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Encyclopedia > The Times
See also: The New York Times, The Times of India, and The Irish Times
The Times

Front page from an October 17, 2007, edition
Type Daily newspaper
Format Compact

Owner Times Newspapers Ltd
Editor James Harding
Founded 1785
Political allegiance Centre-right
Price £0.70 (Monday-Friday)
£1.40 (Saturday)
£1.30 (Sat - Sco)
Headquarters Wapping, London
Circulation 618,160 [1]

Website: www.timesonline.co.uk

The Times is a daily national newspaper published in the United Kingdom since 1785 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. [[THIS WEBSITE:]] IT IS RUBBISH IT DOESNT TELL YOU ANYTHING GO ON A DIFFERNT ONE NOT THIS ONE!!!!!! --82. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Times of India (TOI) is a leading English-language broadsheet daily newspaper in India. ... It has been suggested that Irish Times Trust be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 475 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1776 × 2240 pixel, file size: 938 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Times. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organizations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding far right stances. ... GBP redirects here. ... GBP redirects here. ... GBP redirects here. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times are published by Times Newspapers Limited, a subsidiary of News International. News International is entirely owned by the News Corporation group, headed by Rupert Murdoch. Though traditionally a moderately centre-right newspaper and a supporter of the Conservatives, it supported the Labour party in the 2001 and 2005 general elections.[2] In 2005, according to MORI, the voting intentions of its readership were 40% for the Conservative Party, 29% for the Liberal Democrats, 26% for Labour.[3] For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... The chart proposed by the Political Compass Organization A political compass or political diamond is a multi-axis model used to label or organize political thought on several dimensions. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... Mori (森) is a Japanese family name. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long...


The Times is the original "Times" newspaper, lending its name to many other papers around the world, such as The New York Times, The Times of India, and The Irish Times. It is the originator of the ubiquitous Times Roman typeface, originally developed by Stanley Morison of The Times in collaboration with the Monotype Corporation for its legibility in low-tech printing. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Times of India (TOI) is a leading English-language broadsheet daily newspaper in India. ... It has been suggested that Irish Times Trust be merged into this article or section. ... Times New Roman is a serif typeface commissioned by The Times (London) newspaper in 1931 and designed by Stanley Morison together with Starling Burgess and Victor Lardent. ... Stanley Morison (May 6, 1889—October 11, 1967) was an English typographer and literary editor. ... Monotype Imaging, Inc is a typesetting and typeface design company (type foundry) responsible for many developments in printing technology — in particular the Monotype machine which was the first fully mechanical typesetter — and the design and production of typefaces in the 19th and 20th centuries. ...


The newspaper was printed in broadsheet format for 200 years, but switched to compact size in 2004 in an attempt to appeal to younger readers. In May 2006, it announced plans to launch a United States edition,[4] which began publishing on June 6, 2006. Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In November 2006 The Times began printing headlines in its new font, Times Modern. The Times New Roman typeface, on top at 88. ...

Editors
Editor's name Start year End year
John Walter 1785 1803
John Walter, 2nd 1803 1809
John Stoddart 1809 1817
Thomas Barnes 1817 1841
John Delane 1841 1877
Thomas Chenery 1877 1884
George Earle Buckle 1884 1912
George Geoffrey Dawson 1912 1919
Henry Wickham Steed 1919 1922
George Geoffrey Dawson 1923 1941
Robert McGowan Barrington-Ward 1941 1948
William Francis Casey 1948 1952
William Haley 1952 1966
William Rees-Mogg 1967 1981
Harold Evans 1981 1982
Charles Douglas-Home 1982 1985
Charles Wilson 1985 1990
Simon Jenkins 1990 1992
Peter Stothard 1992 2002
Robert Thomson 2002 2007
James Harding 2007

Contents

John Walter (1738/9 - November 16, 1812), founder of The Times newspaper, London, was born probably in London. ... John Walter (February 23, 1776 - July 28, 1847), son of John Walter, the founder of The Times, really established the great newspaper of which his father had sown the seed. ... Thomas Francis Barnes (1785 - May 7, 1841) was a British journalist. ... John Thadeus Delane (October 11, 1817 - November 22, 1879), editor of The Times (London), was born in London. ... Thomas Chenery (born 1826, Barbados - died 11th February 1884, London) was an English scholar and editor of the British newspaper The Times. ... George Earl Buckle (June 10, 1854–March 13, 1935) was an English editor and biographer. ... George Geoffrey Dawson (October 25, 1874, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire - November 7, 1944, London) was editor of The Times from 1912 to 1919 and again from 1923 until 1941. ... H. Wickham Stickum Steed full name Henry Wickham Steed (October 10, 1871 - January 13, 1956) was a British journalist and historian and was also one of the first English speakers to sound the warning bells about the new German Chancellor Adolf HItler. ... George Geoffrey Dawson (October 25, 1874, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire - November 7, 1944, London) was editor of The Times from 1912 to 1919 and again from 1923 until 1941. ... Sir William Haley (1901-1987) was Director-General of the BBC from 1944 to 1952, succeeding Robert W. Foot and giving way to Sir Ian Jacob. ... William Rees-Mogg, Baron Rees-Mogg (born July 14, 1928) is a journalist and politician in the United Kingdom. ... Harold Evans Sir Harold Matthew Evans (born June 28 1928) is a British-born journalist and writer who was editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981. ... Charles Cospatrick Douglas-Home (1 September 1937 – 29 October 1985) was a Scottish journalist who served as editor of The Times from 1982 until his death. ... Charles Wilson is a Scottish-born journalist and newspaper executive. ... Sir Simon Jenkins (born June 10, 1943) is a British newspaper columnist currently associated with The Guardian after fifteen years with News International titles. ... Peter Stothard (born February 28, 1951) is a British newspaper editor, currently for the Times Literary Supplement, but of The Times itself from 1992 to 2002, and before that, from 1989 to 1992, of its United States section. ... Robert James Thomson is an Australian journalist and editor of The Times newspaper in London, England. ...

