FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Sun (newspaper)

The Sun in January 2005, featuring Prince Harry dressed as a Nazi official.
Type Daily newspaper available Monday to Saturday except Christmas Day.
Format Tabloid

Owner News International
Editor Rebekah Wade
Founded 1964
Political allegiance Nationalist and Populist
Headquarters Wapping, London

Website: www.thesun.co.uk

The Sun is a tabloid daily newspaper published in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland with the highest circulation of any daily English-language newspaper in the world, standing at 3,107,412 copies daily in the first half of 2006.[1] The daily readership is just over 7,800,000 and it has more than twice as many readers in the ABC1 demographic as its upmarket stablemate The Times, although much less as a proportion of total sales. It is published by News Group Newspapers of News International, itself a subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation. Image File history File links The logo of The Sun. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15... HRH Prince Harry of Wales Henry Charles Albert David His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David Mountbatten-Windsor) (born September 15, 1984), nicknamed Prince Harry, is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of Queen Elizabeth II. Harry is third in the line of... National Socialism redirects here. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... Rebekah Wade (born May 27, 1968 in Cheshire, England) is a British journalist and newspaper editor. ... Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Look up sun in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. ... The NRS social grades are a system of demographic classification used in the United Kingdom. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest Media conglomerates. ...

Contents

History

The Sun before Murdoch

The Sun was launched in 1964 as a replacement for the Daily Herald, of which Mirror Group had acquired 51 per cent ownership when it took over Odhams Press in 1961. The Herald, 49 per cent owned by the Trades Union Congress and until recently tied to supporting official Labour Party policy, was selling more than 1.4 million copies a day at the time of the takeover. But its ageing working-class readers were unattractive to advertisers, and the paper's new owners (who in 1963 renamed their printing and publishing empire the International Publishing Corporation) did not want the Herald to compete with The Daily Mirror. Market research conducted by Mark Abrams suggested that there was demand for a new mid-market left-of-centre daily which reflected perceived changes in Britain's demographics, and IPC persuaded an initially reluctant TUC to sell its shares to allow the relaunch of the Herald as The Sun. The Daily Herald was a London newspaper. ... Odhams Press was a British publishing firm. ... Image:TradeUnionsCongress20050108 CopyrightKaihsuTai. ... The Labour Party is an Anti-English political party in the United Kingdom. ... IPC Media the UKs leading consumer magazine publisher, with an unrivalled portfolio of brands, selling over 350 million copies each year. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Map of countries by population Population growth showing projections for later this century Demography is the statistical study of human populations. ... IPC Media the UKs leading consumer magazine publisher, with an unrivalled portfolio of brands, selling over 350 million copies each year. ... Image:TradeUnionsCongress20050108 CopyrightKaihsuTai. ...


It was a broadsheet with a logo featuring an orange disc. The relaunched paper did not live up to IPC's expectations, however. Circulation continued to decline, and it was soon losing even more money than the Herald had lost. In 1969, IPC decided to throw in the towel. Robert Maxwell offered to take it off their hands and retain its commitment to the Labour party, but said there would be redundancies, especially among the printers. Rupert Murdoch had already bought the News of the World, a sensationalist Sunday newspaper, the previous year, and he was in the position of seeing the printing presses in the basement of the old Bouverie Street building sit idle for six days in the week. Seizing the opportunity to increase his presence on Fleet Street, he made an agreement with the print unions, promising fewer redundancies if he got the paper. He assured IPC that he would publish a "straightforward, honest newspaper" which would continue to support Labour. IPC, under pressure from the unions, rejected Maxwell's offer, and Murdoch bought the paper for £800,000, to be paid in instalments. [2] He would later remark: "I am constantly amazed at the ease with which I entered British newspapers." [3] Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... IPC Media the UKs leading consumer magazine publisher, with an unrivalled portfolio of brands, selling over 350 million copies each year. ... Robert Maxwell Ian Robert Maxwell MC (June 10, 1923 – November 5, 1991) was a Czechoslovakian-born British media proprietor and formerly Member of Parliament (MP), who rose from poverty to build an extensive publishing empire. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ...


