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Encyclopedia > The Sting
The Sting

The Sting movie poster
Directed by George Roy Hill
Produced by Tony Bill
Michael Phillips
Julia Phillips
Written by David S. Ward
Starring Paul Newman
Robert Redford
Robert Shaw
Charles Durning
Music by Marvin Hamlisch
Cinematography Robert Surtees
Editing by William Reynolds
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) December 25, 1973
Running time 129 min.
Language English
IMDb profile
This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. For other uses, see Sting (disambiguation). For the Futurama episode, see The Sting (Futurama).

The Sting is an Oscar winning caper film from 1973 set in September of 1936 and revolving around a complicated plot by two professional grifters (Paul Newman and Robert Redford) to con a mob boss (Robert Shaw). The story, created by screenwriter David S. Ward, was inspired by some real-life con games perpetrated by the brothers Fred and Charley Gondorf and documented by David W. Maurer in his book The Big Con: The Story of the Confidence Man. The movie was directed by George Roy Hill, who also directed Newman and Redford in the classic Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The title phrase refers to the moment when a con artist finishes the "play" and takes the mark's money. (Today the name is mostly used in the context of law enforcement sting operations.) If the con game is successful, the mark does not realize he has been "taken" (cheated), at least not until the con men are long gone. This is a DVD cover. ... George Roy Hill (December 20, 1922 – December 27, 2002) was an American film director. ... Tony Bill (born 23 August 1940, San Diego, California) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... Michael Phillips is a prominent Canadian psychiatrist known for his work in mental illness and suicide prevention. ... Julia Phillips (April 7, 1944 – January 1, 2002) was an Academy Award-winning film producer and author. ... David S. Ward (born 25 October 1945) is an American film director and award winning screen writer. ... Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Cannes Award, and Emmy Award-winning American actor and film director. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Robert Shaw as Quint in Jaws. ... Charles Durning Charles Durning (born February 28, 1923 in Highland Falls, New York) is an American actor of stage and screen, born to an impoverished Irish American Catholic family, which he left as soon as possible to ease the financial pressure on his mother. ... Marvin Hamlisch (born June 2, 1944) is an American composer. ... Robert Surtees (Aug 9, 1906 - Jan 5, 1985) was an American cinematographer who won Academy Awards three times, for the films King Solomons Mines, The Bad and the Beautiful and Ben Hur. ... William H. Reynolds (1910 - 1997) was an American Academy Award-winning film editor. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Sting may refer to: Look up sting in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Sting is episode twelve in season four of Futurama. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... A big caper movie or a heist film is a movie that has an intricate plot woven around a group of people trying to steal something. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Grifter redirects here. ... Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Cannes Award, and Emmy Award-winning American actor and film director. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Grifter redirects here. ... Robert Shaw as Quint in Jaws. ... David S. Ward (born 25 October 1945) is an American film director and award winning screen writer. ... George Roy Hill (December 20, 1922 – December 27, 2002) was an American film director. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ... The victim of a confidence game or magic trick is often called the mark, or the vic. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The movie is divided into distinct sections with old-fashioned title cards that resembled illustrations from the Saturday Evening Post. It was noted for its musical score - particularly its theme song, "The Entertainer," a piano rag by Scott Joplin, which was lightly adapted for the movie by Marvin Hamlisch. There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ... The Entertainer is a 1902 piano rag written by Scott Joplin and published by John Stark & Son. ... Look up ragtime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Scott Joplin Scott Joplin (born between June 1867 – January 1868[1]; died April 1, 1917) was an American musician and composer of ragtime music. ... Marvin Hamlisch (born June 2, 1944) is an American composer. ...


The film was a major box office success in 1973, taking in more than US$160 million. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... // Events The Marx Brothers Zeppo Marx divorces his second wife, Barbara Blakely. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...


A less-successful sequel with different players, The Sting II, appeared in 1983. In the same year a prequel was also planned, exploring the earlier career of Henry Gondorff. Infamous confidence man Soapy Smith was scripted to be Gondorff's mentor. When the sequel failed, the prequel was scrapped. Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Jefferson Randolph (Soapy) Smith II (1860-July 8, 1898) was an American con artist and gangster who had a major hand in the organized criminal operations of Denver, Colorado, Creede, Colorado, and Skagway, Alaska from 1879 to 1898. ...


