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Encyclopedia > The Phantom of the Opera (2004 film)
The Phantom of the Opera

Promotional poster for Phantom of the Opera
Directed by Joel Schumacher
Produced by Andrew Lloyd Webber
Written by Andrew Lloyd Webber,
Charles Hart,
Richard Stilgoe,
Joel Schumacher
Starring Gerard Butler
Emmy Rossum
Patrick Wilson
Miranda Richardson
Minnie Driver
Simon Callow
Ciarán Hinds
Jennifer Ellison
Distributed by Warner Bros. (USA)
Universal Studios (Latin America and Australia)
Release date(s) December 22, 2004
Running time 143 min.
Language English
Budget $70,000,000 USD
IMDb profile

The Phantom of the Opera is a 2004 Joel Schumacher directed film adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Charles Hart's internationally successful 1986 stage musical, which is in turn based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. The screenplay was written by Schumacher and Webber, and Webber produced the film. The cast includes Gerard Butler as the Phantom, Emmy Rossum (who was only 16 at the time of filming) as Christine Daaé, Patrick Wilson as Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny, Miranda Richardson as Madame Giry, Jennifer Ellison as Meg Giry, and Minnie Driver (whose vocals were dubbed by Margaret Preece, a professional opera singer) as Carlotta Giudicelli. Ramin Karimloo (who had been playing Raoul in the London production of Phantom at the time of filming) appeared in a cameo role as Christine's father. Image File history File links Poto2. ... Joel Schumacher (born August 29, 1939 in New York, New York, USA) is an American film director, writer, and producer. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Charles Hart (born 1962, London) is a British lyricist, songwriter and musician. ... Richard Stilgoe OBE. Richard Stilgoe OBE (b. ... Joel Schumacher (born August 29, 1939 in New York, New York, USA) is an American film director, writer, and producer. ... Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor best known to American audiences for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ... Patrick Wilson (born July 3, 1973) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American theater and film actor and singer. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Minnie Driver (born Amelia Fiona J. Driver on 31 January 1971) is an Academy award nominated English actress and singer-songwriter, born in London to Ronnie Driver and his wife Gaynor. ... Simon Philip Hugh Callow, CBE (born June 15, 1949 in London, England) is a highly-regarded British actor of stage, film and television, and a biographer of Orson Welles and Charles Laughton. ... Hinds in HBOs TV Series Rome Ciarán Hinds (born February 9, 1953) is a well-respected Belfast-born actor whose work spans theatre, radio, television, and film. ... Jennifer Ellison (born May 30, 1983) is an English actress, singer and dancer. ... “WB” redirects here. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. ... Joel Schumacher (born August 29, 1939 in New York, New York, USA) is an American film director, writer, and producer. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Charles Hart (born 1962, London) is a British lyricist, songwriter and musician. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel by French novelist Gaston Leroux. ... This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ... Gaston Leroux. ... Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor best known to American audiences for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Erik is the title protagonist in The Phantom of the Opera. ... Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ... Christine Daaé is the main female character in Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera (1910), the young singer with whom the Phantom falls in love. ... Patrick Wilson (born July 3, 1973) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American theater and film actor and singer. ... Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny is a fictional character from Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Madame Giry is a character in the Gaston Leroux novel, The Phantom of the Opera. ... Jennifer Ellison (born May 30, 1983) is an English actress, singer and dancer. ... Meg Giry is one of the fictional characters from the Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ... Minnie Driver (born Amelia Fiona J. Driver on 31 January 1971) is an Academy award nominated English actress and singer-songwriter, born in London to Ronnie Driver and his wife Gaynor. ... This page may meet Wikipedia’s criteria for speedy deletion. ... Carlotta Giudicelli is a fictional character from The Phantom of the Opera. ... Ramin Karimloo is an Iranian-born Canadian musical theatre actor, primarily recognised for his work in Londons West End. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The film was a USA/UK co-production that had various distributors worldwide. For example, Warner Bros. distributed the film in the USA, and Universal Pictures (producers and/or distributors of the 1925, 1943, and 1962 adaptations of the book) released the film in Latin America and Australia. “WB” redirects here. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... The 1925 silent film version of The Phantom of the Opera, directed by Rupert Julian, is a classic adaptation of Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera, starring Lon Chaney in the title role as the masked and facially disfigured Phantom who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing... Phantom of the Opera is a 1943 Universal horror film starring Claude Rains. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a 1962 film produced by Hammer Film Productions and directed by Terence Fisher. ...