The early Murdoch years

Murdoch appointed Larry Lamb as his editor. Lamb was scathing in his opinion of the Mirror, the paper where he had recently been senior sub-editor. He shared Murdoch's view that the measure of a paper's quality was best measured by its sales, and he regarded the Mirror as overstaffed, and primarily aimed at an ageing readership. Lamb hastily recruited a staff of about 125 reporters, who were mostly selected for their availability rather than their ability. [4] This was about a quarter of what the Mirror currently employed, and Murdoch had to draft in staff on loan from his Australian papers. Murdoch immediately relaunched The Sun as a tabloid, and ran it as a sister paper to the News of the World [5]. The Sun used the same printing presses, and the two papers were now managed together at senior executive levels. Sir Albert Lamb, commonly known as Larry Lamb (July 15, 1929 – May 19, 2000) was a British newspaper editor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Sun was launched as a rival to The Daily Mirror, which it copied in several ways. It was the same size and its masthead had the name in white on a red rectangle of the same colour as the Daily Mirror. The front page had the same general style and it could easily be picked up by mistake. Inside the Mirror's "Lively Letters" was matched by "Liveliest Letters", and the comic strip "Garth" by a comic strip "Scarth" featuring a frequently naked woman. Sports news was on the back pages in both. The text was written for a slightly lower reading age. It rapidly overtook the Mirror in sales to become the fastest growing daily.[6] Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Garth was a comic strip in the Daily Mirror newspaper from July 24, 1943, to December 14, 1993. ...


From the start, sex was used as an important element in marketing the paper. While the Daily Mirror frequently featured a pin-up photograph of a young woman in bikini or lingerie, ostensibly as a fashion item, The Sun dispensed with the excuses; it featured what were openly glamour photographs of women, with less clothes than their Mirror counterparts. After a year, this would eventually become the regular topless picture known as the Page Three Girl. Features such as 'Do Men Still Want To Marry A Virgin?' and 'The Way into a Woman's Bed' began to appear. Serialisations of erotic books became a staple; the publication of extracts from The Sensuous Woman, at a time when copies of the book were being seized by Customs, produced a scandal and a gratifying amount of free publicity.[7] A pin-up girl is a woman whose physical attractiveness would entice one to place a picture of her on a wall. ... Glamour photography is the photographing of a model (usually female), in a way that is intended to be erotic, yet not pornographic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Is a 1971 book by Joan Garrity under the pseudonym J. The book is a detailed instruction manual on sensuality for women. ...


Despite the industrial relations of the 1970s - the so-called "Spanish practices" of the print unions - The Sun was very profitable, enabling Murdoch to expand to the United States from 1973.


Politically, The Sun in the early Murdoch years remained nominally Labour, although in the two 1974 elections, the paper's attitude to Labour was "agnostic", according to Roy Greenslade in Press Gang (2003). The then editor, Larry Lamb, was originally from a Labour background, with a socialist upbringing. Deputy editor Bernard Shrimsley was a middle-class uncommitted Conservative. Roy Greenslade is Professor of Journalism at London’s City University and has been a media commentator since 1992, most notably for The Guardian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ...


The Sun changed track and caused a small stir by endorsing Margaret Thatcher in the 1979 general election. Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ...


Thatcherite king of the tabloids

In the meantime, The Sun had overtaken the Daily Mirror in circulation by 1978, partly thanks to extensive advertising on ITV, voiced by actor Christopher Timothy. From 1981, The Sun used Bingo as a promotional tool to increase its circulation still further. Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... Christopher Timothy (left) as Dr. Brendan Mac McGuire with Diane Keen in Doctors Christopher Timothy (born October 14, 1940) is a Welsh-born actress best known for playing James Herriot in the television series All Creatures Great and Small. ...


In 1986 Murdoch shut down the Bouverie Street premises of The Sun and News of the World, and moved operations to the new Wapping complex, blocking union activity and greatly reducing the number of staff employed to print the papers; a year-long picket by sacked workers was eventually defeated (see Wapping dispute). Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... Employees of the BBC form a picket line during a strike in May 2005. ... The Wapping dispute started on 24 January 1986 when some 6,000 newspaper workers went on strike after months of protracted negotiation with their employers, News International (parent of Times Newspapers and News Group Newspapers, chaired by Rupert Murdoch). ...


