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Encyclopedia > The Sound of Music (film)
The Sound of Music

Original movie poster
Directed by Robert Wise
Produced by Robert Wise
Written by Howard Lindsay (book)
Russel Crouse (book)
Ernest Lehman
Maria von Trapp (autobiography)
Starring Julie Andrews
Christopher Plummer
Richard Haydn
Peggy Wood
Anna Lee
Portia Nelson
Ben Wright
Eleanor Parker
Music by Richard Rodgers with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and Richard Rodgers (new songs for film)
Cinematography Ted D. McCord, ASC
Editing by William H. Reynolds
Distributed by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Release date(s) March 2, 1965
Running time 174 minutes
Language English
Budget $8,200,000 (estimated)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile
Ratings
Argentina:  Atp
Australia:  G
Canada (Ontario):  F
Canada (Manitoba):  G
Canada (Maritime):  G
Canada (Quebec):  G
Canada (Home Video)):  G
Chile:  TE
Finland:  S
Germany:  6
Iceland:  L
Ireland:  G
Malaysia:  U
Norway:  7 (original) A (DVD)
Peru:  PT
Singapore:  G
South Korea:  All
Spain:  T
Sweden:  11 (original) Btl (re-release)
United Kingdom:  U
United States:  G

Rodgers and Hammerstein's The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. The film is based on the Broadway musical The Sound of Music, with songs written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, and with the musical book written by the writing team of Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. Ernest Lehman wrote the screenplay. Image File history File links Sound_of_music. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Howard Lindsay (March 29, 1888 - February 11, 1968) was a Broadway producer, playwright, librettist, director and actor, best known for his writing work as part of the collaboration of Lindsay and Crouse, and for his performance, with his wife Dorothy Stickney, in the long-running play Life with Father. ... Russel Crouse (1893 - 1966) was a U.S. dramatist and journalist. ... Ernest Lehman (born December 8, 1915 in New York City - died July 2, 2005 in Los Angeles, California) was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood. ... Maria Augusta von Trapp (née Kutschera; January 26, 1905 – March 28, 1987) was the matriarch of the Trapp Family Singers. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Richard Haydn (1905-1985) was a comic actor in radio, movies and TV. He was known for playing eccentric characters, emphasized by a deliberate over-nasalized and over-enunciated speech pattern. ... Peggy Wood (February 9, 1892 - March 18, 1978) was an American actress of film and television. ... Anna Lee MBE (January 2, 1913 – May 14, 2004) was an English actress. ... Ben Wright (May 5, 1915 – July 9, 1989) was a British actor in radio, film, and television. ... Eleanor Jean Parker (born June 26, 1922) is an American film and television actress. ... This article is about the American composer. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... This article is about the American composer. ... William H. Reynolds (1910 - 1997) was an American Academy Award-winning film editor. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... -1... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A motion picture rating system categorizes films with regard to suitability for audiences in terms of issues such as sex, violence, substance abuse, profanity, impudence or other types of mature content. ... The Ontario Film Review Board uses the following motion picture rating system for theatrical releases in the Canadian province of Ontario under the Theatres Act: General. ... The Manitoba Film Classification Board is part of the Ministry of Culture, Heritage and Tourism of the government of the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Maritime Film Classification Board is a government organization responsible for reviewing films and granting film ratings in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. ... The Régie du cinéma is a government agency responsible for the motion picture rating system within the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Canadian Home Video Rating System (CHVRS) is a voluntary rating classification system applied to home video products such as VHS and DVDs. ... A motion picture rating system categorizes films with regard to suitability for audiences in terms of issues such as sex, violence, substance abuse, profanity, impudence or other types of mature content. ... British Board of Film Classification logo The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), originally British Board of Film Censors, is the organisation responsible for film and some video game classification and censorship within the United Kingdom. ... The Motion Picture Association of Americas film-rating system is used in the U.S and its territories to rate a films thematic and content suitability for certain audiences. ... Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... This article is about the American composer. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Howard Lindsay (March 29, 1888 - February 11, 1968) was a Broadway producer, playwright, librettist, director and actor, best known for his writing work as part of the collaboration of Lindsay and Crouse, and for his performance, with his wife Dorothy Stickney, in the long-running play Life with Father. ... Russel Crouse (1893 - 1966) was a U.S. dramatist and journalist. ... Ernest Lehman (born December 8, 1915 in New York City - died July 2, 2005 in Los Angeles, California) was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood. ...


