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Encyclopedia > The Six Million Dollar Man
The Six Million Dollar Man

Opening credits
Format Science Fiction
Starring Lee Majors
Richard Anderson
Martin E. Brooks
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 100 + 6 TV Movies
Production
Running time 60 mins.
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Original run 18 January 19746 March 1978
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

The Six Million Dollar Man is an American television series about a fictional cyborg working for the OSI (which was usually said to refer to the Office of Scientific Intelligence, but sometimes was called the Office of Scientific Investigation as well as the Office of Strategic Intelligence[1]). The show was based on the novel Cyborg by Martin Caidin, and aired on the ABC network as a regular series from 1974 to 1978, following three television movies in 1973. The title role of Steve Austin was played by Lee Majors, who subsequently became a pop culture icon of the 1970s. A spin-off of the show was produced called The Bionic Woman. Image File history File links The Six Million Dollar Man Promotional Image File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Lee Majors (born Harvey Lee Yeary on April 23, 1939) is an American actor, primarily known for his roles in movies, sitcoms and television who also starred in four long-running ABC TV series over four decades. ... Richard Anderson as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man Richard Anderson, born Richard Norman Anderson (born August 8, 1926 in Long Branch, New Jersey, USA) is an actor in film and television. ... Martin E. Brooks (born 1925) is an American character actor best known for playing Dr. Rudy Wells on the television series The Six Million Dollar Man and its spinoff, The Bionic Woman; this role was originally portrayed by Alan Oppenheimer. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... For other uses, see Cyborg (disambiguation). ... Cyborg is the title of a science fiction/secret agent novel by Martin Caidin which was first published in 1972. ... Martin Caidin (1927-1997) was an American author and an authority on aeronautics and aviation. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... This article is about the literary and television character. ... Lee Majors (born Harvey Lee Yeary on April 23, 1939) is an American actor, primarily known for his roles in movies, sitcoms and television who also starred in four long-running ABC TV series over four decades. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... For the British television series, see Pop Idol. ... The Bionic Woman was a television series which spun off from The Six Million Dollar Man. ...

Contents

Overview

The background story of the original novel and the later series is the crash of former astronaut Steve Austin in a “lifting body” craft, shown in the opening credits of the show (the lifting body craft mostly shown was a Northrop M2-F2, however in the episode "The Deadly Replay", a Northrop HL-10, identified as such in dialog, was used). Austin is severely injured in the crash and is “rebuilt” in a title-giving operation that costs six million dollars. His right arm, both legs and the left eye are replaced by "bionic" implants that enhance his strength, speed and vision far above human norms: he can run at speeds of 60 miles an hour, and his eye has a 20:1 zoom lens and infrared capabilities. He uses his enhanced abilities to work for the OSI (Office of Scientific Intelligence) as a secret agent (and as a guinea pig for bionics). For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... The lifting body is an aircraft configuration where the body itself produces lift. ... NASA M2-F2 Lifting Body The Northrop M2-F2 was a heavyweight lifting body based on studies at NASAs Ames and Langley research centers. ... Bionics (also known as Biomimetics, Biognosis or Biomimicry, a short form of Biomechanics - from the Greek word bios - pronounced vios - which means life, and the word mechanics) is the application of methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology. ... Office of Scientific Intelligence (OSI) was the name of a department of the Central Intelligence Agency now called the Directorate of Science and Technology. ... For other uses, see Guinea pig (disambiguation). ...

Lee Majors as Steve Austin, The Six Million Dollar Man

Caidin’s novel was a best-seller when it was published in 1972 and was followed by three sequels, Cyborg II: Operation Nuke, Cyborg III: High Crystal, and Cyborg IV (with no subtitle), respectively about a black market in nuclear weapons, a Chariots of the Gods scenario, and fusing Austin's bionics to a space plane. Image File history File links Sixmilliondollar2. ... Book cover for Chariots of the Gods? Chariots of the Gods?: Unsolved Mysteries of the Past is a controversial book written in 1968 by Erich von Däniken. ...


In the spring of 1973, Cyborg was loosely adapted as a made-for-TV movie starring Majors as Austin (although usually referred to by the title The Six Million Dollar Man, and that is the precise wording used on the original ABC broadcast, this film is sometimes cited by the longer title Cyborg: Six Million Dollar Man). The adaptation was done by writer Howard Rodman working under the pseudonym of Henri Simoun. The film, which was nominated for a Hugo Award, modified Caidin's plot, and notably made Austin a civilian astronaut, rather than an Air Force officer. Absent were some of the standard features of the later series: the electronic sound effects, the slow motion running, and the character of Oscar Goldman (instead, another character named Oliver Spencer, played by Darren McGavin, was Austin's supervisor, of an organization here called the OSO). The lead scientist involved in making Austin bionic, Dr. Rudy Wells, was played in the pilot by Martin Balsam, then on an occasional basis in the series by Alan Oppenheimer, and, finally, as a series regular, by Martin E. Brooks. Austin does not use the enhanced capabilities of his bionic eye at any time during the film. The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Richard Anderson as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man Oscar Goldman is the name of a fictional character portrayed by Richard Anderson in both The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman television series. ... William Lyle Richardson (May 7, 1922 – February 25, 2006), who adopted the name Darren McGavin, was an American actor best known for playing the title role in the television horror series Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and also his portrayal in the movie A Christmas Story of the grumpy father given... Martin Henry Balsam (November 4, 1919 – February 13, 1996) was an American actor. ... Alan Oppenheimer (born April 23, 1930 in New York City, New York) is an American voice-actor who has had an active career in cartoons since the 1940s. ... Martin E. Brooks (born 1925) is an American character actor best known for playing Dr. Rudy Wells on the television series The Six Million Dollar Man and its spinoff, The Bionic Woman; this role was originally portrayed by Alan Oppenheimer. ...