Today

The newspaper's cover price in the United Kingdom is 70p on weekdays (a rise of 5p as of 3 September 2007), 30p for students at some university campus shops and £1.40 on Saturday (from 8 September 2007). The Times' sister paper, The Sunday Times, is a broadsheet with a cover price of £2. Although The Times and The Sunday Times are both owned by News International, a subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch's Newscorp, they do not share editorial staff and were founded independently. The titles have only shared the same owner since 1967. is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ...


Circulation

The certified average circulation figures for November 2005 show that The Times sold 692,581 copies per day. This was the highest achieved under the last editor, Robert Thomson, and ensured that the newspaper remained ahead of The Daily Telegraph in terms of full rate sales, although The Daily Telegraph remains the market leader for broadsheets, with a circulation of 905,955 copies, owing to over 300,000 discount subscribers each day. Tabloid newspapers, such as The Sun and the Daily Mail, at present outsell both papers with a circulation of around 3,274,855 and 2,353,807 respectively.[5] A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day, although circulation rates are decreasing. ... Robert James Thomson is an Australian journalist and editor of The Times newspaper in London, England. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ...


History

The Times was founded by John Walter in 1785 as The Daily Universal Register, with Walter in the role of editor. Walter changed the title after 940 editions on 1 January 1788 to The Times. In 1803, John Walter handed ownership and editorship to his son of the same name. John Walter Sr. had already spent sixteen months in Newgate prison for libel printed in The Times, but his pioneering efforts to obtain Continental news, especially from France, helped build the paper's reputation among policy makers and financiers. John Walter (1738/9 - November 16, 1812), founder of The Times newspaper, London, was born probably in London. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... John Walter (February 23, 1776 - July 28, 1847), son of John Walter, the founder of The Times, really established the great newspaper of which his father had sown the seed. ... Newgate, the old city gate and prison. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ...


The Times used contributions from significant figures in the fields of politics, science, literature, and the arts to build its reputation. For much of its early life, the profits of The Times were very large and the competition minimal, so it could pay far better than its rivals for information or writers.


In 1809, John Stoddart was appointed general editor, replaced in 1817 with Thomas Barnes. Under Barnes and his successor in 1841, John Thadeus Delane, the influence of The Times rose to great heights, especially in politics and amongst the City of London. Peter Fraser and Edward Sterling were two noted hacks[citation needed] and gained for The Times the pompous/satirical nickname 'The Thunderer' (from "We thundered out the other day an article on social and political reform."). Thomas Francis Barnes (1785 - May 7, 1841) was a British journalist. ... John Thadeus Delane (October 11, 1817 - November 22, 1879), editor of The Times (London), was born in London. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...


The Times was the first newspaper to send war correspondents to cover particular conflicts. W. H. Russell, the paper's correspondent with the army in the Crimean War, was immensely influential[6] with his dispatches back to England. A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. ... Categories: People stubs | 1821 births | 1907 deaths ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought...


In other events of the nineteenth century, The Times opposed the repeal of the Corn Laws[citation needed] until the number of demonstrations convinced the editorial board otherwise, and only reluctantly supported aid to victims of the Irish Potato Famine. It enthusiastically supported the Great Reform Bill of 1832 which reduced corruption and increased the electorate from 400 000 people to 800 000 people (still a small minority of the population). During the American Civil War, The Times represented the view of the wealthy classes, favouring the secessionists, but it was not a supporter of slavery. The Corn Laws, in force between 1815 and 1846, were import tariffs ostensibly designed to protect British farmers and landowners against competition from cheap foreign grain imports. ... For other uses, please see Great Famine. ... The Representation of the People Act 1832, commonly known as the Reform Act 1832, was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of the United Kingdom. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The third John Walter (the founder's grandson) succeeded his father in 1847. Though the Walters were becoming more conservative, the paper continued as more or less independent. From the 1850s, however, The Times was beginning to suffer from the rise in competition from the penny press, notably The Daily Telegraph and The Morning Post. John Walter (1818 - November 3, 1894), eldest son of John Walter, editor of The Times, was born at Printing-house Square. ... Penny press newspapers were cheap, tabloid-style papers produced in the middle of the 19th century. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Morning Post was a conservative daily newspaper published in London from 1772 to 1937, when it was acquired by The Daily Telegraph. ...


The Times faced financial extinction in 1890 under A. F. Walter, but it was rescued by an energetic editor, Charles Frederic Moberly Bell. During his tenure (1890-1911), The Times became associated with selling the Encyclopædia Britannica using aggressive American marketing methods introduced by Horace Everett Hooper and his advertising executive, Henry Haxton. However, due to legal fights between the Britannica's two owners, Hooper and Walter Montgomery Jackson, The Times severed its connection in 1908 and was bought by pioneering newspaper magnate, Alfred Harmsworth, later Lord Northcliffe. Charles Frederic Moberly Bell (2 April 1847 in Alexandria – 5 April 1911 in London) was a prominent British journalist and newspaper editor during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Horace Everett Hooper (December 6, 1859 – June 13, 1922) was the publisher of Encyclopædia Britannica from 1897 until his death. ... Walter Montgomery Jackson (1863 in Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts - 1923) was the less-active partner of Horace Everett Hooper in publishing the 10th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica and in developing its 11th. ... Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe (July 15, 1865, Dublin - August 14, 1922, London) was an influential and successful newspaper owner. ...