The musical originated with the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. It contains many popular songs, including "Edelweiss", "My Favorite Things", "Climb Ev'ry Mountain", "Do-Re-Mi", "Sixteen Going on Seventeen" and "The Lonely Goatherd", as well as the title song. The Story of the Trapp Family Singers is a memoir written by Maria Augusta von Trapp, the nun-turned-baroness whose life was set to music in the musical The Sound of Music. ... Maria Augusta von Trapp (née Kutschera; January 26, 1905 – March 28, 1987) was the matriarch of the Trapp Family Singers. ... Edelweiss is a Rodgers and Hammerstein song from musical and film The Sound of Music. ... The Sound of Music soundtrack cover My Favorite Things is a song from the musical The Sound of Music. ... Climb evry mountain Search high and low Follow evry by-way Every path you know Climb evry mountain Ford evry stream Follow evry rainbow Till you find your dream A dream that will need All the love you can give Everyday of your life For... Do Re Mi is a theater musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and book by Garson Kanin. ... Sixteen Going on Seventeen, not to be confused with Sixteen Goin On Seventeen, sung by Maria and Liesl in the Sound of Music, is a love song sung in the musical the Sound of Music. ... The Lonely Goatherd is a song from the musical The Sound Of Music, sung by Julie Andrews, (playing Maria von Trapp), and the von Trapp children. ... The Sound of Music is the class song from the movie under the same title. ...


The movie version was filmed on location in Salzburg, Austria and Bavaria in Southern Germany, and also at the 20th Century Fox Studios in California. It was photographed in 70 mm Todd-AO by Ted D. McCord. It won the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1965 and is one of the most popular musicals ever produced. The cast album was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album of the Year. The United States Library of Congress also selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry in 2001. This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Southern Germany is the term used to desribe the southern states of Germany: namely Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Todd-AO was a widescreen film format developed in the mid 1950s. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... The Grammy Award for Album of the Year is the most prestigious award category. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...

Contents

Plot synopsis

In Salzburg, Austria, Maria, played by Andrews, is studying to become a nun but is not sure if convent life is right for her. She is sent from her abbey to be the governess to seven children of a widower naval commander, Captain Georg Ritter von Trapp. Maria and the Captain immediately disagree on the way the children are treated; the Captain has been raising them according to the principles of military discipline, while Maria wants them to enjoy life as children while they can. The children range in age from sixteen to five: Liesl (16), Friedrich (14), Louisa (13), Kurt (11), Brigitta (10), Marta (7), and Gretl (5). For other uses, see Nun (disambiguation). ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... A governess is a female employee from outside of the family who teaches children within the family circle. ... Naval redirects here. ...


The children, mischievous and initially hostile to Maria, eventually come to love her when she introduces them to the pleasures of music and singing. Once the Captain discovers this, he feels very remorseful for his rigidity. He apologizes to Maria for being so strict with the children, asks her to stay for a while, and seeks to enjoy living himself. One of the Captain's friends, Max Dettweiler, tries to convince the Captain to let the children perform in his concert. Maria finds herself falling in love with the captain, who is engaged to Elsa, a very wealthy baroness. The Baroness becomes jealous of Maria and convinces her to leave during a grand party at the house. For other uses, see Baron (disambiguation). ...


Although the Captain announces his intention to marry the Baroness Elsa, she does not have good rapport with the children. After a talk with the Mother Abbess, Maria decides to return to the Trapp family. Upon Maria's return, the Baroness realizes the Captain is in love with Maria and decides to leave for Vienna after the Captain himself makes it clear that he is not in love with her and that a marriage between them would not work. Afterwards, the Captain and Maria reveal their feelings for each other and finally wed.