A deluxe DVD, The Sting: Special Edition (part of the Universal Legacy Series) was released in September, 2005, including a "making of" featurette and interviews with the cast and crew. Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Plot

The movie's protagonist is Johnny Hooker (Redford), a small-time con man (also known in the movie as a "grifter") from Depression-era Joliet, Illinois. Hooker and his accomplices Luther Coleman (Robert Earl Jones) and Joe Erie (Jack Kehoe) manage to swipe $11,000 in cash from an unsuspecting victim or "mark". In the wake of this apparent success, Luther tells Johnny that he is retiring from his life of crime and moving to Kansas City, Missouri to work in a "mostly legal" business with his brother-in-law. He advises Hooker to seek out an old friend, Henry Gondorff, in Chicago, who will be able to teach him the art of the 'big con'. Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Incorporated City in 1834. ... Robert Earl Jones (February 3, 1910 - September 7, 2006) was an American actor and the father of actor James Earl Jones. ... Jack Kehoe is an American film actor who has appeared in a number of noteworthy films, including the 1973 classics The Sting and Serpico, as well as the 1976 comedy Car Wash. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...


Unfortunately for the three con artists, the man they robbed was a numbers racket courier, transporting the money to Chicago for crime boss Doyle Lonnegan (Robert Shaw). Corrupt Joliet police Lieutenant William Snyder (Charles Durning) confronts Hooker, demanding a cut of the $11,000 and revealing Lonnegan's involvement. Realizing that he and his partners are in danger, Hooker pays Snyder in counterfeit bills, having already squandered all of the money. Hooker goes to warn Coleman, but he arrives too late to save him from Lonnegan's hit man. With nowhere else to turn, Hooker approaches Gondorff for help in avenging Coleman's murder. The Numbers Game is a lottery game where the bettor attempts to pick three or four numbers from zero to nine that will be randomly drawn. ... Robert Shaw as Quint in Jaws. ... Charles Durning Charles Durning (born February 28, 1923 in Highland Falls, New York) is an American actor of stage and screen, born to an impoverished Irish American Catholic family, which he left as soon as possible to ease the financial pressure on his mother. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man) is a hired assassin, often by organized crime. ...


The set-up

Gondorff (Paul Newman) is a seemingly broken-down con artist on the run from the FBI, living in the back of an amusement park that doubles as a tavern and brothel. He is initially reluctant to take on Lonnegan because "revenge is for chumps", and also because the New York gangster/banker has a reputation for ruthlessly killing his enemies. Gondorff nevertheless agrees to help Hooker run a sting on Lonnegan. Since Lonnegan is a shrewd man of few vices, and not to be taken in by a simple confidence scheme, Henry and Johnny will concoct an elaborate plan involving placing Hooker as the inside man in an off-track betting scam known as "The Wire." Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Cannes Award, and Emmy Award-winning American actor and film director. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... A brothel, also known as a bordello or whorehouse, is an establishment specifically dedicated to prostitution, providing the prostitutes a place to meet and to have sex with the clients. ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ... A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short, (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ...


The hook

First, Gondorff's lover and partner in crime, Billie (Eileen Brennan), picks Lonnegan's wallet aboard the famous 20th Century Limited train en route from New York to Chicago. Gondorff, posing as drunk, boorish Chicago bookie, "Shaw," then buys his way into Lonnegan's private high-stakes poker game on the train with the latter's own money. He bursts into the game late, feigning drunkenness, and proclaims to the other card players, "Sorry I'm late. I was taking a crap."[1] Gondorff, a cardsharp, wins the first few hands and, through arrogance and by deliberately mispronouncing his name, goads Lonnegan into cheating with a stacked deck to "break that bastard bookie in one play." Gondorff, having anticipated this, out-cheats a shocked Lonnegan, who loses $15,000 and, without his wallet, cannot immediately pay the debt. Eileen Brennan (born September 3, 1938 in Los Angeles, California) is an American character actress of films, television, and theatre. ... Eighteenth century engraving showing a pickpocket in action. ... The 20th Century Limited was a passenger train operated by the New York Central (NYC) railroad. ... For the domestic fireplace tool, see fireplace poker. ... The Cardsharps, c. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Redford earned an Oscar nomination for his role as Johnny Hooker.
Redford earned an Oscar nomination for his role as Johnny Hooker.