On May 8, 1920, under the editorship of Wickham Steed, the Times in a front-page leader endorsed the anti-Semitic forgery The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion as a genuine document, and called Jews the world’s greatest danger. The following year, when Philip Graves, the Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey) correspondent of the Times exposed The Protocols as a forgery, the Times retracted the leader of the previous year. is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... H. Wickham Stickum Steed full name Henry Wickham Steed (October 10, 1871 - January 13, 1956) was a British journalist and historian and was also one of the first English speakers to sound the warning bells about the new German Chancellor Adolf HItler. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Protocols of the (Learned) Elders of Zion is a fraudulent document purporting to describe a plan to achieve Jewish global domination. ... Major Philip Perceval Graves (February 25, 1876 – June 3, 1953) was a British journalist and writer. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Nova Roma (original name given in 330 and used during Constantines reign) and later Constantinople (following Constantines death in 337) Ottoman period 1453...


In 1922, John Jacob Astor, a son of the 1st Viscount Astor, bought The Times from the Northcliffe estate. The paper gained a measure of notoriety in the 1930s with its advocacy of German appeasement; then-editor Geoffrey Dawson was closely allied with those in the government who practised appeasement[citation needed], most notably Neville Chamberlain. Lt. ... William Waldorf Astor, 1st Viscount Astor (March 31, 1848–October 18, 1919) was a financier and statesman and a member of the prominent Astor family. ... Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe (July 15, 1865, Dublin - August 14, 1922, London) was an influential and successful newspaper owner. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... George Geoffrey Dawson (October 25, 1874, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire - November 7, 1944, London) was editor of The Times from 1912 to 1919 and again from 1923 until 1941. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ...


Kim Philby, a Soviet double agent, served as a correspondent for the newspaper in Spain during the Spanish Civil War of the late 1930s. Philby was admired for his courage in obtaining high-quality reporting from the front lines of the bloody conflict. He later joined MI6 during World War II, was promoted into senior positions after the war ended, then eventually defected to the Soviet Union in 1963.[7] Kim Philby Harold Adrian Russell Kim Philby or H.A.R. Philby (OBE: 1946-1965), (1 January 1912 – 11 May 1988) was a high-ranking member of British intelligence, a communist, and spy for the Soviet Unions NKVD and KGB. In 1963, Philby was revealed as a member of... Soviet redirects here. ... A double agent pretends to spy on a target organization on behalf of a controlling organization, but in fact is loyal to the target organization. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence Section 6), or the Secret Service, is the United Kingdom external security agency. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In 1967, members of the Astor family sold the paper to Canadian publishing magnate Roy Thomson, and on May 3, 1966 it started printing news on the front page for the first time. (Previously, the paper's front page featured small advertisements, usually of interest to the moneyed classes in British society.[citation needed]) The Thomson Corporation merged it with The Sunday Times to form Times Newspapers Limited. The Astor family, founded by the German immigrant John Jacob Astor and his wife Sarah Todd, became the wealthiest family in the United States during the 19th century. ... Roy Herbert Thomson, 1st Baron Thomson of Fleet (June 5, 1894 – August 4, 1976), was a newspaper proprietor and media entrepreneur. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The Thomson Corporation (NYSE: TOC TSX: TOC) is one of the worlds largest information companies, focused on providing integrated information solutions to business and professional customers. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ...


An industrial dispute left the paper shut down for nearly a year (December 1, 1978November 12, 1979). is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


The Thomson Corporation management were struggling to run a business under the grip of the print unions at the height of Union powers. Union demands were increasingly difficult to meet. Management were left with no choice but to save both titles by finding a buyer who was in a position to guarantee the survival of both titles, and also one who had the resources and was committed to funding the inevitable migration to technology-based printing. The Thomson Corporation (NYSE: TOC TSX: TOC) is one of the worlds largest information companies, focused on providing integrated information solutions to business and professional customers. ...


Several suitors appeared, including Robert Maxwell, Tiny Rowland and Lord Rothermere; however, only one buyer was in a position to fulfil the full Thomson remit. That buyer was the Australian media baron Rupert Murdoch. For other persons named Robert Maxwell, see Robert Maxwell (disambiguation). ... Roland Tiny Rowland Roland Tiny Rowland (1917 - 1998) was a British businessman and chairman of the Lonrho conglomerate from 1962 to 1994. ... Viscount Rothermere, of Hemsted in the County of Kent, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... For other companies called Thomson, see Thomson (disambiguation). ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...


Both papers had their survival guaranteed and it marked a significant own goal for the radical elements within the Trade Union movement.


Rupert Murdoch

In 1981, The Times and The Sunday Times were purchased from Thomson by Rupert Murdoch's News International. Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ...


