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Encyclopedia > The Simpsons

Editing of this article by unregistered or newly registered users is currently disabled to deal with vandalism. If you are prevented from editing this article, and you wish to make a change, please discuss changes on the talk page, request unprotection, log in, or create an account. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

"Simpsons" redirects here. For the surname, see Simpson. For other uses of "The Simpsons", see The Simpsons (disambiguation).
The Simpsons

Clockwise from top left: Homer, Marge, Maggie, Santa's Little Helper (dog), Bart, Snowball II (cat) and Lisa.
Genre Animation
Comedy
Created by Matt Groening
Developed by James L. Brooks
Matt Groening
Sam Simon
Voices of Dan Castellaneta
Julie Kavner
Nancy Cartwright
Yeardley Smith
Hank Azaria
Harry Shearer
(Complete list)
Theme music composer Danny Elfman
Country of origin Flag of United States United States
Language(s) English
No. of episodes 397 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Al Jean
James L. Brooks
Matt Groening
Sam Simon
Running time 20–23 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Fox
Picture format 480i (SDTV)
Original run December 17, 1989 – present
(renewed through 2007–2008)
Links
Official website
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

The Simpsons is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning, animated American sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox TV Network. It is a satirical parody of the "Middle American" lifestyle epitomized by its title family, consisting of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. Set in the fictional town of Springfield, the show lampoons many aspects of the human condition, as well as American culture, society as a whole, and even television itself. // Simpson may refer to: Locations Simpson, Illinois Simpson, Kansas Simpson, Louisiana Simpson, North Carolina The Simpson desert, Australia People whose surname is or was Simpson Alan Simpson, British scriptwriter, part of the Galton and Simpson team Albert B. Simpson, Canadian-American evangelist and founder of the Christian and Missionary Alliance... Several works based on the television series The Simpsons are also titled The Simpsons: The Simpsons (arcade game), released by Konami in 1991 The Simpsons (pinball), released by Data East in 1990 The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family, a 1997 book The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide... Image File history File links C-SimpFamily. ... Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (Born February 28, 1959. ... Margaret Maggie Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Santas Little Helper or once known as Santos L Halper (voiced by Frank Welker or Dan Castelanetta) is the Simpson familys pet dog. ... Bart and his sister Lisa as news anchors Bartholomew Jo-Jo Bart Simpson is a main character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Nancy Cartwright. ... Snowball, Snowball II, Snowball III, Coltrane, and Snowball V are five fictional cats that have been owned by the Simpson family in the TV show The Simpsons. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a fictional character on the animated television series The Simpsons, and is voiced by Yeardley Smith. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[3] his family name is pronounced ) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons,[4] Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... James L. Brooks James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is an American producer, writer, and film director. ... Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[3] his family name is pronounced ) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons,[4] Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... Sam Simon was one of the original developers of The Simpsons, along with Matt Groening and James L. Brooks. ... Daniel Louis Castellaneta (born October 29, 1957) is an American voice actor best known for providing the voice of Homer Simpson and other characters on the animated series The Simpsons. ... Julie Deborah Kavner (born September 7, 1950) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress, best known for her role as Brenda Morgenstern on Rhoda in the 1970s, as an actress in several Woody Allen-directed films, and for providing the voice of Marge Simpson on the animated television show The... Nancy Evan Cartwright (born December 6, 1980) is an American voice actress. ... Martha Maria Yeardley Smith (; born July 3, 1964) is an American actress and voice actor who is best known for providing the voice of Lisa Simpson on the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Henry Albert Azaria (born April 25, 1964) is a three-time Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and voice artist. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ... This is a complete listing of cast members from the long-running animated comedy television series The Simpsons. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American singer-songwriter who led the rock band Oingo Boingo from 1978 until its breakup in 1995, and has since gone on to become one of the most sought-after film score composers working in Hollywood today. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The following is an episode list for the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... Al Jean is a TV comedy writer most known for his work on The Simpsons. ... James L. Brooks James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is an American producer, writer, and film director. ... Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[3] his family name is pronounced ) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons,[4] Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... Sam Simon was one of the original developers of The Simpsons, along with Matt Groening and James L. Brooks. ... For the animal, see Fox. ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1989. ... An Emmy Award. ... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting. ... Animation is the rapid display of a sequence of images of 2-D artwork or model positions in order to create an illusion of movement. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[3] his family name is pronounced ) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons,[4] Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... For the animal, see Fox. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Simpson Family The Simpson family is the title family featured in the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (Born February 28, 1959. ... Bart and his sister Lisa as news anchors Bartholomew Jo-Jo Bart Simpson is a main character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Nancy Cartwright. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a fictional character on the animated television series The Simpsons, and is voiced by Yeardley Smith. ... Margaret Maggie Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... For the Simpsons episode, see $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling). ... This article very generally discusses the customs and culture of the United States; for the culture of the United States, see arts and entertainment in the United States. ... Young people interacting within an ethnically diverse society. ...


The family was conceived by Groening shortly before a pitch for a series of animated shorts with James L. Brooks. He sketched out his version of a dysfunctional family, and named the characters after members of his own family, substituting Bart for his own name.[1] The shorts became a part of The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987.[2] After a three-season run, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime time show. The Simpsons made their TV debut on The Tracey Ullman Show in 1987 The Simpsons shorts is a series of one-minute shorts that ran on the variety show The Tracey Ullman Show for three seasons, before the characters spun off into their own half-hour prime time show called... James L. Brooks James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is an American producer, writer, and film director. ... The Tracey Ullman Show was a weekly American television variety show, hosted by comedian and onetime pop singer Tracey Ullman. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ...


The Simpsons was an early hit for Fox, winning several major awards. Time magazine's 1998 issue named it the century's best television series,[3] and on January 14, 2000 it was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It is currently the longest-running American sitcom,[4] as well as the longest-running American animated program.[5] As a testament to the show's influence on popular culture, Homer's annoyed grunt "D'oh!" has been adopted into the English lexicon. The Simpsons is also cited as an influence to many adult-oriented animated sitcoms of the late 1990s.[6] A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A band plays on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... This is a list of the longest running United States television series, ordered by number of broadcast seasons. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Look up Doh! in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Since its debut on December 17, 1989, the show has aired 397 episodes over 18 seasons. As of March 20, 2006, it was renewed for a 19th season due to be aired in 2007–2008.[7] The 18th season finale will be the 400th episode, and 2007 marks the 20th anniversary of The Simpsons franchise. A feature-length film, The Simpsons Movie, is currently being produced to be released on July 27, 2007.[8] December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following is an episode list for the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 24 Minutes will be the 400th episode of The Simpsons and will air on May 20, 2007 as part of the one hour season finale, alongside the episode You Kent Always Say What You Want. ... The Simpsons Movie is an upcoming animated film based on the animated television series The Simpsons. ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ...

Contents

Origins

Main article: The Simpsons shorts

Groening first conceived of the Simpsons in the lobby of James L. Brooks's office. He had been called in to pitch a series of animated shorts, and had intended to present his Life in Hell series. When he realized that animating Life in Hell would require him to rescind publication rights for his life's work, Groening decided to go in another direction.[1] He hurriedly sketched out his version of a dysfunctional family and named the characters after his own, substituting Bart for his own name.[1] The Simpsons made their TV debut on The Tracey Ullman Show in 1987 The Simpsons shorts is a series of one-minute shorts that ran on the variety show The Tracey Ullman Show for three seasons, before the characters spun off into their own half-hour prime time show called... James L. Brooks James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is an American producer, writer, and film director. ... Life in Hell is a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening. ...