The first film was a major ratings success and was followed by two more made-for-TV films that fall—Wine, Women and War and Solid Gold Kidnapping (the former bearing strong resemblances to Caidin's second Cyborg novel, Operation Nuke; the latter was an original story), followed by the debut, in January 1974, of The Six Million Dollar Man as a weekly hour-long series. The last two movies, produced by Glen A. Larson, notably introduced a James Bond flavor to the series and reinstated Austin's status from the novels as an Air Force colonel; the hour-long series, produced by Harve Bennett, dispensed with the James Bond-gloss of the movies, and portrayed a more down-to-earth Austin. Glen A. Larson (born 1937) is a television writer and producer with many of his creations becoming cult hits, with some of them remaining in syndication or have been revived. ... Harve Bennett (born August 17, 1930) is an American television and film producer and scriptwriter, perhaps best known for being the producer on the second through to fifth Star Trek films. ...


The show was very popular during its run and introduced many pop culture elements of the 1970s, such as the show’s opening catch-phrase and the slow-motion action sequences and the accompanying “electronic” sound effects. The slow-motion action sequences were originally referred to as "Kung Fu slow motion" in popular culture (due to its usage in the 1970's martial arts television series), but it became far more noteworthy in The Six Million Dollar Man. (Early episodes, as well as the TV movies, were not consistent in how the bionics effects were presented; such consistency did not begin until the second season.) Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ...


In 1975, a two-part episode entitled "The Bionic Woman" introduced the character of Jaime Sommers, a professional tennis player who rekindled an old romance with Austin, only to experience a parachuting accident that resulted in her being given bionic parts similar to Austin. Ultimately, however, her bionics failed and she died. The character was very popular, however, and the following season she was revived (having been cryogenically frozen) and was given her own spin-off series, The Bionic Woman, which lasted until 1978 when both it and The Six Million Dollar Man were simultaneously cancelled. For the reimagined version of the character from the 2007 television series, see Jaime Sommers (Bionic Woman). ... Cryogenics is a branch of physics (or engineering) that studies the production of very low temperatures (below –150 °C, –238 °F or 123 K) and the behavior of materials at those temperatures. ... The Bionic Woman was a television series which spun off from The Six Million Dollar Man. ...


Steve Austin and Jaime Sommers returned in three subsequent made-for-television movies: The Return of the Six Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman (1987), Bionic Showdown (1989) - which featured Sandra Bullock in an early role as a new bionic woman; and Bionic Ever After? (1994) in which Austin and Sommers finally marry. Majors reprised the role of Steve Austin in all three productions, which also featured Richard Anderson and Martin E. Brooks. Sandra Annette Bullock (born July 26, 1964) is a German-American film actress. ...


For many years, attempts have been made to bring the story of Steve Austin to the movie screen. In the mid-1990s, director Kevin Smith wrote a screenplay (which he talks about on the DVD "An Evening with Kevin Smith 2: Evening Harder" from 2006), and there were reports later that comedian Chris Rock was being considered for the role. In 2003, an announcement was made to film the story as a full-out comedy starring Jim Carrey but that project appears to be on hold. In a July 2006 interview at Comic Con, Richard Anderson (who played Oscar Goldman in the series) stated that he is involved with producing a movie of the series but the rights are in litigation between Miramax and Universal. A post on writer Kenneth Johnson's website, indicates there are similar problems regarding DVD release of the series in North America, although Region 2 (the United Kingdom) has so far seen the release of the first two seasons since 2005. This article is about the American screenwriter, film director, actor and comic book writer. ... Christopher Julius Rock III[5] (born February 7, 1965)[6][7] is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Comic-Con International, commonly known as Comic-Con or the San Diego Comic-Con, is an annual multigenre fan convention founded as the Golden State Comic Book Convention and later the San Diego Comic Book Convention in 1970 by Shel Dorf and a group of San Diegans. ... Richard Anderson as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man Richard Anderson, born Richard Norman Anderson (born August 8, 1926 in Long Branch, New Jersey, USA) is an actor in film and television. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Kenneth Johnson (born 26 October 1942) is an American screenwriter, producer and director best known as the creator of the series V. His creative efforts are almost entirely concentrated in the area of television science fiction. ... The following is an excerpt of the article entitled DVD. For the sake of convenience, the terms Region 0, Region 1, Region 2, Region 3, Region 4, Region 5, Region 6, Region 7 and Region 8 redirect to this page. ...


In 2007, NBC launched a reimagined version of Bionic Woman which integrates elements of The Six Million Dollar Man by having Jaime Sommers equipped with an eye implant in addition to the traditional ones. This article is about the television network. ... Bionic Woman is an American science fiction television drama created by David Eick, under NBC Universal Television Group, GEP Productions and David Eick Productions. ...


Opening sequence

The opening sequence featured NASA's 1967 footage of a real-life accident [1] of the Northrop M2-F2 lifting body tumbling end for end down the runway caused by piloting error. The pilot, Bruce Peterson actually survived reasonably unscathed, although he lost an eye due to an infection acquired while in the hospital. For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... NASA M2-F2 Lifting Body The Northrop M2-F2 was a heavyweight lifting body based on studies at NASAs Ames and Langley research centers. ... The lifting body is an aircraft configuration where the body itself produces lift. ... Pilot-induced oscillations (PIO) occur when the pilot of an aircraft inadvertently commands an often increasing series of corrections in opposite directions, each an attempt to correct for the previous overcorrection with an overcorrection in the opposite direction. ... Bruce Peterson Bruce Peterson (born 23 May 1933) was an American astronaut. ...


The opening credits actually used footage of two different lifting bodies; the HL-10, shown dropping away from its carry plane, and the M2-F2 shown in the unstable flight/crash sequence. (The aircraft was actually referred to as being an “HL-10” in the series, and the real HL-10 was used in a later episode; however, in the 1987 TV film The Return of the Six Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman Austin refers to it as the "M3F5", which is the name used for the aircraft that crashes in the original Cyborg novel.) The Northrop HL-10 was one of five heavyweight lifting body designs flown at NASAs Flight Research Center (FRC--later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from July 1966 to November 1975 to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle... NASA M2-F2 Lifting Body The Northrop M2-F2 was a heavyweight lifting body based on studies at NASAs Ames and Langley research centers. ...