The Sun was a very strong supporter of Margaret Thatcher and her policies, and maintained its support for the Conservatives when Thatcher was succeeded by John Major in 1990. On the day of the 1992 election, its front-page headline was "If [Labour leader] Neil Kinnock wins today, will the last person to leave Britain please turn out the lights", and two days later The Sun was so convinced of its contributions to the Conservative victory that it declared "IT WAS THE SUN WOT WON IT". Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ...


The Sun goes Labour again

The Sun switched support to Labour in March 1997 when the General Election would see Labour leader Tony Blair become Prime Minister. Since then it has supported Labour in each of the subsequent three elections, despite criticising some of their policies. Some say this was down to the paper's general disillusionment with the Conservative party since Black Wednesday. Others have argued that the newspaper changed its stance as it knew there was zero chance of the Conservative Party winning the 1997 General Election, and therefore afterwards would not have been seen as having backed a loser. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... In British politics and economics, Black Wednesday refers to September 16, 1992 when the government was forced to withdraw the Pound from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) by currency speculators—most notably George Soros who earned over US$1 billion in doing so. ...


The Sun today

The Sun relies on stories about the entertainment industry, gossip concerning the British monarchy, and sports, as well as news and politics for its content, with many items revolving around celebrities. The entertainment industry consists of a large number of sub-industries devoted to entertainment. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ...


In addition to writers covering celebrities-about-town and the latest soap opera storylines, the paper is always on the lookout for celebrities in trouble or scandal. Pictures are preferred and The Sun often uses pictures taken by paparazzi. For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... Paparazzo, Stephen. ...


Its serious news stories frequently focus on themes of immigration, security scandals, domestic abuse and paedophiles. The Page 3 pin-up girl is invariably a girl between the ages of 18-28, posing topless. Abuse is a general term for the misuse of a person or thing, causing harm to the person or thing, to the abuser, or to someone else. ... Pedophilia or pædophilia (see spelling differences) is a mental state in which an adult has a preferential sexual attraction to prepubescent and in some definitions, preadolescent children. ... A Page Three girl is a woman who models for topless photographs published in UK tabloids, specifically page three of The Sun. ...


The current editor is Rebekah Wade, the first female editor in the paper's history. Rebekah Wade (born May 27, 1968 in Cheshire, England) is a British journalist and newspaper editor. ...


The Sun has attempted to create a term for itself in Cockney rhyming slang as The Currant Bun.[8] Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ...


Controversy

National controversy

Page 3

The Sun under Murdoch has been a consistent subject of controversy. From the early 1970s, both feminists and many cultural conservatives objected to the Page 3 girls, which they saw as pornographic. In 2006, when the paper ran a story on a website to track down missing sex offenders,they used the headline Pervhunt.Com, despite the actual website having a different name. However a Popbitch.com member bought the rights to the Pervhunt.com name and redirected it to the Sun's Page 3 Rookies webpage, containing Page 3 models of ages 18-20. [1] Feminists redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Porn redirects here. ... Popbitch is a weekly UK-based celebrity and pop music newsletter and associated website dating from the early 2000s. ...


Sickest website campaign

The Sun launched a campaign in January 2007 asking their readers to report to their investigative department the "sickest websites" they find on the internet. This follows a recent exposé The Sun uncovered about websites dealing in human organs.[9]


Populism

After The Sun had abandoned Labour by 1979 for Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives, these critics were joined by left-wingers objecting to the paper's allegedly 'right-wing' populist political line, which, according to criticism, was jingoistic, racist and homophobic. A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church; a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ...


Racism

The Sun Website's Showbiz column was recent criticised for an article on Hilary Duff having a Bollywood theme to her new video that was labelled "Hilary PoppaDuff". [2] This came despite the Sun being outspoken against the allegations of racism on Celebrity Big Brother earlier in the year, where a similar insult was used. Hilary Erhard Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress, singer, songwriter, producer, fashion designer, and spokesperson. ... Bollywood (Hindi: , Urdu: ) is the informal name given to the popular Mumbai-based Hindi-language film industry in India. ... Roasting papadums over an open flame on a stove, one of several methods of cooking them. ... Celebrity Big Brother 2007 was the fifth series of the United Kingdom reality television series Celebrity Big Brother, a spin-off of Big Brother. ...