The Simpson family as they first appeared in The Tracey Ullman Show.
The Simpson family as they first appeared in The Tracey Ullman Show.

The Simpson family first appeared in animated form as shorts on The Tracey Ullman Show, with the first episode, "Good Night", airing on April 19, 1987.[2] The family was crudely drawn because Groening had submitted basic sketches to the animators, assuming they would clean them up; instead they just traced over his drawings.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Simpson Family The Simpson family is the title family featured in the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... The Tracey Ullman Show was a weekly American television variety show, hosted by comedian and onetime pop singer Tracey Ullman. ... The Simpson Family The Simpson family is the title family featured in the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... Homer tucks in Bart in the very first scene. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1989, The Simpsons was adapted into a half-hour series for the Fox network by a team of production companies, including what is now the Klasky Csupo animation house. Due to the fledgling position of the Fox network, Jim Brooks obtained an unusual contractual provision that ensured the network could not interfere with the creative process by providing show notes.[9] Groening has been quoted as saying that his goal in creating the show was to "offer an alternative to the audience, and show them there's something else out there than the mainstream trash that they are presented as the only thing."[10] The first full length episode shown was "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" in place of the intended first episode, "Some Enchanted Evening." The latter had to be reanimated after the creators saw the poor quality of the final animation and the episode was eventually shown as the final episode of the first season. For the animal, see Fox. ... Klasky Csupo Inc. ... Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire, also known as The Simpsons Christmas Special,[2] is the first episode of The Simpsons to air, although it was the eighth episode produced in season one. ... This article is about the Simpsons episode; for other uses see Some Enchanted Evening (disambiguation). ...


The Simpsons was the first TV series of the Fox network to appear in the top 30 highest-rated shows of the season.[11] Its success led Fox to reschedule the series to compete directly against The Cosby Show, a move that hurt the ratings of The Simpsons.[12] Ullman later filed a lawsuit, claiming that her show was the source of the series' success and therefore she should receive a share of The Simpsons' profit. Eventually the courts ruled in favor of the network.[13] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The show was also involved in controversy early on in the series. Bart was rebellious and frequently escaped without punishment, which led some parents' groups and conservative spokespeople to believe he provided a poor role model for children. George H. W. Bush rallied, "We're going to keep trying to strengthen the American family. To make them more like the Waltons and less like the Simpsons."[14] The Simpsons t-shirts, one featuring Bart with the legend "Underachiever ('And proud of it, man!')", alongside other merchandise was banned from several public schools in the United States.[14] The Simpsons merchandise however, sold very well; during the first 14 months, $2 billion in revenue was generated worldwide.[14] This article is about a person who sets examples for others. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Cover art for the DVD release of The Waltons first season. ... T-Shirt A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt with short or long sleeves, a round neck, put on over the head, without pockets. ...


Production

List of show runners throughout the series' run:

Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[3] his family name is pronounced ) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons,[4] Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... James L. Brooks James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is an American producer, writer, and film director. ... Sam Simon was one of the original developers of The Simpsons, along with Matt Groening and James L. Brooks. ... Al Jean is a TV comedy writer most known for his work on The Simpsons. ... Mike Reiss is an American TV comedy writer. ... David Mirkin is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... Bill Oakley (born in 1966) is an American televison writer, best known for his work on The Simpsons. ... This article is about The Simpsons writer Josh Weinstein. ... Mike Scully Mike Scully is a former executive producer of the Fox series The Simpsons (Seasons 9-12, 1997-2001). ... Al Jean is a TV comedy writer most known for his work on The Simpsons. ...

Executive producers

Groening, Brooks, and Simon have been executive producers during the entire run and now function as creative consultants. A more involved position on the show is known as the show runner, who serves as head writer and governs every aspect of the show's production for the entire season.[15] Credited as executive producers in the episode credits, runners often remain for multiple seasons. From season five onwards, the show runner receives first billing on the closing credit run. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Especially in the United States television industry, the show runner is the person responsible for the day to day operation of a television series. ...


Voice actors

With one exception, episode credits list only the voice actors, and not the characters they voice. Both Fox and the production crew wished to keep their identities a secret during the early seasons, and therefore closed most of the recording sessions and refused to publish photos.[16] They eventually revealed which roles each actor performed in the episode "Old Money," because the producers felt the voice actors should receive credit for their work.[17] This is a complete listing of cast members from the long-running animated comedy television series The Simpsons. ... (left to right) Elvis Costello, Tom Petty, Keith Richards, Homer, Mick Jagger, Lenny Kravitz and Brian Setzer guest starred in the heavily promoted season 14 episode How I Spent My Strummer Vacation. This is a list of guest stars who appeared on The Simpsons. ... In some countries the animated show The Simpsons is dubbed. ... A voice actor (also a voice artist) is a person who provides voices for animated characters (including those in feature films, television series, animated shorts), voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. ... Old Money is the 17th episode of the second season of The Simpsons. ...


There are six main cast members who voice The Simpsons. Dan Castellaneta performs the voices of Homer Simpson, Abraham Simpson, Krusty the Clown, alondside many other adult male characters.[18] Julie Kavner performs the voices of Marge Simpson, Patty and Selma[18] and occasionally plays other one-time characters. She has been known to refuse to perform Marge's voice in public, to maintain the mystique of the character. Nancy Cartwright performs the voice of Bart Simpson and other children.[18] Yeardley Smith, the voice of Lisa Simpson, is the only main cast member who regularly voices solely one character, although she occasionally voices other one-time characters.[18] The remaining two male actors who do not voice members of the title family play a majority of the male townspeople. Hank Azaria voices recurring characters such as Moe, Chief Wiggum, and Apu[18] whereas Harry Shearer provides voices for Mr. Burns, Smithers, Principal Skinner, Ned Flanders and Dr. Hibbert.[18] With the exception of Harry Shearer, every main cast member has won an Emmy for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance. Daniel Louis Castellaneta (born October 29, 1957) is an American voice actor best known for providing the voice of Homer Simpson and other characters on the animated series The Simpsons. ... Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Abraham Abe Grampa J. Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated cartoon television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Herschel Pinkus Yerucham Krustofski, more commonly known as Krusty the Clown is a fictional character in the cartoon The Simpsons. ... Julie Deborah Kavner (born September 7, 1950) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress, best known for her role as Brenda Morgenstern on Rhoda in the 1970s, as an actress in several Woody Allen-directed films, and for providing the voice of Marge Simpson on the animated television show The... Marjorie Marge Simpson (Born February 28, 1959. ... Patty Bouvier Selma Bouvier [[ The Bouvier Sisters (Patricia Patty and Selma, voiced by Julie Kavner) are fictional characters on The Simpsons. ... Nancy Evan Cartwright (born December 6, 1980) is an American voice actress. ... Bart and his sister Lisa as news anchors Bartholomew Jo-Jo Bart Simpson is a main character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Nancy Cartwright. ... Martha Maria Yeardley Smith (; born July 3, 1964) is an American actress and voice actor who is best known for providing the voice of Lisa Simpson on the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a fictional character on the animated television series The Simpsons, and is voiced by Yeardley Smith. ... Henry Albert Azaria (born April 25, 1964) is a three-time Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and voice artist. ... Morris Moe Lester Szyslak (pronounced //) is a fictional character on the animated series The Simpsons, voiced by Hank Azaria. ... Police Chief Clancy Wiggum (voiced by Hank Azaria) is a fictional character from the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, Ph. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ... Charles Montgomery Burns, normally referred to as Mr. ... Waylon J. Smithers, Jr. ... Seymour Spanky Skinner (born in Capital City, 1953, as Armin Tanzarian), known to most of Springfield as Principal Skinner, is a fictional character on the animated sitcom The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Nedward Ned Flanders is a fictional character on The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Julius Hibbert, M.D. is a doctor and physician from the TV series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... The Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance is a creative arts Primetime Emmy that is awarded by a committee. ...