The Nazis take power in Austria as part of the Anschluss, and try to force Captain von Trapp back into military service. The Captain, unwilling to serve the Reich, delays the matter by insisting to Zeller, the Gauleiter, or party leader for the district, that he is part of the Trapp Family Singers and must appear with them during a performance at the Salzburg Music Festival, in a guarded theater. After a curtain call, and with the help of the nuns of Maria's former convent, the whole family flees and hikes over the Alps to Switzerland. Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ... A Gauleiter was the party leader of a regional branch of the NSDAP (more commonly known as the Nazi Party) or the head of a Gau or of a Reichsgau. ... Maria Augusta von Trapp (née Kutschera; January 26, 1905–March 28, 1987) was the matriarch of the Trapp Family Singers. ... The Salzburg Festival is a prominent music festival in the Austrian town of Salzburg, the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The festival was founded in 1877 but was discontinued in 1910. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... Alp redirects here. ...


In a subplot, Liesl, the eldest, falls for a mail boy turned Nazi messenger named Rolfe; at first he comes to see Liesl every evening, but then distances himself after learning that her father has no regard for him and does not support Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. Hitler redirects here. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


Cast

Actor Role
Julie Andrews Maria von Trapp
Christopher Plummer Captain Georg Ludwig von Trapp
Peggy Wood Mother Abbess
Charmian Carr Liesl von Trapp
Richard Haydn Max Detweiler
Nicholas Hammond Friedrich von Trapp
Heather Menzies Louisa von Trapp
Duane Chase Kurt von Trapp
Angela Cartwright Brigitta von Trapp
Debbie Turner Marta von Trapp
Kym Karath Gretl von Trapp
Eleanor Parker Baroness Elsa Schraeder
Daniel Truhitte Rolf
Ben Wright Hans Zeller, Gauleiter

Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Maria Augusta von Trapp (née Kutschera; January 26, 1905 – March 28, 1987) was the matriarch of the Trapp Family Singers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... . Captain, is the name most often given in naval circles to the NATO rank code of OF-5. ... Peggy Wood (February 9, 1892 - March 18, 1978) was an American actress of film and television. ... Charmian Carr (born Charmian Farnon December 27, 1942) is best known for role as Liesl, the eldest Von Trapp daughter in The Sound of Music. ... Richard Haydn (1905-1985) was a comic actor in radio, movies and TV. He was known for playing eccentric characters, emphasized by a deliberate over-nasalized and over-enunciated speech pattern. ... Nicholas Hammond (born May 15, 1950) is an American actor. ... Heather Urich (nee Menzies), born December 3, 1949 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is a Canadian-born actress who moved to California via Florida at the age of 11. ... Duane Chase (born 12 December 1950) is an actor, best remembered as Kurt von Trapp in The Sound of Music,and being gay He played Danny Matthews in The Big Valley for one episode. ... Angela Margaret Cartwright (born September 9, 1952 in Altrincham, Cheshire, England) is an English-born American actress, primarily known for her roles in movies and television. ... Debbie Turner (born September 5, 1956 in Arcadia, California) is a former child star who played the role of Marta von Trapp in the film The Sound of Music. ... Kimberly Karath (born 4 August 1958 in Los Angeles, California, USA) is an American actress. ... Eleanor Jean Parker (born June 26, 1922) is an American film and television actress. ... Daniel Truhitte (born September 10, 1943 in California) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of Rolf in the film The Sound of Music. ... Ben Wright (May 5, 1915 – July 9, 1989) was a British actor in radio, film, and television. ...

Production

Julie Andrews as Maria, seeks guidance from the Mother Abbess, played by Peggy Wood, in this scene from the 1965 film version.
Julie Andrews as Maria, seeks guidance from the Mother Abbess, played by Peggy Wood, in this scene from the 1965 film version.

The film presents a history of the von (pronounced as 'fon') Trapp family which is not wholly accurate. still from the movie taken from http://en. ... still from the movie taken from http://en. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Peggy Wood (February 9, 1892 - March 18, 1978) was an American actress of film and television. ...


