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Encyclopedia > The Trouble with Tribbles
Star Trek: TOS episode
"The Trouble With Tribbles"
Image:STTroubleTrib.jpg
Captain Kirk up to his shirt in tribbles
Episode no. 44
Prod. code 042
Remastered no. 9
Airdate December 29, 1967
Writer(s) David Gerrold
Director Joseph Pevney
Guest star(s) William Schallert
William Campbell
Stanley Adams
Whit Bissell
Michael Pataki
Ed Reimers
Charlie Brill
Paul Baxley
David L. Ross
Guy Raymond
Eddie Paskey
William Blackburn
Year 2268
Stardate 4523.3
Episode chronology
Previous "Wolf in the Fold"
Next "The Gamesters of Triskelion"

"The Trouble With Tribbles" is a second-season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast on December 29, 1967 and repeated June 21, 1968. It is episode #44, production #42, and was written by David Gerrold, and directed by Joseph Pevney. Image from Star Trek: The Original Series episode, The Trouble with Tribbles © 1967 Paramount Pictures, produced by Gene Roddenberry. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), in Chicago, Illinois, is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ... A television director is usually responsible for directing the actors and other taped aspects of a television production. ... Joseph Pevney (born September 15, 1911, New York City) is a prolific film and television director, with a directing career that spanned over 80 productions from 1950 to 1984. ... William Schallert (born July 6, 1922 in Los Angeles, California), is a very tall actor who has appeared in many movies and television series such as The Smurfs, Gunsmoke, and Get Smart. ... William Campbell in Blood Bath (1966) William Campbell (born October 30, 1926 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American actor. ... Stanley Adams as Cyrano Jones Stanley Adams (April 7, 1915 - April 27, 1977) was an American actor and filmwriter. ... Whit Bissell in the 1948 film He Walked by Night Whitner Nutting Bissell (25 October 1909 – 5 March 1996) was an American character actor. ... Michael Pataki (b. ... Ed Reimers was an American actor in the 1950s and 60s who also served as the announcer for early Warner Brothers television shows such as Cheyenne and Maverick. ... Mitzi McCall and Charlie Brill, 1964 Charlie Brill is an American actor. ... Eddie Paskey-is an actor who is primarily known for playing the uncredited Lieutenant Leslie in the original Star Trek. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Wolf in the Fold is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... The Gamesters of Triskelion is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast January 5, 1968 and repeated May 3, 1968. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), in Chicago, Illinois, is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ... Joseph Pevney (born September 15, 1911, New York City) is a prolific film and television director, with a directing career that spanned over 80 productions from 1950 to 1984. ...


Overview: The Federation and the Klingons have aspirations to develop a nearby planet; Kirk has to deal with the Klingons on one side, a nervous space station administrator on the other, and in the middle is a trader who has introduced a very cuddly, and very prolific, little creature.

Contents

Plot

On stardate 4523.3, Captain James T. Kirk and his crew are called to Deep Space Station K7 by a priority-one distress call. The station is near Sherman's Planet, a world in a sector of space disputed between the Federation and the Klingon Empire. Under the terms of the Organian Peace Treaty, Sherman's Planet would be awarded to whichever side demonstrates that it can manage it most efficiently. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... James Tiberius Kirk, played by William Shatner, is the main character in the original Star Trek television series and the films based on it. ... A space station on the Klingon-Federation border, from the classic Star Trek episode The Trouble with Tribbles. ... This article is becoming very long. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the fictional race. ... The Organian Peace Treaty was the treaty of peace, imposed by the Organians, upon the United Federation of Planets and the Klingon Empire, on stardate 3199. ...


Kirk is furious when he later realizes the distress call was unwarranted, and the undersecretary in charge of agriculture in the sector, Nilz Baris, simply wants someone to guard the shipments of quadro-triticale grain bound for Sherman's Planet. To Baris's annoyance, Kirk assigns a token two guards to the task shortly before learning that Starfleet Command endorses Baris's concerns. A Klingon ship soon arrives at the space station and requests that its crew be granted shore leave, as entitled under the treaty. Kirk tells the Klingon leader Koloth that he may only bring members of his crew down 12 at a time, and that he will provide one security guard for each Klingon who beams down. Triticale Triticale (x Triticosecale) is an artificial or man-made hybrid of rye and wheat first bred in laboratories during the late 19th century. ... Starfleet Command In the fictional world of Star Trek, Starfleet Command is the headquarters of Starfleet, the directorate of exploration and defense for the United Federation of Planets. ... This article is about the fictional race. ... Koloth is a character from the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


Meanwhile, an independent trader, Cyrano Jones, sneaks some little furry animals called tribbles onto the station, and starting with a sale to Uhura, they quickly find their way onto the Enterprise as adorable pets. The animals purr a relaxing trill that the crew (even the stoic Mr. Spock) find soothing. Klingons, however, find tribbles very annoying, and the feeling is mutual - tribbles emit an ear-piercing shriek of aggression whenever they are around Klingons. This article is about the fictional furry creature of Star Trek. ... Uhura, played by Nichelle Nichols, is a character in Star Trek: The Original Series and the first six Star Trek films. ...