Alongside the main cast, Pamela Hayden, Tress MacNeille, Marcia Wallace, Maggie Roswell, and Russi Taylor are regular cast members who voice several recurring characters.[18] From the 1999 season to the 2002 season, Maggie Roswell's characters were voiced by Marcia Mitzman Gaven. Karl Wiedergott has made many appearances in minor roles but does not voice any recurring characters. Recurring "special guest" cast members include Albert Brooks, the late Phil Hartman, Jon Lovitz, Jane Kaczmarek, Jan Hooks, Joe Mantegna, Maurice LaMarche and Kelsey Grammer. The show is known for its frequent use of celebrity guest stars, who often play a stylised version of themselves. Pamela Hayden is an United States actress, best known for providing various voices for the animated television show The Simpsons (1989). ... Tress MacNeille (born June 20, 1951) is an American voice actress who is best known for providing various voices on the animated television shows The Simpsons and Futurama, and also Animaniacs. ... Marcia Wallace (born November 1, 1942) is an actress from Creston, Iowa. ... Maggie Roswell is an actress best known for her voice work on The Simpsons depicting the characters of Maude Flanders, Helen Lovejoy, Miss Hoover, and Luann Van Houten among others. ... Russi Taylor is the current voice actress for Disneys Minnie Mouse character. ... Marcia Mitzman Gaven (born on 28 February 1959 in New York City, New York, USA) was the voice for Maude Flanders, Helen Lovejoy, Miss Hoover and others on The Simpsons from 1999 until 2002, when Maggie Roswell returned after a pay dispute. ... Karl Wiedergott has regularly played various voice roles in the television program The Simpsons, beginning in 1998. ... Albert Brooks (born July 22, 1947 as Albert Lawrence Einstein) is an Academy Award nominated American actor, writer, comedian and director. ... Phil Hartman (born as Philip Edward Hartmann) (September 24, 1948 – May 28, 1998) was an Emmy-winning Canadian/American graphic artist, writer, actor, voice artist, and comedian. ... Jonathan Lovitz (born July 21, 1957 in Tarzana, California) is an American actor and comedian perhaps best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live and for his show The Critic. ... Jane Kaczmarek (born December 21, 1955 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American actress, probably best known for playing the character Lois in Malcolm in the Middle. ... Jan Hooks in 1988 Jan Hooks (born April 23, 1957 in Decatur, Georgia) is an American actress and comedian best known for her work on NBCs Saturday Night Live, on which she appeared from 1986 to 1991. ... Joe Mantegna as Detective Will Girardi in Joan of Arcadia Joe Mantegnas character, Fat Tony in The Simpsons Joseph Anthony Mantegna, Jr. ... Maurice LaMarche (born March 30, 1958 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian voice actor and former stand up comedian. ... Allen Kelsey Grammer (born February 21, 1955) is a five-time Emmy and Golden Globe-winning American actor who is best known for his two decade portrayal of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane in the NBC sitcoms Cheers and Frasier. ...


The main cast has been involved in much-publicized pay disputes with Fox on more than one occasion. In 1998, they threatened to strike, forcing 20th Century Fox to increase their salary from $30,000 per episode to $125,000. The actors were supported in their action by series creator Groening.[19] As the revenue generated by the show continued to increase through syndication and DVD sales, the main cast stopped appearing for script readings in April 2004 after weeks of unsuccessful negotiations with Fox, requesting an increase to $360,000 per episode, or $8 million over a 22-episode season. On May 2, 2004, the actors resolved their dispute with Fox after reaching an agreement.[20] Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the major American film studios. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Simpsons writing staff in season 13, including current show runner Al Jean (fourth from left in middle row) and previous show runners Mike Scully (first from left in back row), David Mirkin (sixth from left in back row), and Mike Reiss (fourth from left in back row).

Image File history File links Simpsons_writing_team. ... Image File history File links Simpsons_writing_team. ... Promotional Picture from Treehouse of Horror XII. The Simpsons 13th season (November 2001 - May 2002) began on Sunday, November 6, 2001 with Treehouse of Horror XII. The season contains five hold-over episodes from the season 12 (CABF) production line. ... Al Jean is a TV comedy writer most known for his work on The Simpsons. ... Mike Scully Mike Scully is a former executive producer of the Fox series The Simpsons (Seasons 9-12, 1997-2001). ... David Mirkin is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... Mike Reiss is an American TV comedy writer. ...

Writing

The Simpsons is created by a writing team consisting of 16 writers.[21] The team proposes episode ideas at the beginning of December[21] and each episode is assigned to a main writer who produces the first draft of the script. The final scripts are developed during group rewriting sessions, during which the writers can add or remove jokes, insert scenes, and call for re-readings of lines by the show’s vocal performers.[22] The leader of these sessions is George Meyer, who has developed the show since season one. Long time writer Jon Vitti once explained that even though he will receive the script credit for an episode, the best quotes are usually invented by Meyer.[22] Since it requires six months to produce an episode of The Simpsons,[23] it is very rare for the show to comment on spontaneous current events, though they occasionally cite planned events such as the Olympics or the World Series. The Simpsons writing staff in season 13, including current show runner Al Jean (fourth from left in middle row) and previous show runners Mike Scully (first from left in back row), David Mirkin (sixth from left in back row), and Mike Reiss (fourth from left in back row). ... George Meyer is a producer and writer for The Simpsons, and arguably the writer who has contributed the most to the show over its long run. ... Jon Vitti is a writer who is most noted for his well-received scripts for the television series The Simpsons. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


John Swartzwelder is the most prolific writer on The Simpsons staff, credited with 60 episodes. Interestingly, Conan O’Brien wrote four scripts before becoming the host of Late Night with Conan O'Brien. English comedian Ricky Gervais is the only celebrity to have guest written an episode[24] although there have been other guest writers, such as Spike Feresten, a Seinfeld writer famous for "The Soup Nazi" episode. One of the few pictures of John Swartzwelder John Swartzwelder (born November 16, 1950) is a writer for the animated television series The Simpsons and a published author. ... Conan O’Brien (born April 18, 1963) is a comedian best known as host of NBCs late-night talk show/variety show Late Night with Conan O’Brien. ... Late Night with Conan OBrien is an American late night talk show on NBC, that is also syndicated worldwide. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (IPA: or ) (born June 25, 1961) is an award-winning English comic writer and performer from Reading, Berkshire. ... Spike Feresten is a television writer for The Simpsons (Sideshow Bobs Last Gleaming), Seinfeld (The Soup Nazi, among others), The Michael Richards Show, The Dana Carvey Show, and an episode for Saturday Night Live who currently hosts Talkshow with Spike Feresten on FOX. FOX announced that Spike wiould host... This article is about the sitcom. ... The Soup Nazi is the title of the 116th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld, which was the 6th episode of the 7th season. ...


Animation

International animation studios involved:


AKOM AKOM is a South Korean animation studio that has provided much work since its conception in 1985 by Nelson Shin. ...