Sensationalism

More generally, the Murdoch Sun has been criticised since its launch for its sensationalism, which on occasion has led it to publish stories on the most spurious evidence, and for its focus on celebrities for its news and feature coverage. It has regularly been accused of appealing to the lowest common denominator and dumbing down public discourse. In a skit on the Benny Hill Show, two photographers from London's "mainstream" papers are showing taking photographs of a beautiful model in the regular manner, while two other photographers, identified by their press cards as from The Mirror and The Sun are shown photographing her upskirt. In mathematics, the lowest common denominator or least common denominator (abbreviated LCD) is the least common multiple of the denominators of a set of vulgar fractions. ... Dumbing down is a usually derogatory term which refers to the simplifying of a subject, often education, news and TV amongst others. ...


Miners' strike

The newspaper supported the government in the miners' strike of 1984-85 and there were incidents where staff threatened to resign over what they saw as deliberate misinformation. To this day, the paper's circulation in the old mining areas of Britain remains much smaller than in the country as a whole. The miners strike of 1984-5 was a major piece of industrial action affecting the British coal industry. ...


Nationalism

The torpedoing of the Belgrano was celebrated on the front page of the British tabloid newspaper The Sun

The paper infamously published the headline "GOTCHA" when, during the Falklands War, the Argentine cruiser General Belgrano was torpedoed, although that headline was dropped when it was known that the ship had sunk and the extent of Argentinian casualties became clear. Support of British troops — referred to as "Our Boys" — in action is invariably unequivocal. The Sun's ultra-patriotism has, however, outgrown the racism some claim it came close to embracing in the 1970s and 1980s — the nadir was its coverage of the Broadwater Farm riot of 1985. It has been as forceful on asylum-seekers as the Daily Express and the Daily Mail. On July 4, 2003 it printed a front page story under the headline "Swan Bake" claiming that asylum seekers were slaughtering and eating swans. It later emerged that the story had no factual basis but The Sun defiantly published a follow up story headlined "Now they're after our fish!". Following a Press Complaints Commission adjudication a "clarification" was eventually printed - on page 41.[10] A copy of The Sun from the 1982 sinking of the ARA General Belgrano — one of the most famous headlines ever. ... A copy of The Sun from the 1982 sinking of the ARA General Belgrano — one of the most famous headlines ever. ... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed... For the Argentine politician and military leader, see Manuel Belgrano. ... The Broadwater Farm riot was a riot that occurred in and around the Broadwater Farm area of Tottenham London on 6 October 1985. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Press Complaints Commission is a British organisation that has regulated printed newspapers and magazines since 1990. ...


Hillsborough

Further information: Hillsborough disaster - The Sun newspaper controversy
The controversial Hillsborough edition
The controversial Hillsborough edition

The worst moment journalistically for The Sun's sensationalism was its coverage of the 1989 Hillsborough football stadium disaster in Sheffield, where 96 people died and 730 were injured. Under a banner of the headline "THE TRUTH" the paper claimed that some fans picked the pockets of crush victims, that others urinated upon members of the emergency services as they tried to assist and that some even assaulted a Police Constable "whilst he was administering the kiss of life to a patient" (19 April 1989). Despite the bold headline - the work of Kelvin MacKenzie- the story was based on allegations which were either made by unnamed and unattributable sources, or were hearsay accounts of what named individuals had said - a fact made clear to MacKenzie by Harry Arnold, the reporter who had written it. Although the disaster had occurred before TV cameras and a mass of sports reporters, no evidence was ever produced to substantiate the allegations made in the story [11]. It caused outrage amongst the people of Liverpool and the paper still sells poorly in the city to this day. It is unavailable in many parts of the city, as many newsagents refuse to stock it. The Memorial at Hillsborough. ... Image File history File links Hillsborough_disaster_Sun. ... Image File history File links Hillsborough_disaster_Sun. ... The Memorial at Hillsborough. ... Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. ... For the painter see John Constable. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ...