The "trouble" with the tribbles is that they reproduce far too quickly; in the words of Dr. McCoy, "they are born pregnant" and threaten to consume all the onboard supplies. The problem is aggravated when it is discovered that the creatures are physically entering essential ship systems, interfering with their functions and consuming any edible contents present. Kirk realizes that if the tribbles are getting into the Enterprise's stores, then they are a direct threat to the grain stores aboard the station. However, upon examining the holds, Kirk learns the that it is already too late; the tribbles have indeed eaten the grain. It appears the mission has ended in a fiasco. On top of that, Koloth wants Kirk to formally apologize since some of the Enterprise crew members have started, though not without provocation, a western-style fistfight with the Klingon crew in the station's bar. Dr. Leonard H. McCoy (nicknamed Bones), played by DeForest Kelley, is a character in the original Star Trek series, and the first six Star Trek films. ...


Spock and McCoy, however, soon discover that around half the tribbles in the hold are dead and many of the rest were dying, alerting the Federation that the grain has been poisoned. Furthermore, the tribbles also give away the identity of a Klingon agent responsible. The saboteur is the only "human" the tribbles don't like: Arne Darvin, Baris's own assistant. Upon a medical scan by Dr. McCoy, it is revealed that Darvin is indeed a Klingon in disguise. Thus the tribbles redeem themselves and enable the Federation to score a diplomatic victory against the Klingons. As for Cyrano Jones, who introduced the species to the station, he is ordered to remove the tribbles from the station (a clean-up task that Spock estimates will take 17.9 years) or be imprisoned for 20 years for transporting a dangerous life-form off its native planet. This article is about the Star Trek character. ... Arne Darvin was a character in the Star Trek Universe played by Charlie Brill. ...


Just before departing, all tribbles that were on the Enterprise are somehow beamed onto the Klingon ship by Scotty as a retaliation for the troubles the Klingons have caused, where, in his words, "they'll be no tribble at all". Scotty redirects here. ...


40th anniversary remastering

"The Trouble With Tribbles" was remastered in 2006 and first aired on November 4, 2006 as part of the remastered original series. It was preceded a week earlier by "Catspaw", and followed a week later by "Mirror, Mirror". Video and audio have been digitally restored, and the episode features the all-CGI USS Enterprise that is standard among the revisions. Other changes to this episode include: is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Catspaw is the first episode of the second season of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... Mirror, Mirror is an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ...

  • Space station K7 is rendered as a CGI effect with more surface detail added.
  • Klingons' ship has been added in orbit around the station (it was never seen in the original episode, but was seen in the Deep Space Nine tribute episode, "Trials and Tribble-ations").

Trials and Tribble-ations is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine that was written as a tribute to the original series of Star Trek. ...

Notes

Background

David Gerrold was a college student just learning to write for television when he submitted five story outlines to Producer Gene L. Coon. Of those five, "The Fuzzies" was the only one that sold, and Gerrold was commissioned to write the script while still an amateur. Gene L. Coon (7 January 1924-8 July 1973) was an American screenwriter and television producer. ...


Gerrold wrote the character of Ensign Freeman with the intention of playing the part himself; however, Coon nixed the idea, saying that Gerrold was too skinny. Paul Baxley, William Shatner's frequent stuntman, was cast in the role (Gerrold later appeared as an Enterprise crew member watching the destruction of the space station in Star Trek: The Motion Picture). William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ...


"Tribbles" was originally intended to be a serious take on the introduction of alien species to predator-free environments, as had happened with rabbits in Australia. Gerrold said he wanted to show how something that looked cute, fuzzy and adorable could be quite dangerous. Another version of the same theme appears in his script treatment "Bandi", in which a crew member has a sort of living teddy-bear for a pet. When the creature feels threatened, it telepathically induces other species to fight or kill on its behalf. D.C. Fontana later used the idea in Star Trek: The Next Generation; the Bandi are people on Deneb IV who appear to be harmless and peaceful, but are found to enslave other entities to materialize their desires. Possible literary antecedents include Pigs is Pigs and the flatcats from the Robert A. Heinlein novel The Rolling Stones. [1] For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... Dorothy Catherine D.C. Fontana, is a screenplay writer, best known for her work in the Star Trek television franchise, produced by Paramount Studios. ... Encounter at Farpoint was the first episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Pigs is Pigs cover when originally published in 1905. ... In Robert Heinleins science fiction novel The Rolling Stones, flatcats are a species of emotional symbiotes native to Mars, with very adaptive metabolisms. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Rolling Stones (also published under the name Space Family Stone in the United Kingdom) is a 1952 science fiction novel by Robert Heinlein June 1, 1952, Atheneum, library binding, ISBN 0684923033 June 13, 1985, Del Rey, paperback reissue edition, 256 pages, ISBN 034532451X May 12, 1977, Del Rey, paperback...


