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Encyclopedia > The Patchwork Girl of Oz
The Patchwork Girl of Oz
Cover of The Patchwork Girl of Oz.
Author L. Frank Baum
Illustrator John R. Neill
Cover artist John R. Neill
Country United States
Language English
Series The Oz books
Genre(s) Children's novel
Publisher Reilly & Britton
Publication date 1913
Media type Print (Hardcover)
Preceded by The Emerald City of Oz
Followed by Tik-Tok of Oz

The Patchwork Girl of Oz by L. Frank Baum, is a children's novel, the seventh set in the Land of Oz. Characters include the Woozy, Ojo "the Unlucky", Unc Nunkie, Dr. Pipt, Scraps (the patchwork girl), and others. The book was first published on July 1, 1913, with illustrations by John R. Neill. In 1914, Baum adapted the book to film through his "Oz Film Manufacturing Company." Image File history File links Cover of the Patchwork Girl of Oz This image is a book cover. ... Image File history File links Cover of the Patchwork Girl of Oz This image is a book cover. ... The Laughing Dragon of Oz, see Frank Joslyn Baum . ... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... In political geography and international politics, a country is a political division of a geographical entity, a sovereign territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation and government. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... The Reilly and Britton Company, or Reilly & Britton (after 1919, Reilly & Lee) was an American publishing company of the early and middle 20th century, famous as the publisher of the works of L. Frank Baum. ... See also: 1912 in literature, other events of 1913, 1914 in literature, list of years in literature. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ... Tik-Tok of Oz is the eighth Land of Oz book written by L. Frank Baum. ... The Laughing Dragon of Oz, see Frank Joslyn Baum . ... Oz is a fantasy region containing four countries under the rule of one monarch. ... The Woozy, Ojo, Scraps, and Bungle from the 1913 Oz book. ... Ojo may refer to: an Oz book series character. ... Unc Nunkie is a character from the fictional Oz book series by L. Frank Baum. ... Dr. Pipt, sometimes called The Crooked Magician is a fictional character from the Oz books series by L. Frank Baum. ... The Patchwork Girl (aka Scraps) is a character from the fantasy Oz Book series by L. Frank Baum. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ...


In the previous Oz book, The Emerald City of Oz, magic was used to isolate Oz from all outside worlds. Baum did this to end the Oz series, but was forced to restart the series with this book due to financial hardships.[1] In the prologue, he explains how he managed to get another story about Oz, even though it is isolated from all other worlds. He explains that a child suggested he make contact with Oz with wireless telegraphy.[2] Glinda, using her book that records everything that happens, is able to know that someone is using a telegraph to contact Oz, so she erects a telegraph tower and has the Shaggy Man, who knows how to make a telegraph reply, tell the story contained in this book to Baum. The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ... The Sorceress by John William Waterhouse Magic and sorcery are the influencing of events, objects, people and physical phenomena by mystical, paranormal or supernatural means. ... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military policy and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... The Laughing Dragon of Oz, see Frank Joslyn Baum . ... Wireless telegraphy is the practice of remote writing (see telegraphy) without the wires normally involved in an electrical telegraph. ... Glinda depicted on the cover of Glinda of Oz Glinda (or Glinda the Good Witch) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. ... Shaggy Man is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ...


This story is the first one since the original The Wonderful Wizard of Oz to send its hero on a quest through the land of Oz, a technique that allowed Baum to showcase the marvels of the land.[3] The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) is a childrens book written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... This article is about the word, for other meanings see Quest (disambiguation) A quest is a journey towards a goal with great meaning and is used in mythology and literature as a plot device. ...