  • Exclusively produced the first two seasons of the series.
  • Produced various episodes throughout the run of the series.

Anivision Anivision is a division of Sunwoo Entertainment, a large Korean animation studio. ...

  • Produced animation for episodes from seasons 3–10.

Rough Draft Studios Rough Draft Studios, Inc. ...

  • Produced animation for episodes from season four onwards.

U.S. Animation, Inc. U.S. Animation, Inc. ...

Toonzone Entertainment For the character and Bongo comic, see Radioactive Man Radioactive Man is the second episode in the seventh season of The Simpsons. ... The Simpsons 138th Episode Spectacular is the tenth episode of The Simpsons seventh season, and is, as the title suggests, the 138th episode. ... Toonzone Entertainment is an animation studio that has worked on The Simpsons (Seasons 15+) and King of the Hill (Seasons 8+). The overseas director for Toonzone Entertainment is Eom Hyoung Sik. ...

The Simpsons has been animated by many different studios over the past 18 years, both American and international. Throughout the run of animated shorts on The Tracey Ullman Show, the animation was solely produced domestically at Klasky Csupo.[25] Due to the increased workload, production began to be subcontracted to international studios for the half-hour show, usually to South Korea.[25] Character and background layout is drawn by the domestic studio whereas tweening, coloring and filming is animated by the international studios. Throughout the years, different international studios have animated different episodes, even those within the same season. The Fat and the Furriest is an episode from The Simpsons that aired in the fifteenth season on November 30, 2003. ... She Used to Be My Girl is the fourth episode from the sixteenth season of the animated TV series The Simpsons. ... Klasky Csupo Inc. ... This animated GIF demonstrates the effects of Adobe Flash shape, motion and color tweening. ...


For the first three seasons, Klasky Csupo acted as the domestic animation studio although onwards, Gracie Films made the decision to switch the domestic production to Film Roman from season four [26] who continue to animate the show as of December 2006. The last episode (in terms of production order) to be animated by Klasky Csupo was "Kamp Krusty." Gracie Films logo Gracie Films is an American film and television production company, created by James L. Brooks in 1986 for The Tracey Ullman Show. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Kamp Krusty is the first episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ...


After season 13, production was switched from traditional cel animation to digital ink and paint.[27] The first episode to experiment with digital coloring was "Radioactive Man" in 1995, and was used again during season 12 with the episode "Tennis the Menace". However, after seeing the results, Gracie Films decided to delay using 'digital ink and paint' for two more seasons. "Tennis the Menace," being already completed, was broadcast as made. Traditional animation, sometimes also called cel animation or hand-drawn animation, is the oldest and historically the most popular form of animation. ... Traditional animation, sometimes also called cel animation or hand-drawn animation, is the oldest and historically the most popular form of animation. ... Radioactive Man is the second episode in the seventh season of The Simpsons and was the first one to use Digital Ink and Paint. ... Tennis the Menace is the twelfth episode of the twelfth season of The Simpsons. ...


Characters

The Simpsons sports a vast array of secondary and tertiary characters.
The Simpsons sports a vast array of secondary and tertiary characters.

The Simpsons are a typical nuclear "Middle American" family who live in the town of Springfield. [28] Homer, the father, works as a safety inspector at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant although his personality his personality would suggest otherwise, being that of a well-meaning buffoon. He is married to Marge Simpson, a stereotypical American housewife and mother, and together they have three children. The eldest, Bart, is a ten-year-old troublemaker who considers himself to be a rebel. On the other hand, Lisa, aged eight, is an extremely intelligent middle child, often involved in left-wing activism and loves playing the saxophone. Lastly, Maggie Simpson is a baby who is always seen with a pacifier and never speaks, lest for one episode. The family own a dog, Santa's Little Helper, and a cat, Snowball II, both of which have been the focus of several episodes. Despite numerous yearly milestones passing such as holidays or birthdays, the Simpsons do not physically age. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1020x358, 408 KB)The Simpsons animated cast. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1020x358, 408 KB)The Simpsons animated cast. ... The following is a list of characters featured in the American animated television series The Simpsons. ... The Simpson Family The Simpson family is the title family featured in the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... The term nuclear family developed in the western world to distinguish the family group consisting of parents (usually a father and mother) and their children, from what is known as an extended family. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the 1996 Blur single, see Stereotypes (song). ... Two homemakers. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... A pacifier A pacifier (North American English), dummy (British, New Zealand, and Australian English) or soother (Canadian and Irish English), is a rubber, plastic, or silicone nipple given to an infant or other young child to suck upon. ... Lisas First Word is the 10th episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ... Santas Little Helper or once known as Santos L Halper (voiced by Frank Welker or Dan Castelanetta) is the Simpson familys pet dog. ... Snowball II Snowball II (a fictional cat in the television series The Simpsons) was the Simpson familys cat. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ageless. ...


The show sports a vast array of quirky supporting characters, including co-workers, teachers, family friends, extended relatives and local celebrities. Originally, many of these characters were planned as one-time jokes or to fill a function in the town. However, a number of them gained expanded roles and subsequently have been the subject of their own episodes. According to Matt Groening, the show's large supporting cast was very much inspired by the sketch comedy show SCTV, in which all the characters interact within the in-show universe.[12] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Setting

The Simpsons is set in the fictional American city of Springfield. The state in which it is located has never been made clear and is not actually intended to exist in any specific state. Nevertheless, throughout the show's history, fans have tried to determine where Springfield is by taking the town's characteristics, surrounding geography and nearby landmarks as clues. As a response, the show has become intentionally deceptive about the state, and nearly every state and region in the U.S. has been both suggested and ruled out by conflicting evidence. [29] Only once, in the season 11 episode "Behind the Laughter", the Simpsons are described as a "Northern Kentucky family," but since there are many counterexamples contradicting this statement in other episodes, this could just be seen as a teaser from the writers at the increasing curiosity of the fans. Groening has stated that Springfield has much in common with Portland, Oregon, the city he grew up in,[30] and the name "Springfield" was chosen because it is a common city name, appearing in more than thirty states. The geography of Springfield and its surroundings is seen to be flexible and has been shown to contain coastlines, deserts, vast farmland, and tall mountains, or whatever a story or joke requires.[31] For the Simpsons episode, see $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling). ... Behind the Laughter is an Emmy winning episode from the eleventh season of The Simpsons. ... Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City  145. ...


Themes

See also: Politics in The Simpsons, Religion in The Simpsons, and Education in The Simpsons

The basic premise of The Simpsons is a standard sitcom setup. It is a series about a family and their life in a typical American town.[28] The scope of The Simpsons, however, is larger than the regular sitcom. The town of Springfield is a complete universe in which they can explore all themes of modern society. Homer is deliberately working in a nuclear power plant, so that the show can make a comment on the environment.[32] Bart's and Lisa's days at Springfield Elementary School can make a statement on education. The town features a vast in-universe media landscape, which has everything from kids' television programming to local news. This is used to make a statement about the entertainment industry.[33] The following is an episode list for the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... Mr. ... Along with politics, religion remains a major theme on the animated show The Simpsons. ... Springfield Elementary School Education is a common recurring theme in the Television show The Simpsons. ... Springfield Elementary School In the television series The Simpsons, Springfield Elementary School is the name of the school that Bart Simpson, Lisa Simpson and their fellow students attend. ...