The use of quadro-triticale was supposed to reestablish Mr. Sulu as an amateur botanist; since George Takei was away filming The Green Berets, all his lines were given instead to Ensign Chekov, marking the only time Scotty and Chekov have a conversation during the original series.[1] Hikaru Sulu, played by George Takei, is a character in the original Star Trek series, the first six Star Trek films and one episode of Star Trek: Voyager. ... George Hosato Takei (IPA: ) (born April 20, 1937) is an Japanese American actor best known for his role in the TV series Star Trek, in which he played the helmsman Hikaru Sulu on the USS Enterprise. ... The Green Berets is the title of a 1968 film starring John Wayne and featuring George Takei, David Janssen, Jim Hutton, and Aldo Ray. ... Pavel Andreievich Chekov, Cyrillic: Павел Андрейевич Чеков), played by Walter Koenig, is a Russian Starfleet officer in the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


James Doohan did most of his own stunts in this episode, including some of the punches in the bar fight scene, exposing his missing middle finger (lost as a result of a war injury) for the first time (the other being "Catspaw"). The missing finger is also observable under the great armload of tribbles that Scotty carries into the lounge. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Catspaw is the first episode of the second season of Star Trek: The Original Series. ...


"Sherman's Planet" was a reference to Holly Sherman, David Gerrold's girlfriend at the time.[1]


Tribbles revisited

The James Blish adaption of the episode was included in the Star Trek 3 collection published in April 1969. It is based on a version of the script which incorporated Sulu rather than Chekov. The episode was the basis of the third Star Trek fotonovel. James Benjamin Blish (East Orange, New Jersey, May 23, 1921 – Henley-on-Thames, July 30, 1975) was an American author of fantasy and science fiction. ...


A sequel episode appeared in Star Trek: The Animated Series titled "More Tribbles, More Troubles", for which Gerrold also wrote the script. He is writing another sequel for the Star Trek: New Voyages fan film series. Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... More Tribbles, More Troubles is an episode of Star Trek: The Animated Series. ...


Tribbles are handled by Starfleet personnel in the bar scene in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock while Dr. McCoy seeks illegal passage to the Genesis Planet. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... This article or section should include material from Project Genesis, eliminating duplication and integrating references. ...


The original episode was later edited and spliced into the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Trials and Tribble-ations". In this retelling, the crew of Deep Space Nine witness the original events via time travel in an effort to stop Darvin from returning to change the course of history. This time, Gerrold made a cameo as a gray-haired, red-shirted ensign in a corridor of the Enterprise. During the episode, Worf reveals that Klingons considered tribbles to be an ecological menace and destroyed their homeworld. Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... Trials and Tribble-ations is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine that was written as a tribute to the original series of Star Trek. ... This article is about the space station, for the Television show of the same name, see Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... A comparison of the Enterprise with other ships and buildings (see image description for more detail) The USS Enterprise, (NCC-1701) is a fictional starship in the television series Star Trek, which chronicles the vessels mission to explore strange new worlds; to seek out new life and new civilizations...


The makeup used in the original series was minimal, whereas by the time of the Star Trek films and spinoff series the Klingons had a very obviously different facial appearance from humans. This was not reconciled in the DS9 episode, but merely played for a laugh. Other DS9 crew members look in wonder at the mostly-human-looking Klingons and ask Worf, "Those are Klingons?" Worf offers no explanation, but merely grumps, "We don't discuss it with outsiders."

  • A side-by-side comparison of the bar fight from this show and DS9's "Trials and Tribble-ations", featuring this conversation

The original episode is featured on the Star Trek: Fan Collective - Klingon DVD set as the fourth of 13 episodes featured on the four-disc set. It was released on August 1, 2006, in the United States and Canada. is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In popular culture

  • In the cartoon Futurama, in the episode entitled Where No Fan Has Gone Before, a recollection of the plan to beam the tribbles aboard the Klingon vessel and Scotty's pun serve as a blessing in the ceremonies of the overzealous Trekdom religion, as presented in a flashback sequence.
  • The album Alien Worlds by the Swedish synthpop band S.P.O.C.K featured a track titled "Trouble With Tribbles".
  • In the Commodore 64 version of the classic video game Elite, it was possible for Trumbles, creatures based on Tribbles, to infest the player's ship.[2]
  • The animated TV show The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron loosely parodies "The Trouble With Tribbles" in the episode entitled "Attack of the Twonkies". Also, as a running gag, the furry twonkies occasionally appear in the background scenes of future episodes.
  • The animated TV show Sealab 2021 based the Season Two episode "Hail Squishface" around a breed of creatures called Gloops that are brought on board by a strange Asian S&M saleswoman, who after being sold off as cute, with warnings ignored by Captain Murphy, quickly reproduce, overtake, and devour Sealab's kelp harvest, until they are burned to death by Sealab's crew. They are also capable of emitting noxious gases, which overpowers Sealab's crew.

