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Encyclopedia > The Producers (1968 film)
The Producers (1968)
Directed by Mel Brooks
Produced by Sidney Glazier
Written by Mel Brooks
Starring Zero Mostel
Gene Wilder
Kenneth Mars
Music by Brian Morris
John Morris
Cinematography Joseph Coffey
Editing by Ralph Rosenblum
Distributed by Embassy Pictures
Release date(s) March 18, 1968
Running time 90 min.
Country Flag of United States United States
Language English
Budget $941,000 USD (est.)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

This page is about the 1968 film. For the 2005 movie, see The Producers (2005 film). For other uses, see The Producers (disambiguation) Image File history File links TheProducers1968DVD.jpg Summary DVD cover of the 1968 film The Producers. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Mostel in Sirocco (1951) Zero Mostel (February 28, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Brooklyn-born stage and film actor best known for his portrayal of comic characters such as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof , Pseudolus in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Max... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor and comedian who has starred in more than thirty movies. ... Kenneth Mars (born April 14, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois) is a television, movie and voice actor, perhaps best known for his roles in several Mel Brooks films and for playing King Triton in Disneys The Little Mermaid. ... Brian Morris is a professor of molecular medical sciences at the University of Sydney. ... The Right Honourable John Morris, Earl Morris of Aberavon, KG, PC, QC (born 5 November 1931), was a UK Labour member of Parliament for Aberavon. ... Embassy Pictures Corporation (aka Embassy Film Associates) was an independent studio and distributor responsible for such films as The Graduate and The Lion in Winter. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Producers is a 2005 film based on the 2001 Broadway musical of the same name, which is in turn based on the 1968 movie starring Zero Mostel, Gene Wilder and Andréas Voutsinas. ... The Producers may refer to one of the following: American actor and writer director Mel Brooks comedy about two con-men who attempt to cheat theatre investors out of their investment money. ...


The Producers is a 1968 feature-length comedy film written and directed by Mel Brooks. In the film, two New York City con men (Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom) attempt to cheat theater 'angels' (investors) out of their investment money by deliberately producing a "flop," or intentionally unsuccessful show. // October 30 - The film The Lion in Winter, starring Katharine Hepburn, debuts. ... Airplane! is considered by some critics to be one of the funniest movies of all time. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, also known as a con or scam, is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... Max Bialystock is a fictional character and main protagonist who first appeared in Mel Brooks 1969 movie, The Producers, played by Zero Mostel. ... Leopold Bloom is a fictional character in James Joyces novel Ulysses. ... Investment is a term with several closely related meanings in finance and economics. ...


This was the first film directed by Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony winner Mel Brooks, and it sparked Brooks' lengthy career. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... An Emmy Award. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ...

Contents

Cast

Zero Mostel - Max Bialystock
Gene Wilder - Leopold Bloom
Kenneth Mars - Franz Liebkind
Lee Meredith - Ulla
Estelle Winwood - Hold Me-Touch Me
Christopher Hewett - Roger DeBris
Andréas Voutsinas - Carmen Ghia
Dick Shawn - Lorenzo St. DuBois (L.S.D.)
Renée Taylor - Eva Braun

Mostel in Sirocco (1951) Zero Mostel (February 28, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Brooklyn-born stage and film actor best known for his portrayal of comic characters such as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof , Pseudolus in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Max... Max Bialystock is a fictional character and main protagonist who first appeared in Mel Brooks 1969 movie, The Producers, played by Zero Mostel. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor and comedian who has starred in more than thirty movies. ... Leopold Bloom is a fictional character in James Joyces novel Ulysses. ... Kenneth Mars (born April 14, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois) is a television, movie and voice actor, perhaps best known for his roles in several Mel Brooks films and for playing King Triton in Disneys The Little Mermaid. ... Franz Liebkind is a fictional character in Mel Brooks film and musical, The Producers. ... Lee Meredith (born October 22, 1947) is an American actress. ... Scene from the London version of the Producers, Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, April 2006. ... Estelle Winwood (January 24, 1883 – June 20, 1984) was a English stage and film actress who in moved to America mid-career and became celebrated for her longevity. ... Christopher Hewett, (April 5, 1922 – August 3, 2001), was an English actor who was perhaps best known for his role as Mr. ... Andréas Voutsinas is a French actor. ... Richard Schulefand (December 1, 1924 – April 17, 1987), an American actor and comedian known professionally as Dick Shawn, was born in Buffalo, New York. ... Born Renée Wexler in New York City on March 19, 1933, Renée Taylor is best known for playing Fran Dreschers voracious and outspoken mother, Sylvia Fine, on the TV series The Nanny. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Plot