Gondorff tells Lonnegan that he will "send a boy" to his room to collect the money, who turns out to be Hooker, posing as a disgruntled employee of Shaw's, and calling himself "Kelly." Image File history File links Redford2. ... Image File history File links Redford2. ...


The tale

"Kelly" plays on Lonnegan's desire for revenge by asking for his help to break Shaw and take over his business. Johnny convinces Doyle that he has a partner in the Chicago Western Union office (portrayed at a meeting by con man "Kid Twist," played by Harold Gould), and that he can use this connection to win large sums of money in the off-track betting (OTB) establishment run by Shaw by past-posting. All of this, including the OTB establishment itself, is in reality a hoax instigated solely for Lonnegan's benefit; for example, the con men get the supposed play-by-play from a surplus tickertape wire and then have an accomplice in the back (the con man "J.J.," played by Ray Walston) read it through a microphone to make it sound as if it were live on the radio; meanwhile, Erie manages to prove his own worth as a con man, posing as a regular gambler in "Shaw's place" to help convince Lonnegan of the reality of the place. Western Union (NYSE: WU) is a financial services and communications company based in the United States. ... Harold V. Goldstein (born December 10, 1923 in Schenectady, New York) known as Harold Gould, is an American actor who has spent his career in movies and television. ... Off-track betting (or OTB) refers to sanctioned gambling on horse racing outside a race track. ... Late betting or past posting is making a bet after the time when no more bets are to be taken. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ...


In addition to luring Lonnegan into this con as Kelly, and eluding the assassins Lonnegan has sent to kill him as Hooker, Johnny must continually avoid Snyder, who has followed him to Chicago, looking for either his cut of the original $11,000 or revenge on Hooker for cheating him. Snyder's efforts are derailed when FBI agents make their presence known to him and Hooker. Snyder is brought into a warehouse serving as a front for FBI operations. Special agent Polk is discussing strategy with another agent in the foreground, heard plainly by the film audience though not necessarily by Snyder at first. Snyder observes while special agent Polk coerces Hooker into helping them capture Gondorff. Snyder is to be part of that operation also. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


Meanwhile, Hooker begins a romance with a local waitress named Loretta. Unbeknownst to Hooker, Lonnegan has grown frustrated with his own men's inability to find and kill Hooker, so he arranges for a professional killer, "Salino," to finish the job. (Not having previously met Hooker, Lonnegan is unaware that Hooker and "Kelly" are the same person). A mysterious man with black leather gloves is seen following and observing Hooker.


The sting

All the pieces of the elaborate puzzle come together on the morning of the sting that is planned to swindle Lonnegan. Various players are seen making preparations for the day. Then the action begins:‎