Murdoch soon began making his mark on the paper, replacing its editor, William Rees-Mogg, with Harold Evans in 1981. One of his most important changes was in the introduction of new technology and efficiency measures. In March–May 1982, following agreement with print unions, the hot-metal Linotype printing process used to print The Times since the 19th century was phased out and replaced by computer input and photo-composition. This allowed the staff of the print rooms of The Times and The Sunday Times to be reduced by half[citation needed]. However, direct input of text by journalists ("single stroke" input) was still not achieved, and this was to remain an interim measure until the Wapping dispute of 1986, which saw The Times move from its home at New Printing House Square in Gray's Inn Road (near Fleet Street) to new offices in Wapping.[8] William Rees-Mogg, Baron Rees-Mogg (born July 14, 1928) is a journalist and politician in the United Kingdom. ... Harold Evans Sir Harold Matthew Evans (born June 28 1928) is a British-born journalist and writer who was editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981. ... The Wapping dispute started on 24 January 1986 when some 6,000 newspaper workers went on strike after months of protracted negotiation with their employers, News International (parent of Times Newspapers and News Group Newspapers, chaired by Rupert Murdoch). ... Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ...


In June 1990, The Times ceased its policy of using courtesy titles ("Mr", "Mrs", or "Miss" prefixes for living persons) before full names on first reference, but it continues to use them before surnames on subsequent references. The more formal style is now confined to the "Court and Social" page, though "Ms" is now acceptable in that section, as well as before surnames in news sections.


In November 2003, News International began producing the newspaper in both broadsheet and compact sizes. On 13 September 2004, the weekday broadsheet was withdrawn from sale in Northern Ireland. Since 1 November 2004, the paper has been printed solely in compact format. is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Conservative Party announced plans to launch litigation against The Times over an incident in which the newspaper claimed that Conservative election strategist Lynton Crosby had admitted that his party would not win the 2005 General Election. The Times later published a clarification, and the litigation was dropped. The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... Lynton Crosby is an Australian campaign strategist who has been given much credit for Australian Prime Minister John Howards four election victories. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ...


On 6 June 2005, The Times redesigned its Letters page, dropping the practice of printing correspondents' full postal addresses. According to its leading article, "From Our Own Correspondents", this was in order to fit more letters onto the page. is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper or magazine) that expresses the opinion of the editor, editorial board, or publisher. ...


In September 2005, the cover price of The Times was raised to 60p, the same as The Daily Telegraph and The Guardian, and 5p less than The Independent. It was the first time in twelve years that the cover price of The Times has matched that of its rivals, a clear indication[citation needed] that News International was no longer prepared to fund the price war it had launched in September 1993 by cutting the price of The Times from 45p to 30p. Above: A variety of coins considered to be lower-value, including an Irish 2p piece and many US pennies. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


In September 2007, the cover price of The Times was again raised by 5p to 70p, matching rivals The Daily Telegraph, The Guardian and the The Independent. Its Saturday edition also matches rivals' prices. For other uses, see Guardian. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


In a 2007 meeting with the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications who were investigating media ownership and the news, Murdoch stated that the law and the independent board prevented him from exercising editorial control. [9] This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


Image

Long considered the UK's newspaper of record, The Times was generally seen as a serious publication with high standards of journalism. However, some, including employees of The Times, feel it has gone downmarket since being acquired by Murdoch; they cite its coverage of celebrities as evidence, although this increased coverage of and emphasis on celebrity- and sports-related news is rarely given prominence on the front page. It is not without trenchant critics, however: Robert Fisk,[10] seven times British International Journalist of the Year, resigned as foreign correspondent in 1988 over what he saw as political censorship of his article on the shooting down of Iran Air Flight 655 in July 1988. Robert Fisk during a lecture at Carleton University, Canada, 2004 Robert Fisk (born July 12, 1946 in Maidstone, Kent) is a British journalist and is currently a Middle East correspondent for the British newspaper The Independent. ... Iran Air Flight 655 (IR655) was a commercial flight operated by Iran Air that flew from Bandar Abbas, Iran to Dubai, UAE. On Sunday July 3, 1988, towards the end of the Iran Iraq War, the aircraft flying IR655 was shot down by the U.S. Navy guided missile cruiser...


Readership profile and image

The British Business Survey 2005 named The Times as the UK's leading daily newspaper for business people. This independent survey was sponsored by The Financial Times, The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph, The Economist, and The Times. The Financial Times building The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


The latest figures from the national readership survey show The Times to have the highest number of ABC1 25–44 readers and the largest numbers of readers in London of any of the "quality" papers. The NRS social grades are a system of demographic classification used in the United Kingdom. ...


Format and supplements

The main section of The Times features news in the first half of the paper, with the Comment section midway through the main news, and world news following after this. The business pages begin on the centre spread, and are followed by The Register, containing obituaries, Court & Social and the like. The sport section is at the end of the main paper, with the Times Crossword puzzle on the inside back cover. A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square grid of black and white squares. ...


times2

times2 is The Times's main supplement, featuring various lifestyle columns. Its current incarnation began on 5 September 2005, before which it was called T2 and previously Times 2. Regular features include an "Image of the Day" and a "Modern Morals" column, where people pose moral dilemmas to columnist Joe Joseph. The back page is devoted to puzzles and contains Sudoku puzzles and a crossword that is simpler and more concise than the main Times Crossword. is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the logic puzzle. ... A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square grid of black and white squares. ...


The supplement contains arts and lifestyle features, a regular poetry column, and TV and radio listings and reviews. On Wednesdays, times2 includes Crème, the newspaper's supplement for "PAs, secretaries, executive assistants and anyone who works in administrative support."[11] It is read by more secretaries than The Guardian and The Evening Standard.[12] For other uses, see Guardian. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a London tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas, and is technically a local paper, although it carries considerable influence. ...