Contents

Plot

Directly adapted from the musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber, which in turn was based on the novel by Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera tells the story of a disfigured recluse who lives in the Opera Populaire in Paris and the extreme lengths he goes to benefit the 16-year-old girl with whom he's obsessed. The Phantom of the Opera is a musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel by French novelist Gaston Leroux. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ... Gaston Leroux. ...


Prologue

The film begins in 1919 (in black and white) at an auction in the decrepit Opera Populaire, where Raoul, the elderly Vicomte de Chagny, purchases a music box featuring a monkey. Madame Giry, an old acquaintance and also elderly, is at the auction as well. The next lot is a chandelier (announced as auction lot 666, traditionally associated as the Number of the Beast) in pieces covered by an enormous tarp. The tarp is lifted. As it rises, a flashback that lasts most of the movie begins, set in time when the Opera Populaire was in its grandeur. A contemporary chandelier in the Galt House in Louisville, Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Number of the Beast (disambiguation). ...


Paris — 1870

Rehearsals are underway for Chalumeau's Hannibal starring Carlotta Giudicelli and Ubaldo Piangi. Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny visits during a rehearsal. The retiring manager of the opera house, Lefevre, introduces the new managers, Richard Firmin and Gille André. The new managers, in turn, introduce Raoul. Christine Daaé, a chorus girl, recognizes Raoul as a childhood sweetheart, but does not go to speak with him because she doesn't think he'll recognize her. Carlotta is asked to sing "Think of Me," but a large set piece activated by the Phantom of the Opera falls on her and she leaves, refusing to perform. A note from the Phantom explains to Firmin and André that Box 5 is to be kept empty for the Phantom's use and that his salary of 20,000 francs is to be paid monthly. Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny is a fictional character from Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ...


The directors choose Christine to replace Carlotta after Madame Giry, the dance director, recommends her. During the performance, Christine steals the show, and Raoul remembers Christine as his childhood sweetheart. After the performance, Christine confesses to Meg, Madame Giry's daughter, that she has been tutored by a mysterious voice whom she thinks is her father, who told her before he died that an "Angel of Music" would come to her ("Angel of Music"). Raoul enters Christine's dressing room and they embrace, recalling fond childhood memories ("Little Lotte"). After he leaves to prepare a carriage for them, the Phantom, whom Christine thought was her father/Angel of Music, reveals his true identity through Christine's mirror ("Angel of Music (The Mirror)") and takes her to his lair ("The Phantom of the Opera") where he infatuates her with his passion for music ("The Music of the Night"). He shows Christine a mannequin he has carved of her wearing a wedding gown. Christine is shocked and faints, so the Phantom carries her tenderly and places her in a bed. It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: Mini-essay on a song; WP:OR. If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a song from the stage musical of the same name, composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, lyrics written by Charles Hart and Richard Stilgoe, and additional lyrics by Mike Batt. ... The Music of the Night is a song from the musical The Phantom of the Opera. ...


Later, Meg discovers the passageway in Christine's dressing room, but Madame Giry stops her before she travels along it. Joseph Buquet, a stage hand, frightens the performers with stories of the Phantom and his magical lasso, to earn the scolding of Madame Giry. ("Magical Lasso") The Punjab lasso is a type of weapon referred to in Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ...