Dusty Springfield sang a theme song written by Glen A. Larson and Stu Phillips, which was used in the opening and closing credits for the Wine, Women & War and Solid Gold Kidnapping telefilms. The song was also used in the promotion of the series, but when the weekly series began the song was replaced by the instrumental theme. The first regular episode, "Population Zero", introduced a new element to the opening sequence: a voiceover of Oscar Goldman stating the rationale behind creating a bionic man. The first season narration was shorter than that used in the second and subsequent seasons. Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939–2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ...


Main characters

This article is about the literary and television character. ... Lee Majors (born Harvey Lee Yeary on April 23, 1939) is an American actor, primarily known for his roles in movies, sitcoms and television who also starred in four long-running ABC TV series over four decades. ... Richard Anderson as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man Oscar Goldman is the name of a fictional character portrayed by Richard Anderson in both The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman television series. ... Richard Anderson as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man Richard Anderson, born Richard Norman Anderson (born August 8, 1926 in Long Branch, New Jersey, USA) is an actor in film and television. ... Martin Henry Balsam (November 4, 1919 – February 13, 1996) was an American actor. ... Alan Oppenheimer (born April 23, 1930 in New York City, New York) is an American voice-actor who has had an active career in cartoons since the 1940s. ... Martin E. Brooks (born 1925) is an American character actor best known for playing Dr. Rudy Wells on the television series The Six Million Dollar Man and its spinoff, The Bionic Woman; this role was originally portrayed by Alan Oppenheimer. ... Jaime Sommers, sometimes spelled Jamie Sommers, is a fictional character portrayed by Lindsay Wagner in The Bionic Woman and The Six Million Dollar Man. ... This article is about the actress. ... William Lyle Richardson (May 7, 1922 – February 25, 2006), who adopted the name Darren McGavin, was an American actor best known for playing the title role in the television horror series Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and also his portrayal in the movie A Christmas Story of the grumpy father given...

A roster of guest stars

Many familiar and/or unfamiliar actors who guest-starred on the show became successful actors: Elizabeth Ashley, Kim Basinger, Noah Beery Jr., Sonny Bono, Gary Collins, Jack Colvin, Yvonne Craig, Larry Csonka, Dana Elcar, Erik Estrada, Maurice Evans, Mike Farrell, Beverly Garland, Katherine Helmond, Earl Holliman, Jayne Kennedy, Gerald McRaney, Don Porter, Stefanie Powers, Pernell Roberts, Dale Robertson, Dick Sargent, John Saxon, Anne Schedeen, William Shatner, Suzanne Somers, Rick Springfield, George Takei, Kevin Tighe, Ray Walston among many others. Future Heavyweight champion George Foreman, also made a cameo appearance. Future Eight is Enough stars, Dick Van Patten and Adam Rich made guest-starring roles, respectively, and future serials, The Young and The Restless rising stars Eric Braeden and Jess Walton both guest-starred on different episodes, and future Knots Landing stars, Joan Van Ark and Donna Mills, guest starred on separate episodes. Elizabeth Ashley is an American actress who first came to prominence in the Broadway play Take Her, Shes Mine, which earned her a Tony award as Best Featured Actress in a Play. ... Kimila Ann Basinger (born December 8, 1953) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Noah Beery (August 10, 1913 – November 1, 1994) was an American actor. ... Salvatore Phillip Sonny Bono (February 16, 1935) – January 5, 1998) was an American record producer, singer, actor, and politician whose career spanned over three decades. ... Gary James Collins (born August 20, 1940) is a retired American football wide receiver and punter who played for the Cleveland Browns from 1962 to 1971. ... Jack Colvin (born October 13, 1932, Lyndon, Kansas; died December 1, 2005) was an American character actor of theater, film and TV, best known for the role of the snoopy tabloid reporter Jack McGee on the TV series The Incredible Hulk from 1977 through 1982, and a TV-movie sequel. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Dana Elcar Dana Elcar (October 10, 1927–June 6, 2005) was an American television and movie character actor. ... Erik Estrada at DragonCon 07 in Atlanta, GA Erik Estrada (born March 16, 1949 in East Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States) is an American actor of Puerto Rican descent, known for his co-starring lead role in the 1977–1983 US television series CHiPs. ... Maurice Evans (born June 3, 1901 in Dorset; died March 12, 1989 in East Sussex) was a British-born actor who became a US citizen in 1941. ... Mike Farrell (born February 6, 1939) is an American actor, best known for his role as Captain B.J. Hunnicutt on the popular television series M*A*S*H (1975-83). ... Beverly Garland (born Beverly Lucy Fessenden on October 17, 1926) is a veteran American film and television actress with a half-century of credits, from cult 1950s B movies to the hit WB series 7th Heaven. ... Katherine Marie Helmond (July 5, 1928, Galveston, Texas) is an American film, theater and television actress. ... Earl Holliman Earl Holliman (born Anthony Earl Numkena on September 11, 1928 in Delhi, Louisiana) is an American film and television actor. ... On the cover of Playboy, July 1981 Jayne Kennedy (born Jane Harrison on October 27, 1951 in Washington D.C.) is an American actress, model and sportscaster. ... Gerald McRaney Gerald Mac McRaney (born August 19, 1948, Collins, Mississippi, although some sources indicate 1947) is an American television and movie actor of Scottish and Choctaw Indian ancestry. ... Don Porter (Born: September 24, 1912 - Died: February 11, 1997) was an american actor who appeared in a number of films in the 1940s, including Top Sergeant and Eagle Squadron, but is perhaps best known for his role as the widowed father of Gidget. ... Stefanie Powers with Robert Wagner Stefanie Powers (born Stefania Zofia Federkiewicz[1] on November 2, 1942) is an American stage and film actress and singer. ... Pernell Roberts (born 18 May 1928 in Waycross, Georgia, USA) is an American actor. ... Dale Robertson (born 14 July 1923 in Harrah, Oklahoma) is an American actor. ... Dick Sargent (April 19, 1930 – July 8, 1994) was born Richard Stanford Cox in Carmel, California. ... There have been at least two prominent Americans in the 20th century named John Saxon: John Saxon (actor) (b. ... Anne Schedeen (born on January 7, 1949) is an actress who starred as Kate Tanner in the sitcom Alf. ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... Suzanne Somers (born October 16, 1946) is an American actress, author, and businesswoman. ... Rick Springfield (born Richard Lewis Springthorpe on August 23, 1949 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is a songwriter, musician and actor. ... George Hosato Takei (IPA: ) (born April 20, 1937) is an Japanese American actor best known for his role in the TV series Star Trek, in which he played the helmsman Hikaru Sulu on the USS Enterprise. ... Kevin Tighe (born August 13, 1944 in Los Angeles) is an American actor best remembered for his role as Roy DeSoto on the TV series Emergency! from 1972 to 1979. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... George Edward Foreman (born January 10, 1949) is an American two-time World Heavyweight Boxing Champion. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Eight Is Enough was an American television comedy-drama series which ran on ABC from March 15, 1977 until August 29, 1981. ... Dick Van Patten (born December 9, 1928 in New York City, New York) is an American actor. ... Adam Rich (born in Brooklyn, New York City, on October 12, 1968) is an American actor. ... For other uses, see Young and Restless. ... Eric Braeden (born Hans Jörg Gudegast on April 3, 1939) is an Emmy Award-winning German film and television actor, best known for his role as Victor Newman on the soap opera The Young and the Restless. ... Jess Walton is an American actress known for her portrayal of Jill Foster Abbott on soap opera The Young and the Restless. ... Knots Landing was a primetime television soap opera that aired for 14 seasons, from December 27th, 1979 to May 13th, 1993 on CBS. Set in a fictitious coastal suburb of Los Angeles in California, the show initially centered around the lives of four married couples residing in a cul-de... Joan Van Ark (born June 16, 1943 in New York, New York, sometime credited as Joan Van Arc) is an actress who is best known for playing Larry Hagmans troubling sister-in-law and Michele Lees neighbor and best friend, Valene (Val) Clements Ewing Gibson Waleska Ewing on... On the cover of Playboy, November 1989 Main title caption for Knots Landing. ...