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Max Bialystock is a failed, aging Broadway producer who ekes out a living romancing rich old women in exchange for money for his "next play." He encounters the nebbish accountant Leo Bloom when the latter is sent to Bialystock's office to do his books; in the process of this, a chance comment by Bloom inspires a scheme to massively oversell shares in a Broadway production, then purposely make a horrific flop, so that no one will ever audit its books, thus avoiding a payout and leaving the duo free to flee to Brazil with the profits. After an extensive search they find an unproduced play which Bialystock gleefully describes as "a love letter to Hitler," written in total sincerity by a deranged ex-Nazi named Franz Liebkind. They convince Liebkind to sign over the rights, then collect money from dozens of little old ladies—ultimately selling 25,000 percent of the play—and hire the monumentally untalented director Roger De Bris to stage the production. The part of Hitler goes to a charismatic hippie named Lorenzo St. Dubois (aka LSD), who wanders into the wrong theater by accident during the casting call. Note on spelling: While most Americans use er (as per American spelling conventions), the majority of venues, performers and trade groups for live theatre use re. ... Hitler redirects here. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Singer at a modern Hippie movement in Russia Hippie or Hippy refers to a subgroup of the 1960s and early 1970s counterculture that found its earliest beginnings in the United States, becoming an established social group by 1965 before declining during the mid-1970s. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... In the performing arts, casting is a vital pre-production process for selecting a cast (a meaning of the word recorded since 1631) of actors, dancers, singers, models and other talent for a live or recorded performance. ...


The result of all of this is Springtime for Hitler, a cheerfully upbeat (and apocalyptically tasteless) musical comedy detailing the life of the dictator, which opens with a lavish production number celebrating Nazi Germany overrunning Europe. Unfortunately for the protagonists, their attempt to make an unwatchable play backfires as, after initial dumbfounded disbelief, the audience finds the inept production so funny that they view it as an over-the-top satire on Nazism and universally hail it as a hit. A row of dancing stormtroopers in the infamous opening musical number from Springtime for Hitler. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


After an enraged Liebkind attempts to shoot the producers in their office, the three of them band together and, in desperation, blow up the theater to end the production. They get caught in the explosion and are hauled off to jail. Found "incredibly guilty" in their criminal trial, they are sent to prison, where they proceed to create a new play starring their fellow convicts entitled "Prisoners of Love," running the exact same scam as before.

Spoilers end here.

Release History

According to Brooks, after the film was completed, MGM executives declined to release it due to "bad taste" until Peter Sellers saw the film privately and placed an advertisement in Variety in support of the film's wider release[1]. It was still only released to only a small number of theaters[2]. The Producers was rated PG by the MPAA for brief mild language. Richard Henry Peter Sellers, CBE (8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was an English comedian, actor, and performer, who came to prominence on the BBC radio series The Goon Show and later became a film star. ... Variety (linguistics) is a concept that includes for instance dialects, standard language and jargon. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and territories and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ... The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), originally called the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors Association of America, is a non-profit trade association based in the United States which was formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ...


In 2002 The Producers was re-issued to three theaters by Rialto Pictures and earned $111,866[3] [4]at the box office. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


In 2001 Brooks adapted the film into a Broadway musical of the same name (The Producers). In 2005, a film, based in turn on that musical, was released (The Producers). 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... The Fantasticks was the longest-running musical in history. ... The 1968 film The Producers was adapted as a critically acclaimed Broadway musical by Mel Brooks in 2001. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... The Producers is a 2005 film based on the 2001 Broadway musical of the same name, which is in turn based on the 1968 movie starring Zero Mostel, Gene Wilder and Andréas Voutsinas. ...


The Producers is currently available on DVD, released by MGM. As of 2007, the film continues to be distributed to art-film and repertory cinemas by Rialto. For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ...