The show is sometimes political with a left-wing bias.[34] There is a general fondness for progressive ideals, but the show does make jokes from both sides of the political spectrum.[35] The overall philosophy of The Simpsons is nihilism.[36] The show portrays government and big business so that they are out to screw the little guy.[36] Thus any authority figure in the show is portrayed in a negative light. The politicians are corrupt, Reverend Lovejoy is indifferent to the people going to his church and the local police force is incompetent.[37] Religion is also a recurring theme. In the time of crisis the family will turn to God and the show has dealt with most of the major religions.[38] Nihilism (from the Latin nihil, nothing) is a philosophical position which argues that the world, especially past and current human existence, is without objective meaning, purpose, comprehensible truth, or essential value. ... This article contains a list of recurring characters from The Simpsons with descriptions. ...


The plots of many episodes focus on one particular character, or the relationship between two characters. Common plots have involved the following: Homer getting a new job or attempting a get-rich-quick scheme; Marge attempting to escape the monotony of keeping house by finding employment or taking up a hobby; Bart causing a large problem and attempting to fix it, cover it up, or ignore it entirely; and Lisa embracing or advocating the merits of a particular cause or group. Some episodes have focused on the problems of secondary or tertiary characters, which are usually solved with the help of a member of the Simpson family. This is a list of jobs held by the fictional character Homer Simpson from the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Get-rich-quick schemes promise high rates of return for a small investment. ...


Hallmarks

Shot from an overblown, extended couch gag (often used when an episode is running short).
Shot from an overblown, extended couch gag (often used when an episode is running short).

Simpsons couch gag This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Simpsons couch gag This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... The couch gag is a running visual joke in the opening credits of the animated television series The Simpsons. ...

Opening sequence

See also: Chalkboard gag, Sax solo gag, and couch gag

The Simpsons opening sequence is one of the show's most memorable hallmarks. Almost every episode opens with the camera zooming through the show's title towards the town of Springfield. Then we follow the members of the family on their way home. Upon entering their house, they settle down on their couch to watch television. The series' distinctive theme song was composed by musician Danny Elfman in 1989, after Groening approached him requesting a "retro" style piece. This piece, which took two days to create, has been noted by Elfman as the most popular of his career.[39] A typical chalkboard gag. ... Bart writes The Pledge of Allegiance does not end with Hail Satan The chalkboard gag is a running visual joke that occurs during the opening credits of many episodes of The Simpsons. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The couch gag is a running visual joke in the opening credits of the animated television series The Simpsons. ... This example of a title sequence, from long-running serial drama Another World, was seen from 1966 to 1981, making it one of the longest-running continuous title sequences on television. ... For the Simpsons episode, see $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music Musicians can be classified by their role in creating or performing music: A singer (or vocalist) uses his or her voice as an instrument. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American singer-songwriter who led the rock band Oingo Boingo from 1978 until its breakup in 1995, and has since gone on to become one of the most sought-after film score composers working in Hollywood today. ...


One of the most distinctive aspects of the opening is that there are several segments that are changed from episode to episode. Bart writes something different on the blackboard. Lisa sometimes plays a different solo on her saxophone and something different happens when the family enters the living room to sit on the couch. This last segment is often the only one of the three gags to survive the process of shortening the opening for some syndicated episodes and for later episodes which needed extra time. This concept of rotating elements has been subsequently used both by Groening in Futurama, and by others, such as a newspaper headline in American Dad. Futurama is an Emmy Award-winning animated sitcom created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen for the Fox network, and will resume airing in 2008 on Comedy Central. ... The Smiths, from left to right: Roger, Francine, Stan, Klaus, Hayley, and Steve. ...


Halloween episodes

Bart introducing a segment of "Treehouse of Horror IV" in the manner of Rod Serling's Night Gallery.
Bart introducing a segment of "Treehouse of Horror IV" in the manner of Rod Serling's Night Gallery.

An annual tradition is a special Halloween episode. "Treehouse of Horror" (1990) started a tradition of three separate, self-contained stories in each Halloween episode. These pieces usually involve the family in some horror, science fiction, or supernatural setting and often parody or pay homage to a famous piece of work in those genres.[40] They always take place outside the normal continuity of the show. Although the Treehouse series is meant to be seen on Halloween, in recent years new installments have premiered after Halloween. This is due to Fox's current contract with Major League Baseball's World Series. Screenshot from Treehouse of Horror IV This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Screenshot from Treehouse of Horror IV This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Rodman Edward Rod Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975) was an American screenwriter, most famous for his science fiction anthology television series, The Twilight Zone. ... Night Gallery was Rod Serlings follow-up to The Twilight Zone, airing on NBC from 1970 to 1973. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Treehouse of Horror. ... Halloween, or Halloween, is a tradition celebrated on the night of October 31, most notably by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting sweets, fruit, and other gifts. ... This article refers to the first Treehouse of Horror episode. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


Humor

The show uses catchphrases and most of the primary and secondary characters have at least one catchphrase each.[41] Notable catchphrases include Homer's famous annoyed grunt "D'oh!", Mr. Burns' "Excellent..." and Nelson Muntz's "Ha-ha!". An interesting phenomenon occurred with Bart's catchphrases. The phrases "¡Ay, caramba!," "Don't have a cow, man!" and "Eat my shorts!" were featured on t-shirts in the early days of the show's run.[42] However, the latter two phrases were rarely actually spoken on the show itself until after they became popular through merchandise, and the use of many of these catchphrases has declined in recent seasons. The use of catchphrase-based humor was mocked in the episode "Bart Gets Famous" in which Bart gets famous on the Krusty show for saying the line "I didn't do it."[43] Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: The Simpsons catch phrases There are many recurring jokes in The Simpsons, many of which have been retired during the series. ... Look up Doh! in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ¡Ay, caramba! (pronounced ; from Spanish ¡ay! (interjection denoting surprise) and caramba, lace worn on the head, (euphemism for carajo, an exclamation of disgust), from Caramba, nickname of María Antonia Fernández, music composer of the 18th century who wore that kind of laces; carajo in south america means hell... Bart Gets Famous is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which originally aired on February 3, 1994. ...


Another part of the show's humor is to make cultural references.[44] They cover a wide range of references so that viewers from all generations can have a piece of the show. These references could be scenes from a movie or TV show, which is played out in the Simpson universe. It could also be references to music, literature, science or history.[44]


Whenever possible, jokes are put in the background of the show.[45] This is typically humorous bits of text, which is put on signs, newspapers or other places. These are sometimes hard to find in a single viewing and some of them can only be viewed when the show is paused.[45]


Cultural impact

Impact on language

A number of neologisms that originated on The Simpsons have become common knowledge.[46] The most famous is Homer's annoyed grunt: "D'oh!." So ubiquitous is the catchphrase that it is now listed in the Oxford English Dictionary,[47] but without the apostrophe. The first listed usage is not from The Simpsons, but from a 1945 BBC radio script in which the word was spelled "dooh." Dan Castellaneta has explained that he borrowed the phrase from James Finlayson, an actor in early Laurel and Hardy comedies, who pronounced it more stretched-out and whiny.[48] Castellaneta was told by the show's director to shorten the noise, leading to the famous grunt in the TV series.[48] This article contains speculation and may try to argue its points. ... A neologism (Greek νεολογισμός [neologismos], from νέος [neos] new + λόγος [logos] word, speech, discourse + suffix -ισμός [-ismos] -ism) is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... Actor Jimmy Finlayson James Jimmy Finlayson (born August 27, 1887 in Falkirk, Scotland; died October 9, 1953 in Los Angeles) was a Scottish-American actor who worked in both silent and sound comedies. ... Laurel and Hardy, in a promotional still from their 1937 feature film Way Out West. ...


