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Encyclopedia > The Saturday Evening Post
A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903, illustrated by George Gibbs.
A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903, illustrated by George Gibbs.

The Saturday Evening Post was a weekly magazine published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. From 1897, it was published by Curtis Publishing Company. Curtis claimed the Post was descended from The Pennsylvania Gazette founded in 1728 by Benjamin Franklin, although the magazine's first issue was published more than 30 years after Franklin's death. According to historians, and the circulation numbers, the magazine gained prominent status under the leadership of his editor (1899-1937) George Horace Lorimer. Download high resolution version (623x800, 118 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (623x800, 118 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... George Gibbs may refer to: George Gibbs, 1st Baron Wraxall (1873–1931), British Member of Parliament and baron of peerage George Gibbs, 2nd Baron Wraxall (1928–2001), British baron of peerage and kidnapping victim George Gibbs (geologist) (1815–1873), American geologist and ethnologist George F. Gibbs (1846–1924), secretary to... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... During the early 20th century The Curtis Publishing Company was one of the largest and most influential publishers in America. ... The Pennsylvania Gazette was one of the United States most prominent newspapers from 1723, before the time period of the American Revolution, until 1800. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... George Horace Lorimer (1869-1937) was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the son of the Rev. ...

Contents

Description and History

Its contents consisted primarily of articles on current events and pieces of well-written popular fiction in mainstream genres, at least one of which was usually run in serial format over several issues. These were supplemented by single-panel cartoons, small human-interest, humorous or poetic filler pieces (often reader-contributed), editorials, a letter column, and quality interior illustrations of both stories and advertising plus illustrated covers. In March 1916 Lorimer agreed to meet Norman Rockwell, a 22 year old artist from New York. He immediately accepted two front covers he had produced and commissioned three more. Rockwell did covers and illustrations for the magazine through 1963, and gained his public fame by these works; several of these are among his critically best-acclaimed works. Other artists also gained fame by contributing Post covers, for example Nebraska artist John Philip Falter. Fiction authors included the likes of John Steinbeck, William Saroyan, John P. Marquand, Paul Gallico, Kay Boyle, C. S. Forester, Hammond Innes, Sax Rohmer, Louis L'Amour, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Rex Stout, Joseph C. Lincoln, C.S. Lewis, Brian Cleeve, and Ray Bradbury. For the band, see Cartoons (band). ... Illustration by Jessie Willcox Smith. ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... John Falter in his studio, 1978 John Philip Falter (Plattsmouth, NE, 1910 - Philadelphia, PA, 1982), more commonly known as John Falter, was a renowned Nebraska artist who was perhaps most famous for his many Saturday Evening Post covers. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was one of the best-known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... William Saroyan, 1940 William Saroyan (August 31, 1908 - May 18, 1981) was an American author who wrote many plays and short stories about growing up impoverished as the son of Armenian immigrants. ... John Phillips Marquand (November 10, 1893 - July 16, 1960 ) was a 20th-century American novelist. ... Paul Gallico, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Paul William Gallico (July 26, 1897-July 15, 1976) was a fabulously successful U.S. novelist and short story writer. ... Kay Boyle Kay Boyle, born February 19, 1902 in St. ... The cover of the 1974 paperback edition of one of Foresters non-fiction titles: Hunting The Bismarck Cecil Scott Forester was the pen name of Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (August 27, 1899 – April 2, 1966), an English novelist who rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes. ... Hammond Innes (July 15, 1914 – June 10, 1998) was an English author who wrote over thirty novels, as well as childrens and travel books. ... Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward (February 15, 1883 - June 1, 1959), better known as Sax Rohmer, was a prolific English novelist. ... Cover Louis LAmour book, Showdown at Yellow Butte. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Rex Stout, full name Rex Todhunter Stout, (December 1, 1886 - October 27, 1975) was an American writer best known as the creator of the larger-than-life fictional detective Nero Wolfe. ... Joseph Crosby Lincoln, (born February 13, 1870 in Brewster, Massachusetts died March 10, 1944 in Winter Park, Florida) was an American author of novels, poems, and short stories, many set in a fictionalized Cape Cod. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Brian Cleeve Brian Talbot Cleeve, (November 22, 1921 – March 11, 2003) was a prolific writer and popular TV broadcaster, who lived in Ireland for most of his life . ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451, is widely considered...


Along with many other general-interest magazines, the Post saw a decline in the late 1950s and 1960s, generally attributed to the rise of television. In addition, interest in the Post's style of fiction and its conservative editorial bent declined during the advent of American counterculture. "Name" authors were drawn to more libertine magazines like Playboy as a high-status and high-paying venue for their work. Increasingly, the Post turned to articles on more current and fashionable topics, using cheaper photographic covers and advertisements. the first thing that was invented was the automatic DILDO. Education grew explosively because of a very strong demand for high school and college education. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ...


