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Encyclopedia > The Third Man
The Third Man
Directed by Carol Reed
Produced by Alexander Korda, David O. Selznick
Written by Graham Greene
Starring Orson Welles
Joseph Cotten
Alida Valli
Trevor Howard
Wilfrid Hyde-White
Bernard Lee
Music by Anton Karas
Editing by Oswald Hafenrichter
Distributed by British Lion Films (UK)
Release date(s) September 2, 1949 (UK)
2 January 1950 (USA)
Running time 104 min.
Country United Kingdom
Language English
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

The Third Man (1949) is a British film noir directed by Carol Reed. The screenplay was written by novelist Graham Greene. Greene wrote a novella of the same name in preparation for the screenplay, and this was published in 1950. The Third Man Argument (commonly refered to as TMA), first offered by Plato in his dialogue Parmenides, is a philosophical criticism of Platos own Theory of Forms. ... Image File history File links ThirdManUSPoster. ... Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968). ... Sir Alexander Korda (September 16, 1893 - January 23, 1956) was a film director and producer, a leading figure in the British film industry and the founder of London Films. ... David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ... This article is about the writer Graham Greene. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ... Alida Valli (31 May 1921 – 22 April 2006), sometimes simply credited as Valli, was an Italian actress. ... Trevor Howard, CBE (29 September 1913 – 7 January 1988), born Trevor Wallace Howard-Smith, was an English movie, stage and television actor. ... Wilfrid Hyde-White (May 12, 1903 – May 6, 1991) was a British character actor. ... Bernard Lee as M in The Man with the Golden Gun Bernard Lee (January 10, 1908 – January 16, 1981) was a British actor, best known for his role as M in the first eleven James Bond films. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Yugoslavian born editor Oswald Hafenrichter (1899 - 1973) cut his teeth on a series of German films in the early 30s and some Italian films in the mid 40s. ... British Lion Films Corporation is a film production and distribution company active under several forms since 1919. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968). ... This article is about the writer Graham Greene. ...


The film won the 1949 Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival, a British Academy Award for Best Film, and an Academy Award for Best Black and White Cinematography in 1950. The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ...


The film was also voted the best British film of all time by the British Film Institute, while in 2004 the magazine Total Film named it the third greatest British film. The film also placed 57th on the American Film Institute's list of top American films, "100 Years... 100 Movies" in 1998, an accolade which is controversial because the film's only American connection was its executive co-producer, David O. Selznick; the other two, Sir Alexander Korda and Carol Reed, were British. In 2005, viewers of BBC Television's Newsnight Review voted the film their fourth most favourite of all time; it was the only film in the top five made prior to 1970.The film is regarded as so influential that it has even inspired the infamous graffiti tag "Harry Lime lives" which appeared in random places across london in 2001. This is a list of some of the more notable British films. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Total Film, published by Future Publishing, is the United Kingdoms second best-selling film magazine, after the longer-established Empire from Emap. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ... Alexander Korda (September 16, 1893 - January 23, 1956) was a film director and producer, a leading figure in the British film industry and the founder of London Films. ... Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968). ... Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22:30 and 23:20 on weekdays on BBC Two. ...

Contents

Plot

Synopsis

The story is set in the Austrian city of Vienna, just after the Second World War, when it was divided into four zones controlled by the Allied powers of Britain, France, the USA and the USSR. The central character is pulp western author Holly Martins, who is seeking an old friend, Harry Lime, who has offered him the opportunity to work in Vienna. For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ...


Details

Upon arriving in Vienna, Holly Martins, an American pulp-novelist, heads to stay with a friend of his, Harry Lime, who had offered him a job. When he arrives at Lime's apartment, Holly learns that Lime had been killed by a truck while crossing the street the other day. Shocked, Holly heads to the cemetery to attend Harry's funeral, where he meets a British police officer, Major Calloway. After the services end, Calloway gives him a lift to his hotel, advising him to leave Vienna, as he can do nothing more than get himself into trouble.