Bionic parts

  • A 20.2:1 zoom lens along with a night vision function in the left eye (as well as the restoration of normal vision). The figure of 20.2:1 is taken from the faux computer graphics in the opening credits; the only figure actually mentioned in the series, by Austin himself, is 20:1, in the episode "Population: Zero." Austin's bionic eye also has other features, such as an infrared feature used frequently to see in the dark, and he has also demonstrated the ability to detect heat (as in the episode "The Pioneers") and view humanoid beings moving too fast for a normal eye to see (as in the "Secret of Bigfoot" story arc). In Caidin's original novels, Austin's eye was originally depicted as simply a camera (which had to be physicially removed after use) and Austin remained blind in the eye; later, he gained the ability to shoot a laser from the eye (this ability is also demonstrated in the first issue of the Six Million Dollar Man comic book issued by Charlton Comics).
  • Bionic legs allowing him to run at tremendous speed and make great leaps. Austin’s upper speed limit was never firmly established, although a speed of 60 mph is commonly quoted since this figure is shown on a speed gauge during the opening credits; the highest speed ever shown in the series on a speed gauge is 66 mph; the later revival films suggested that he could run faster, however.
  • A Bionic right arm with the equivalent strength of a bulldozer; the arm contains a Geiger counter (established in "The Last of the Fourth of Julys").

The implants have a major flaw in that extreme cold interferes with their functions and can disable them given sufficient exposure. However, when Austin returns to a warmer temperature, the implants quickly regain full functionality. A Canon Inc. ... Night-vision is seeing in the dark. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... For other uses, see Bulldozer (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Charlton Comics comic book spin-off from the series also established that Austin's bionic eye could shoot a laser beam and also worked as a miniature camera (these abilities were demonstrated in the first issues of the color comic and black-and-white illustrated magazine, respectively), but neither function was shown on television and are not considered canonical. Big C logo, used from Sept. ...


The series became known for how Austin's bionic abilities were presented. When running or using his bionic arm, Austin was usually presented in slow-motion, accompanied by an electronic grinding-like sound effect. When the bionic eye was used, the camera would zoom in on Austin's face, followed by an extreme close-up of his eye; his point-of-view usually included a crosshair motif accompanied by a beeping sound-effect. In early episodes, different ways of presenting Austin's powers were tested, including a heartbeat sound effect that predated the electronic sound, and in the three original made-for-TV movies, no sound effects or slow-motion were used at all, with Austin's actions shown at normal speed (except for his running which utilized trick photography); the slow-motion portrayal was introduced with the first hour-long episode, "Population: Zero." Slow motion is a technique in filmmaking whereby time appears to be slowed down. ...


Changes for television

A number of changes had to be made to Caidin’s version of the character to make him work for television. In the original novels, Austin was a cold-blooded killer, while the TV version rarely killed after his status as a childhood hero had been realized, and in fact Austin explicitly states his opposition to killing in the pilot film.


A number of changes to Austin’s bionics were also made. In the novel, Austin’s left arm, not his right, was the bionic one. Also, the arm was little more than a superpowered battering ram and not as complex as the TV version. Austin was blind in his bionic eye in the books, which was simply used as alternately a camera or a laser, and was removable. The book version of Steve Austin had some abilities the TV version lacked, such as a radio transmitter contained within a rib, a steel-reinforced skull that made it impossible for him to be knocked out with a blow to the head, and a CO2-powered poison dart gun in one of his bionic fingers which the literary version of Austin often used to eliminate bad guys. Carbon dioxide (chemical formula: ) is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ...


Another minor change was a matter of spelling: in the original novels, the term “bionics” was always used in its pure Greek form, e.g. “bionics limbs,” rather than the backformed adjective "bionic" (a formation based on the incorrect perception, which Caidin points out in the novel, that the Greek "-ics" suffix is plural). Perhaps to make it easier to say in dialogue, this was changed to “bionic limbs” et al. for the television series. The word “bionics” is never actually uttered during the first pilot film.