The book was dedicated to Sumner Hamilton Britton, the young son of one of its publishers, Sumner Charles Britton of Reilly & Britton. The Reilly and Britton Company, or Reilly & Britton (after 1919, Reilly & Lee) was an American publishing company of the early and middle 20th century, famous as the publisher of the works of L. Frank Baum. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Ojo the Unlucky is a Munchkin boy who, devoted to life with his uncle Unc Nunkie in the wilderness but on the verge of starvation, goes to see a neighboring "magician" and old friend of Unc's, Dr. Pipt. While there they see a demonstration of the Pipt-made Powder of Life, which animates any object it touches. Unc Nunkie and Dr. Pipt's wife are also the sufferers of the consequences of another of the Doctor's inventions, the Liquid of Petrifaction, which turns them into solid marble statues. Ojo may refer to: an Oz book series character. ... Unc Nunkie is a character from the fictional Oz book series by L. Frank Baum. ... Dr. Pipt, sometimes called The Crooked Magician is a fictional character from the Oz books series by L. Frank Baum. ... Powder of Life is a magic substance from the Oz book series by L. Frank Baum. ... Petrified wood In geology, petrifaction or petrification is the process by which organic material is converted into stone or a similar substance. ... Marble sculpture is the art of creating three-dimensional forms from marble. ...


The remainder of this books is Ojo's quest through Oz to retrieve the five components of an antidote to the Liquid: a six-leaved clover found only in the Emerald City, three hairs from the tip of a Woozy's tail, a gill (a quarter of a pint) of water from a dark well (one that remains untouched by natural light), a drop of oil from a live man's body, and the left wing of a yellow butterfly. With the help of the patchwork girl Scraps, Bungle the Glass Cat (another of Dr. Pipt's creations), the Woozy, Dorothy, the Shaggy Man, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Woodman, gathers all of these supplies but the left wing — the Tin Woodman won't allow any living thing to be killed, even to save another's life. This article is about the word, for other meanings see Quest (disambiguation) A quest is a journey towards a goal with great meaning and is used in mythology and literature as a plot device. ... An antidote is a substance which can counteract a form of poisoning. ... Six can refer to: 6 (number), a number Six (cricket), when a batsman in cricket hits the ball to or over the boundary without the ball touching the ground inside the boundary first Six, a character on the television series Blossom (television) Six (television) or Channel 6, a proposed satellite... Species See text Clover is my sisters name! Clover (Trifolium) is a genus of about 300 species of plants in the pea family Fabaceae. ... For other uses, see Emerald City (disambiguation). ... For the film, see Hair (film). ... The gill is a unit of measurement for volume, equal in the USA to one half of a cup (120 ml). ... The pint is a unit of volume or capacity. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Natural olive oil Synthetic motor oil An oil is any substance that is in a viscous liquid state (oily) at ambient temperatures or slightly warmer, and is both hydrophobic (immiscible with water, literally water fearing) and lipophilic (miscible with other oils, literally fat loving). This general definition includes compound classes... A Laughing Gull with its wings extended in a gull wing profile Aircraft wing planform shapes: a swept wing KC-10 Extender (top) refuels a trapezoid-wing F/A-22 Raptor A wing is a surface used to produce lift and therefore flight, for travel in the air or another... Superfamilies and families Superfamily Hedyloidea: Hedylidae Superfamily Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae Superfamily Papilionoidea: Papilionidae Pieridae Nymphalidae Lycaenidae Riodinidae A butterfly is an insect of the order Lepidoptera. ... Doctor Who character, see Ace (Doctor Who). ... Shaggy Man is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Scarecrows in a rice paddy in Japan For other uses, see Scarecrow (disambiguation). ... Cover of The Tin Woodman of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ...


The party returns to the Emerald City, where the Wizard of Oz (one of the few allowed to lawfully practice magic in Oz) restores Unc Nunkie and Dr. Pipt's wife. The story is also a growth process for Ojo; he learns that luck is not a matter of who you are or what you have, but what you do; he is renamed "Ojo the Lucky," and so he appears in the following Oz books. The Wizard of Oz (or simply The Wizard) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and further popularized by the classic 1939 movie. ... “Good luck” redirects here. ...


In reference to The Patchwork Girl of Oz, one of Baum's letters to his publisher, Sumner Britton of Reilly & Britton, offers unusual insight on Baum's manner of creating his Oz fantasies: The Reilly and Britton Company, or Reilly & Britton (after 1919, Reilly & Lee) was an American publishing company of the early and middle 20th century, famous as the publisher of the works of L. Frank Baum. ...