After arriving at the hotel, Holly agrees to speak in front of a book club and arranges a meeting with a friend of Lime's. Holly meets the man, Kurtz, in the Mozart Café to discuss Harry's death. Kurtz shows Holly exactly what happened when Harry was killed. He says that he and another friend of Harry's had picked him up and brought him over to the side of the street, where Harry had asked them to take care of Holly and Anna, Harry's actress girlfriend. Kurtz tells Holly which theatre Anna works in, but advises against investigating.


Holly then heads to Anna's theatre and arranges a meeting with her. During the course of their conversation, Holly becomes suspicious and wonders if Harry's death had really been an accident. Later, the porter at Harry's apartment house tells Holly that there is no way that Harry could have been alive immediately after getting hit by the truck, due to the way his neck was bent, and that three men had carried Lime across the street, not two, as Baron Kurtz had said. Holly tries to get the porter to tell his story to the police, but he refuses, acts very agitated, and asks Holly to leave.


Holly walks Anna back to her apartment, where the police are searching her room. When they find a forged passport, they leave, taking Anna with them. Holly then speaks with the other witnesses, but learns nothing new.


When Anna and Holly arrive at the porter's apartment, they find that he has been murdered. The crowd around the building suspects Holly and chases him. Eventually, Holly gets away and is taken to talk at the book-club meeting, where he tries to field intellectual questions about whether he uses the stream of consciousness technique and who had influenced his work. He stammers out a few brief answers, satisfying no one; after the meeting, he flees from two suspicious looking men and eventually meets up with Calloway. In psychology and philosophy stream of consciousness, introduced by William James, is the set of constantly changing inner thoughts and sensations which an individual has while conscious, used as a synonym for stream of thought. ...


Major Calloway advises Holly to leave Vienna and, when Holly refuses, tells Holly about Harry Lime's racket. Calloway then reveals that Harry had sold diluted penicillin—stolen from military hospitals—and in the process killed or injured many people. He takes Martins into a hospital ward and shows him children who had died of meningitis after receiving some of Lime's under-strength penicillin. Holly, saddened by this new information, promises to leave Vienna. As Holly leaves, a Russian officer comes in, asking for Anna's passport so that they may arrest her. Meningitis is the inflammation of the protective membranes covering the central nervous system, known collectively as the meninges. ...

Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles
Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles

Holly then heads back to Anna's apartment, hoping to win her back, and confirms that she had been arrested by the Russian occupation police for having a forged passport, courtesy of Harry Lime: they suspect that she is Czech—not Austrian. Leaving her apartment, Holly hears Anna's cat meow, looks over, and can barely make out a man in the doorway, the cat rubbing against his legs. A moment later, a woman across the street opens her window to yell at Holly, spilling light onto the man in the doorway—Harry Lime, alive and well. Harry takes off around the corner and disappears, prompting Holly to get Major Calloway, who determines that Harry had escaped to the sewers via a kiosk; he's been using the sewer tunnels to move about the city undetected. The police then dig up Harry's grave, only to find that Joseph Harbin has been buried in his place. (Harbin had been an orderly in a military hospital and was thought to have stolen the penicillin.) The next day, Holly meets with Harry in Vienna's celebrated Ferris Wheel. They talk and Harry offers to bring Holly in on his racket. In a famous scene, Lime points to dots (people) moving on the ground far below and asks Martins whether anyone would notice if one of the dots below them stopped moving—how much money would one of those dots be worth to him? Harry and Holly agree to meet in a café near the railroad station, to discuss what work Holly could do for his old friend. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For Microsoft Corporation’s “universal login” service, formerly known as Microsoft Passport Network, see Windows Live ID. For other types of travel document, see Travel document. ... A Ferris wheel on the boardwalk in Ocean City, New Jersey, USA. A Ferris wheel (or, more commonly in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [UK], big wheel) is a nonbuilding structure consisting of an upright wheel with passenger gondolas suspended from the rim. ...


Holly goes to the arranged meeting place, but plans to turn Harry over the police, in exchange for amnesty (and a train ticket) for Anna. Anna stays behind, and when Harry shows up, the police chase him down to the sewers, where he is eventually cornered and opens fire on Sgt. Paine, killing him. Harry is then shot by Major Calloway, but manages to drag himself up a staircase and up to a grating. Holly then takes Sgt. Paine's gun and corners Harry, shooting him. Holly attends Harry's second funeral. Afterwards, he waits to speak to Anna, but she simply walks past him.


