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Encyclopedia > The Teahouse of the August Moon

The Teahouse of the August Moon

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Written by: John Patrick from his own play based on the novel by Vern J. Sneider
Starring: Marlon Brando,
Glenn Ford,
Machiko Kyô,
Paul Ford
Directed by: Daniel Mann
Photography by: John Alton
Art direction by: Terry Knight
Edited by: Harold F. Kress
Music by: Saul Chaplin
Distributed by: MGM
Release Date: 1956

The Teahouse of the August Moon is a 1956 motion picture comedy satirising the US occupation of Japan following the end of World War II. John Patrick adapted the screenplay from his own Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning Broadway play of 1953. The play was, in turn, adapted from a 1951 novel by Vern J. Sneider. John Patrick (May 17, 1905 - November 7, 1995) was a US playwright and screenwriter. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Glenn Ford Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford (born May 1, 1916)(died October 15, 2005), better known by his stage name Glenn Ford, is an actor. ... Machiko Kyo Machiko Kyō (京マチ子 Kyō Machiko) (March 25, 1924-) was a Japanese actress who worked primarily during the 1950s. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Daniel Mann, also known as Daniel Chugerman (August 8, 1912–November 21, 1991), was an American film and television director. ... Cinematographer John Alton ( 1901- 1996) photographed some of the most famous films noir of the classic period. ... Terry Knight (born Richard Terrence Knapp on April 9, 1943, died November 1, 2004), was an American rock and roll music producer, promoter, singer, songwriter and radio personality. ... Saul Chaplin (born February 19, 1912 - died November 15, 1997) was one of Hollywoods preeminent composers and musical directors. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Comedy is the use of humor in the form of theater, where it simply referred to a play with a happy ending, in contrast to a tragedy. ... Satire is a literary technique not of writing or art which exposes the follies of its subject (for example, individuals, organizations, or states) to ridicule, often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... // Surrender Representatives of Japan stand aboard the USS Missouri prior to signing of the Instrument of Surrender Japan surrendered to the Allies on August 14, 1945, when Emperor Hirohito accepted the terms of the Potsdam Declaration. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 17 million military deaths 7 million military deaths World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as the largest and deadliest... John Patrick (May 17, 1905 - November 7, 1995) was a US playwright and screenwriter. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... A Tony Award for Best Play has been awarded since 1947. ... This article is about the street in New York City. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...

Contents


Production

Playing the role of a Japanese villager from Okinawa was to prove a challenge for Marlon Brando's method acting techniques. He spent two months studying local culture, speech and gestures. This article is about the prefecture. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Method acting is an acting technique in which actors try to replicate the emotional conditions under which the character operates in real life, in an effort to process an acting role. ...


The role of Colonel Wainwright Purdy III was to have been played by Louis Calhern but he died in Tokyo during filming, being replaced by Paul Ford. Louis Calhern (February 19, 1895 - May 12, 1956) was an American actor. ... View of Tokyos Shibuya district Long a symbol of Tokyo, the Nijubashi Bridge at the Kokyo Imperial Palace. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Cultural impact

Conventionally, the film stands firmly within the genre of official goes native stories such as Local Hero. A stuffy bureaucrat is sent to resolve a perceived problem in a community but becomes socialised into a more permissive way of life. When the official's superiors come to audit him, conflicts in values are exposed with results comic or tragic. Perhaps Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness is the prototype of such tales. Local Hero (1983) is a British comedy film starring Burt Lancaster, Peter Riegert, Fulton Mackay and Denis Lawson, directed by Bill Forsyth. ... This Article discusses the learning process called socialization. ... Joseph Conrad Joseph Conrad (December 3, 1857 – August 3, 1924) was a naturalized British novelist of Polish origin. ... Heart of Darkness is a novella (published 1902) by Joseph Conrad. ...


However, in the occupation of Japan, the US were aiming to nurture democracy, respect for human rights and liberal values. The occupation had seen not only reconstruction but also the trial and execution of those held responsible for war crimes. With the occupation only ended in 1952, the subject ought to feel like an odd one for a light popular comedy. Moreover, the Japanese people are cast in a humane and civilised, if somewhat patronising, light alongside the officious and bureaucratic Americans. Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The film was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Motion Picture Promoting International Understanding but by the 1970s, cultural idiosyncrasies and pronunciation struggles had ceased to be a subject of fun. A 1971 musical version of the play (Lovely Ladies, Kind Gentlemen) flopped. The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The 1970s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1970 and 1979. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ...


Plot summary

Captain Fisby (Glenn Ford) is sent to Americanise the village of Tobiki in Okinawa and retains the services of local Sakini (Brando) as interpretor. Fisby encourages the villagers to build a school but they want to build a teahouse and cannot afford both. Fisby gradually becomes assimilated to the local customs and mores with the help of Sakini and Lotus Blossom, a young geisha, (Kyô) and is ultimately surprised by his superior officer, Colonel Wainwright Purdy III (Paul Ford), in the teahouse wearing a bathrobe as an improvised kimono. Despite Purdy's anger and intended punishment of both Fisby and the villagers, the village is chosen by the SCAP as an example of successful democratisation. This deus ex machina enables all parties to end the drama recognising and celebrating their cultural diversity and common humanity. A woman wearing kimono performs a tea ceremony seated in seiza position on tatami. ... Women dressed as maiko (apprentice geisha) in Kyoto, Japan Geisha (芸者 person of the arts) are traditional Japanese artist-entertainers. ... Kimono on a Japanese Postage Stamp Kimono (Japanese: 着物 literally something one wears) are the traditional garments of Japan. ... SCAP, short for Supreme Commander Allied Powers, was the title for Douglas MacArthur during the Occupation of Japan following WWII. SCAP also referred to the offices of the occupation, including a staff of several hundred American civil servants as well as military officers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Quotes

  • Sakini: Pain makes man think. Thought makes man wise. Wisdom makes life endurable.

External links

  • Tribute site for film, play and novel featuring images and memorabilia

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Teahouse of the August Moon Study Guide by John Patrick (224 words)
The Teahouse of the August Moon Essay #1
The Teahouse of the August Moon Essay #2
The Teahouse of the August Moon Essay #3
The Teahouse of the August Moon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (534 words)
The Teahouse of the August Moon is a 1956 motion picture comedy satirising the US occupation of Japan following the end of World War II.
Fisby gradually becomes assimilated to the local customs and mores with the help of Sakini and Lotus Blossom, a young geisha, (Kyô) and is ultimately surprised by his superior officer, Colonel Wainwright Purdy III (Paul Ford), in the teahouse wearing a bathrobe as an improvised kimono.
Despite Purdy's anger and intended punishment of both Fisby and the villagers, the village is chosen by the SCAP as an example of successful democratisation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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