Reception

The film received harsh reviews from New York critics Renata Adler ("shoddy and gross and cruel" in the New York Times), Stanley Kauffmann ("the film bloats into sogginess." -- New Republic), Pauline Kael ("amateurishly crude" in the New Yorker) and Andrew Sarris, partly due to its directorial style and broad ethnic humor [5]. Negative reviewers noted the bad taste and insensitivity (against a narrow and agressively conservative moral standard) of devising a broad comedy about two Jewish men conspiring to cheat theatrical investors by devising a designed-to-fail singing, dancing, tasteless Broadway musical show about Hitler (a mere 23 years after the end of World War II) [6]. Time Magazine's reviewers wrote, "...hilariously funny ... Unfortunately, the film is burdened with the kind of plot that demands resolution ... ends in a whimper of sentimentality ... The movie is disjointed and inconsistent ..."[7] and "... a wildly funny joy ride ..."[8], "...despite its bad moments, is some of the funniest American cinema comedy in years."[9] The film industry trade paper Variety magazine wrote, "The film is unmatched in the scenes featuring Mostel and Wilder alone together, and several episodes with other actors are truly rare"[10] Variety is a daily magazine for the entertainment industry. ...


Reviews in the U.K. were positive to very positive[6].


Awards and Recognition

In 1968, The Producers won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Story and Screenplay—Written Directly for the Screen and was nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Gene Wilder). Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...


The film has been deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. The Great Hall interior. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


In 1969, The Producers won a Writers Guild of America Best Original Screenplay award. The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ... Best Original Screenplay The Producers, Written by Mel Brooks Best Written Musical Funny Girl, Written by Isobel Lennart Best Written Drama The Lion in Winter, Written by James Goldman Best Written Comedy The Odd Couple, Neil Simon Writers Guild of America awards list Categories: | ...


In 2004, The Producers was placed at #11 of the American Film Institute list of The 100 Funniest Films Of All Time. The American Film Institute (AFI) is an independent non-profit organization created by the National Endowment for the Arts, which was established in 1967 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act. ...


Trivia

  • Max Bialystock is named after the Polish city of Białystok. A 'Bialy' is a kind of bagel.[citation needed]
  • Carmen Ghia is named after the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia, a popular car in production in 1968.
  • The writer-director Mel Brooks' is heard briefly in the film, singing "Don't be stupid, be a smarty/Come and join the Nazi Party" in the song Springtime For Hitler. His version of line is also dubbed into each performance of the musical and in the movie version of the musical.[citation needed]
  • At its theatrical release in Sweden, the film was given the Swedish title Producenterna (The Producers), but it was not a success then. After it was re-released under the title Det Våras För Hitler (Springtime for Hitler), it did score with the Swedish audience. Because of this, all of Mel Brooks' films were given a title with Det våras för... (Springtime For...) in Sweden, up until Life Stinks. (For example, Blazing Saddles was retitled Det Våras För Sheriffen (Springtime For The Sheriff) and Spaceballs was retitled Det Våras För Rymden (Springtime For Space). After this, Mel Brooks himself has complained at the Swedish habit of always calling his films something with 'Springtime For...' and so, his last two films have been called Robin Hood: Karlar I Trikåer (Robin Hood: Men in Tights) and Dracula: Död Men Lycklig (Dracula: Dead and Loving It), although the latter is called Det Våras För Dracula on the Swedish DVD cover).[citation needed]
  • The foreman of the jury is played by Bill Macy, who would later star in the 1970s sitcom, Maude, and numerous Hollywood films.
  • According to Mel Brooks during an interview in the bonus DVD ofThe Producers , Dustin Hoffman was originally cast as Franz Liebkind, but the night before shooting (according to Brooks) bowed out to star in The Graduate, which starred Mel Brook's late wife, Anne Bancroft
  • Peter Sellers was a fan and appeared on Michael Parkinson's BBC1 chat show Parkinson in a Nazi helmet reciting the entire "Hitler was a better painter than Churchill" speech. (Parkinson BBC1 09/11/74 & BBC Audiobooks (5 Feb 1996))
  • The title of the U2 album Achtung Baby comes from a line in the movie.
  • A spoof of The Producers is the Goof Troop episode "Pete's Day at the Races" (Black Pete tries to pull a scam by overselling a racehorse).
  • This film is number 12 on Bravo's "100 Funniest Movies".[citation needed]