Differences between releases

As the original British release begins, an unnamed narrator (actually the voice of director Carol Reed) is heard describing post-war Vienna from the point of view of a racketeer. The version shown in American theatres replaced this with narration by Holly Martins. This change was made by David O. Selznick, who did not think American audiences would relate to the seedy tone of the original.[1] In addition, eleven minutes were cut.[2] Today, Reed's original version now appears on American DVDs and in showings on Turner Classic Movies. (both the Criterion Collection and Studio Canal releases include a comparison of the two opening monologues.) David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ...


Adaptation of the source material

Before writing the screenplay, Greene worked out the atmosphere, characterization, and mood of the story by writing a novella. This was written purely to be used as a source text for the screenplay and was never intended to be read by the general public, although it was later published (alongside The Fallen Idol). The Fallen Idol is a 1948 film directed by Carol Reed and based on the short story The Basement Room, by Graham Greene. ...


The narrator in the novella is Col. Calloway, a British policeman, which gives the book a slightly different emphasis from that of the screenplay. A small portion of his narration is retained in a modified form at the very beginning of the movie, the part in which a voice-over declaims: "I never knew the old Vienna..."


Other differences include the nationality of both Martins and Lime; they are English in the book. Martins' first name is Rollo rather than Holly. Popescu's character is an American called Cooler. The character of Crabbin was originally meant to be two characters, to be played by Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne, who were an established comedy duo in films. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Basil Radford (25 June 1897 Chester, England - 20 October 1952 London, England) was a British character actor who featured in many British films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Naunton Wayne (1901-1970) was a British character actor, born in Llanwonno, South Wales. ...


Perhaps the fundamental difference is the end of the novella,[original research?] in which it is implied that Anna and Rollo (Holly) are about to begin a new life together, in stark contrast to the unmistakable snub by Anna that marks the end of the movie. Anna does walk away from Lime's grave in the book, but the text continues: "I watched him striding off on his overgrown legs after the girl. He caught her up and they walked side by side. I don't think he said a word to her: it was like the end of a story. He was a very bad shot and a very bad judge of character, but he had a way with Westerns (a trick of tension) and with girls (I wouldn't know what)." In some prints of the film, the last few seconds have been deleted to try to conceal the snub and manufacture the happy ending of the book.[citation needed] During the shooting of the movie, the final scene was the subject of a dispute between Greene, who wanted the happy ending of the novella, and Selznick and Reed, who stubbornly refused to end the film on what they felt was an artificially happy note. This is one of the few areas where Reed and Selznick did not clash during the production.[citation needed]


Production

The film was shot on location in Vienna, with additional scenes shot in England. The tall and wide sewer shown in the film is in fact the tunnel of the Wien River, although many shots were also filmed in a London studio. After one day's shooting Welles declined to film in the sewers and sets were built at Shepperton to finish the film. There is a great deal of footage using doubles for Welles shot in the actual sewers.[citation needed] For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Vienna Length 34 km Elevation of the source 520 m Average discharge 200-450. ...


Style

The atmospheric use of black and white expressionist cinematography (by Robert Krasker), with harsh lighting and distorted camera angles, is a key feature of The Third Man. Combined with the unique musical theme, seedy locations, and acclaimed performances from the cast, the style evokes the atmosphere of an exhausted, cynical post-war Vienna at the start of the Cold War. The film's unusual camera angles, however, weren't always appreciated. C.A. Lejeune in the Observer described Reed's "habit of printing his scenes askew, with floors sloping at a diagonal and close-ups deliriously tilted" as "most distracting". Reputedly American director William Wyler, a close friend of Reed's, sent him a spirit level, with a note saying, "Carol, next time you make a picture, just put it on top of the camera, will you?".[citation needed] On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Born 21 August 1913 Died 16 August 1981 Gifted cinematographer, whose work was strongly influenced by film noir. ... This is a current Stagecraft collaboration! Please help improve it to good article standard. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... A spirit level A spirit level or bubble level is an instrument designed to indicate whether a surface is level or plumb. ...