The Game

"The Game" is included in the newspaper on a Monday, and details all the weekend's association football activity (Premier League and Football League Championship, League One and League Two.) The Scottish edition of The Game also includes results and analysis from Scottish Premier League games. “Soccer” redirects here. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see list of professional sports leagues. ... The Football League is an organisation representing 72 professional football clubs in England and Wales, and runs the oldest professional football league competition in the world. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... Football League One (often referred to as League One for short or Coca-Cola Football League 1 for sponsorship reasons) is the second-highest division of The Football League and third-highest division overall in the English football league system. ... Football League Two (often referred to as League Two for short or Coca-Cola Football League 2 for sponsorship reasons) is the third-highest division of The Football League and fourth-highest division overall in the English football league system. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ...


Saturday Times supplements

The Saturday edition of The Times does not carry the times2 supplement, instead coming with a variety of supplements, on travel, health and wellbeing (called Body&Soul), and the following:


Books

The only supplement with a quality newspaper devoted to book reviews, features and interviews. It also features a Puzzles section on the back pages, where the Su Doku puzzles can be found on Saturdays, along with a large crossword and the Listener crossword puzzle. Edited by Erica Wagner [1]. This article is about the logic puzzle. ...


The Times Magazine

The Knowledge magazine.

The Times Magazine features columns touching on various subjects such as celebrities, fashion and beauty, food and drink, homes and gardens or simply writers' anecdotes. Notable contributors include Gordon Ramsay, one of Britain's highest profile chefs, and Giles Coren, Food And Drink Writer of the Year in 2005. Image File history File links Theknowledge. ... Image File history File links Theknowledge. ... Gordon James Ramsay, OBE (born November 8, 1966 in Johnstone, Scotland) is a Scottish chef, television personality and entrepreneur. ... For other uses, see Chef (disambiguation). ... Giles Coren (born 1969 in Paddington, London) is a British journalist and broadcaster. ...


The Knowledge

The Knowledge is a culture supplement, featuring information and reviews of the coming week's best entertainment.


Its content is usually split up into the sections 'Arts & Entertainment' and 'TV & Radio'. 'Arts & Entertainment' is further subdivided into 'Starts', 'Screen' (which includes film, DVD, Internet and Games), 'Stages' (including Theatre, Dance, Opera and Comedy). 'Sounds' (Music, Clubs and Concerts) and 'Sights' (Museums, Galleries, Events and Kids). 'TV & Radio' consists of reviews and listings for current and upcoming Television and Radio shows.


The Knowledge is published in four different editions depending on region so that the information contained is more relevant to the reader. These are; Scotland and Ireland, North of England, West and Central, East and Southeast and London. It used to be published in smaller A5 format, but was relaunched in 2005 in an A4 format in order to more closely resemble the Saturday Times Magazine. ISO 216 specifies international standard (ISO) paper sizes, used in most countries in the world today. ... A comparison of different paper sizes A4 is a standard paper size, defined by the international standard ISO 216 as 210×297 mm (roughly 8. ...


Money

"Money" is a personal finance supplement with features on investment, mortgages and consumer affairs, among other subjects, plus news and comment. The regular "Money MoT" slot sees experts give a detailed financial makeover to a selected reader. Edited by Andrew Ellson [2].


Events

The Times, along with the British Film Institute, sponsors the London Film Festival (or more specifically, The Times bfi London Film Festival). As of 2005, it is Europe's largest public event for motion pictures. The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... The Times BFI London Film Festival is the UKs largest public film event, screening 300 films from 60 countries. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of...


The Times also sponsors the Cheltenham Festival of Literature.


Ownership

John Walter (1738/9 - November 16, 1812), founder of The Times newspaper, London, was born probably in London. ... John Walter (February 23, 1776 - July 28, 1847), son of John Walter, the founder of The Times, really established the great newspaper of which his father had sown the seed. ... John Walter (1818 - November 3, 1894), eldest son of John Walter, editor of The Times, was born at Printing-house Square. ... Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe ( 15 July 1865 - 14 August 1922) rose from childhood poverty to become a powerful newspaper and publishing magnate, famed for buying stolid, unprofitable newspapers and transforming (some say demeaning) them to make them lively and entertaining for the... The Astor family, founded by the German immigrant John Jacob Astor and his wife Sarah Todd, became the wealthiest family in the United States during the 19th century. ... Roy Herbert Thomson, 1st Baron Thomson of Fleet (June 5, 1894 – August 4, 1976), was a newspaper proprietor and media entrepreneur. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...

