for Best Cinematography.[34] The Truman Show was a success at The Saturn Awards with Best Fantasy Film and Best Writing (Niccol). Carrey (Best Actor), Harris (Best Supporting Actor) and Weir (Direction) received nominations.[35] The film won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.[36] 52nd BAFTA Awards April 11, 1999 Best Film: Best British Film: The 52nd BAFTA Awards, given by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts on 11 April 1999, honored the best in film for 1998. ... Winners of the BAFTA Award for Best Direction presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. ... 2006 - Little Miss Sunshine - Michael Arndt Babel - Guillermo Arriaga El Laberinto del fauno - Guillermo del Toro The Queen - Peter Morgan United 93 - Paul Greengrass 2005 - Crash - Paul Haggis Robert Moresco Good Night, and Good Luck. ... 2006 - Children of Men - Geoffrey Kirkland Jim Clay Jennifer Williams Casino Royale – Peter Lamont Simon Wakefield El Laberinto del fauno – Eugenio Caballero Pilar Revuelta Marie Antoinette – K.K. Barrett Véronique Melery Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Mans Chest – Rick Heinrichs Cheryl Carasik 2005 - Harry Potter and the Goblet... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... 2006 - Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Mans Chest - John Knoll Hal T. Hickel Charles Gibson Allen Hall Superman Returns – Mark Stetson Neil Corbould Richard Hoover Jon Thum El Laberinto del fauno – Edward Irastorza Everett Burrell David Martí Montse Ribé Casino Royale – Steven Begg Chris Corbould John Paul Docherty Ditch... In the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role actors of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Peter Biziou (born August 8, 1944 in Wales, United Kingdom) is a British cinematographer. ... // 2006 - Children of Men - Emmanuel Lubezki Babel – Rodrigo Prieto Casino Royale – Phil Meheux El Laberinto del fauno – Guillermo Navarro United 93 – Barry Ackroyd 2005 - Memoirs of a Geisha - Dion Beebe Brokeback Mountain – Rodrigo Prieto The Constant Gardener – César Charlone Crash – J. Michael Muro La Marche de lempereur – Laurent... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Fantasy Film: ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Writing: ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Actor (in a film): Category: ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Direction: ... The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation is one of the annual Hugo Award categories, presented by members of the World Science Fiction Convention. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Benjamin Svetkey. "The Truman Pro", Entertainment Weekly, 1998-06-05. Retrieved on 2008-03-16. 
  2. ^ Bernard Weinraub. "Director Tries a Fantasy As He Questions Reality", The New York Times, 1998-05-21. Retrieved on 2008-04-01. 
  3. ^ a b Anita M. Busch. "New Truman villain: Harris", Variety, 1997-04-07. Retrieved on 2008-03-08. 
  4. ^ a b c d (2005). How's It Going to End? The Making of The Truman Show, Part 2 (DVD). Paramount Pictures.
  5. ^ a b c d e (2005). How's It Going to End? The Making of The Truman Show, Part 1 (DVD). Paramount Pictures.
  6. ^ a b c d Sheila Johnston. "Interview: The clevering-up of America", The Independent, 1998-09-20. Retrieved on 2008-04-01. 
  7. ^ a b Michael Fleming. "SNL's Farley crashes filmdom", Variety, 1994-03-10. Retrieved on 2008-03-08. 
  8. ^ Michael Fleming. "TriStar acquires female bounty hunter project", Variety, 1994-02-18. Retrieved on 2008-03-08. 
  9. ^ Rob Blackwelder. "S1M0NE'S SIRE", Spliced Wire, 2002-08-12. Retrieved on 2008-03-28. 
  10. ^ a b c Eric Rudolph. "This is Your Life", American Cinematographer, June 1998. Retrieved on 2008-04-01. 
  11. ^ a b (2005). Faux Finishing, the Visual Effects of The Truman Show (DVD). Paramount Pictures.
  12. ^ Burkhard Dallwitz. Australian Musician (Autumn 1999). Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  13. ^ a b Benson Parkinson. "The Literary Combine: Intimations of Immortality on The Truman Show", Association for Mormon Letters, 2003-09-19. Retrieved on 2008-03-25. 
  14. ^ Erik Sofge. "The 10 Most Prophetic Sci-Fi Movies Ever", Popular Mechanics, 2008-03-28. Retrieved on 2008-03-31. 