The film's expressionistic photography is reminiscent of the directorial style of Welles, who is sometimes erroneously credited with directing the film himself on this ground. In interviews with Peter Bogdanovich, Welles stated that outside of acting, his only contribution was the 'cuckoo clock' speech.[3] Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић (born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. ...


Score

The distinctive musical score was composed and played on the zither by Anton Karas. A single, "The Third Man Theme", released in 1950 (Decca in UK, London Records in USA) became a best-seller, and later an LP was released. Before the production came to Vienna, Karas was an unknown wine bar performer. Reed and Howard fell in love with Karas' zither after hearing him play inside a café. Karas agreed to record some of his own compositions on a reel-to-reel tape machine that Reed set up in the bedroom of his hotel; one of these was later to become the Harry Lime Theme and become a popular hit. The exposure made Karas an international star after the movie was released.[4] Film critic Roger Ebert wrote, "Has there ever been a film where the music more perfectly suited the action than in Carol Reed's 'The Third Man'?"[5] Concert zither The zither is a musical string instrument, mainly used in folk music, most commonly in German-speaking Alpine Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Third Man Theme is an instrumental written and performed by Anton Karas for the soundtrack to the film The Third Man (1949). ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...

Anton Karas - Third Man Theme excerpt Image File history File links Anton_Karas_-_Third_Man_Theme_excerpt. ...

An excerpt from Anton Karas' The Third Man Theme

Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Victor Borge later covered the theme on piano for his album Caught in the Act, and a version with a faster tempo and without the zither was featured on the album "Going Places" by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. The music is also used in a bar scene in the 2002 film Triple X. The beginning of the song also appears in "Stork Patrol" by The Lonely Island available at http://www.thelonelyisland.com/storkpatrol.html. Musician/Comedian Victor Borge For the Cape Verdean politician, see Víctor Borges. ... Herb Alpert (born March 31, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician most associated with the Tijuana Brass, a now-defunct brass band of which he was leader. ... XXX (also written xXx), pronounced Triple X, is a 2002 action movie starring Vin Diesel. ...


Cast

Joseph Cotten in the starring role of Holly Martins, writer of cheap novels and friend of Harry Lime.
Joseph Cotten in the starring role of Holly Martins, writer of cheap novels and friend of Harry Lime.

Image File history File links Joseph Cotten in The Third Man. ... Image File history File links Joseph Cotten in The Third Man. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ... Alida Valli (31 May 1921 – 22 April 2006), sometimes simply credited as Valli, was an Italian actress. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Trevor Howard, CBE (29 September 1913 – 7 January 1988), born Trevor Wallace Howard-Smith, was an English movie, stage and television actor. ... Wilfrid Hyde-White (May 12, 1903 – May 6, 1991) was a British character actor. ... Bernard Lee as M in The Man with the Golden Gun Bernard Lee (January 10, 1908 – January 16, 1981) was a British actor, best known for his role as M in the first eleven James Bond films. ... Ernst Deutsch (born September 16, 1890 in Prague; died March 22, 1969 in Berlin) was a German actor. ... Siegfried Breuer (June 24, 1906 - February 1, 1954 ) was a Austrian stage and film actor and occasional film director and screenwriter. ... Annie Rosar in Die Lindenwirtin vom Donaustrand (1957) Annie Rosar (May 17, 1888 — August 5, 1963) was an Austrian stage and film actress who is best remembered today for her appearances in many Austrian comedy films from the 1930s to the early 1960s. ...

Adaptations and spin-offs

A radio drama series called The Lives of Harry Lime (original British title: The Adventures of Harry Lime), centering on the adventures of Harry Lime (voiced by Welles) prior to his "death in Vienna", comprising 52 episodes, was aired in 1951 and 1952. Welles wrote several of the episodes, including "Ticket to Tangiers," which is included on the Criterion Collection and Studio Canal releases of the film. In addition, recordings of the 1952 episodes "Man of Mystery", "Murder on the Riviera" and "Blackmail is a Nasty Word" are included on the Criterion Collection DVD The Complete Mr. Arkadin. Radio drama is a form of audio storytelling broadcast on radio. ... The Lives of Harry Lime (original British title The Adventures of Harry Lime) was an old-time radio program produced in London, England during the 1951 to 1952 season. ... The Criterion Collection is a joint venture between Janus Films and The Voyager Company that was begun in the mid 1980s for the purpose of releasing authoritative consumer versions of classic and important contemporary films on the laserdisc and DVD formats. ... Mr. ...