On January 2005 The Sun's managing editor Graham Dudman claimed their coverage of the Hillsborough disaster was "the worst mistake in their history", he further added, "What we did was a terrible mistake. It was a terrible, insensitive, horrible article, with a dreadful headline; but what we'd also say is: we have apologised for it, and the entire senior team here now is completely different from the team that put the paper out in 1989." Although Dudman made this claim/apology in January 2005 he rehired Kelvin MacKenzie (the editor responsible for their biggest mistake in history) as a columnist in May 2006, furthermore, on January 11, 2007, MacKenzie went on record as a panellist on BBC1's Question Time as saying the apology he made after the disaster was a hollow one, forced upon him by the paper's proprietor, Rupert Murdoch. MacKenzie further claimed he was not sorry "for telling the truth" but he admitted that he did not know for sure whether some Liverpool fans urinated on the police, or robbed victims.[12] Kelvin MacKenzie (born October 22, 1946) is a British media executive and former newspaper editor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Freddie Starr "ate my hamster"

The 13 March 1986 edition of The Sun, with the famous headline.
The 13 March 1986 edition of The Sun, with the famous headline.

On 13 March 1986 The Sun carried as it main headline: "FREDDIE STARR ATE MY HAMSTER". According to the text of the story, the British comedian Freddie Starr had been staying at the home of Vince McCaffrey and his 23-year old girlfriend Lea La Salle in Birchwood, Cheshire when the incident took place. Starr was claimed to have returned home from a performance at a Manchester nightclub in the small hours of the morning and demanded that Lea La Salle make him a sandwich. When she refused, he went into the kitchen and put her pet hamster Supersonic between two slices of bread and proceeded to eat it. Image File history File links Freddiehamster. ... Image File history File links Freddiehamster. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Freddie Starr as seen on the cover of his 2001 autobiography Unwrapped. ... Statistics Population: 11,395 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SJ647911 Administration District: Warrington Shire county: Cheshire Region: North West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cheshire Historic county: Lancashire Services Police force: Cheshire Ambulance service: North West Post office and telephone Post town: Warrington... Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a county in North West England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ...


Freddie Starr gives his side of the story in his 2001 autobiography Unwrapped. He says that the only time that he ever stayed at Vince McCaffrey's house was in 1979 and that the incident was a complete fabrication. Starr writes in the book: "I have never eaten or even nibbled a live hamster, gerbil, guinea pig, mouse, shrew, vole or any other small mammal." The man behind the hamster story was the British publicist Max Clifford. When asked in a television interview with Esther Rantzen some years later whether Starr really had eaten a hamster, his reply was "Of course not." Clifford was unapologetic, insisting that the story had given a huge boost to Starr's career. In May 2006 the BBC nominated "FREDDIE STARR ATE MY HAMSTER" as one of the top British newspaper headlines of all time. [13] Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Maxwell Frank Clifford [1] (born April 6, 1943 in Kingston upon Thames), is an English publicist. ... Esther Louise Rantzen CBE (born on 22 June 1940 ) (age 66)) is a British journalist and television presenter who is best known for her long stint in Thats Life! and her anti paedophile activism activities as founder of the charity ChildLine. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


Mental health

On September 22, 2003 the newspaper misjudged the public mood surrounding mental health. When the former boxer Frank Bruno was admitted to hospital, early editions read Bonkers Bruno Locked Up across its front page. The reaction was so strong and immediate that by its second edition the headline had become: Sad Bruno In Mental Home.[14] is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franklin Ray Bruno (born November 16, 1961) is an English former boxer whose career highlight was winning the WBC world heavyweight championship in 1995. ...


Homosexuality

In the early 1980s, the paper was excoriating the Greater London Council, led by Ken Livingstone, giving financial support to various gay rights groups. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the paper campaigned against "pulpit poofs", as it described gay Church of England clergy, and in 1987 published a front-page article falsely accusing the pop musician Elton John of having sexual relationships with rent boys and indulging in under-age sex. A furious John successfully sued the paper for libel and damages. The paper settled out of court for a million pounds and printed a full, front page apology titled "Sorry Elton". During the 1980s the paper carried a number of articles related to the supposed sexual orientation of a number of famous people, including one particular article written by Piers Morgan titled 'The Poofs of Pop', where the paper gave its verdict on whether endless male pop stars were gay or not.[15]. Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born June 17, 1945) is an English politician who became Mayor of London on the creation of the post in 2000. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Male prostitution is the sale of sexual services (prostitution) by a male. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Piers Stefan Pughe-Morgan (born 30 March 1965 in Newick, East Sussex) is a former editor of British tabloid newspapers the News of the World (1994 – 1995) and the Daily Mirror (1995 – 2004). ...