Other Simpsons expressions that have entered into popular use include the word "excellent" (drawn out as a sinister "eeeexcelllent…" in the style of Charles Montgomery Burns), Homer's triumphant "Woohoo!" and Nelson Muntz's mocking "HA-ha!" Groundskeeper Willie's description of the French as "cheese-eating surrender monkeys" was used by conservative National Review columnist Jonah Goldberg, in 2003, after France's opposition to the proposed invasion of Iraq, and quickly spread to other journalists.[49] Groundskeeper Willie (a. ... Cheese-eating surrender monkeys is a satirical and insulting phrase, referring to the French, which gained notoriety in the United States, particularly in the run-up to the war in Iraq; as the war in Iraq grew far longer and bloodier than initially anticipated, the phrase began to fall into... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ... Jonah Jacob Goldberg (born March 21, 1969), is an American conservative commentator. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Australia Poland Romania others. ...


Impact on television

The Simpsons was the first animated program in prime time since the Flintstones era. During most of the 1980s, animated shows were seen as being for kids and the animation was too expensive to get a quality suitable for prime time television. The Simpsons changed this perception.[25] The use of Korean animation studios doing inbetweening, coloring and filming made the episodes cheaper. The success of The Simpsons and the lower production cost made television networks take chances on other animated series.[25] This led to a boom in new animated shows for prime time in the 1990s, such as South Park, Family Guy, King of the Hill, Futurama and The Critic.[25] South Park later paid homage to The Simpsons with the episode "Simpsons Already Did It." The Flintstones is an American animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... South Park is an American, Emmy Award-winning[1] animated television comedy series about four fourth-grade school boys who live in the small town of South Park, Colorado. ... Family Guy is an American animated television series about a nuclear family in the suburb of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... King of the Hill is a satirical American animated television series created by Mike Judge (creator of Beavis and Butt-head) and Greg Daniels for the FOX Network. ... Futurama is an Emmy Award-winning animated sitcom created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen for the Fox network, and will resume airing in 2008 on Comedy Central. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Simpsons Already Did It is the seventh episode in the sixth season of the Comedy Central series South Park. ...


The Simpsons also had an impact on live-action shows. Malcolm in the Middle, which debuted January 9, 2000 in the time slot right after The Simpsons, was largely inspired by this show.[6][50] It features the use of sight gags and does not use a laugh track like most sitcoms. Ricky Gervais has called The Simpsons a major influence on his British comedy The Office, which also leaves out a laugh track.[51] Malcolm in the Middle is a five-time Emmy, Grammy-winning and three time-nominated Golden Globe American situation comedy created by Linwood Boomer for the Fox Network. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (IPA: or ) (born June 25, 1961) is an award-winning English comic writer and performer from Reading, Berkshire. ... The Office is a British television comedy series, created, written and directed by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, and first aired in the UK on BBC Two on July 9, 2001. ...


Critical reactions and achievements

The Simpsons have been awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
The Simpsons have been awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 620 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (769 × 744 pixel, file size: 167 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo originally from flickr, but has been cut by User:Maitch. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 620 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (769 × 744 pixel, file size: 167 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo originally from flickr, but has been cut by User:Maitch. ...

Awards

The Simpsons has won dozens of awards since it debuted as a series, including 23 Emmy Awards, 22 Annie Awards and a Peabody. On January 14, 2000 the Simpsons were awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In its 1998 issue celebrating the greatest achievements in arts and entertainment of the 20th century, Time magazine named The Simpsons the century's best television series.[3] In that same issue, Bart Simpson was named to the Time 100, the publication's list of the century's 100 most influential people.[52] He was the only fictional character on the list. In 2002, it was listed as #8 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.[53] In 2000, Entertainment Weekly magazine TV critic Ken Tucker named The Simpsons the greatest television show of the 1990s. Furthermore, viewers of the UK television channel Channel 4 have voted "The Simpsons" top of two polls, 2001's 100 Greatest Kids' TV shows, and 2005's 100 Greatest Cartoons, with Homer Simpson voted first place in 2001's 100 Greatest TV Characters. This is a list of the awards won by the animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... An Emmy Award. ... The Annie Awards are given to an animation award show created by the International Animated Film Society ASIFA-Hollywood, and are animations highest honor[1]. Originally designed to celebrate lifetime or career contributions to animation in the fields of producing, directing, animation, design, writing, voice acting, sound and sound... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A band plays on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time is a list compiled by TV Guide as a cover story for the week of May 4, 2002. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... It has been suggested that Channel Four Television Corporation be merged into this article or section. ... The 100 Greatest Kids TV Shows was a poll conducted by the British television channel Channel 4 in 2001. ... The 100 Greatest Cartoons is a documentary that features a poll conducted by the British television channel Channel 4 in 2004. ...


Run length achievements

On February 9, 1997, The Simpsons surpassed The Flintstones with the episode "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show" as the longest-running prime time animated series in America. In 2004 it replaced The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (1952 to 1966) as the longest-running sitcom, animated or live action, ever in the United States.[4] In October 2004, Scooby-Doo briefly overtook The Simpsons as the American animated show with the highest episode count.[54] In April 2005, Scooby-Doo was cancelled again, finishing with 371 episodes, while The Simpsons reclaimed the title with 378 episodes as of the end of their seventeenth season.[5] While The Simpsons has a record number of episodes for an American animated show, some foreign animated series have surpassed The Simpsons in this regard. For example, the Japanese anime series Doraemon has over 600 episodes to its credit.[55] February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Flintstones is an American animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show is the fourteenth episode of the eighth season of The Simpsons, which originally aired February 9, 1997. ... Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ... The Nelson family The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, an American radio and television series, was once the longest-running, live-action situation comedy on American television, having aired on ABC from 1952 to 1966 after a ten-year run on radio. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... Scooby-doo is also British naval divers slang for civilian sport scuba diver. Scooby-Doo is an important character in animation up to this day Scooby-Doo is a long-running animated series produced for television by Hanna-Barbera Productions from 1969 to 1986, 1988 to 1991, and from 2002... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... Original run April 15, 2005 - Present April 2, 1979 – March 25, 2005 No. ...


The year 2007 marks the 20th anniversary of the Simpsons franchise, since the show originally began as skits on The Tracey Ullman Show in 1987. With its 19th season (2007-2008), through which the show was renewed in 2006, the series will be one season behind Gunsmoke's US entertainment record of 20 produced seasons.[4] However, Gunsmoke's episode count of 635 episodes far surpasses The Simpsons, which would not reach that mark until its 29th season, under normal season lengths. The cast of radios Gunsmoke: Howard McNear (Doc), William Conrad (Matt), Georgia Ellis (Kitty) and Parley Baer (Chester) Gunsmoke was a long-running American old-time radio and television Western drama created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. ...