When Christine wakes some time later ("I Remember..."), she removes the Phantom's mask in curiosity. Just before she sees his features, he throws her to the floor in his fury, yet when she begins to cry, he becomes on the verge of tears himself. He tells Christine how much he despises himself ("Stranger Than You Dreamt It"), and Christine is moved to pity. She hands the Phantom his mask with new understanding, and the Phantom returns her to the opera house, after she promises to return again.


Interlude — 1919

The film cuts back to 1919, as the elderly Raoul leaves the Paris Opera House. As he gets into his car, he sees Madame Giry also leave; they nod acknowledgment to each other as his car departs. Raoul looks into the car's side mirror to watch her receding form and experiences another flashback...


Paris — 1870

The day after the events of the first flashback, the opera house is thrown into confusion over the upcoming production of Il Muto as well as the reception of several notes from the Phantom ("Notes"). One note insists that Christine should play the Countess and that Carlotta should play the mute pageboy. Carlotta accuses Raoul of writing the note and threatens to leave, but André and Firmin flatter her into performing as the Countess ("Prima Donna"). Look up Prima donna in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


During the performance all goes as planned, until the Phantom makes an appearance at an upper balcony. Carlotta loses her voice ("Poor Fool, He Makes Me Laugh") as a result of the Phantom slipping a substance into her water, forcing the managers to let Christine play the Countess. The dancers perform a ballet number while the audience waits, and during this time, Joseph Buquet discovers the Phantom. Furious that anyone would follow him, the Phantom strangles the stagehand, hanging the body over the stage and frightening everyone. Christine takes Raoul to the opera house roof as Raoul tries to convince her (and himself) that the Phantom does not exist. Christine tells Raoul about her mixed feelings about the Phantom ("Why Have You Brought Me Here?/Raoul, I've Been There"), and Raoul promises to keep her safe ("All I Ask of You"). They kiss, and the hurt Phantom, secretly watching, weeps alone ("All I Ask of You" — Reprise). He then hears Christine and Raoul off in the distance. Destroying the rose, he climbs a statue, and vows revenge: "You will curse the day you did not do all that the Phantom asked of you!"


Interlude — 1919

Raoul's car is stopped in traffic. Raoul spots a shop on the corner that sells Swarovski Crystals and sees a couple looking at jewelry in the store window, then watches them kiss, which reminds him of he and Christine. He eyes the crystal display, which resembles fireworks, which then cuts back to 1870 Paris. Swarovski crystal beads Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Swarovski Swarovski is the luxury brand name for the range of precision-cut lead crystal glass products produced by companies owned by Swarovski AG of Feldmeilen, near Zürich, Switzerland. ...


Paris — New Year's Eve 1870/1871

Fireworks are on display over Paris and there is a Masked Ball at the Opera House. Raoul and Christine are now engaged, and Christine's engagement ring is on a chain around her neck. The party at first proceeds normally with everyone joyiously celebrating the New Year ("Masquerade"). For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next year. ... Original poster for The Phantom of the Opera. ...


However, everyone goes silent as a man dressed as Edgar Allan Poe's Red Death makes his entrance -- no one else is wearing red. Despite his mask and costume, everyone instantly knows it is the Phantom ("Why So Silent?"). He presents André and Firmin with his masterpiece, Don Juan Triumphant. He then instructs them (at swordpoint) to cast Christine as the lead, and while doing so, his eyes meet Christine's. There is a moment where the two approach each other, and we see mixed reactions: Raoul is afraid, while Madame Giry seems pleased. However, catching sight of the ring, the Phantom grabs it from her neck, angrily tells her that she belongs to him, then disappears. Raoul, who had run for his sword, follows the Phantom to his torture chamber, but madame Giry leads him out. Realizing Madame Giry knows more than she is telling, Raoul demands to know about the Phantom's mysterious past. Madame Giry explains to Raoul how she saw him, as a youth, on display as "The Devil's Child" in a traveling gypsy fair and hid him in the opera house out of pity after she saw him strangle his captor ("Madame Giry's Tale/The Fairground"). It is revealed that, while beaten as a fairground attraction, he took solace in his only toy and possession, the monkey music box. Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Red Death may refer to: The Masque of the Red Death, a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Interlude — 1919

Raoul's car is now on a deserted road outside Paris; it is going to the cemetery.