Białystok (pronounced: , Belarusian: , Lithuanian: , Yiddish ביאַליסטאָק) is the largest city (pop. ... The Karmann Ghia was a two-seater sports car marketed by Volkswagen, designed by the Italian firm Ghia, and built by German coach builder Karmann. ... Alex Karras as Mongo in Blazing Saddles Blazing Saddles is a Warner Bros. ... This article is about a motion picture. ... Robin Hood: Men In Tights (1993) is a film parody of the story of Robin Hood, particularly parodying Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. ... Dracula: Dead and Loving It is a 1995 movie directed by Mel Brooks. ... Bill Macy (born May 18, 1922 in Revere, Massachusetts) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of Walter Findlay, Bea Arthurs long-suffering husband on the television sitcom Maude. ... Maude is a half-hour American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on the CBS network from September 12, 1972 until April 29, 1978. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... The Producers may refer to one of the following: American actor and writer director Mel Brooks comedy about two con-men who attempt to cheat theatre investors out of their investment money. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the American rock band, see The Graduate (band). ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Richard Henry Peter Sellers, CBE (8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was an English comedian, actor, and performer, who came to prominence on the BBC radio series The Goon Show and later became a film star. ... Michael Parkinson CBE (born 28 March 1935) is an English journalist and television presenter. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Pete laughing at Goofy. ... Black Pete (also known by countless other names, including Peg-Leg Pete and, simply, Pete) is a fictional character from the Walt Disney Company stables. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short, (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... This article is about the U.S. cable network. ...

Quotations

From Mel Brooks' interview: "I was never crazy about Hitler...If you stand on a soapbox and trade rhetoric with a dictator you never win...That's what they do so well: they seduce people. But if you ridicule them, bring them down with laughter, they can't win. You show how crazy they are."


See also

Differences between film and musical versions of The Producers The following table depicts the differences between the film and musical adaptations of The Producers (1968 film). ...


References

  1. ^ The Producers(1968): Deluxe Edition DVD: The Making of The Producers | Interview with Mel Brooks
  2. ^ Mark Bourne. The Producers(1968): Deluxe Edition DVD review". dvdjournal.com. Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  3. ^ Business Data for The Producers (1968). imdb.com. Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  4. ^ Business Data for The Producers (Re-issue). boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  5. ^ J. Hoberman (2001-04-15). When The Nazis Became Nudniks. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  6. ^ a b Symons, Alex (2006-03-22). An audience for Mel Brooks's The Producers: the avant-garde of the masses.(Critical essay). Journal of Popular Film and Television. Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  7. ^ The Producers (review). time.com (1968-01-26). Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  8. ^ Arts & Entertainment (Cinema). time.com (1968-04-19). Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  9. ^ Arts & Entertainment (Cinema). time.com (1968-05-10). Retrieved on 2007 February 2.
  10. ^ Variety Staff (1968-01-01). The Producers (review). variety.com. Retrieved on 2007 February 2.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (82nd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (131st in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Producers (1968 film)


Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize winning American film critic. ...

Films Directed by Mel Brooks
The Producers | The Twelve Chairs | Young Frankenstein | Blazing Saddles | Silent Movie | High Anxiety
History of the World, Part I | Spaceballs | Life Stinks | Robin Hood: Men in Tights | Dracula: Dead and Loving It

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Reasons for Movie Ratings (CARA) - Frequently Asked Questions (1192 words)
No; the system is not designed to serve the function of "critic." The ratings do not determine or reflect whether a film is "good" or "bad." The system is not intended to approve, disapprove or censor any film; it merely assigns a rating for guidance--leaving the decision-making responsibilities to the parents.
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The Producers (1968 film) Summary (399 words)
The Producers is a 1968 feature-length comedy film set in New York City, in which two con men (Bialystock and Bloom) attempt to cheat theatre 'angels' (investors) out of their investment money.
The film was adapted by its writer/director, Mel Brooks, int...
The Producers (1968 film): The Producers (1968 film) Summary
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