A lot of thought is required on one of these fairy tales. The odd characters are a sort of inspiration, liable to strike me at any time, but the plot and plan of adventures takes me considerable time...I live with it day by day, jotting down on odd slips of paper the various ideas that occur and in this way getting my materials together. The new Oz book is at this stage....But...it's a long way from being ready for the printer yet. I must rewrite it, stringing the incidents into consecutive order, elaborating the characters, etc. Then it's typewritten. Then it's revised, retypewritten and sent on the Reilly and Britton.[4]

The same correspondence (Nov. 23-7, 1912) discusses the deleted Chapter 21 of the book, "The Garden of Meats." The text of the chapter has not survived, but Neill's illustrations and their captions still exist. The deleted chapter dealt with a race of vegetable people comparable to the Mangaboos in Chapters 4-6 of Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz. The vegetable people grow what Baum elsewhere calls "meat people," apparently for food; Neill's pictures show plants with the heads of human children.[5] being watered by their growers. (This is thematically connected with the anthropophagous plants in Chapter 10 of Patchwork Girl.) Frank Reilly tactfully wrote to Baum that the material was not "in harmony with your other fairy stories," and would generate "considerable adverse criticism." Baum saw his point; the chapter was dropped.[6] 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz is the fourth book set in the Land of Oz (though most of the action is outside of it) written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by John R. Neill. ...


At least at one point in his life, Baum stated that he considered The Patchwork Girl of Oz "one of the two best books of my career"—the other being The Sea Fairies.[7] The book was a popular success, selling just over 17,000 copies—though this was somewhat lower than the total for the previous book, The Emerald City of Oz, and marked the start of a trend in declining sales for the Oz books that would not reverse until The Tin Woodman of Oz in 1918. The Sea Fairies is a childrens fantasy novel written by L. Frank Baum, illustrated by John R. Neill, and published in 1911 by the Reilly & Britton Company, the publisher of Baums series of Oz books. ... Title page of The Tin Woodman of Oz. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

See The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914 film) The Patchwork Girl of Oz was a 1914 film made by L. Frank Baums Oz Film Company. ...


See The Patchwork Girl of Oz (2005 animated video)


Footnotes

  1. ^ Michael O. Riley, Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum, p 171, ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  2. ^ Michael O. Riley, Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum, p 176, ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  3. ^ Michael O. Riley, Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum, p 178-9, ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  4. ^ Quoted in: Katharine M. Rogers, L. Frank Baum: Creator of Oz, New York, St. Martin's Press, 2002; pp. 179-80.
  5. ^ Bodiless human heads are rather a pre-occupation with Baum; they occur repeatedly in his fantasies, Ozma in Oz, Chapter 6 and The Tin Woodman of Oz, Chapter 18 being two examples.
  6. ^ Rogers, pp. 198-9.
  7. ^ Rogers, p. 184.

External links


Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

The Oz books
Previous book:
The Emerald City of Oz
The Patchwork Girl of Oz
1913
Next book:
Tik-Tok of Oz


The Oz books are a series of books, which begin with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and deal with the history of the Land of Oz. ... The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Tik-Tok of Oz is the eighth Land of Oz book written by L. Frank Baum. ...




  Results from FactBites:
 
The Patchwork Girl of Oz, L. Frank Baum - Section 3 of 28 - Book Club/Fiction - ArcaMax Publishing (1996 words)
The Patchwork Girl was taller than he, when she stood upright, and her body was plump and rounded because it had been so neatly stuffed with cotton.
Margolotte had first made the girl's form from the patchwork quilt and then she had dressed it with a patchwork skirt and an apron with pockets in it-- using the same gay material throughout.
There were almost too many patches on the face of the girl for her to be considered strictly beautiful, for one cheek was yellow and the other red, her chin blue, her forehead purple and the center, where her nose had been formed and padded, a bright yellow.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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