Cemetery Outside Paris — 1871

Confused and lost, Christine visits her father's grave at the Daaé mausoleum ("Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again"). The Phantom tries to seduce Christine once more, posing as her father ("Wandering Child"), but Raoul arrives and a sword fight ensues. Raoul nearly kills the Phantom, but Christine stops him. The Phantom swears vengeance on both Raoul and Christine. At the opera house, Raoul, Firmin, and André decide to produce the Phantom's opera in order to catch him, knowing he will be present if Christine sings ("We Have All Been Blind"). Christine is frightened, now knowing the lengths the Phantom will take to make Christine his own, but Raoul comforts her ("Twisted Every Way"). The Phantom is prepared for the opera.


On opening night, Ubaldo Piangi and Christine are to sing a duet. The Phantom strangles Piangi and takes his place in the duet with Christine ("The Point of No Return"). Christine immediately recognizes his voice, but says nothing. She seems to be falling for the Phantom once again. Raoul in the audience also recognizes the Phantom, fear striking him as he watches. Although he informs the police and managers, everyone seems somewhat confused by the performance as the Phantom and Christine continue to sing passionately to each other and embrace. We see a tear in Raoul's eye as he watches this passionate duet, realizing for the first time that Christine is in love with the Phantom. The song ends, and the Phantom sings a haunting version of "All I Ask of You," pleading for her to love him. At that moment, determined to see his face for what it is, Christine strips off his mask in front of the entire audience, revealing his scarred, frightening features. Humiliated and distraught, the Phantom causes the huge chandelier to crash upon the audience, setting the building on fire. He escapes through a trapdoor, taking Christine with him. An angry mob pursues them for revenge for the deaths of Buquet and Piangi ("Down Once More/Track Down This Murderer"). The Point of No Return is a song from the hit West End musical The Phantom of the Opera (1986 musical), based on Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ...


In his lair, the Phantom gives Christine back her engagement ring, this time as part of his own proposal and forces her to wear the wedding dress. He asks her if his face is the reason she won't agree to stay, but Christine tells him she is no longer afraid of his face, but of his soul. After narrowly escaping death as a result of one of the Phantom's traps, Raoul finally reaches the lair, begging for mercy on Christine's behalf. The Phantom tells him that he would never harm her, but he angrily exclaims that Raoul has no right to tell him to show compassion, since nobody ever treated him with it before. He lets Raoul in, where he throws a Punjab lasso at Raoul, offering Christine a deal: should she agree to stay with the Phantom forever and Raoul would be released, but should she refuse to stay with the Phantom, Raoul would be killed but Christine allowed to go free. The three sing together: Raoul telling Christine to refuse the Phantom, Christine hating the Phantom for deceiving her, the Phantom taunting both of them. Christine knows nothing of the Phantom's scary past, but realizes how it must have affected him. Moved to pity, she slips on her ring and kisses him. The Phantom is too stunned to kiss her back, and the two pull apart. The Phantom gives Christine a trembling smile, and Christine kisses him again. This kiss is passionate and full of all the love that she feels for the Phantom. The Punjab lasso is a type of weapon referred to in Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ...