One character name was also initially changed. In the original novel Austin’s superior is Oscar Goldman, as he is in the series; however, in the pilot film the name was changed to Oliver Spencer. The opening credits of the second pilot film, Wine, Women and War, performs retconning to eliminate Spencer and reinstate Goldman as the government chief who authorizes Austin’s conversion; Goldman is also portrayed as a friendlier and more sympathetic character than Spencer, whom Austin accuses of being little more than a robot. In Caidin’s novel, Austin is recruited by the Office of Strategic Operations (OSO). In the TV pilot, it is still referred to verbally as the OSO, but door labels are OSI. Later TV episodes completed the change to OSI, and the first season episode Operation Firefly identified this as the Office of Scientific Intelligence (shown on Steve Austin's ID card). Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ...


The pilot film changed Austin’s character, making him a civilian member of NASA, rather than the Air Force colonel he was in the original novel; his military rank and background was restored for the TV series and no further reference was made to him being a civilian astronaut.


Novels

Martin Caidin wrote four novels featuring his original version of Steve Austin beginning in 1972 with Cyborg. Although several other writers such as Mike Jahn would later write a number of novelizations based upon the TV series, in most cases these writers chose to base their character upon the literary version of Austin rather than the TV show version. As a result, several of the novelizations have entire scenes and in one case an ending that differed from the original episodes, as the cold-blooded killer of Caidin’s novels handled things somewhat differently than his watered-down TV counterpart. For example, the Jahn book International Incidents, an adaptation of the episode “Love Song for Tanya”, ends with Austin using the poison dart gun in his bionic hand to kill an enemy agent; since the TV version of the character lacked this weapon, the villain was simply captured in the episode as broadcast. Martin Caidin (1927-1997) was an American author and an authority on aeronautics and aviation. ... Cyborg is the title of a science fiction/secret agent novel by Martin Caidin which was first published in 1972. ...


Original novels

(all by Martin Caidin)

(Of the above, only Cyborg was adapted for television.) Cyborg is the title of a science fiction/secret agent novel by Martin Caidin which was first published in 1972. ... Operation Nuke is the title of the second book in the Cyborg series of science fiction/secret agent novels by Martin Caidin which was first published in 1973, just prior to Cyborg being adapted as the television series The Six Million Dollar Man. ... High Crystal is a science fiction/secret agent novel by Martin Caidin that was first published in 1974. ... Cyborg IV is a science fiction/secret agent novel by Martin Caidin that was first published in 1975. ...


Novelizations

  • Wine, Women and War—Mike Jahn
  • Solid Gold Kidnapping—Evan Richards
  • Pilot ErrorJay Barbree
  • The Rescue of Athena One—Jahn
  • The Secret of Bigfoot Pass (UK title, The Secret of Bigfoot)—Jahn
  • International Incidents—Jahn (this volume adapted several episodes into one interconnected storyline)

Jay Barbree is a news correspondent for NBC, focusing on space travel. ...

Other adaptations

The Six Million Dollar Man logo used for various merchandise

Charlton Comics published both a color comic book and a black and white, illustrated magazine, featuring original adventures as well as differing adaptations of the original TV movie. While the comic book was closely based upon the series, the magazine was darker and more violent and seemed to be based more upon the literary version of the character. Both magazines were cancelled around the same time the TV series ended. Artists Howard Chaykin and Neal Adams were frequent contributors to both publications. Image File history File links The Six Million Dollar Man product logo - promotional image File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Howard Victor Chaykin (born 1950 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American comic book writer and artist famous for his innovative storytelling and sometimes controversial material. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ...


A British comic strip version was also produced, written by Angus P. Allan, drawn by Martin Asbury and printed in TV comic Look-In. A series of standalone comic strips was printed on the packaging of a series of model kits by Fundimensions based upon the series. In Colombia, a black and white comic book series was published in the late 70s, with art and stories by Jorge Peña. This series was licensed by Universal studios to Greco (Grupo Editorial Colombiano), then kwown as Editora Cinco, now part of Grupo Editorial Televisa. In France, Télé-Junior, a magazine devoted to comic book adaptations of all sorts of TV series and cartoons also featured a Six Million Dollar Man comic (under its French title, L'Homme qui valait trois milliards) with art by Pierre Le Goff and stories by P. Tabet and Bodis. A tradepaperback reprinting several episodes from the magazine was released in October, 1980.[2] As almost the only script writer employed by television listings comic Look-In in the 1970s, Angus Allan (sometimes also credited as Angus P. Allan) was responsible for original comic strip adaptations of: Timeslip, Wreckers At Dead Eye, Redgauntlet, Prize Idiots, Follyfoot, The Flaxton Boys, Please, Sir, The Fenn... Cover to Look-in, No. ...


Peter Pan Records and its sister company Power Records published several record albums featuring original dramatized stories (including an adaptation of the pilot film), several of which were also adapted as comic books designed to be read along with the recording. Three albums' worth of stories were released, one of which featured Christmas-themed stories. Individual stories were also released in other formats, including 7-inch singles. Peter Pan Records was a manufacturer of childrens music located in Newark, NJ which existed from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Peter Pan Records was a record label specializing in childrens music which existed from the 1950s to the present. ... 33⅓ LP vinyl record album The vinyl record is a type of gramophone record, most popular from the 1950s to the 1990s, that was most commonly used for mass-produced recordings of music. ...


In 1996, a new comic book series entitled Bionix was announced, to be published by Maximum Press. The comic was to have been an updated version of both the Six Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman and feature new renditions of the two characters. Although the magazine was advertised in comic book trade publications, it was ultimately never published.[2] Awesome Comics or Awesome Entertainment is an American comic book studio that was formed in 1997 by Image Comics co-founder Rob Liefeld. ...