When Peter Mandelson was "outed" by Matthew Parris (a gay former columnist on The Sun) on Newsnight in November 1998, the paper asked whether Britain was governed by a "gay mafia", as there were then several openly gay members of the British cabinet. The newspaper apologised the following day. The Sun's U-turn on its views of homosexuality dispells the notion that their editorial position on the subject in prior years was based on a religious pretext, rather it was strictly sensationalist journalism for commercial purposes. This would explain the present tone in which their entertainment sections now hype and promote rather than ridicule or pour scorn over TV programmes that are based on alternative lifestyles. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Matthew Parris (born August 7, 1949 in Johannesburg) is a journalist and former Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22:30 and 23:20 on weekdays on BBC Two. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Swearing

The Sun was once opposed to printing bad language, to the extent that "tits" would often be spelt "t*ts". This policy has recently been relaxed.


Politics

The Sun routinely refers to foreign leaders in unflattering terms — such as dubbing President Jacques Chirac of France "le Worm" — and is consistently and deliberately offensive to the French and the Germans at every opportunity. When France declared itself against the Iraq war the editorial said "The French President is an unscrupulous, conniving, preening, lying, cheating hypocrite". George Galloway is quite frequently referred to in denigrating language and accused of befriending Saddam Hussein and his sons. It has been argued that this displays a level of hypocrisy; when a British journalist named Farzad Bazoft was hanged by the Hussein regime for alleged espionage, The Sun published a conviction of Bazoft for minor theft when he was a student. This information was allegedly supplied by MI5 in accordance with a request by the Thatcher government. [citation needed] “Chirac” redirects here. ... George Galloway, (born 16 August 1954 in Dundee), is a Scottish politician and author noted for his left-wing views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Farzad Bazoft was an 32-year-old Iran-born British journalist working as a freelance reporter for The Observer. ...


More recently, The Sun labelled many British Members of Parliament as traitors, regardless of their political parties, for failing to vote in favour of controversial anti-terrorism laws.[16] In the run up to the vote on Tuesday 8 November 2005, The Sun featured bombs victim John Tulloch on its front page with the words "Tell Tony He's Right" in their headline, despite Tulloch being vociferously opposed to the measure and to the Government's action.[17] A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


More than else, The Sun is passionately opposed to the European Union, taking every opportunity to thrash policy that promotes further European integration, often using Napoleonic or WW2 era fighting language.


International controversy

British tabloids are popularly perceived abroad as offensive and tasteless. Here are some notable examples of The Sun's more controversial headlines:


"Urs hole" British tabloids and English hooligans joined their efforts in harassing Swiss referee Urs Meier after the English lost in the Euro 2004 quarter-final where Meier disallowed an English goal, which would have won the match, for a foul on the goalkeeper. English media and football fans were not happy with this decision, blaming Meier, calling him "Urs hole" and "idiot ref". After his personal details were published by British tabloid newspapers, Meier received more than 16,000 abusive e-mails, and also death threats. Reporters of The Sun even travelled to Switzerland and placed an English flag at his home. As a result, he was placed under police protection. At the airport, Meier was picked from the plane and had to hide for seven days, and could not meet his children for four days. The Sun later criticised Chelsea FC manager José Mourinho for intimidating referee Anders Frisk in a Champions League match against FC Barcelona. Ultras at FC Twente - SC Heerenveen in 2002 Hooliganism is unruly and destructive behaviour, usually by gangs of young people. ... Urs Meier (born January 22, 1959 in Würenlos) is a retired Swiss football referee, a grocer by trade that owns a brand of household appliances. ... The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between June 12 and July 4, 2004. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as the Blues, previously also known as the Pensioners), founded in 1905, is a Premier League football team that plays at Stamford Bridge football ground in west London. ... José Mourinho, GOIH (pron. ... Anders Frisk (born 18 February 1963 in Gothenburg, Sweden) is an insurance agent by trade and a former football referee. ... The UEFA Champions League (also known as the European Cup, UCL, CE1, C1[1] or CL) is a seasonal club football competition organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) since 1955 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... Futbol Club Barcelona, known familiarly as Barça (IPA: baɾ.sÉ™), is a sports club based in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ...