This article is about the television series. ... Where No Fan Has Gone Before is the eleventh episode of the fourth season of the animated series Futurama. ... In literature, film, television and other media, a flashback (also called analepsis) is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point the story has reached. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends (sometimes called Fosters for short, and abbreviated as FHIF/FHFIF) is an Emmy Award-Winning American animated television series created and produced at Cartoon Network Studios by animator Craig McCracken, who also created The Powerpuff Girls. ... S.P.O.C.K (Star Pilot On Channel K) is a Swedish synth pop band, known particularly for their science fiction references, especially Star Trek. ... Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (KotOR) is an RPG video game originally for the Microsoft Xbox and later for PCs running Microsoft Windows. ... Elite is a seminal space trading computer game, originally published by Acornsoft in 1984 for the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron computers. ... The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius is a spin-off of the Oscar-nominated computer-animated movie; Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, first officially aired in September 2002. ... Sealab 2021 is an American animated television series shown on Cartoon Networks adult-oriented programming block, Adult Swim. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Gerrold, David. The Trouble With Tribbles: the birth, sale and final production of one episode. benbellabooks.com. Retrieved on 27 November 2006.
  2. ^ alt.fan.elite FAQ (1999-09-28). Retrieved on 2007-09-24.

is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • The Trouble With Tribbles 2006 remastered side-by-side comparisons
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • The Trouble With Tribbles at StarTrek.com
  • The Trouble With Tribbles at Memory-alpha
Last produced:
"I, Mudd"
Star Trek: TOS episodes
Season 2
Next produced:
"Bread and Circuses"
Last transmitted:
"Wolf in the Fold"
Next transmitted:
"The Gamesters of Triskelion"
 v  d  e Klingon stories
Star Trek: Errand of Mercy | Friday's Child | The Trouble With Tribbles | A Private Little War | Day of the Dove | Elaan of Troyius | The Savage Curtain | Star Trek: The Motion Picture | Star Trek III: The Search for Spock | Star Trek V: The Final Frontier | Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
Star Trek: The Next Generation: Heart of Glory | A Matter of Honor | The Emissary | Sins of the Father | Reunion | The Mind's Eye | Redemption | New Ground | Ethics | Birthright | The Chase | Rightful Heir | Firstborn | All Good Things... | Star Trek Generations
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Past Prologue | Blood Oath | The House of Quark | Visionary | The Way of the Warrior | The Sword of Kahless | Return to Grace | Sons of Mogh | Rules of Engagement | Apocalypse Rising | Looking for par'Mach in All the Wrong Places | Trials and Tribble-ations | In Purgatory's Shadow | By Inferno's Light | Soldiers of the Empire | Children of Time | Call to Arms | Sons and Daughters | Sacrifice of Angels | You Are Cordially Invited... | Once More Unto the Breach | Strange Bedfellows | Tacking Into the Wind
Star Trek: Voyager: Faces | Day of Honor | Barge of the Dead | Lineage | Prophecy
Star Trek: Enterprise: Broken Bow | Sleeping Dogs | Marauders | Judgment | Bounty | The Expanse | Affliction | Divergence

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Trouble with Tribbles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1009 words)
The "trouble" with the tribbles is that they reproduce far too quickly; in the words of Dr.
Just before departing, all tribbles that were on the Enterprise are beamed onto the Klingon ship by Scotty, where, in his words, they will be "no tribble at all".
The word "tribble" was a deliberate, friendly tip of the hat to science fiction fans extraordinaire, Bjo and John Trimble, for their advocacy campaign that led to the series' renewal for its third year.
Tribble - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (801 words)
Tribbles are small, soft, gentle fictional animals in the Star Trek universe whose cute appearance and soothing purring endears them to every sentient race which encounters them—with one notable exception: Klingons.
Another possible inspiration for the story is the trouble that Australia had with imported rabbits, which overran the continent causing serious ecological damage, and which were finally controlled somewhat in 1951 by introducing the disease myxomatosis (see Rabbits in Australia).
This is because they were "ecological disasters", and emitted a loud shrieking noise instead of their normal soothing purr in the presence of Klingons (this may be due to the tribbles reacting to the Klingon's reptilian ancestry, similar to the tribble's natural enemy).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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