Merchandise

The Six Million Dollar Man spawned a number of toys and other licensed merchandise. Everything from lunch boxes and running shoes to children’s eyeglasses and bedsheets all carried images of Steve Austin. The 12-inch tall Steve Austin action figure marketed by Kenner in the mid-1970s was particularly popular and intact Six Million Dollar Man and Bionic Woman toys continue to attract premium prices on the collector’s market. Besides the lead characters, 12-inch scale action figures were also produced of Oscar Goldman (with an "exploding" briefcase similar to the type used by James Bond in From Russia with Love), "Maskatron" (an android character based upon a cyborg played by John Saxon in several episodes), a Fembot (from a Bionic Woman episode) and the recurring character of Bigfoot (the Bigfoot doll was more than 12 inches high). Associated merchandise for use with the action figures included a rocketship that could transform into a bionic repair station, an inflatable command base, auxiliary bionic arms (critical assignment arms) with different features (such as one that included a flashlight), auxiliary bionic legs (critical assignment legs) with different features. For the Marilyn Manson single, see Lunchbox (single). ... Zarbon action figure from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ... Kenner Products was a toy company founded in 1947 by three brothers, Albert, Phillip, and Joseph L. Steiner, in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, and was named after the street where the original corporate offices were located. ... This article is about the spy series. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see From Russia with Love. ... There have been at least two prominent Americans in the 20th century named John Saxon: John Saxon (actor) (b. ... A Fembot (sometimes spelled Femmebot) is an alternate name for a gynoid depicted in two major productions, The Bionic Woman television series and the Austin Powers film series, which parodied the name. ... It has been suggested that Evidence regarding Bigfoot be merged into this article or section. ...


Fully intact Steve Austin action figures are rare. The bionic right arms of the dolls were covered in an elastic, skin-like material (intended to be rolled back to reveal bionic modules underneath) and this material tended to deteriorate over time. Early versions of the arms also included removable bionic modules that could be easily lost; later versions of the action figured included modules that could not be removed.


Episodes

Here is a list of the Six Million Dollar Man episodes: // Some sources consider these movies to be part of Season 1 of the series, particularly the second and third films, which aired only a couple of months before the weekly series began. ...

DVD releases

Universal Playback has released the first 2 Seasons of The Six Million Dollar Man on DVD in Region 2 for the first time. It has yet to be released in Region 1 for unconfirmed reasons. In fact, with the exception of a few episodes released in the DiscoVision format in the early 1980s, and a single VHS release of the two-part "The Bionic Woman" storyline, the series as a whole has never been released in North America in any home video format. Universal Playback is a subsidiary of Universal Studios which specialises in releasing DVDs of old and cult television programmes. ... Pioneers LaserDisc Logo The Laserdisc (LD) was the first commercial optical disc storage medium, and was used primarily for the presentation of movies. ...

Name Region 1 Region 2
The Complete Season One TBA September 26, 2005
The Complete Season Two TBA October 23, 2006

is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Trivia

  • The aircraft seen crashing in the opening sequence of the show is real[citation needed] and the dialogue spoken by actor Lee Majors during the opening credits is reportedly based upon communication prior to a crash that occurred on May 10, 1967: (“I can’t hold her; she’s breaking up! She’s breaking—”). Test pilot Bruce Peterson lost an eye due to infection following the crash, but likewise also miraculously survived what appeared to be a fatal accident even though his lifting body aircraft hit the ground at approximately 250 mph (400 km/h) and tumbled six times.[citation needed]
  • André the Giant was the first to play Bigfoot in the two-part episode "The Secret of Bigfoot". Ted Cassidy[citation needed] played the characters in several sequel episodes.
  • During filming of the 1977 episode “Carnival of Spies,” which was shot at a real-life carnival, a crewmember was moving what was thought to be a wax mannequin.[citation needed] When the mannequin’s arm broke, it was discovered that it was in fact the mummified remains of a man. Researchers discovered that the body was that of one Elmer McCurdy, an outlaw who had died in a gunfight in 1911.
  • The exterior shots of the "OSI" Building are actually the Russell Senate Office Building as seen from the Senate side of the Capitol, across Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC.
  • A character introduced in the episode "The Seven Million Dollar Man" was a man given bionics after Steve Austin. The character's name in his first appearance was "Barney Miller." However, when the character made an appearance in a subsequent episode, the name had been changed to "Barney Hiller" since at the time ABC had another series called Barney Miller about a New York policeman.
  • In Latin America, the 6 Million Dollar Man show was called "El Hombre Nuclear", Spanish for nuclear man; presumably implying that Steve Austin was nuclear powered. The premiere hour-long episode, "Population: Zero" states that Austin's bionics are atomic powered.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Bruce Peterson Bruce Peterson (born 23 May 1933) was an American astronaut. ... André René Roussimoff (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993), best known as André the Giant, was a French professional wrestler and actor. ... Theodore Crawford Ted Cassidy (born July 31, 1932 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - January 16, 1979 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor who played Lurch (in which role he was able to demonstrate his genuine skill on the harpsichord) and Thing on The Addams Family. ... A wooden mannequin For other uses, see Mannequin (disambiguation). ... Elmer McCurdy (January, 1880 in Washington, Maine – October 7, 1911) was an Oklahoma outlaw whose mummified body was discovered in the Nu-Pike amusement park in Long Beach, California in December 1976. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The rotunda of the Russell Building featuring the sculpture by Frederick Hart. ... Barney Miller was a comedy television series set in a New York City police station that ran from January 23, 1975 to May 20, 1982 on ABC. It was created by Danny Arnold (who also did work on Gilligans Island and The Brady Bunch) and Theodore J. Flicker. ...