"From Hitler Youth to Papa Ratzi" Headline of 20 April 2005 about German Joseph Ratzinger being elected Pope Benedict XVI. is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (b. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


"I'm Big in the Bumdestag" Headline of 17 April 2006 about a paparazzo picture taken of German chancellor Angela Merkel's rear during a change of clothing while on holiday in Italy. Additional puns were "the cheeky chancellor" and "the Iron Frau", and "much improved bottom line" in regard to economy. is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (IPA: ) (b. ...


Editors

  • Graham Dudman (current Managing Editor)
  • Sydney Jacobson (1964–1965) (previously editor of the Daily Herald before the name change)
  • Dick Dinsdale (1965–1969)
  • Larry Lamb (1969–1972)
  • Bernard Shrimsley (1972–1975) (Lamb was "editorial director", supervising both the Sun and NOW)
  • Larry Lamb (1975–1980) (Lamb took an enforced six month sabbatical before being sacked by Murdoch)
  • Kelvin MacKenzie (1981–1994)
  • Stuart Higgins (1994–1998)
  • David Yelland (1998–2003)
  • Rebekah Wade (2003–)

Sydney Jacobson, Baron Jacobson, (26 October 1908 - 13 September 1988) was a British journalist and political commentator. ... The Daily Herald was a London newspaper. ... Sir Albert Lamb, commonly known as Larry Lamb (July 15, 1929 – May 19, 2000) was a British newspaper editor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Albert Lamb, commonly known as Larry Lamb (July 15, 1929 – May 19, 2000) was a British newspaper editor. ... Kelvin MacKenzie (born October 22, 1946) is a British media executive and former newspaper editor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rebekah Wade (born May 27, 1968 in Cheshire, England) is a British journalist and newspaper editor. ...

Scottish edition

There is also a Scottish edition of The Sun launched in 1987, known as The Scottish Sun. Based in Glasgow, the paper sells for just 15p in Scotland and has now overtaken its Scottish tabloid rival Daily Record[citation needed]. The Scottish Sun is often referred to as "a downmarket, English-based tabloid" by the Record. It duplicates much of the content of the English edition but with additional coverage of Scottish news and sport. In the early 1990s, the Scottish edition became notable as the first major newspaper to declare support for the pro-independence Scottish National Party. At the time the paper elsewhere continued to support the Conservatives, who were then becoming an increasingly marginalised force in Scotland. This stance, however, became somewhat problematic following The Sun's adoption of support for Labour elsewhere in the UK, given that the SNP were seen as Labour's main challengers and fiercest rivals in Scotland. The Scottish edition was forced to employ some convoluted logic to justify its eventual withdrawal of support for the SNP in favour of pro-union Labour. Daily Record building at Central Quay, Glasgow The Daily Record is a combination of a comic for the mentally sub-normal and substitute tiolet paper, based in Glasgow. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ...


However, the Scottish Sun had done a major U-turn, by the time of the Scottish Parliament election, 2007, in which its front page featured a hangman's noose in the shape of an SNP logo. "Vote SNP today and you put Scotland's head in the noose" [3] This drew heavy criticism, even from those who opposed the SNP. The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ...


Related newspapers

Other newspapers published by other companies within the UK with "tabloid values" are the Daily Express, the Daily Mail, the Daily Mirror, the Daily Star, and the Daily Sport. Of these, only the Mirror supports the Labour Party. The others are Conservative, although The Sun has supported New Labour from 1996. See List of newspapers in the United Kingdom for a comparison of The Sun with other newspapers. For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Daily Sport is a tabloid newspaper published in the United Kingdom by Sport Newspapers. ... The Labour Party is an Anti-English political party in the United Kingdom. ... // Traditionally newspapers could be split into quality, serious-minded newspapers (usually referred to as broadsheets due to their large size) and tabloid, less serious newspapers. ...