Current columnists and journalists

Rachel Campbell-Johnston is the The Times newspapers chief art critic, and has held this position since 1995. ... Stephen Farrell is a British journalist who has been the Middle East correspondent for The Times of London. ... Hugo Rifkind was born in Edinburgh in 1977 and is a British writer. ... Anthony Browne was Environment Editor of The Times and The Observer newspaper. ... Ruth Gledhill (b. ... Giles Coren (born 1969 in Paddington, London) is a British journalist and broadcaster. ... Dan Sabbagh, 34, is the media editor of The Times, a British national newspaper. ... Ginny Dougary is an award-winning interviewer and feature writer for The Times. ... Michael Andrew Gove (born August 26, 1967) is a Conservative politician, journalist and author in the United Kingdom. ... Tim Hames is a columnist and Chief Leader Writer at the The Times. ... Anthony Michell Howard (born February 12, 1934) is a prominent British journalist, broadcaster and writer. ... Mick Hume (born 1959) is a British journalist and former organiser of the Revolutionary Communist Party. ... Anatole Kaletsky (born June 1, 1952) is a journalist and economist in the United Kingdom. ... Magnus Linklater is a Scottish journalist and former newspaper editor. ... Richard Lloyd Parry is a British foreign correspondent. ... Anthony Loyd is a noted British war correspondent. ... Ben Macintyre is a columnist writing for The Times newspaper. ... Caitlin Moran (b. ... Matthew Parris (born August 7, 1949 in Johannesburg) is a journalist and former Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... Alan Yentob and Grayson Perry at private view of Gilbert & George retrospective, Tate Modern Grayson Perry (born 24 March 1960), is an award-winning English artist, best known for his ceramics and cross-dressing. ... Libby Purves (born February 2, 1950 in London, England) is a radio presenter, journalist and author. ... William Rees-Mogg, Baron Rees-Mogg (born July 14, 1928) is a journalist and politician in the United Kingdom. ... Peter Riddell is a British journalist writing for The Times since 1991. ... Nick Robinson (right) interviewing Michael Portillo in July 2001. ... Paul Sheehan (born October 19, 1963) is a British born Canadian journalist who specializes in pop culture. ... Mary Ann Sieghart (born 1961) is an assistant editor of The Times, where she writes columns about politics, social affairs and life generally. ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is English, a self-described libertarian conservative author and political commentator, known for his often personal style of political analysis. ... Ann Treneman is a Parliamentary sketchwriter for The Times newspaper in the United Kingdom. ... Alexander Williams, also Alex Williams (born October 18, 1967 in London) is an English film animator and cartoonist. ... Aki Pasinpoika Riihilahti (born September 9, 1976 in Helsinki) is a Finnish footballer who currently plays for Djurgårdens IF in the Swedish Allsvenskan. ... Gordon James Ramsay, OBE (born November 8, 1966 in Johnstone, Scotland) is a Scottish chef, television personality and entrepreneur. ... Guillem Balague (Born Barcelona, Spain) is Sky Sports Spanish football expert and a respected journalist. ... Daniel Finkelstein OBE (b august 30th 1962) is Associate Editor of The Times. ...

Bibliography

Harold Evans Sir Harold Matthew Evans (born June 28 1928) is a British-born journalist and writer who was editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sample flowchart diagram The word graph is often used as a synonym for diagram. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Tryhorn, Chris. "April ABCS - Financial Times dips for second month", Guardian.co.uk, 9 May 2008. Retrieved on 24 May 2008. (English) 
  2. ^ FT.com / News in depth / UK Election - Election 2005: What the papers said
  3. ^ MORI survey of newspaper readers. Retrieved on 2007-12-21.
  4. ^ New York Times - Times of London to Print Daily U.S. Edition
  5. ^ Summary Report, Daily Mail - 01-Oct-2007 to 28-Oct-2007. Audited Bureau of Circulations (ABC) (2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-22.
  6. ^ Philip Knightley, The First Casualty: The War Correspondent as Hero, Propagandist, and Myth-maker from the Crimea to the Gulf War II
  7. ^ Treason in the Blood, by Anthony Cave Brown, 1995.
  8. ^ Alan Hamilton, "The Times bids farewell to old technology". The Times, May 1, 1982, pg. 2, col. C.
  9. ^ (17 September 2007) "Minute of the meeting with Mr Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, News Corporation". Inquiry into Media Ownership and the News: p. 10, New York: House of Commons Select Committee on Communications. 
  10. ^ Robert Fisk, 2005. The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East. London: Fourth Estate, pp329-334. ISBN 1-84115-007-X
  11. ^ Crème Jobs, Times Online
  12. ^ NRS, April 04 – March 05
  13. ^ Detail from a copy of Good Times, Bad Times, first published by Weidenfeld and Nicolson London in 1983 with an ISBN 0 297 78295 9