Georg Ludwig von Trapp, who was not anti-Nazi, lived with his family in a villa in a suburb of Salzburg, called Aigen. Maria and Georg had been married 10 years before the Anschluss and had two of their three children before that time. Georg had even considered a position in the Kriegsmarine but ultimately decided to emigrate.[1] German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ...


While the von Trapp family hiked over the Alps to Switzerland in the movie, in reality they walked to the local train station and boarded the next train to Italy. From Italy, they fled to London and ultimately the United States.[1] Salzburg is in fact only a few miles away from the Austrian-German border, and is much too far from either the Swiss or Italian borders for a family to escape by walking. Had the von Trapps hiked over the mountains, they would have ended up in Germany, near the Kehlsteinhaus, Hitler's mountain retreat in Berchtesgaden. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Kehlsteinhaus The Kehlsteinhaus is a chalet-style building, which used to be an extension of the Obersalzberg complex built by the Nazis in the German Alps near Berchtesgaden. ... Berchtesgaden is a town in the German Bavarian Alps. ...


Marc Breaux and Dee Dee Wood did the choreography for the film. The Ländler dance that Maria and the Captain shared was not performed in the traditional Austrian way. Marc Breaux is an American Choreographer and occaisional film director best known for his work on musical films of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Dee Dee Wood is an American Choreographer best known for her work on musical films of the 1960s and 1970s. ... The ländler is a folk dance in 3/4 time which was popular in Austria, south Germany and German Switzerland at the end of the 18th century. ...


Even though the film does not recount an entirely accurate story of the family, it was filmed at original locations in the city and county of Salzburg and Upper Austria, including Nonnberg Abbey, and St. Peter's Cemetery. Leopoldskron Palace, Frohnburg Palace, and Hellbrunn Palace were some of the locations used for the Trapp Villa in the film. The opening scene and aerial shots were filmed in Anif (Anif Palace), Mondsee, and Salzkammergut (Fuschl am See, St. Gilgen and St. Wolfgang).[2] Hohenwerfen Castle served as the main backdrop for the song "Do-Re-Mi". Upper Austria (Ober sterreich) is one of the nine federal states or Bundesl nder of Austria. ... Nonnberg Abbey is a Benedictine monastery in Salzburg, Austria. ... Schloss Leopoldskron with the fortress Hohensalzburg Racing pool of the Freibad Leopoldskron with 10m diving tower. ... Schloss Hellbrunn, Austria. ... Anif is as small village southern of Salzburg with 4. ... This article is about Mondsee, the lake. ... The Salzkammergut is a resort area east of Salzburg, Austria, spanning the federal states of Upper Austria, Salzburg, and Styria. ... Fuschl am See, view from the Schober mountain The resort destination Fuschl am See is located between Salzburg and Bad Ischl in the state of Salzburg. ... St. ... St. ... Burg Hohenwerfen is a fortress in Werfen, Salzburg, in Austria. ...


Several key members of the cast had their singing voices dubbed by others. Peggy Wood, who was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Mother Abbess, was dubbed by Margery McKay after Wood discovered she could not handle the high registers of "Climb Ev'ry Mountain". Anna Lee, who played Sister Margaretta, was dubbed by Marie Greene. Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Anna Lee MBE (January 2, 1913 – May 14, 2004) was an English actress. ...


Originally Plummer was slated to do his own singing, but although he trained during the film and post-recorded his singing vocals, Robert Wise and the creative team felt his voice, although good, was not good enough alongside the excellent voice of Julie Andrews.[3] Plummer agreed with the assessment, so they enlisted Bill Lee to "ghost" Plummer's singing.


There were once rumors that some or all of the children's voices were dubbed.[4] Wise insists that none of their voices were dubbed, though at times other children's voices were added to theirs for a stronger effect; the extra singers included Randy Perkins, Diane Burt, Sue McBain, and Darlene Farnon, sister of Charmian Carr (Liesel). Farnon sang the high note for Duane Chase, who played Kurt, in the song, "So Long, Farewell", because it was well beyond Chase's vocal range. Duane Chase (born 12 December 1950) is an actor, best remembered as Kurt von Trapp in The Sound of Music,and being gay He played Danny Matthews in The Big Valley for one episode. ...


