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Encyclopedia > The Spectator
Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine.

The Spectator is a British magazine founded in 1828 and published weekly. It is currently owned by the Barclay brothers, who also own The Daily Telegraph. Its principal subject area is politics, about which it generally takes a robustly conservative editorial line, although regular contributors such as Rod Liddle write from the Left. The magazine also has extensive arts pages on books, music, opera, and film and TV reviews. Image File history File links The_Spect. ... Image File history File links The_Spect. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sir David and Sir Frederick Barclay (both born 27 October 1934) are British businessmen. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Rod Liddle (born 1960) is a controversial British journalist best known for his term as editor of BBC Radio 4s Today programme. ...


Editorship of The Spectator has often been a route to high office in the British Conservative Party; past editors include Iain Macleod, Ian Gilmour and Nigel Lawson, all of whom became cabinet ministers. Editorship can also be a springboard for a greater role in public affairs, as with Boris Johnson (1999 to 2005) who is now a public figure in Britain and the Conservative candidate for the 2008 London mayoral election. The new logo of the Conservative Party The Conservative Party is the largest centre right political party in the United Kingdom. ... Iain Norman Macleod, PC (11 November 1913 – 20 July 1970) was a British Conservative Party politician and government minister. ... The Right Honourable Sir Ian Hedworth John Little Gilmour, 3rd Bt. ... Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson of Blaby, PC (born March 11, 1932), was a British politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer between June 1983 and October 1989. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson(born 19 June 1964, New York City)[2] is a British Conservative Party politician, journalist and former editor of The Spectator. ...

Contents

Policy positions

From its founding in 1828 The Spectator has taken a pro-British line in foreign affairs; such was the case in 1904 when it raised concerns about the anti-British and Pan-Asian attitudes prevalent amongst Indian students in Japan. Pan-Asianism is an ideology that Asian countries and peoples share similar values and similar histories and should be united politically or culturally. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ...


Like its sister publication The Daily Telegraph, The Spectator is generally Atlanticist and Eurosceptic in outlook, favouring close ties with the United States rather than with the European Union, and it is usually supportive of Israel. However, it has expressed strong doubts about the Iraq war, and some of its contributors, such as Matthew Parris and Stuart Reid, express a more Americosceptic, old-school conservative line. Other contributors such as Irwin Stelzer argue from an American-style neoconservative position. Like much of the British press it is critical of the unilateral extradition treaty that has condemned the Natwest three to extradition without a prima facie case, and the magazine recently devoted a leading article to lambasting the US Senate[1] Atlanticism is a philosophy of cooperation among European and North American nations regarding political, economic, and defense issues. ... Euroscepticism (a portmanteau of European and scepticism) has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Matthew Parris (born August 7, 1949 in Johannesburg) is a journalist and former Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... Irwin M. Stelzer (born 1932) is an American economist. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... The NatWest Three, also known as the Enron Three, are three United Kingdom businessmen—Giles Darby, David Bermingham and Gary Mulgrew—who were extradited to the United States on July 13, 2006 on charges relating[1] to a transaction with Enron Corporation in 2000 when they were working for the... Look up prima facie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...


Cultural positions

The Spectator is one of the few British publications that still ignores or dismisses most popular culture, in the way that (for example) The Daily Telegraph did under W.F. Deedes, or The Times did under William Haley. The magazine coined the phrase "young fogey" in 1984 (in an article by Alan Watkins). "Culture" for The Spectator tends towards gallery openings, new opera productions and the like. Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... William Francis Deedes, Baron Deedes, PC (Bill Deedes, born Kent, England, June 1, 1913), is a veteran British journalist and ex-politician. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Sir William Haley (1901-1987) was Director-General of the BBC from 1944 to 1952, succeeding Robert W. Foot and giving way to Sir Ian Jacob. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with old fogey. ... British journalist Alan Watkins is a columnist who writes on politics and rugby. ...


Contributors

Although there is a permanent staff of writers, The Spectator has always had room for a wide array of contributors. These have included Auberon Waugh, Jeffrey Bernard (the "Low Life" column) and Taki (the "High Life" column). Following Bernard's death, the "Low Life" column is now written by Jeremy Clarke. Joan Collins contributes regularly as Guest Diarist, as does Barry Humphries. The book reviews are often 'outsourced' to outsiders who are experts in the given subject, so consequently it is rare to see the same review author twice in as many weeks. The restaurant section is also an irregular piece. Auberon Alexander Waugh (November 17, 1939 – January 16, 2001) was a British author and journalist. ... Jeffrey Bernard (May 27, 1932 - September 4, 1997) was a British journalist, notorious for a feckless and chaotic career and life of alcohol abuse. ... Taki Theodoracopulos (born August 11, 1937), better known as Taki, is a Greek born conservative journalist and writer, living in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Joan Henrietta Collins OBE (born May 23, 1933) is a Golden Globe Award winning English actress and bestselling author. ... John Barry Humphries, AO, CBE (born 17 February 1934 in Camberwell, Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian comedian, satirist and character actor best known for his on-stage and television alter egos Dame Edna Everage, a Melbourne housewife, and Sir Les Patterson, Australias foul-mouthed cultural attaché to Britain. ...