  • After Hooker had spent the night with Loretta, he wakes up alone and begins walking to work. He sees Loretta coming toward him, so does not see the black-gloved man behind him, lining up to fire a gun in his direction. The bullet hits Loretta and kills her instantly. It turns out that the hired killer was "Loretta Salino," who was carrying a concealed gun and was preparing to kill Hooker at that moment. The gloved man, who had been hired by Gondorff to protect Hooker, drives him to work. The reason Loretta had not killed him in her room is that the nosy old lady next door had seen Hooker go into her room.
  • After getting word from Kid Twist to "place it on" a particular horse, Lonnegan brings a briefcase containing half a million dollars to bet on the horse to win. Although "Shaw" argues that the bet is too large, Lonnegan calls him a "gutless cheat;" so Gondorff, feigning stung pride, accepts the bet.
  • Kid Twist drops by and quietly asks Lonnegan how it's going. Lonnegan informs him that he has half a million dollars on the horse to win. Kid Twist feigns shock and tells him he was supposed to bet on the horse to "place," as it was going to finish second. The angry Lonnegan goes to the window and demands his money back. The clerk begins to argue that that is against the rules.
  • Just then the FBI and Snyder burst in and order everyone to freeze. In the noise and the chaos, Polk is seen stepping up to Gondorff and saying, "Hello, Henry, it's been a long time!"
  • Polk gestures to Hooker and says, "You can go," revealing to all that he had betrayed Gondorff to the FBI. Hooker starts to walk toward the door but Gondorff pulls a gun and shoots him in the back. Polk then shoots Gondorff. Polk orders Snyder to get Lonnegan out of there. Lonnegan realizes that, for his reputation's sake, he cannot allow himself to be involved in this incident; but he is torn, because he has left half a million dollars inside, as he tries to explain to Snyder while the detective whisks him away.
  • With Lonnegan and Snyder safely away, Polk leans over Hooker's body and says, "He's gone!" Hooker opens his eyes and gets up, as does Gondorff, to the cheers and laughter of the rest of the group. Not only have Lonnegan and Snyder been stung, so has the film audience. Gondorff expresses as much as "Polk" helps him up: "Nice con, Hickey. I thought you were Feds myself, when you first came in." Hooker and Gondorff then proceed to nonchalantly walk out of the alley way, as the rest of the players and members of the Sting strip the room of its contents before Snyder, and/or Lonnegan and his men come back to retrieve the money.

Cast

Paul Newman as Henry Gondorff.
Paul Newman as Henry Gondorff.

Image File history File links PaulNewmanTheSting. ... Image File history File links PaulNewmanTheSting. ... Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Cannes Award, and Emmy Award-winning American actor and film director. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Robert Shaw as Quint in Jaws. ... Charles Durning Charles Durning (born February 28, 1923 in Highland Falls, New York) is an American actor of stage and screen, born to an impoverished Irish American Catholic family, which he left as soon as possible to ease the financial pressure on his mother. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Eileen Brennan (born September 3, 1938 in Los Angeles, California) is an American character actress of films, television, and theatre. ... Harold V. Goldstein (born December 10, 1923 in Schenectady, New York) known as Harold Gould, is an American actor who has spent his career in movies and television. ... Dana Elcar Dana Elcar (October 10, 1927–June 6, 2005) was an American television and movie character actor. ... Larry D. Mann (b. ... For Sally Kirkland the Vogue & Life editor, see, see Sally Kirkland (editor). ... Jack Kehoe is an American film actor who has appeared in a number of noteworthy films, including the 1973 classics The Sting and Serpico, as well as the 1976 comedy Car Wash. ... Robert Earl Jones (February 3, 1910 - September 7, 2006) was an American actor and the father of actor James Earl Jones. ... Charles Dierkop (born September 11, 1936) is a film and television actor. ... Leonard Barr (September 27, 1903 - November 22, 1980) was an old-style, one-liner standup comic in the tradition of Henny Youngman. ... Jack Collins is a stage, film, and television actor. ...

Awards

Wins

The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... George Roy Hill (December 20, 1922 – December 27, 2002) was an American film director. ... Director Guild of America building on Sunset Boulevard. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... David S. Ward (born 25 October 1945) is an American film director and award winning screen writer. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Lloyd Henry Bumstead (March 17, 1915 – May 24, 2006) was an American cinematic art director and production designer. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... Edith Head on the cover of the book The Life and Times of Edith Head by David Chierichetti Edith Head (October 28, 1897 – October 24, 1981) was an American costume designer who had a long career in Hollywood that garnered her more Academy Awards than any other woman in history. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... William H. Reynolds (1910 - 1997) was an American Academy Award-winning film editor. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Marvin Hamlisch (born June 2, 1944) is an American composer. ...

Nominations

The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... Robert Surtees (Aug 9, 1906 - Jan 5, 1985) was an American cinematographer who won Academy Awards three times, for the films King Solomons Mines, The Bad and the Beautiful and Ben Hur. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... David S. Ward (born 25 October 1945) is an American film director and award winning screen writer. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ...