The movie features a rare onscreen performance by Marni Nixon, who plays Sister Sophia. Nixon dubbed the singing voices for many famous movie stars, including Natalie Wood in West Side Story and Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady. Because Julie Andrews, who originally played Eliza in the stage version of My Fair Lady, was not selected to reprise her role in the film and that Marni Nixon ultimately dubbed Audrey Hepburn's singing voice, everybody held their breath when Andrews and Nixon met for the first time.[3] Marni Nixon (born February 22, 1930) is a singer whose renown for dubbing the singing voices of featured actresses in movies earned her the sobriquet The Ghostess with the Mostess. She was born Margaret McEathron in Altadena, California and began singing at a young age in choruses. ... Natalie Wood (July 20, 1938 – November 29, 1981) was a three time Academy Award nominated American film actress. ... For other uses, see West Side Story (disambiguation). ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an English Academy Award-, Tony Award-, Grammy Award-, and Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ... My Fair Lady is a 1964 film adaptation of the stage musical, My Fair Lady, based in turn on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. ... Eliza Doolittle is a fictional character who appears in the play Pygmalion (George Bernard Shaw, 1912) and, by extension, the musical version of that play My Fair Lady. ...

And of course, everybody was sort of worried that Julie would be upset that I was hired, because they imagined that she had have this great envy of me because I had done the dubbing on a part that she should have done in My Fair Lady. And when they said, "Julie, this is Marni Nixon" -- everybody was kind of 'how is she going to react?' And she stood up, strolled across the room, and extended her handshake – "Marni, I'm such a fan of yours." Everybody went 'ahh', you know, it was going to be all right.

Songs

LP cover
LP cover

All songs have music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II unless otherwise noted. Instrumental underscore passages were adapted by Irwin Kostal. Image File history File links The-Sound-of-Music-CD.jpg Summary CD cover - visual reference Licensing This image is of a music album or single cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the album or the artist(s) which produced the... Image File history File links The-Sound-of-Music-CD.jpg Summary CD cover - visual reference Licensing This image is of a music album or single cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the album or the artist(s) which produced the... Irwin Kostal (October 1, 1911-November 23, 1994) is the Academy Award winning musical arranger of films including: West Side Story (one of several orchestrators under musical director Johnny Green), Mary Poppins The Sound of Music Half a Sixpence Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Bedknobs and Broomsticks Charlottes Web The...

  • "Prelude and The Sound of Music"
  • "Overture" (Main Titles, consisting of "The Sound of Music", "Do-Re-Mi", "My Favorite Things", "Something Good" and "Climb Ev'ry Mountain") seguéin= into the Preludium
  • "Preludium: Dixit Dominus", "Morning Hymn" (Rex admirabilis and Alleluia, based on traditional songs)
  • "Maria"
  • "I Have Confidence" (lyrics and music by Rodgers)
  • "Sixteen Going On Seventeen"
  • "My Favorite Things"
  • "Salzburg Montage" (instrumental underscore based on "My Favorite Things"
  • "Do-Re-Mi"
  • "The Sound of Music" (reprise)
  • "The Lonely Goatherd"
  • "Edelweiss"
  • "The Grand Waltz" (instrumental underscore, based on "My Favorite Things")
  • "Ländler" (instrumental based on "The Lonely Goatherd")
  • "So Long, Farewell"
  • "Processional Waltz" (instrumental underscore)
  • "Goodbye Maria/How Can Love Survive Waltz" (instrumental underscore, incorporating "Edelweiss" and the deleted song "How Can Love Survive?")
  • "Edelweiss Waltz" (instrumental, Act 1 Finale, based on "Edelweiss")
  • "Entr'acte" (instrumental, consisting of "I Have Confidence", "So Long, Farewell", "Do-Re-Mi", "Something Good" and "The Sound of Music")
  • "Climb Ev'ry Mountain"
  • "My Favorite Things" (reprise)
  • "Something Good" (lyrics and music by Rodgers)
  • "Processional" (instrumental) and "Maria"
  • "Sixteen Going On Seventeen" (reprise)
  • "Do-Re-Mi" (Salzburg Folk Festival reprise)
  • "Edelweiss" (Salzburg Folk Festival reprise)
  • "So Long, Farewell" (Salzburg Folk Festival reprise)
  • "Climb Ev'ry Mountain" (reprise)
  • "End Titles"

Lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II died in 1960, a few years before the film adaptation went into production. Richard Rodgers had to write the lyrics for two songs that were added to the score: "Something Good" and "I Have Confidence". "Something Good" replaced the show's original love song, "An Ordinary Couple", as Rodgers was never happy with that song. The Sound of Music is the class song from the movie under the same title. ... Maria is a popular song with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, published in 1959. ... Sixteen Going on Seventeen, not to be confused with Sixteen Goin On Seventeen, sung by Maria and Liesl in the Sound of Music, is a love song sung in the musical the Sound of Music. ... The Sound of Music soundtrack cover My Favorite Things is a song from the musical The Sound of Music. ... Do Re Mi is a theater musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and book by Garson Kanin. ... The Lonely Goatherd is a song from the musical The Sound Of Music, sung by Julie Andrews, (playing Maria von Trapp), and the von Trapp children. ... Edelweiss is a Rodgers and Hammerstein song from musical and film The Sound of Music. ... The ländler is a folk dance in 3/4 time which was popular in Austria, south Germany and German Switzerland at the end of the 18th century. ... Climb evry mountain Search high and low Follow evry by-way Every path you know Climb evry mountain Ford evry stream Follow evry rainbow Till you find your dream A dream that will need All the love you can give Everyday of your life For... Edelweiss is a Rodgers and Hammerstein song from musical and film The Sound of Music. ...


"I Have Confidence" is a song that Rodgers wrote as a musical bridge, needed in the movie to get Maria from the convent to the von Trapp manor (as he explained). During that segment, at one point Julie Andrews passes under an archway. The real Maria von Trapp, one of her daughters, Rosmarie, and one of Werner's daughters can be seen starting to cross the road at that point. The von Trapps happened to arrive on set that day and Wise offered them this walk-on role. It has also been reported that Andrews tripped at one point during the filming, a moment the editors left in because it seemed to fit the character.[5]


Two other songs from the Broadway production were cut from the score as well: "How Can Love Survive" and "No Way to Stop It", though the former song can be heard briefly as background music towards the end of act I. Other songs were shifted to different scenes. No Way to Stop It is a popular song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics written by Oscar Hammerstein II. It was written for the 1959 musical The Sound of Music, but not included in the later film version The Sound of Music (1965). ...


The order of the songs is markedly different between the stage play and the film. In the play, "My Favorite Things" is sung at the convent, whereas in the movie it is sung to the children. "How Can Love Survive?", which did not fit the flow of the movie very well, was reduced to an instrumental, one of several waltz numbers played at the party occurring just before intermission. The title song's four-line prelude ("My day in the hills has come to an end, I know..."), sung by Mary Martin in the stage play, is reduced to an instrumental hint during the overture and dramatic zoom-in shot to Julie Andrews on the mountaintop at the start of the movie. The downwash of the helicopter used to film the shot reportedly made it difficult for Andrews to remain standing. Mary Virginia Martin (b. ...


The movie plot also varies from the stage play in some respects. In the scene where the von Trapps are hiding in the cemetery, the behavior of Rolfe differs quite considerably between the stage and screen versions. In the movie he raises the alarm when he discovers the group, but in the original stage version he conceals the fact that he has found them, thus aiding their escape. Broadly speaking, the play has the Captain's personality conversion take place very rapidly, while in the film it is stretched over an extended period of time.


"Edelweiss", thought by some to be a traditional Austrian song or even the Austrian national anthem, was written for the musical by Hammerstein and is little known in Austria.[5] Edelweiss is a Rodgers and Hammerstein song from musical and film The Sound of Music. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...