A television series later used the film's title, theme music and the character name "Harry Lime", in which Lime was played by Michael Rennie. However, the Lime character was a wealthy art-dealer who behaved like Robin Hood, and had an associate called Bradford Webster (played by Jonathan Harris). The series was produced by the BBC and ran for 77 episodes between 1959 and 1965. It was syndicated in the United States. [6] Michael Rennie (25 August 1909—10 June 1971) was an English film, television and stage actor best known for his starring role as the benevolent space visitor Klaatu in the 1951 classic science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Harris (November 6, 1914 – November 3, 2002), was an American stage and character actor. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ...


The cuckoo clock speech

In a famous scene, looking down upon the people beneath from his vantage point on top of the Riesenrad, the large Ferris wheel in the Prater amusement park, Lime compares them to dots. Back on the ground, he makes the now famous remark: The Riesenrad, seen from the outside of the Prater The Riesenrad (meaning giant wheel) is a Ferris wheel at the entrance of the Prater amusement park in Vienna, Austria. ... A Ferris wheel on the boardwalk in Ocean City, New Jersey, USA. A Ferris wheel (or, more commonly in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [UK], big wheel) is a nonbuilding structure consisting of an upright wheel with passenger gondolas suspended from the rim. ... The Hauptallee in the Prater Leopoldstadt (Leopold-Town) is Viennas second district. ... Dot can refer to several different characters: full stop, or period, primarily used in writing to end a sentence. ...

"In Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshed — they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love, they had five hundred years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock." Borja (better known by the Italian spelling of the name, Borgia) was an influential Spanish family during the Renaissance. ... Cuckoo clock, a so-called Jagdstück, Black Forest, ca. ...

Greene has conceded that this remark was not his own invention, but rather Welles' contribution to the script. Welles himself admitted that he was inspired to his speech by a much smaller and older quote that implied the same from a Hungarian play. (The impact of Lime's statement is in some ways enhanced by the fact that the cuckoo clock is in fact a German invention, and the Swiss do not even have that to their credit. This fact, however, is not very well known.[original research?])


Copyright status

This film lapsed into public domain in the United States when the copyright was not renewed after the death of producer David Selznick. In 1997, the movie was restored to copyright in accordance to the Uruguay Round Agreements Act, and the Criterion Collection released a digitally restored DVD of the original British print of the movie. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902 - June 22, 1965), was an influential Hollywood producer, best known for producing the epic blockbuster Gone With the Wind (1939) which earned him an Oscar. ... See Uruguay Round and General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade Rounds item #8 for more information. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


See also

Odd Man Out (1947) is classic post WW 2 British film noir starring James Mason as an Irish republican operative running from the military state that was Northern Ireland after a botched bank robbery meant to replenish republican coffers. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Drazen, Charles: "In Search of the Third Man", page 36. Limelight Editions, 1999
  2. ^ The Third Man at the Internet Movie Database
  3. ^ This is Orson Welles, p. 220
  4. ^ "The Third Man" DVD review, Sean Axmaker, Turner Classic Movies
  5. ^ The Third Man review, Roger Ebert, December 8, 1996
  6. ^ The Third Man TV series.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...

Further reading

  • Drazin, Charles (2000). In Search of the Third Man. New York: Limelight Editions. ISBN 9780879102944. 
  • Moss, Robert (1987). The Films of Carol Reed. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 9780231059848. 

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Third Man
Preceded by
The Fallen Idol
BAFTA Award for Best British Film
1951
Succeeded by
The Blue Lamp

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Third Man - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1493 words)
It is this "third man", to whom the title of the film (which is essentially an elaborate MacGuffin) refers.
The version of the The Third Man shown in American theaters, though not the version that appears on American DVDs, emphasizes Holly Martins' point of view rather than a racketeer's as shown in the UK version, from which 11 minutes were cut.
A single, "The Third Man Theme", released in 1950 (Decca in UK, London Records in USA) became a best-seller, and later an LP was released.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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