Suddenly realizing the horrible things he has done and that the sounds of the mob are approaching, the Phantom begins to cry in shame. He releases Christine and Raoul, telling them to escape and never to tell anyone about "the secrets they know of the angel in hell," a reference to the Phantom. He sits by the music box, plays it, and through his tears reprises "Masquerade." Christine returns, and filled with hope that Christine will stay, the Phantom tells her that he loves her. Christine hands him her engagement ring and forces herself to turn away. She and Raoul sing to each other as they leave on the boat across the gondola. Christine and the Phantom exchange one last glance as the boat disappears around the corner; the Phantom declares that Christine is the only one who can make his song take flight. Finally content that he has felt true love, the Phantom turns back and smashes all the mirrors in his lair with the envelope seal he had used for all his mysterious notes, stepping into an empty mirror frame and escaping just before Meg Giry enters with the mob. She looks and finds only the Phantom's white mask.


Epilogue: Cemetery Outside Paris — 1919

The elderly Raoul places the monkey music box at Christine's (1854-1917) grave. Her tombstone indicates she married him and bore him children. Raoul then sees that, also on the grave, is a fresh red rose with a black ribbon and Christine's engagement ring tied to it. Raoul looks around, but there is no one else there; he knows that the rose was left by the Phantom, who is alive somewhere, still loving Christine.


Casting the Film

The casting for the two leading roles was a rather lengthy process. Patrick Wilson, who later got the part of Raoul, had initially auditioned for the title role of The Phantom. The director later felt he was better to play Raoul because his voice matched the character better. Several actors were considered to play the title role including John Travolta and Antonio Banderas. Originally offered the role, Travolta turned it down because he felt the film wouldn't work, while Banderas, a skilled singer, took several months off from acting to train for the part, before he was turned down. Hugh Jackman was up for the role, but he lost the role at the last minute after the director heard him singing. He felt that he looked right for the part, but something about his voice wasn't good enough. Gerard Butler finally won the role after several intense screen tests. Casting for the role of Christine Daae took longer. Charlotte Church, Keira Knightley, and Katie Holmes were all in the running. Holmes had secured the part but the director refused to cast her because he felt that she was too old for the part; she reportedly impressed him with her voice. Anne Hathaway was a soprano singer in New York, and she was praised for her voice; she auditioned several times and almost got the part, but just as the contract was sent to her, she was forced to decline because of the overlapping schedules with the Princess Diaries sequel, although she tried to make it work. Emmy Rossum won the part. There are several Patrick Wilsons. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer. ... José Antonio Domínguez Banderas (born August 10, 1960), better known as Antonio Banderas, is a Spanish film actor and singer who has starred in high-profile Hollywood films including Assassins, Interview with the Vampire, Mariachi sequels, Philadelphia, The Mask of Zorro, and the Shrek sequels. ... Hugh Michael Jackman (born 12 October 1968 in Pymble, New South Wales) is an Australian film star, television and stage actor. ... Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor best known to American audiences for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Christine Daaé is the main female character in Gaston_Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera (1910), the young singer with whom the Phantom falls in love. ... Charlotte Church (born Charlotte Maria Reed on February 21, 1986) is a Welsh singer and television presenter who rose to international fame in childhood as a popular classical singer with a precociously mature dramatic operatic voice, in particular in its tonal qualities. ... Keira Christina Knightley (pronounced IPA: ;[1] born 26 March 1985) is an English[2] film and television actress. ... Kate Noelle Katie Holmes[1] (born December 18, 1978) is an American actress who first achieved fame for her role as Joey Potter on The WB television teen drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2003. ... Anne Hathaway can refer to at least two people: Anne Hathaway, an American actress, star of The Princess Diaries films and Ella Enchanted Anne Hathaway, the wife of William Shakespeare Anne received critical acclaim for her role as Jack Twists [played by Jake Gyllenhaal] wife in Brokeback Mountain, a controversial... The Princess Diaries is a novel by Meg Cabot that was made into a film in 2001. ... Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ...


Stage version vs. film version

While the film remained mostly faithful to the original libretto of the stage show, some minor changes were made. Some scenes were added; others were deleted; some songs were shortened or deleted; some lines that were sung on stage were spoken in the movie, as well as minor changes in the lyrics to suit the scenes. In addition, several slight changes were made to the story.