International release dates

In addition to the above list, the film was adapted for other countries, including Germany (retitled Meine Lieder, Meine Träume, or My Songs, My Dreams), Portugal (Música no Coração, or Music in the Heart), Brazil (A Noviça Rebelde, or The Rebel Novice), Italy (Tutti insieme Appassionatamente, All Together with Passion), Netherlands (De mooiste muziek, The Most Beautiful Music), Spain (Sonrisas y Lágrimas, Smiles and Tears), Greece (Η μελωδία της ευτυχίας,I melodia tis eftihias, The Melody of Happiness), Israel (צלילי המוזיקהTzeliley ha-muzika, The Sound of Music), Saudi Arabia (صوت الموسيقى Saut al-musiqa, The Sound of Music), Mexico (La Novicia Rebelde, The Rebel Novice), Iran اشکها و لبخندها (Ashkha va labkhandha, Tears and Smiles), Slovenia (Moje pesmi, moje sanje, My Songs, My Dreams), Yugoslavia (Moje pesme, moji snovi, My Songs, My Dreams), and Thailand ( มนต์รักเพลงสวรรค์ , Love Magic from the Song of Paradise). The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


Reception

Maria with the von Trapp children.
Maria with the von Trapp children.

The film premiered in the United States on March 2, 1965. It ultimately grossed over US$158 million at the North American box office, and displaced Gone with the Wind as all-time champion.[6][7] Adjusted for inflation, it made $1.048 billion at 2007 prices, putting it third on the list of all-time inflation-adjusted box office hits, behind Gone with the Wind and Star Wars.[6] still from the movie taken from http://en. ... still from the movie taken from http://en. ... -1... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... For the novel, see Gone with the Wind. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological...


The soundtrack album on the RCA Victor label has sold over 11 million copies worldwide, and has never been out of print. The soundtrack album was included in the stockpile of records held in 20 underground radio stations of Great Britain's Wartime Broadcasting Service, designed to provide public information and morale-boosting broadcasts for 100 days after a nuclear attack.[8] Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... The Titan II ICBM carried a 9 Mt W53 warhead, making it one of the most powerful nuclear weapons fielded by the United States during the Cold War. ...


Despite the enormous popularity of the movie, some critics were unimpressed. Walter Kerr of the New York Herald Tribune wrote the film was, "not only too sweet for words but almost too sweet for music." Noted film critic Pauline Kael blasted the film in a review in which she called the movie "the sugar-coated lie people seem to want to eat," and "we have been turned into emotional and aesthetic imbeciles when we hear ourselves humming the sickly, goody-goody songs."[9] This review allegedly led to Kael's dismissal from McCall's magazine.[7][9] Walter Kerr (July 8, 1913 – October 9, 1996) was an American writer and Broadway theater critic. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine from 1968 to 1991. ... Cover of the March 1911 issue McCalls was a monthly American womens magazine that enjoyed great popularity through much of the 20th century, peaking at a readership of six million in 1960. ...


Controversy surrounded the film's release in Germany. According to a 2000 documentary, "...the film's Nazi overtones brought about the unauthorized cutting of the third act," which begins directly after Maria's wedding to the Baron and contains images of post-Anschluss Austria. Eventually, the third act was restored to the German release, but audience attendance did not improve, and the movie is ironically unknown in Germany and Austria.[10] This can be mainly attributed to the former German-made movie "Die Trapp-Familie" (1956) and its sequel "Die Trapp-Familie in Amerika" (1958), but also to the dark period of Austrian history, cursorily displayed in the latter movie, as well as in the former Austro-German films, which starred popular German and Austrian actors, not to mention the almost merciless exploitation of Austrian stereotypes in the American movie.


The Sound of Music is credited as the film that saved 20th Century Fox, after high production costs and low revenue for Cleopatra nearly bankrupted the studio.[7] This article is about the 1963 film. ...


Awards

Academy Awards

Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...

Wins

©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ...

Nominations

Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Peggy Wood (February 9, 1892 - March 18, 1978) was an American actress of film and television. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ...