  15. ^ Ronald Bishop. "Good Afternoon, Good Evening, and Good Night: The Truman Show as Media Criticism", Sage Journals Online, 2000-06-18. Retrieved on 2008-03-26. 
  16. ^ Brearley M, Sabbadini A. (2008). "The Truman Show : How's it going to end?". International Journal of Psychoanalysis 89 (2): 433-40. PMID 18405297. 
  17. ^ Beuka, Robert. SuburbiaNation :Reading Suburban Landscape in Twentieth Century American Fiction and Film. 1st ed. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2004. ix-284.
  18. ^ Andrew Hindes. "Speed 2 shifted in sked scramble", Variety, 1997-04-10. Retrieved on 2008-03-08. 
  19. ^ Jenny Hontz. "Peacock buys Par pic pack", Variety, 1997-12-18. Retrieved on 2008-03-08. 
  20. ^ "Turner Broadcasting Acquires Runaway Bride, Deep Impact, The Truman Show, Forrest Gump and Others in Film Deal With Paramount", Business Wire, 2000-03-06. Retrieved on 2008-03-28. 
  21. ^ The Truman Show. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  22. ^ 1998 Yearly Box Office Results. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  23. ^ The Truman Show. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  24. ^ The Truman Show: Rotten Tomatoes' Top Critics. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  25. ^ Truman Show, The (1998): Reviews. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  26. ^ Roger Ebert. "The Truman Show", RogerEbert.com, 1998-06-05. Retrieved on 2008-03-21. 
  27. ^ Kenneth Turan. "The Truman Show", Los Angeles Times, 1998-06-05. Retrieved on 2008-03-21. 
  28. ^ James Berardinelli. "The Truman Show", ReelViews, 1998-06-05. Retrieved on 2008-03-21. 
  29. ^ Jonathan Rosenbaum. "The Audience Is Us", Chicago Reader. Retrieved on 2008-03-21. 
  30. ^ Tom Meek. "The Truman Show", Film Threat. Retrieved on 2008-03-21. 
  31. ^ Fernando F. Croce. "The Truman Show", Slant Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-03-21. 
  32. ^ Academy Awards: 1999. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-03-21.
  33. ^ Golden Globes: 1999. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-03-21.
  34. ^ BAFTA Awards: 1999. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-03-22.
  35. ^ Saturn Awards: 1999. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-03-22.
  36. ^ Hugo Awards: 1999. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-03-22.

Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... American Cinematographer is a monthly journal published by the American Society of Cinematographers. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The adolescent Internet. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Turan is an American film critic, currently writing for the Los Angeles Times. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Rosenbaum is a prominent American film critic. ... The Chicago Reader is an alternative newsweekly in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It was founded in 1971[2] by a group of friends who attended Carleton College. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tom Meek with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, 2002 Tom Meek (b. ... Film Threat is the name of a magazine and website devoted to coverage of independent film. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Since its inception in 2001, Slant Magazine has grown exponentially in content, exposure, and readership. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Linda A. Mercadante. "The God Behind the Screen: Pleasantville & The Truman Show", University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2001-10-02. 
  • Peter Goldman. "Consumer Society and its Discontents: The Truman Show and The Day of the Locust", Westminister College, 2004-09-13. 
  • Mike Hertenstein. "The Truth May Be "Out There": The Question Is Can We Get There From Here?", Imaginarium Online, 2000-07-13. 
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Truman Show

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Truman Show (1998) (498 words)
A lot more pseudo-documentary footage on the making of the fictional Truman Show was shot but not used in the theatrical version.
Incorrectly regarded as goofs: An 8-ball that appears to be on Truman's desk (and then disappears) is in fact in a basket on a cart.
Although it sometimes seems that Hollywood is catering to the lowest common denominator of everything, The Truman Show is proof that there are great ideas that are able to be turned into great movies.
"The Truman Show", shooting draft, by Andrew M Niccol (13889 words)
TRUMAN "With a mutiny but half-repressed and starvation imminent, he pressed southward till he found the long-hoped-for straits..." Truman is interrupted by a TRANSIENT in a wheelchair.
TRUMAN paces impatiently in the living room of his Mother's cramped, fussy, doilyed little house full of Burbank family memorabilia - a cluster of framed photographs is dominated by one of his FATHER trimmed with a fl ribbon.
Truman's view is abruptly blocked as a rear panel is hastily attached to the elevator.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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