An account of the final years of the Post (1962-1969) by Otto Friedrich, the magazine's last managing editor, was published as Decline and Fall (Harper & Row, 1970). Friedrich acknowledged that times were against the Post, but insisted that the magazine was of high quality and appreciated by its readers, attributing the financial difficulties largely to unimaginative and incompetent corporate management at Curtis. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


The demise of the Post came after the magazine ran an article implying that football coaches Paul "Bear" Bryant and Wally Butts had conspired to "fix" a game between the University of Alabama and the University of Georgia. Butts sued and the case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where it became a landmark libel case (Curtis Publishing Co. v. Butts, 388 U.S. 130 (1967)). Butts ultimately won, and the magazine was ordered to pay $3,060,000 in damages. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... Paul William Bear Bryant (September 11, 1913–January 26, 1983) was an American college football coach. ... James Wallace Wally Butts (February 7, 1905 – December 17, 1973) was the head football coach (seasons 1939 through 1960) and athletic director (1939 to 1963) at the University of Georgia. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... “Libel” redirects here. ... Holding Libel damages may be recoverable (in this instance against a news organization) if the injured party is a non-public official; but claimants must demonstrate a reckless lack of professional standards on the part of the organization in examining allegations for reasonable credibility. ... In law, damages refers to the money paid or awarded to a claimant (as it is known in the UK) or plaintiff (in the US) following their successful claim in a civil action. ...


In 1971, the Post was revived, first as a quarterly, then as a bi-monthly publication specializing in health and medical breakthroughs. The magazine is currently published six times a year by the "Benjamin Franklin Literary & Medical Society", a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... 501(c) is a provision of the United States Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. Â§ 501(c)), listing twenty-eight types of non-profit organizations exempt from some Federal income taxes. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ...


In 1958, Mad Magazine published a satire of the Post titled "The Saturday Evening Pest," whose first page shows a spoof of a Norman Rockwell Thanksgiving scene (pipe-smoking painter "Norman Shockwell" smirks at the reader from one corner); the cover announces articles such as "Our State Department--Do We Need It?" by Joseph and Stewart Allslop" (Joseph and Stewart Alsop) and "This Isn't Exactly What I Had in Mind" by Benjamin Franklin. Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... The art of diplomacy, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Joseph Alsop V (1910-1989) was a columnist and analyst in the Kennedy era. ... Stewart Johonnot Oliver Alsop (17 May 1914 – 26 May 1974) was an American newspaper columnist and political analyst. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...


Editors

(from the purchase by Curtis, 1898) Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

William George Jordan (1864 - 1928) was an American editor and essayist, considered by some to be one of the greatest essayists of his time. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... George Horace Lorimer (1869-1937) was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the son of the Rev. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clay Blair, Jr. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Cover Gallery

See also

Cyrus Hermann Kotzschmar Curtis (1850 - 1933) was a significant U.S. publisher. ... Garet Garrett (1878-1954) was an American journalist and author who was noted for his critiques of the New Deal and U.S. involvement in the Second World War. ... A cover of Ladies Home Journal from 1906 Ladies Home Journal is a magazine first published February 16, 1883 as a womens supplement to the Tribune and Farmer. ... Joseph Christian Leyendecker (23 March 1874-25 July 1951) was a popularAmerican illustrator. ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... John Falter in his studio, 1978 John Philip Falter (Plattsmouth, NE, 1910 - Philadelphia, PA, 1982), more commonly known as John Falter, was a renowned Nebraska artist who was perhaps most famous for his many Saturday Evening Post covers. ... Harry Simmons was the major league schedule maker from 1953 - 1982 Harry Simmons (September 29, 1907, New York, New York - January 14, 1998, New Canaan, Connecticut) was a Baseball executive, writer, and historian. ...

Popular Culture

  • Steve Allen wrote a song inspired by the magazine's title.

Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian, and writer who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ...

Similar magazines

Colliers (May 7, 1932) Colliers Weekly was an American magazine founded by Peter Fenelon Collier and published from 1888 to 1957. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Philippe Halsmans famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe Life generally refers to two American magazines: A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936; A publication created by Time founder Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. ... Look was a weekly, general-interest magazine published in the United States from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles. ...

External links

  • Saturday Evening Post website
  • Saturday Evening Post illustration archive
  • George Horace Lorimer

  Results from FactBites:
 
On the Saturday Evening Post, Norman Rockwell Made America Laugh (864 words)
The Saturday Evening Post was published weekly in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969 and monthly afterward.
Although hesitant about approaching the Saturday Evening Post, Norman Rockwell was certain that the cover of the Post was his window of opportunity.
Even more important than the immediate payment was the knowledge that he was going to be published on the cover of The Post.
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