Golden Globe Awards

The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...

Wins

  • Best Picture - Musical or Comedy
  • Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy (Julie Andrews)

Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy has been awarded annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1950. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ...

Nominations

Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... Peggy Wood (February 9, 1892 - March 18, 1978) was an American actress of film and television. ...

Television and video releases

DVD cover
DVD cover

The first American television airing was on ABC on February 29, 1976. ABC controlled the TV rights to the film until NBC acquired them; their first telecast of the film was on February 11, 1979.[11] NBC continued to air it annually for twenty years, often preempting regular programming. During most of its run on NBC, the film was heavily edited to fit a three-hour time slot (approximately 140 minutes without commercials). Image File history File links Sound_of_Music_DVD_Cover. ... Image File history File links Sound_of_Music_DVD_Cover. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


Starting in 1995, the movie aired in an uncut form on NBC (on April 9, 1995, minus the entr'acte). Julie Andrews hosted the four-hour telecast which presented the musical numbers in a letterbox format). As the film's home video availability cut into its TV ratings, NBC let their contract lapse at the turn of the 21st century. In 2001 it had a one time airing on the Fox network, again in its heavily-edited 140-minute version. Currently, it airs at Christmas time on ABC since 2003 and around Easter on its sister cable network, ABC Family, where its most recent runs have been the full version in a four-hour time slot, complete with the entr'acte. is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For the mail collector, see letter box. ... FOX redirects here. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... ABC Family is an American cable television network currently owned by Disney-ABC Television Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company. ...


In the UK, the first television airing was on BBC1, on Christmas Day, 1978. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formerly styled) is the oldest United Kingdom, and indeed, the world. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...


The film has been released on VHS and DVD numerous times. The movie is often included in box sets with other Rodgers & Hammerstein film adaptations. A 40th anniversary DVD, with 'making of' documentaries and special features, was released in 2005. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Gearin, Joan (Winter 2005). "Movie vs. Reality:The Real Story of the von Trapp Family". Prologue 37 (4). National Archives and Records Administration. 
  2. ^ The Sound of Music - shooting locations (2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  3. ^ a b (1994). The Sound of Music: From Fact to Phenomenon [DVD]. 20th century Fox.
  4. ^ Carr, Charmian (2000). Forever Liesl. New York: Penguin Books. ISBN 0670889083. 
  5. ^ a b BBC (2006-07-11). "How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?". Press release. Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  6. ^ a b All Time Box Office Adjusted For Ticket Price Inflation. boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-02.
  7. ^ a b c Purdum, Todd (2005-06-01). 'The Sound of Music':40 years of unstoppable success. International Herald Tribune. Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  8. ^ Hellen, Nicholas. "Julie Andrews to sing to Brits during nuclear attack", Sunday Times, 1999-07-11. 
  9. ^ a b Tucker, Ken (1999-02-09). A Gift for Effrontery. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  10. ^ Dassanowsky, Robert Von (2003). "An Unclaimed Country: The Austrian Image in American Film and the Sociopolitics of The Sound of Music". Bright Lights Film Journal 41. 
  11. ^ "Chaos in Television", TIME, 1979-03-12. Retrieved on 2008-04-02. 
  • Hirsch, Julia Antopol (1993). The sound of music: the making of America's favorite movie. Chicago: Contemporary Books. ISBN 0809238373. 

Prologue Magazine, Summer 2005 cover Prologue magazine brings readers stories based on the rich holdings and programs of NARA, the regional archives, and the presidential libraries from across the United States. ... The National Archives building in Washington, DC The United States National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the United States federal government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charmian Carr (born Charmian Farnon December 27, 1942) is best known for role as Liesl, the eldest Von Trapp daughter in The Sound of Music. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sunday Times is the name of several Sunday newspapers. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the concept of time. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Sound of Music (film)
Awards
Preceded by
My Fair Lady
Academy Award for Best Picture
1965
Succeeded by
A Man for All Seasons
Preceded by
My Fair Lady
Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy
1965
Succeeded by
The Russians Are Coming,
The Russians Are Coming

 
 

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