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Official website, including a Style Guide
  • Wapping: legacy of Rupert's revolution, January 15, 2006 - The Observer - Three views of the industrial dispute twenty years on.
  • The Times editor Robert Thomson lecture online: From the editorial desk of The Times, RMIT School of Applied Communication Public Lecture series
  • Anthony Trollope's satire on the mid-nineteenth century Times
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Anthony Trollope (April 24, 1815 – December 6, 1882) became one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. ... // Traditionally newspapers could be split into quality, serious-minded newspapers (usually referred to as broadsheets due to their large size) and tabloid, less serious newspapers. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... The Sunday Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper, founded in 1961. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Middle Market Newspaper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... This article is about the newspaper size. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Daily Sport is a tabloid newspaper published in the United Kingdom by Sport Newspapers, owned by the pornographer David Sullivan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Morning Star. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The People, formerly known as the Sunday People, is a British red-top Sunday-only newspaper, owned by the Trinity Mirror Group. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... The Sunday Sport is a British newspaper, printed by Sport Newspapers, which established itself in 1986 as a tabloid. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...   (born in Madrid on February 25, 1953) is a Spanish politician who served as Spanish prime minister from 1996 to 2004. ... Peter Chernin (born May 29, 1951 in Harrison, New York) is President and Chief Operating Officer of News Corporation, and Chairman and CEO of the Fox Group. ... David DeVoe is the CFO of News Corporation. ... Arthur Siskind (born 11 October 1938) has been a executive director of the News Corporation since 1991. ... Sir Rod Eddington is an Australian businessman perhaps best known as CEO of British Airways from 2000 to 2005. ... Andrew Stephen Bower Knight (born 1st November 1939 in England) is a journalist, editor, and media magnate. ... James Murdoch (born December 1972) is the CEO of British Sky Broadcasting and younger son of billionaire media tycoon Rupert Murdoch. ... Lachlan Keith Murdoch (born September 8, 1971), is the elder son of media mogul, Rupert Murdoch and the former Anna Torv. ... Roderick Raynor Rod Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. ... Thomas James Perkins (Born 1932), American businessman, capitalist, and was one of the founders of leading venture capital firm Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers. ... Viet D. Dinh This is a Vietnamese name; the surname is Dinh. ... John L. Thornton is Professor and Director of Global Leadership at Tsinghua University in Beijing. ... Dow Jones redirects here. ... Barrons magazine is an American weekly newspaper covering U.S. financial information, market developments, and relevant statistics. ... A cover of the then-weekly Far Eastern Economic Review in September 2003 The Far Eastern Economic Review (Chinese: 遠東經濟評論; also referred to as FEER) is an English language Asian news magazine. ... SmartMoney The Wall Street Journal Magazine of Personal Business was launched in 1992 by Hearst Corporation and Dow Jones & Company. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The Wall Street Journal Asia is a version of The Wall Street Journal that provides news and analysis of global business developments for an Asian audience. ... The Wall Street Journal Europe is a version of The Wall Street Journal with daily news and analysis of global business developments for a European audience. ... Vedomosti, literally The Record, is a Russian language business daily. ... Factiva Logo Factiva, Dow Jones & Company which provides essential business and research information and services for the business and education communities. ... Dow Jones Newswires is the real-time financial news organization owned by Dow Jones. ... MarketWatch is the operator of a leading business news and information Website that provides headline news, analysis and stock market data to some 6 million people. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... News Limited was the principal holding for the business interests of Rupert Murdoch until the formation of News Corporation in 1979. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... thelondonpaper is the trading name of a free newspaper, published by NI Free Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International (who also own the companies which publish The Sun and The Times). ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... 20th Century Fox Animation is the animation division of film studio 20th Century Fox. ... 20th Century Fox Television is the television production division of the 20th Century Fox movie studio, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ... 20th Television (also referred to as Twentieth Television) is a U.S. television distribution company that was formed in 1992 by 20th Century Fox Film Corporation. ... Blue Sky Studios is an Academy Award winning computer animation studio which specializes in photo-realistic, high-resolution, computer-generated character animation and rendering. ... Fox Atomic logo Fox Atomic is a theatrical movie studio and a sub-division of Twentieth Century Fox. ... Fox Faith (also spelled FoxFaith) is a brand of film studio Twentieth Century Fox targeting evangelical Christians. ... Fox Searchlight Pictures logo. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Fox Television Studios is the sister television arm of 20th Century Fox Television. ... FOX redirects here. ... This is an incomplete list of Fox Broadcasting Company affiliates. ... MyNetworkTV (sometimes written My Network TV, and unofficially abbreviated MyNet, MyTV, MYN-TV, MNT, or MNTV) is a television network in the United States, owned by the Fox Broadcasting Company, a division of News Corporation. ... Fox Business Network is a United States-based cable and satellite news channel that commenced broadcasting on October 15, 2007 at 5:00 a. ... Fox College Sports is a United States digital cable network, owned by News Corporation, that specializes primarily in College sports. ... Fox Movie Channel, formerly fXM, is a television channel that concentrates on showing movies uncut and commercial-free. ... Fox News redirects here. ... Fox Reality is a reality TV network on U.S. cable and satellite. ... Fox Soccer Channel is a United States digital cable network, owned by News Corporation, that specializes in soccer. ... Fox Sports en Español is an cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Fox Sports Net headquarters in Los Angeles. ... Fuel TV is a 24 hr. ... FX (for Fox eXtended Networks) is the name of a number of related subscription TV channels owned by News Corporations Fox Entertainment Group. ... The National Geographic Channel is a subscription television network that features documentaries produced by the National Geographic Society. ... SportSouth is a regional sports network in the United States, with its headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. ... TV Guide Network is a cable network produced by Gemstar-TV Guide International. ... FOX redirects here. ... In the broadcasting industry (especially in North America), an owned-and-operated station (frequently abbreviated as O&O) usually refers to a television station or radio station that is owned by the network with which it is associated. ... KDFW, channel 4, is the Fox owned and operated television station in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex designated market area. ... KDVR, channel 31, is the Fox-owned and operated television station based in Denver, Colorado, USA. Its transmitter is located in Golden, Colorado. ... KMSP-TV, channel 9, is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... KRIV, channel 26, is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, based in Houston, Texas. ... KSAZ-TV is the owned-and-operated FOX station in Phoenix, Arizona. ... KSTU (FOX13) is the Fox owned-and-operated television station serving