Music

The soundtrack album contained the following selections, most of which are Scott Joplin ragtime pieces. There are some variances from the actual film soundtrack, as noted. Joplin's ragtime music was no longer popular during the 1930s, although its use in The Sting evokes a definitive 1930s gangster movie, The Public Enemy, which also featured Scott Joplin theme music. The two Jazz Age style tunes written by Hamlisch are chronologically much closer to the film's time period than are the Joplin rags: This article is about the 1931 film. ... The Jazz Age, describes the period from 1918-1929, the years between the end of World War I and the start of the Great Depression, particularly in North America and (in the eras literature) specifically in Miami, largely coinciding with the Roaring Twenties; ending with the rise of the...

  1. "Solace" (Joplin) - orchestral version
  2. "The Entertainer" (Joplin) - orchestral version
  3. "The Easy Winners" (Joplin)
  4. "Hooker's Hooker" (Hamlisch)
  5. "Luther" - same basic tune as "Solace", re-arranged by Hamlisch as a dirge
  6. "Pine Apple Rag" / "Gladiolus Rag" medley (Joplin)
  7. "The Entertainer" (Joplin) - piano version
  8. "The Glove" (Hamlisch) - a Jazz Age style number; only a short segment was used in the film
  9. "Little Girl" (Hamlisch) - another Jazz Age style number; not used in the film
  10. "Pine Apple Rag" (Joplin)
  11. "Merry-Go-Round Music" medley (traditional) - "Listen to the Mocking Bird" was the only portion actually used in the film, along with the second segment of "King Cotton", a Sousa march, which was not on the album
  12. "Solace" (Joplin) - piano version
  13. "The Entertainer" / "The Ragtime Dance" medley (Joplin)

The album sequence differs from the film sequence, a standard practice with vinyl LPs, often for technical reasons having to do with the varying rotational speed of the disk and/or for perceived aesthetic reasons. Some additional content differences: The Entertainer is a 1902 piano rag written by Scott Joplin and published by John Stark & Son. ... Look up Dirge in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Portrait of John Philip Sousa taken in 1900 John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor known particularly for American military marches. ...

  • Selected snippets of Joplin's works, some appearing on the album and some not, provided linking music over the title cards that were used to introduce major scenes. (The final card, "The Sting", introducing the film's dramatic conclusion, had no music at all.)
  • Some of the tunes in the film that appear on the album were different takes than those on the album.
  • The most obvious Joplin tune used in the film but not appearing in the soundtrack album was "Cascades". The middle (fast) portion of it was played when Hooker was running away from Snyder along the 'L' train platform.

The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ...

Other production information

  • Plans were made for a prequel to The Sting. The film was to be based on the early days of Henry Gondorff (Paul Newman). His mentor was to be the infamous 19th century confidence man Soapy Smith, known as "the king of the frontier con men." Plans were scrapped after the failure of the sequel, starring Jackie Gleason.
  • Harold Gould's character, "Kid Twist," shared that nickname with (though apparently not the profession of) at least two different mob hit men, Max Zwerbach and Abe Reles.
  • At the beginning of the film, the Universal Pictures logo from 1936 (the glass Art Deco globe with the words "A UNIVERSAL PICTURE") is used instead of the contemporary version to establish the film's time setting.
  • In 1974 The Big Con author David Maurer filed a $10 million dollar lawsuit claiming at least part of the film's story had been taken from his book. The matter was resolved out of court in 1976.

Jefferson Randolph (Soapy) Smith II (1860-July 8, 1898) was an American con artist and gangster who had a major hand in the organized criminal operations of Denver, Colorado, Creede, Colorado, and Skagway, Alaska from 1879 to 1898. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... Max Kid Twist Zwerbach (?-1908) was a gangster in the around the turn of the century who belonged to the Eastman Gang. ... Abe Kid Twist Reles (1906 – 12 November 1941) was an American mobster who was probably the most feared hitman in the stable of Murder, Inc. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Sting
  • The Sting at the Internet Movie Database
  • Early draft of the screenplay at awesome film.com
  • Screen Captures of the Film

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

References

  1. ^ IMDb quotes from The Sting Retrieved March 20, 2007.
Awards
Preceded by
The Godfather
Academy Award for Best Picture
1973
Succeeded by
The Godfather Part II

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