Criticism of declining quality

For many years, most critics' reviews of new Simpsons episodes praised the show for its wit, realism, and intelligence.[10][56] But gradually starting in the mid-90s, the tone and emphasis of the show changed. Some critics began calling the show tired.[57] By 2000, a segment of long-term fans had become disillusioned with the show, including its movement from more character-driven plots to what they perceived as an overemphasis on zany antics.[58][59]


In 2003, to celebrate the show's 300th episode "Barting Over", USA Today published a pair of Simpsons related articles: a top-10 episodes list chosen by webmaster of The Simpsons Archive fansite,[60] and a top-15 list by The Simpsons' own writers.[61] The most recent episode listed on the fan list was 1997's "Homer's Phobia"; the Simpsons' writers most recent choice was 2000's "Behind the Laughter." In 2004, Harry Shearer criticized the show's sliding quality in an interview: "I rate the last three seasons as among the worst, so season four looks very good to me now."[62] Barting Over is an episode of The Simpsons advertised by FOX to be the 300th episode of the show. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Simpsons Archive (www. ... Homers Phobia is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons eighth season, which originally aired on the Fox network on February 16, 1997. ... Behind the Laughter is an Emmy winning episode from the eleventh season of The Simpsons. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ...


Despite this criticism, The Simpsons has managed to maintain an audience and attract new fans, although the first season had an average of 13.4 million viewers alone in the U.S.,[11] compared to the 17th season, which ended with an average of 9.2 million viewers.[63] In an April 2006 interview, Matt Groening said, "I honestly don't see any end in sight. I think it's possible that the show will get too financially cumbersome...but right now, the show is creatively, I think, as good or better than it's ever been. The animation is incredibly detailed and imaginative, the stories do things that we haven't done before, so creatively there's no reason to quit."[64]


Merchandise

Monopoly: The Simpsons Edition
See also: List of songs featured in The Simpsons, The Simpsons discography

The popularity of The Simpsons has made it into a billion dollar merchandizing industry.[14] The title family and supporting characters appear on everything from t-shirts to posters. On April 24, 2007 it was officially announced that a The Simpsons Ride will be implemented into the Universal Studios Orlando and Universal Studios Hollywood. It is scheduled for a Spring 2008 opening.[65]. The Simpsons has inspired special editions of well-known board games, including Clue, Scrabble, Monopoly, Operation, and The Game of Life, as well as the trivia games What Would Homer Do? and Simpsons Jeopardy!.[66] Several card games such as trump cards and The Simpsons Trading Card Game have also been released. Image File history File links Simmonopoly. ... Image File history File links Simmonopoly. ... // Comics Simpsons comic books Numerous different Simpsons-related comic book series have been published by Bongo Comics since 1993. ... This is a list of songs / tracks that have been featured on the animated television sitcom, The Simpsons. ... This is a discography of music related to the Simpsons. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (115th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... The Simpsons Ride is an upcoming simulator ride featured at the Universal Studios Florida, Universal Studios Hollywood theme parks. ... This June 2005 does not cite its references or sources. ... Universal Studios Hollywood is the original Universal Studios theme park, created initially to offer tours of the real Universal Studios soundstages and sets. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The verb to scrabble also means to scratch, scramble or scrape about: see Wiktionary:scrabble. ... Monopoly is the best-selling commercial board game in the world. ... Operation is a battery-operated game of physical skill that tests players hand-eye co-ordination. ... The Game of Life is a board game originally created in 1861 by Milton Bradley as The Checkered Game of Life. ... Home Screen Simpsons Jeopardy! began as a board game (published by Pressman®) which took the popular game show Jeopardy! and themed it to the long-running animated series The Simpsons. The game contained a Jeopardy! style plastic board behind which question sheets could be inserted. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Simpsons Trading Card Game is a collectible card game based on the popular FOX animated television series, The Simpsons. ...

A sampling of Simpsons comic books.

Numerous Simpson-related publications have been released over the years. So far, nine comic book series have been published by Bongo Comics since 1993.[67] The Simpsons and Bart Simpson comics are also reprinted in the United Kingdom, under the same titles, with various stories from the other Bongo series reprinted in the main Simpsons comic. The comics have also been collected in book form; many other Simpsons books such as episode guides have also been published. The Simpsons comic books. ... The Simpsons comic books. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Bongo Comics is a comic book publishing company founded in 1993 by Steve and Cindy Vance, Bill Morrison, and Simpsons creator Matt Groening. ...


Music is featured in The Simpsons, with characters breaking into song during the course of the series. Collections of original music featured in the TV series have been released on the albums Songs in the Key of Springfield and Go Simpsonic with The Simpsons. Several songs have been recorded with the purpose of a single or album release and have not been featured on the show. The best known single is "Do the Bartman", which was co-written by Michael Jackson[68] and became an international success. In the United Kingdom, "Deep, Deep Trouble" was released as a follow up to "Do The Bartman". The albums The Simpsons Sing the Blues and The Yellow Album contained cover versions of songs, as well as some originals. Songs in the Key of Springfield is a 1997 soundtrack album from The Simpsons compiling many of the musical numbers from the series. ... Go Simpsonic with The Simpsons is the 1999 soundtrack album from The Simpsons. ... Do the Bartman is a song from The Simpsons 1990 album The Simpsons Sing the Blues. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Simpsons Sing the Blues is the 1990 album released as an offshoot of The Simpsons. ... The Yellow Album is the 1998 Simpsons album released as a follow up to the 1990 album The Simpsons Sing the Blues. ... In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ...


DVDs

Many episodes of the show have been released on DVD and VHS over the years. When the first season DVD was released in 2001, it quickly became the best-selling television DVD in history, although it would later be overtaken by the first season of Chappelle's Show.[69] In particular, these DVDs have been released in North America (Region 1), Europe (Region 2) and Australia/New Zealand/Latin America (Region 4). Seasons 1-7 have also been released in Japan (Region 2). The following Simpsons DVDs are all one-disc compilation releases in various regions. ... The Simpsons DVD season sets have been released since 2001 in different regions all over the world. ... Chappelles Show is an American comedy television series starring comedian Dave Chappelle. ... DVD Regions Each DVD-Video disc contains one or more region codes, denoting the area(s) of the world in which distribution and playback are intended. ... DVD Regions Each DVD-Video disc contains one or more region codes, denoting the area(s) of the world in which distribution and playback are intended. ... DVD Regions Each DVD-Video disc contains one or more region codes, denoting the area(s) of the world in which distribution and playback are intended. ...


Video games

The video game industry was quick to adapt the characters and world of Springfield into games. Some of the early notable games includes Konami's arcade game The Simpsons (1991) and Acclaim Entertainment's The Simpsons: Bart vs. the Space Mutants (1991). More modern games include The Simpsons Road Rage (2001) and The Simpsons Hit & Run (2003). Two Simpsons pinball machines have been produced; one after the first season, and the other still available. A screenshot of Konamis arcade game The Simpsons The Simpsons video games are video games that uses the characters from the animated television show The Simpsons. ... “Computer Games” redirects here. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... The Simpsons is an arcade game produced by Konami in 1991. ... Acclaim Entertainment was an American video game developer and publisher. ... The Simpsons Road Rage is a video game that was released in 2001 by Electronic Arts. ... The Simpsons Hit & Run is a third-person action adventure game based on the animated sitcom The Simpsons, and is currently the most recent in the line. ... Pinball is a type of coin-operated arcade game where a player attempts to score points by manipulating one or more metal balls on a playfield inside a glass covered case called a pinball machine. ...


Film

Official movie poster
Main article: The Simpsons Movie

There has been talk of a possible feature-length Simpsons film ever since the early seasons of the series. James L. Brooks originally thought that the story of the episode "Kamp Krusty" was suitable for a film, but difficulties were encountered in trying to expand the script to feature-length.[70] For a long time the project was held up. There was trouble finding a story that was right for a film, and the crew did not have enough time to complete the project, as they already worked full time year-round on the show.[64] Image File history File links Simpsons_movie_poster. ... Image File history File links Simpsons_movie_poster. ... The Simpsons Movie is an upcoming animated film based on the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Kamp Krusty is the first episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ...