Recent times

The magazine has prospered in recent times. Under former editor Boris Johnson and his appealing Wodehousian aura clumsy public relations did no harm. He resigned in December 2005, on taking up an appointment as Shadow Minister for Higher Education. Johnson's final months as editor were marred by the negative reaction to an editorial written by Simon Heffer criticising the people of Liverpool for engaging in vicarious victimhood following the death of Kenneth Bigley. Johnson made a personal apology. Recent articles have resumed the theme in commenting on public declarations of grief following the Murder of Rhys Jones. Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson(born 19 June 1964, New York City)[2] is a British Conservative Party politician, journalist and former editor of The Spectator. ... P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse KBE (October 15, 1881 – February 14, 1975) (pronounced WOOD-house) was an English comic writer who enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ... The frontbench of Her Majestys Loyal Opposition consists of the Shadow Cabinet and other official spokesmen of the political party currently serving as the Official Opposition. ... Simon James Heffer (born July 18, 1960) is an English journalist and writer. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Kenneth Bigley and his wife Sombat at their wedding in 1998. ... This article is about the schoolboy murdered in Liverpool. ...


The circulation was not at all hindered by the notoriety the magazine achieved after revelations about Johnson's affair with one of his columnists Petronella Wyatt, the extramarital adventures of its publisher Kimberly Quinn and affair of the associate editor Rod Liddle. The nickname The Sextator has gained some currency. Petronella Wyatt (born 1969, London) is a British journalist and author. ... Kimberly Quinn (born 1961 as Kimberly Solomon, also formerly known as Kimberly Fortier) is an American journalist, commentator, and magazine publisher. ... Rod Liddle (born 1960) is a controversial British journalist best known for his term as editor of BBC Radio 4s Today programme. ...


Treatment in Other UK Press

In Private Eye, the magazine is usually referred to either as The Spectacularlyboring or as The Hasbeano (with Boris Johnson, while he was editor, referred to as "Boris the Menace" and with other parodic cartoon strips portraying people associated with The Spectator as characters in The Beano). Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson(born 19 June 1964, New York City)[2] is a British Conservative Party politician, journalist and former editor of The Spectator. ... This March 2007 does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Editors

Robert Stephen Rintoul (1787-1858), British journalist, was born at Tibbermore, Perthshire, in 1787, and educated at the Aberdalgie parish school. ... Richard Holt Hutton (June 2, 1826 – September 9, 1897) was an English writer and theologian. ... John St Loe Strachey (9 February 1860-1927), was a British journalist and newspaper proprietor. ... Evelyn Wrench was editor of The Spectator between 1925 and 1932. ... Wilson Harris (Born March 4, 1921) is a Guyanese writer. ... Walter Taplin was editor of The Spectator between 1953 and 1954. ... The Right Honourable Sir Ian Hedworth John Little Gilmour, 3rd Bt. ... Brian Inglis (31 July 1916-11 February 1993) was a British journalist, historian and television presenter. ... Iain Hamilton was the editor of The Spectator between 1962 and 1963. ... Iain Norman Macleod, PC (11 November 1913 – 20 July 1970) was a British Conservative Party politician and government minister. ... Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson of Blaby, PC (born March 11, 1932), was a British politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer between June 1983 and October 1989. ... George Gale (died in 1990, aged 63) was editor of the British political magazine The Spectator from 1970 to 1973. ... Harold Creighton was a British journalist, editor of the political magazine The Spectator from 1973 to 1975. ... Alexander Chancellor is a British journalist. ... Charles Moore (born October 31, 1956) is a former editor of the Daily Telegraph (1995-2003). ... Dominic Ralph Campden Lawson (born December 17, 1956) is a British journalist. ... Frank Johnson is a British journalist. ... Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson(born 19 June 1964, New York City)[2] is a British Conservative Party politician, journalist and former editor of The Spectator. ... Matthew dAncona (born 1968) is a British journalist. ...

References

  1. ^ The Spectator, 8th July 2006

The Spectator is also the name of the Mississippi University for Women campus newspaper. The MUW Spectator has been in print for over 125 years. The 2007 editorial staff includes: Casey K. Parkman- Editor, Briana LoChiatto- Managing Editor, Sarah A. Wilson- News Editor, and Sam Bartell- Lifestyles Editor.


External links

  • The Spectator official site

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Spectator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (678 words)
The Spectator is a British magazine, established in 1828 and published weekly.
The Spectator has always been nationalistic throughout its lifetime (1828-present), notably in 1904 when it raised concerns about the anti-British and Pan-Asian attitudes prevalent amongst Indian students in Japan.
Like its sister publication The Daily Telegraph, The Spectator is Atlanticist in outlook, favouring close ties with the United States rather than with the European Union, and it is usually supportive of Israel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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