Note: the sister Sunday paper of The Sun (also published by News Group Newspapers) is the News of the World – the Sunday Sun is an unrelated tabloid newspaper, published in Newcastle upon Tyne. The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... The Sunday Sun is a regional Sunday Newspaper. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ...


In the Republic of Ireland, an Irish edition of The Sun, known as The Irish Sun, is published. This contains much of the same content as the main UK edition, but with some Irish news and editorial content, as well as advertising. It tends to replace articles that would be seen as anti-Irish with ones more palatable to their readership there. One notable example is how the release of the film The Wind That Shakes the Barley was covered, with the UK editions describing it as "designed to drag the reputation of our nation through the mud" and "the most pro-IRA ever",[18] whereas the Irish edition described it as giving "the Brits a tanning".[19] It uses a slightly bigger sheet size than the UK version, and costs €0.90. The Wind That Shakes The Barley is a Palme dOr-winning 2006 film set during the Irish War of Independence (1919–21) and the subsequent Irish Civil War (1922–3). ...


The first newspaper to carry the Sun masthead was published in 1792 by the Pitt government to counter the pro-revolutionary press at that time.


The Toronto Sun in Canada modelled itself on the newspaper, including a sunshine girl (who has never been topless). The "Sun" masthead has since spread to many other cities in Canada. The Toronto Sun is an English language daily newspaper published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


The Sun has also been adopted in Nigeria as "The Sun" or the "Daily Sun", With the page-3 girl dubbed "The Sun Girl". The Nigerian counterpart shares the same iconic red and white masthead with the British paper.


References

  1. ^ "The Sun facts & figures", Newspaper Marketing Agency. 
  2. ^ Greenslade, Ch. 9
  3. ^ Chippindale and Horrie, Ch 1.
  4. ^ Chippindale and Horrie Ch. 1
  5. ^ Chippindale and Horrie, Ch 1
  6. ^ Greenslade Ch. 9
  7. ^ Chippindale and Horrie
  8. ^ "Cockney rhyming slang dictionary", cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk. 
  9. ^ Masters, Dave. "Send us web's sickest sites", The Sun, 10-1-2007. 
  10. ^ Medic, Nick. "How I took on The Sun - and lost", 15-7-2004. 
  11. ^ Chippindale and Horrie
  12. ^ "No apology for Hillsborough story", BBC, 2007-01-12. Retrieved on 2007-02-23. 
  13. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/newsnight/4973880.stm#hamster
  14. ^ Persaud, Raj. "Knocking Bruno when he is down", British Medical Journal, 4-10-2003. 
  15. ^ Morgan, Piers. "'No stereotypes were harmed in the making of this film'", The Daily Telegraph, 17-09-2005. 
  16. ^ Kavanagh, Trevor. "Terror bill defeat", The Sun. 
  17. ^ Coward, Ros. "'They have given me someone else's voice - Blair's voice'", The Guardian, 10-11-2005. 
  18. ^ Hall, Mick. "Ken Loach hits back at English tabloids", Indymedia Ireland, 1-6-2006. 
  19. ^ Greenslade, Roy. "A classic example of newspaper spin", The Guardian. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Medical Journal (BMJ) is a medical journal published weekly in the United Kingdom by the British Medical Association (BMA)which published its first issue in 1845. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The Independent Media Center (aka Indymedia or IMC) is a global network of participatory journalists that reports with a generally left-wing perspective on political and social issues. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...

Further Reading

Stick It Up Your Punter! The rise and fall of The Sun, Peter Chippindale & Chris Horrie, Heinemann 1990.


Press Gang, Roy Greenslade, Macmillan, 2003.


See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ... Hold Ye Front Page was a best-selling history book published by The Sun newspaper in 1999 to commemorate the Millennium. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Premier is a daily online 3d webcomic revolving around the lives of an english premiership football team called Red Park City. ... Striker is a comic strip (and for a time, it was a magazine) in the British tabloid The Sun, created by Pete Nash. ... Freddie Starr as seen on the cover of his 2001 autobiography Unwrapped. ...

External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m