References in pop culture

  • In the 1999 Disney movie Inspector Gadget the titular character is involved in a serious accident, and is then rebuilt in a vein similar to "Six Million Dollar Man." During testing of Gadget's new hardware, he is referred to as the Six Million Dollar Man by the mayor. When he malfunctions hilariously, the Chief of Police says between laughs, "I guess six million dollars doesn't buy what it used to."
  • In the 2000s, AOL adapted the opening sequence for a television commercial. Using the same soundtrack as the series opening, the commercial shows the animated AOL mascot going through vigorous physical testing, including running on a treadmill a la Steve Austin.
  • In the 2005 episode of the animated TV series Duck Dodgers titled "The Six Wazillion Dollar Duck", Duck Dodgers is severely injured while attempting to close the hatch of an experimental rocket. He is repaired with "cyborganic" parts and assigned a mentor named "Steve Boston, the Cyborganic Man". Steve Boston is married to "Jamie Wynters, the Cyborganic Woman", an obvious reference to Jaime Sommers. A cyborganic Bigfoot also makes an appearance.
  • In the episode "War Babies" from the British comedy series The Goodies, Tim Brooke-Taylor plays himself as an adult-sized baby in World War II. After being injured in a parachuting accident he is rebuilt as the "Six Million Dollar Baby", and later goes about impersonating Winston Churchill.
  • In one episode of The Venture Bros., a six-million-dollar man named "Steve Summers" is discovered living in the woods with his Sasquatch lover. The government expects him to pay off the six million dollars on a government salary. Brock Samson, one of the main characters, is identified as an agent of OSI (though in Venture Bros, it is referred to as the "Office of Secret Intelligence").
  • In the 1999 film Dogma, when Dorothy is killed, God brings her back to life. When Dorothy awakens she's confused as to how she was brought back. The Metatron tells Dorothy, "She can rebuild you. She has the technology, she can make you better, stronger, faster."
  • In a sketch in the comedy series Goodness Gracious Me there was a parody called "The Six Million Rupee Man". The Six Million Rupee Man, played by Sanjeev Bhaskar, had the ability to see objects on a supermarket shelf barely 3 feet away that others supposedly couldn't see, and, due to the lack of value of the rupee, his legs were made of plastic tea stirrers, which promptly snapped.
  • In Mexico, Guatemala, Puerto Rico, and Peru the The Six Million Dollar Man was known as El Hombre Nuclear (The Nuclear Man). The Bionic Woman name of the series remained the same (La Mujer Bíónica).
  • A scene from the Family Guy episode "Running Mates" parodied the opening of The Six Million Dollar Man with Peter Griffin in place of Steve Austin. The doctor working on Peter Griffin says "We can rebuild him, we have the technology, but I don't want to spend a lot of money" It then cuts to Peter, walking on the sidewalk, with a rake for an arm, a garbage can and plunger for legs, and a magnifying glass taped over his eye.
  • A 2006 episode of the Canadian sitcom Corner Gas ("Kids Stuff") spoofed the series by having series lead Brent Butt dressing in an outfit identical to that worn by Lee Majors in several episodes. Twice during the episode he imitates his childhood hero by running in slow motion (accompanied by the original bionics sound effect on the soundtrack).
  • The 1995 Stephen Chow movie Sixty Million Dollar Man is a spoof of the series; whereas the main villain is a war cyborg built with $60 million dollars, the main hero is reconstructed using spare parts from only $6,000.
  • When the series was broadcast in Israel in the 1970s, its name was translated as "The Man Worth Millions" (Ha'ish ha'shaveh millionim,האיש השווה מיליונים), because of the strong Holocaust connotations that the number six million raises in the Jewish state[citation needed].
  • In the late 70s, the chemicals needed to hypothetically build a complete person would have cost near enough $6 million.[citation needed]
  • The television series Jake 2.0 is essentially an updating of the premise, with the lead character's enhanced abilities due to nanotechnology rather than bionics. Lee Majors appeared in the episode "Double Agent" as "legendary operative Richard 'Dick" Fox." The episode suggests that Fox has been enhanced somehow, and the end of the episode features an oblique reference/homage to the Six Million Dollar Man.
  • The Blanks performed the theme song for The Six Million Dollar Man in the episode "My Nightingale" (2.02) of Scrubs.
  • The US Rock band Danger Danger released a song called "Six Million Dollar Man" on their album The Return of the Great Gildersleeves. The beginning of this song features a sample from the opening credits of the TV series.
  • The 2001 song "Austin's Groove", by Kid Crème, featured the famous sample: "A man barely alive. We can rebuild him. We have the technology. We can make him better than he was. Better...stronger...faster.".
  • On the TV series The Electric Company, a spoof of "The Six Million Dollar Man" was introduced in Season Five and became a recurring sketch in Season Six entitled "The Six-Dollar and Thirty-Nine Cent Man". Show cast member Jim Boyd played Steve Awesome, who had far more bionic features than his more serious counterpart.
  • On Sesame Street in the 1970s, Kermit the Frog in a Sesame Street News Flash sketch parodied the show by interviewing Professor Nucleus Von Fission who creates a "Six Dollar Man" robot (whose junk parts did total up to US$6 plus tax), but upon activation the creation goes berserk and partially destroys the scientist's lab before it falls apart while he laughs at the havoc it's wreaking. Aghast by the destruction in the aftermath, Kermit bemoans that the robot didn't do anything in which the scientist nonchalantly responds with the punchline: "Well, what did you expect for six dollars?".
  • Trigun's first episode is titled, "The $$60,000,000,000 Man", a dual reference to the bounty on the main character's head and this show.
  • In 2005, The Six Million Dollar Man was referenced in a commercial for Lenovo's new fingerprint authentication tool. In the commercial, the laptop's user attempts to make the "na na na na" sound and gets corrected by Lee Majors.
  • A reference to The Six Million Dollar Man is made in Shrek the Third when The Gingerbread Man, who lost his legs in the first Shrek movie, reminisces and during this sequence you see how he was given new legs and then you see him on a treadmill (with an EKG trace in the background) and eventually he does a slow motion Bionic jump, along with Bionic sound effect, and a small segment of the main theme tune.
  • In the Robot Chicken episode "Suck It" there is a whole sketch featuring a Mexican version of Six Million Dollar Man called Six Million Peso Man.
  • In the cult classic Misfits of Science's 9th episode entitled "Fumble on the One", there is a bionic-enhanced CIA agent named Brick who had a similar slow-motion special effects whenever he used his bionic abilities.
  • Chelsea boss Avram Grant referred to captain John Terry as the Bionic Man after recovering earlier then expected from a broken foot. [3]
  • Canadian comedy duo Wayne and Shuster introduced The Six Hundred Dollar Man. The hero posessed a myriad of gizmos but obviously due to the relative low value, these turned out to be incredibly useless, all for comedic effect.
  • In a Youtube Video, Buckethead while talking with his puppet "Herbie the Severed Head" makes many references to Six million Dollar Man and Maskatron.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For the 1999 live-action film, see Inspector Gadget (film). ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ... Duck Dodgers was an American animated television series based on the classic cartoon short Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century produced by Warner Bros. ... Jaime Sommers, sometimes spelled Jamie Sommers, is a fictional character portrayed by Lindsay Wagner in The Bionic Woman and The Six Million Dollar Man. ... It has been suggested that Evidence regarding Bigfoot be merged into this article or section. ... War Babies is an episode of the British comedy television series The Goodies. ... The Goodies was a surreal British television comedy series of the 1970s and early 1980s combining sketches and situation comedy and starring Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Bill Oddie. ... Tim Brooke-Taylor (April 2000) Timothy Julian Brooke-Taylor, (born 17 July 1940 in Buxton, Derbyshire, England) is a British comic actor most well known in Britain as a member of The Goodies comedy trio and in the comedy radio shows Im Sorry I Havent a Clue, and... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Churchill redirects here. ... The Venture Bros. ... Goodness Gracious Me is a BBC English language Sketch comedy show originally on BBC Radio 4 and later televised on BBC Two (comprising of three seasons running from from 1996 to 1998) based on four British Asian actors: Sanjeev Bhaskar, Kulvinder Ghir, Meera Syal and Nina Wadia. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Running Mates is an episode from the second season of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Peter Löwenbräu Griffin is the protagonist in the American animated television series Family Guy. ... Peter Löwenbräu Griffin is the protagonist in the American animated television series Family Guy. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Corner Gas is Canadian situation comedy which has aired on CTV and The Comedy Network since 2004. ... Brent Butt (born August 3, 1966) is a Canadian comedian and writer. ... Stephen Chow (also Stephen Chiau) (traditional Chinese: 周星馳; simplified Chinese : 周星驰; often Romanized as Chow Sing Chi; pinyin : Zhōu XÄ«ngchí; jyutping : zau1 sing1 ci4) (born June 22, 1962) is a director and actor in many blockbuster movies in Hong Kong. ... Sixty Million Dollar Man (百變星君) is a 1995 Hong Kong comedy film directed by Wong Jing and Yip Wai Man, starring Stephen Chow, Ng Man Tat, and Gigi Leung. ... “Shoah” redirects here. ... Jake 2. ... Buckminsterfullerene C60, also known as the buckyball, is the simplest of the carbon structures known as fullerenes. ... The Blanks; (left to right) Miserlis, McNiven, Perry, and Lloyd; as first seen on the television show Scrubs (Season 2 Episode 2 My Nightingale). ... Scrubs is an Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning American situation comedy/comedy-drama that premiered on October 2, 2001 on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence and is produced by Touchstone Television. ... Danger Danger is a glam metal/rock band formed in 1987 in Queens, New York. ... The Return of the Great Gildersleeves is a Danger Danger album featuring singer Paul Laine. ... The Electric Company was an educational American childrens television series produced by the Childrens Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) for PBS in the United States. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... Kermit the Frog is a Muppet, one of puppeteer Jim Hensons most famous and beloved creations, first introduced in 1955. ... The Sesame Street News Flash segments were a regular part of the childrens TV show Sesame Street from 1971 up until 2001. ... Serialized in Shōnen Captain Original run February 1995 – 1997 No. ... This article is about the film. ... For other uses of the word, see Gingerbread Man (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shrek (disambiguation). ... ECG may also refer to the East Coast Greenway Lead II An Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG, abbreviated from the German Elektrokardiogramm) is a graphic produced by an electrocardiograph, which records the electrical voltage in the heart in the form of a continuous strip graph. ... Robot Chicken is an Emmy award-winning American stop motion animated television series produced by Stoopid Monkey, ShadowMachine Films, Williams Street, and Sony Pictures Digital, currently airing in the US as a part of Cartoon Networks Adult Swim line-up, in the United Kingdom and Ireland as part of... D-Generation X (sometimes spelled Degeneration-X and commonly known as DX) is an active professional wrestling tag team (formerly a stable) currently wrestling on the RAW brand of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... Mark Thomas Miller and Courteney Cox in Misfits of Science Misfits of Science was a short-lived American superhero fantasy television series that aired on NBC Fridays at 8 PM EST from October, 1985 to February, 1986. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Avraham Avram Grant (‎; born 6 May 1955 in Petah Tikva, Israel) is an Israeli football coach. ... For other persons named John Terry, see John Terry (disambiguation). ... Wayne and Shuster were a Canadian comedy duo formed by Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. ... This article is about the avant-garde metal composer and musician. ...