The famous chandelier crash - used to close Act One on stage - was moved to the film's climax after the song "The Point of No Return", and becomes a crucial plot point in that it explains the destruction of the opera house, which is set on fire as a result of the crash. This, as well as some other changes, was kept for Phantom: The Las Vegas Spectacular, a modified stage production modelled mostly after the film. The chandelier crash also received computer-generated imagery alterations. For example, before reaching the floor, the chandelier's cables rip through the ceiling of the Opera House where this would be all but impossible on a live stage. Computer-generated imagery (commonly abbreviated as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


Changes were also made to some of the characters and their backgrounds. In the film, Madame Giry first meets the Phantom when they are both children and helps him escape from imprisonment in a carnival, after which he spends his entire life living at the Opera. In both the original book and the stage adaptation, the Phantom winds up in the carnival as an adult after travelling the world and spending time in Persia. Also, during the film scene in which Christine visits her father's grave, a sword-fight ensues between Raoul and the Phantom. In the stage production, the Phantom stands upon the grave and attacks the couple with small blasts of fire from his torch. The Phantom's makeup for the film was changed from the stage and made much more subtle and natural as it would not be required to impact from afar, although the scarred face that ultimately was revealed proved to be far less horrific than one would have anticipated given the character's angst, and proved to be a bone of contention with many critics. The Phantom's various magical tricks (such as his sudden disappearances) were also demystified and fully explained in the film. For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ...


The pivotal unmasking of the Phantom was made more dramatic; unlike on the stage, close-ups could be afforded. Furthermore, there was a noticeable increase in the action and drama of the film incarnation, examples including the various sword-fighting sequences absent from the stage version. The Phantom's subterranean lair was enlarged and given various new furnishings including candles that lit themselves automatically (these were actually accomplished with a special type of candle which would light itself when brought out from underwater, instead of using CGI).


The ending of the movie was also very different from the play. The movie ends with the Phantom walking through a passage behind mirrors, then the final cemetery scene. The play ends just after Christine and Raoul leave the lair in the boat; the Phantom notes of Christine that "you alone can make my song take flight; it's over now, the music of the night!" He then smashes all of the mirrors and enters a secret hidden passage in one of the mirrors, pulling the cloak behind him. When Meg and the mob enter, she looks and finds only the Phantom's white mask.


The character of Christine was similarly changed; in the film, she is orphaned as a young girl and brought to the Opera by Madame Giry. The film ends at her grave, and her tombstone indicates she married Raoul and bore him children.


Cast

Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor best known to American audiences for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Erik is the title character in The Phantom of the Opera. ... Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ... Christine Daaé is the main female character in Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera (1910), the young singer with whom the Phantom falls in love. ... Patrick Wilson (born July 3, 1973) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American theater and film actor and singer. ... Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny is a fictional character from Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Madame Giry is a character in the Gaston Leroux novel, The Phantom of the Opera. ... Minnie Driver (born Amelia Fiona J. Driver on 31 January 1971) is an Academy award nominated English actress and singer-songwriter, born in London to Ronnie Driver and his wife Gaynor. ... Carlotta Giudicelli is a fictional character from The Phantom of the Opera. ... Simon Philip Hugh Callow, CBE (born June 15, 1949 in London, England) is a highly-regarded British actor of stage, film and television, and a biographer of Orson Welles and Charles Laughton. ... Hinds in HBOs TV Series Rome Ciarán Hinds (born February 9, 1953) is a well-respected Belfast-born actor whose work spans theatre, radio, television, and film. ... Victor McGuire is an English actor. ... Jennifer Ellison (born May 30, 1983) is an English actress, singer and dancer. ... Meg Giry is one of the fictional characters from the Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera. ... Murray Melvin (born 1932, London, England) is a British stage and film actor. ... Kevin McNally (born 27 April 1956 in Bristol) is an English actor who has worked extensively in both film and television. ... James Fleet is a British actor, most famous for his role as the bumbling and well-meaning Tom in the 1994 film Four Weddings and a Funeral, a 1994 British romantic comedy film directed by Mike Newell. ...