An animated Simpsons movie is now well into production.[8] It is being produced by 20th Century Fox, Gracie Films, and Film Roman and is scheduled to be released July 27, 2007. The film will be directed by long-time Simpsons producer David Silverman and written by a team of Simpsons writers that includes Matt Groening, James L. Brooks, Al Jean, George Meyer, Mike Reiss, John Swartzwelder, Jon Vitti, David Mirkin, Mike Scully, Matt Selman, and Ian Maxtone-Graham.[8] The film is produced alongside the series, despite long-time claims by those involved in the show's production that a movie would enter production only when the series had reached its end. Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the major American film studios. ... Gracie Films logo Gracie Films is an American film and television production company, created by James L. Brooks in 1986 for The Tracey Ullman Show. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... David Silverman (b. ... Mike Reiss is an American TV comedy writer. ... One of the few pictures of John Swartzwelder John Swartzwelder (born November 16, 1950) is a writer for the animated television series The Simpsons and a published author. ... Jon Vitti is a writer who is most noted for his well-received scripts for the television series The Simpsons. ... David Mirkin is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... Mike Scully Mike Scully is a former executive producer of the Fox series The Simpsons (Seasons 9-12, 1997-2001). ... Matt Selman is a writer for The Simpsons. ... Ian Maxtone-Graham caricatured on The Simpsons, where he has worked since 1994 Ian Maxtone-Graham, born July 3, 1959, is a television writer and producer. ...


References

  • Richmond, Ray; Antonia Coffman (1997). The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to our Favorite Family. Harper Collins Publishers, p. 178. ISBN 0-00063-8898-1. 
  • Turner, Chris. Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation. ISBN 0-679-31318-4. 
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  41. ^ Turner p. 60
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  43. ^ Turner p. 61
  44. ^ a b Turner pp. 63-65
  45. ^ a b Turner p. 62
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  49. ^ Younge, Gary; Jon Henley (2006-07-07). Wimps, weasels and monkeys - the US media view of 'perfidious France'. Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2006-08-05.
  50. ^ Wallenstein, Andrew. 'Malcolm in the Middle': trite Fox fare with a first-rate time slot. Media Life Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
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  54. ^ Unnamed author (2004-10-25). Scooby-Doo breaks cartoon record. BBC. Retrieved on 2006-08-21.
  55. ^ Winslow, George (2003). Japan Rising. World Screen. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  56. ^ Remington, Bob. "It's The Simpsons, Man", TV Times (The Calgary Herald), 1990-10-26, p. 10. 
  57. ^ Suellentrop, Chris (2003-02-12). Who turned America's best TV show into a cartoon?. Slate. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  58. ^ Weinman, Jaime J. (2000-01-24). Worst Episode Ever. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  59. ^ Bonné, Jon (2000-09-02). ’The Simpsons’ has lost its cool. MSNBC. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
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  61. ^ Unnamed author (2003-02-06). 15 writer favorites. USA Today. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  62. ^ Leggett, Chris. "Harry Shearer", UK Teletext, 2004-08-04. 
  63. ^ Mahan, Colin (2006-05-26). 2006 Ratings Wrap-Up (continued). TV.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  64. ^ a b Rabin, Nathan (2006-04-26). Matt Groening interview with The A.V. Club (page 3). A.V. Club. Retrieved on 2006-10-27.
  65. ^ Powers, Scott (2007-04-24). Universal Studios says welcome to The Simpsons ride in Orlando. Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  66. ^ Sexton, Timothy (2005-08-30). Simpsons Board and Trivia Games Are Fun for the Whole Family. Associated Content. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  67. ^ Shutt, Craig. Sundays with the Simpsons. MSNBC. Retrieved on 2007-05-06.
  68. ^ Bird, Brad; Matt Groening. (2002). The Simpsons season 2 DVD commentary for the special feature "Do the Bartman" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  69. ^ Lambert, David (2004-09-19). Chapelle's Show — S1 DVD Passes The Simpsons As #1 All-Time TV-DVD; Celebrates by Announcing Season 2!. TVshowsonDVD.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  70. ^ Groening, Matt; Al Jean, Mark Kirkland, David Silverman. (2004). The Simpsons season 4 DVD commentary for the episode "Kamp Krusty" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.

1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Further reading

  • Alberti, John (ed.) (2003). Leaving Springfield: 'The Simpsons' and the Possibility of Oppositional Culture. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-2849-0. 
  • Brown, Alan; Chris Logan (2006). The Psychology of The Simpsons. ISBN 1-932100-70-9. 
  • Gray, Jonathan (2006). Watching with The Simpsons: Television, Parody, and Intertextuality. ISBN 0-4153-6202-4. 
  • Irwin, William; Mark T. Conrad; Aeon Skoble (eds.) (1999). The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer. Chicago: Open Court. ISBN 0-8126-9433-3.
  • Keller, Beth L. (1992). The Gospel According to Bart: Examining the Religious Elements of The Simpsons. Regent University. ISBN 0-8126-9433-3. 
  • Keslowitz, Steven (2003). The Simpsons And Society: An Analysis Of Our Favorite Family And Its Influence In Contemporary Society. Hats Off Books. ISBN 1-58736-253-8. 
  • Pinsky, Mark I. The Gospel According to The Simpsons: The Spiritual Life of the World's Most Animated Family. ISBN 0-664-22419-9. 
  • Pinsky, Mark I.; Samuel F. Parvin. The Gospel According to the Simpsons: Leaders Guide for Group Study. ISBN 0-664-22590-X. 

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Simpsons
The Simpsons Portal
  The Simpsons
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Characters: Homer Simpson • Marge Simpson Bart Simpson Lisa Simpson Maggie Simpson Other characters
Production: Cast members Guest stars Foreign language cast Writers Directors Awards Songs
Media releases: Episodes Tracey Ullman shorts The Simpsons Movie Discography Complete list of media
Seasons: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Hallmarks: Opening sequence Chalkboard gag Sax solo gag Couch gag Halloween episodes Recurring jokes
Themes: Education Media Politics Religion Travel
Locations: Springfield Shelbyville Capital City The Simpson house Springfield's state Springfield Elementary School
Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Moe's Tavern Kwik-E-Mart • Krusty Burger Springfield Retirement Castle
Publications: DVDs DVD boxsets Video games Simpsons Comics Bart Simpson Comics Other publications
Miscellaneous: D'oh! Words and phrases Products "Do the Bartman" • "Deep, Deep Trouble" • Homer's jobs World of Springfield Duff beer The Simpsons Ride

  Results from FactBites:
 
Simpsons Channel | Your Source For Simpsons News (1186 words)
EA's forthcoming The Simpsons game parodies 30 years of videogaming and gaming IPs, but there are games companies that have refused to see the funny side of things.
Despite the high figures Fox came fourth overall and amongst the adult demographic, and The Simpsons was fourth in its timeslot of 8.00.
Simpson - Homer and Marge in a Mr.
Simpsons City - La ville Simpson (1053 words)
Simpsons City est un forum sur les Simpson.
Simpsons City est aussi un forum et une ville virtuelle.
Pour pouvoir profiter pleinement du jeu de Simpsons City et pour pouvoir participer au forum, tu peux t'inscrire gratuitement en cliquant ici.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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