Further Reading

  • Pilato, Herbie J. The Bionic Book: The Six Million Dollar Man and Bionic Woman Reconstructed. (2007) (BearManor Media) ISBN 978-1593930837

Notes and references

  1. ^ Lottman, Eileen, Welcome Home, Jaime (Berkeley Books, 1976)
  2. ^ Publishing details about "L'Homme qui valait trois milliards" French comic (In French)
  3. ^ "‘Bionic Man’ John Terry is close to remarkable Chelsea return", http://www.timesonline.co.uk/, 2008-02-16. Retrieved on 2008-02-16. 

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • see TfDWikia has a wiki on this subject: The Bionic Wiki
  • The Six Million Dollar Man at the Internet Movie Database (original pilot)
  • The Six Million Dollar Man at the Internet Movie Database (series)
  • The Six Million Dollar Man at Nostalgia Central
  • The Six Million Dollar Man at JumpTheShark.com
  • The Last Kamikaze episode review
  • Richard Anderson interview at Comic Con 2006 at Revver.com
Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gothamist: Six Million Dollar Man Movie (2215 words)
SMDM was I believe every kids fantasy, to be bionic, and smart, not to be bionic, and stupid.
SMDM was meant to be a serious show, that had comedy written in by great writers, not a comedy with some if any, serious parts put in.
While I agree that the Six Million Dollar Man had become really corny by the end of its run, you have to remember the era in which it came out - the mid 1970's.
The Six Million Dollar Man News (428 words)
A MAN paralysed from the neck down uses a robotic arm operated by thought power to open email, control a TV and move objects.
Steve Austin, the bionic man. I always found it puzzling that, in order to suggest that Austin was moving extremely rapidly, they would show him moving in slow motion.
Three decades after the hit television programme The Six Million Dollar Man described how the broken body of a former astronaut was rebuilt with mechanical parts, scientists are closer than ever to creating...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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