Notes

Driver herself does lend her actual singing voice to the film's end title song, "Learn To Be Lonely", written by Lloyd Webber and Hart exclusively for the film. The tune for "Learn to Be Lonely" was originally intended for an additional song to be sung by the Phantom during the film, called "No One Would Listen" (originally to have had lyrics by David Zippel, who adapted a few lines of the musical for the movie due to changes in the staging), but the song was removed for pacing reasons. (It is included as an extra on some editions of the DVD.) David Zippel is an American Tony Award-winning Musical theatre lyricist. ...


Trafalgar Square Publishing has issued The Phantom of the Opera Companion, a definitive account of the tale, tracing the legend from its origins, and through all its artistic incarnations, to the contemporary theater production and film. It includes the complete screenplay and more than 150 photographs from both the film and theater productions worldwide. Independent Publishers Group, or IPG, is a book distributor, founded in 1971 to exclusively market titles from independent client publishers to the book trade. ...


The soundtrack has been released on CD. CD redirects here. ...


Warner Home Video released the film on HD DVD on March 28, 2006 and on Blu-ray Disc on October 31, 2006.[1] It would be one of the earliest titles to be released on high-definition. The HD DVD audio track features Dolby TrueHD. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dolby TrueHD logo Dolby TrueHD, from Dolby Laboratories, is an advanced lossless multi-channel audio codec, intended primarily for high-end home-entertainment equipment, such as Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD. In this application, Dolby TrueHD competes with DTS-HD Master Audio, another lossless codec from Digital Theater System. ...


Awards and nominations

Wins

Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films

Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ... The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is the largest film critics organization in the U.S. and Canada, representing 199 television, radio and online critics. ...

National Board of Review Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George McClennans revocation of moving-picture exhibition licenses on Christmas Eve 1908. ...

San Diego Film Critics Society Awards Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ...

Young Artist Awards born 30th November 1958 in Dorset, United Kingdom British cinematographer. ... Christopher Doyle (born May 2, 1952 in Sydney, Australia; Chinese name: 杜可風) is a highly acclaimed, multi-award winning cinematographer, known for his extreme angles and vanguard color grading. ... Hero (Chinese: 英雄; pinyin: ) is a film first released in China on October 24, 2002. ...

  • Best Performance in a Feature Film - Leading Young Actress - Emmy Rossum

Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ...

Nominations

2005 Academy Awards The 77th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 2004, were held on February 27, 2005, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California. ...

Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Anthony D.G. Pratt / Anthony D.G Pratt / Tony Pratt 27 November 1937, London, England, UK. Great nephew of William Henry Pratt (a. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... born 30th November 1958 in Dorset, United Kingdom British cinematographer. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ...

Art Directors Guild Alexandra Byrne is an Academy Award-nominated costume designer. ...

Costume Designers Guild Awards Anthony D.G. Pratt / Anthony D.G Pratt / Tony Pratt 27 November 1937, London, England, UK. Great nephew of William Henry Pratt (a. ...

Golden Globe Alexandra Byrne is an Academy Award-nominated costume designer. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...

  • Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy - Emmy Rossum
  • Best Original Song - Motion Picture - Learn to Be Lonely

Online Film Critics Society Awards Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy has been awarded annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1950. ... Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ...

Young Artist Awards Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ...

  • Best Family Feature Film - Comedy or Musical

Critical reaction

The film was met with mixed reviews upon its release, the general critical consensus being that it was visually spectacular but lacked any truly compelling sense of romance or danger[2][3][4].