the Salt Lake City, Utah television market. ... KTBC channel 7 is the Fox owned-and-operated television station in Austin, Texas. ... KTTV, channel 11, is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, located in Los Angeles, California. ... KTVI-TV/KTVI-DT is the Fox owned and operated station in St. ... WAGA (FOX5 Atlanta) is the Fox-owned and operated television station (O&O) in Atlanta, Georgia. ... WBRC, channel 6, Fox 6 is the Fox O&O Station in the Birmingham/Anniston/Tuscaloosa, Alabama television market. ... WDAF TV Channel 4 is The Fox Owned & Operated Television station for The Kansas City Market. ... WFLD is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, based in Chicago, Illinois. ... WFXT is the Fox owned and operated television station for Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. ... WGHP (FOX8) is the FOX television station which serves the Greensboro/High Point/Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Piedmont Triad) market area. ... WHBQ-TV, channel 13, is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, located in Memphis, Tennessee. ... WNYW, channel 5, is the flagship television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, located in New York City. ... WOFL, FOX 35, is the Fox owned-and-operated television station serving the Orlando, Florida metropolitan area. ... WOGX is Fox networks owned-and-operated station serving the Gainesville, Florida television market, but also serves the neighboring portions of the Orlando and Jacksonville markets. ... WTTG, FOX5 DC is an owned and operated TV station of the Fox Broadcasting Company. ... WTVT is a television station in Tampa, Florida. ... WTXF-TV, channel 29, is an owned-and-operated station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... MyNetworkTV (sometimes written My Network TV, and unofficially abbreviated MyNet, MyTV, MYN-TV, MNT, or MNTV) is a television network in the United States, owned by the Fox Broadcasting Company, a division of News Corporation. ... KCOP, channel 13, is a television station in Los Angeles, California. ... KDFI, My 27, is a MyNetworkTV owned and operated station broadcasting in the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas area. ... KTXH, channel 20, is currently the MyNetworkTV owned and operated station in Houston, Texas. ... KUTP is a My Network TV owned and operated station in Phoenix, Arizona. ... WDCA, channel 20, is a television station in Washington, D.C.. Owned by Fox Television Stations, a division of the News Corporation, WDCA is a sister station to Fox network outlet WTTG (channel 5), and is affiliated with the co-owned MyNetworkTV programming service. ... WFTC, channel 29, is a MyNetworkTV-affiliated station licensed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and serving the Minneapolis-St. ... WPWR-TV is a broadcast-television station licensed to Gary, Indiana, serving the Chicago, Illinois, viewing area. ... WRBW is a My Network TV owned and operated station serving the Orlando/Daytona Beach/Melbourne, Florida television market. ... WUTB is the UPN affiliate in Baltimore, Maryland, broadcasting on channel 24 (digital channel 41). ... WWOR-TV, channel 9, is a MyNetworkTV-affiliated television station licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, and serving the New York City metropolitan area. ... AMP Radio Networks, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Astro All Asia Networks plc, is a Malaysian-based radio services company that manages 8 of Malaysias leading radio stations. ... B1 TV is a television station located in Bucharest. ... British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB — formerly two companies, Sky Television and BSB) is a company that operates Sky Digital, a subscription television service in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. ... bTV is the first private-owned national television channel in Bulgaria. ... Fox Televizija is a Serbian commercial television network that was launched on November 30, 2006 and is full owned by the Fox Corporation. ... Foxtel is a subscription television company in Australia, formed through a joint venture between Telstra and News Corporation. ... Imedi Media Holding refers to a private TV and Radio Company in Georgia. ... Phoenix Television (鳳凰衛星電視) SEHK: 8002 is a Hong Kong-based Mandarin Chinese television broadcaster that aims to promote a free flow of information and entertainment within the Greater China region. ... Premiere is the first German Pay-TV company, offering several channels of digital content via satellite and cable. ... SKY Italia is an Italian digital satellite television platform owned by News Corporation. ... SKY Network Television Limited (ASX: ; NZX: SKT), often trading as SKY, is a New Zealand pay television service. ... Satellite Television for the Asian Region (STAR) is an Asian TV service owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... TV Puls is polish commercial television start in March 2001. ... XYZnetworks owns, operates and distributes eleven of the leading subscription television channels in Australia. ... FOX redirects here. ... Fox Life is a television network, launched by the Fox Broadcasting Company, which airs across Latin America, Europe and Japan (where it broadcasts on high definition). ... Fox Crime is a television network, launched by the Fox Broadcasting Company, which airs across several countries of Europe, such as Italy, Portugal and Bulgaria. ... FX (for Fox eXtended Networks) is the name of a number of related subscription TV channels owned by News Corporations Fox Entertainment Group. ... Fuel TV is a 24 hr. ... The Fox Sports logo used from 1999 to the present. ... For other uses, see Speed (disambiguation). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The National Geographic Channel is a subscription television network that features documentaries produced by the National Geographic Society. ... National Geographic Channel HD is a high definition simulcast of the National Geographic channel. ... National Geographic Wild is a British TV channel devoted to programming about wildlife animals. ... National Geographic Adventure is a magazine published by the National Geographic Society in the United States. ... 20th Century Fox logo Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Fox News Talk is a channel on XM Satellite Radios US platform that showcases talk shows and news reports from Fox News Channel personalities and syndicated show hosts such as Tony Snow and Alan Colmes. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The National Rugby League (NRL) is the top league of professional rugby league football clubs in Australasia. ... NDS Group plc is a DRM and conditional access firm. ... News Outdoor Group is the largest outdoor advertising company in Eastern Europe, it is a subsidiary of News Corporation. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... The Weekly Standard is an American neoconservative [1] magazine published 48 times per year. ... MySpace is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. ... Local TV LLC is a limited liability corporation owned by Oak Hill Capital. ... FCC redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... A fiscal year (or financial year or accounting reference date) is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial statements in businesses and other organizations. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) is the primary stock exchange in Australia. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... List of assets owned by the News Corporation: // Twentieth Century Fox Twentieth Century Fox Español Twentieth Century Fox International Twentieth Century Fox Television Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Studios Australia Fox Studios Baja Fox Studios Los Angeles Fox Television Studios 20th Century Fox Television bTV BSkyB Fox Broadcasting Company Fox...

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A single leap second 23:59:60 is inserted into the UTC time scale every few years as announced by the International Earth Rotation Service in Paris, to keep UTC from wandering away more than 0.9 s from the less constant astronomical time scale UT1, which is defined by the actual rotation of the earth.
In case an unambiguous representation of time is required, 00:00 is usually the preferred notation for midnight and not 24:00.
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