Gerard Butler, who had no formal vocal training prior to the film, was criticized for not having the full vocal range needed to play the title character. Joel Schumacher states in the special features of the DVD that he intended "to make [the film], probably about 14 or 15 years ago with Michael Crawford and Sarah Brightman" to which Andrew Lloyd Webber adds "then frankly, I started to split up with Sarah and things were getting a bit bumpy between us" and Schumacher concludes "we had to put it on a shelf for a minute there". In many interviews, Andrew Lloyd Webber said that Butler was chosen specifically for the emotional, rocky quality of his voice as a juxtaposition against Patrick Wilson's much sweeter singing style. He did, however, receive praise for his acting and potential star power in several papers such as the New York Times. Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor best known to American audiences for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Michael Crawford (right) as Frank Spencer in Some Mothers Do Ave Em Michael Crawford, OBE (born Michael Patrick Dumble-Smith, 19 January 1942 in Salisbury, Wiltshire), is an English actor and singer. ... Sarah Brightman (born August 14, 1960) is an English classical crossover soprano, actress and dancer. ...


Some reviewers suggested that Emmy Rossum's voice was not mature enough for the role of Christine, as she was only 16 and a half at the time of filming. Emmanuelle Grey Emmy Rossum (born September 12, 1986) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress and singer. ...


Many fans were disappointed by the lack of disfigurement of the phantom's face, which looked more like a bad burn than anything likely to incite fear and horror.


Popular response, however, was much more positive, with the movie maintaining a spot in the top ten grossing movies of the week, for a month, even in limited release. Due to its limited theatre count, however, domestic box office receipts overall fell short of the film's $60-70 million USD budget. When foreign box office receipts were added in, it quickly made a profit, earning over $100 million overseas.[5]


See also

This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel by French novelist Gaston Leroux. ... The Phantom of the Opera is the soundtrack to the Andrew Lloyd Webber film-adaptation of the musical, The Phantom of the Opera. ...

References

  1. ^ Business Wire. Warner Home Video Announces Titles and Release Dates for HD DVD. January 5, 2006.
  2. ^ "Film version lacking" by Phil Villareal, Arizona Daily Star, December 22, 2004, retrieved September 1, 2006
  3. ^ "Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera (2004)" by Jeffrey Westhoff, Northwest Herald, 2004, retrieved September 2, 2006
  4. ^ "The Phantom of the Opera (2004)" by Staci Layne Wilson, horror.com, 2004, retrieved September 2, 2006
  5. ^ Business data for The Phantom of the Opera, IMDb.com, retrieved November 5, 2006.

is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Arizona Daily Star is a daily newspaper that serves Tucson, Arizona, and southern Arizona. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Northwest Herald is a daily newspaper in the US city of Crystal Lake, Illinois. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
The Phantom of the Opera (2004 film)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Phantom of the Opera Review -- Roger Ebert's Overlooked Film Festival (1354 words)
There are five levels of cellars beneath the opera, one descending beneath another in an expressionist series of staircases, ramps, trapdoors, and a Styxian river that the Phantom crosses in a gondola.
This is held in the Opera House on the very next night, with the chandelier miraculously repaired and no mourning period, apparently, for the dozens of crushed and maimed.
This plan is too optimistic, as the Phantom snatches Christine from her dressing room, and the two are pursued into the bowels of Paris by Raoul and Inspector Ledoux -- and, in a separate pursuit, by the vengeful stagehand Buquet (whose brother the Phantom murdered), leading a mob of torch-carrying rabble.
Filmtracks: The Phantom of the Opera (Andrew Lloyd Webber) (4738 words)
As filming commenced, Butler and other principle actors would practice and record their vocals in the days before the filming of their scenes, but in the waning days of the project, the process became so hectic that Butler would practice and record only hours before stepping on the set.
An entirely new theme accompanies the second half of the film; it is one of solace that is introduced when Christine journeys to the cemetery and culminates in a full, lengthy brass statement during the final underground confrontation.
The second total chaos sequence in the film version now involves the chandelier (instead of the strangling of the male opera star), and the extended score for this scene is done well despite, once again, the significant sound effects that hinder the clarity of the music and dialogue.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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