FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > The Order of the Stick
The Order of the Stick

Author(s) Rich Burlew
Website http://www.giantitp.com/comics/ootslatest.html
RSS web feed
Current status / schedule Three-a-week (on average) [1]
Launch date 2003-09-30 [1]
Publisher(s) Giant in the Playground
Genre(s) Fantasy, Comedy, Parody

The Order of the Stick is a comedic fantasy webcomic based on pencil and paper roleplaying games, particularly Dungeons and Dragons, and its accompanying system, d20. While it is principally published on the web, four book collections have been published, including two print-only stories (On the Origin of PCs and Start of Darkness). It appeared monthly in Dragon Magazine from issue #338 (December 2005) up until the magazine's final print issue, #359 (September 2007).[2] Order of the Stick webcomic graphic - link picture from http://www. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Feed-icon. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... The webcomic genres are the types of themes a webcomic can take. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ... The original Dungeons & Dragons set Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) published by Gary Gygax and David Arneson in January 1974. ... d20 redirects here. ... The cover of the 300th issue Dragon is one of the two official magazines for source material for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game and associated products. ...


A May 2007 survey of webcomic site traffic placed The Order of the Stick as one of the 10 most widely-read webcomics in existence.[3]


The comic is drawn and authored in a deliberate stick figure style by Rich Burlew, a graphic designer and game designer living in Philadelphia. While the stick figure art is usually created on a computer, accounts of historical events have been portrayed in hand-drawn crayon to distinguish them from events in the strip's present. The series has also received one art upgrade (humorously portrayed in the comic[4]) although, as with most comics, minor modifications to the drawing style occur continuously. A stick figure. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...

Contents

Fictional world

The world the characters inhabit is similar to that depicted in Dungeons & Dragons, complete with functional magic and monsters. A significant portion of the humor of the strip is based on the characters being aware of the game rules which govern their lives—they discuss their hit points and class levels, the chances of random encounters, call themselves "PCs" and other characters "NPCs," stop in the middle of combat to check their "to hit" modifiers, and even get "role-playing bonuses" (possibly from an unseen Dungeon Master) for fabricating involved or tragic backstories for themselves. Whether the events that transpire in the comic are happening as part of a game of D&D by unseen players, or are actually happening in a universe where the natural laws happen to conform with the rules of D&D, is not made clear in the comic itself. As to date, there have been no references to any real-world people playing out the events that the readers witness. The introduction strip found only in the first book collection strongly suggests that the rules of tabletop gaming are simply part of the natural laws of the universe that the characters live in. The characters also occasionally display awareness that they are in a comic strip (breaking the fourth wall). D&D redirects here. ... Look up metafiction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An NPC from the video game The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Despite its ostensibly medieval nature, the OOTS world is rife with anachronisms, both social (such as college admissions standards for the Evil Ivy League[5]) and technological (such as coffee makers[6]). The characters sometimes make references to real-life persons (such as Michael Jackson) or pop culture in general. D&D's various books also seem to exist in the comic's world; for example, at one point Redcloak went through various monster books to choose which undead minions to summon, and Julio Scoundrél chose his Dashing Swordsman profession from a third-party sourcebook. Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Redcloak is a major villain of the webcomic The Order of the Stick, created and written by Rich Burlew. ... Current Monster Manual (v3. ... This is a list of characters from the webcomic The Order of the Stick. ...


Three main areas of the world's geography have been mentioned: the Northern Lands, the Southern Lands[7], and the Western Continent. The Northern Lands resemble medieval Europe in setting, but the ethnic distribution seems to more closely parallel that of contemporary United States, with a wider variety of native skin colors than was present in medieval Europe. For example, Roy Greenhilt and his family have dark brown skin, and are not referred to as coming from a different area or having a different cultural background to the characters with light skin. Other characters, such as the lawyer Phil Rodriguez, show a third (light brown) skin color. Non-human races which are often player characters in D&D, such as dwarves and gnomes, have both dark- and light-skinned members as well. The people of the Southern Lands have a significantly different culture, with nations loosely based on various real-world Asian cultures, such as feudal Japan, China, and India. As the Western Continent has only been mentioned and not seen in the comic, it is unknown what its inhabitants might be like, though they may be based on ancient Mesopotamians. Roy Greenhilt is a major character in the webcomic, The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. ...


There are three main pantheons of gods in the OOTS world as well: The Northern Gods, worshipped by the dwarves and humans living in the Northern Lands, are based on the Norse gods, while the Southern Gods (often referred to by their worshippers as the "Twelve Gods") are revered by the people of the Southern Lands and are based on the twelve animals of the Chinese zodiac. The third set of gods, called the Western Gods, are based on the deities of the ancient Near East, such as Marduk; only one of their worshippers, the Oracle of the Sunken Valley, has been depicted in the comic so far. A fourth pantheon, called the Eastern Gods and based on the Olympian gods of ancient Greece, was destroyed at the dawn of time by the Snarl and is thus unknown to most inhabitants of the world. Norse gods Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including Jotun, the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... Chinese astrology (占星術 pinyin: zhan4 xing1 shu4; 星學 pinyin: xing1 xue2; 七政四餘 pinyin: qi1 zheng4 si4 yu2; and 果老星宗 pinyin: guo3 lao3 xing1 zong1) is related to the Chinese calendar, particularly its 12-year cycle of animals (aka Chinese Zodiac), and... Marduk (Sumerian spelling in Akkadian: AMAR.UTU solar calf; Biblical: Merodach) was the Babylonian name of a late-generation god from ancient Mesopotamia and patron deity of the city of Babylon, who, when Babylon permanently became the political center of the Euphrates valley in the time of Hammurabi (18th century... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... This is a list of characters from the webcomic The Order of the Stick. ...


The elves and goblins have their own gods, as well, such as Vaarsuvius' God of Knowledge and Redcloak's Dark One; they are mentioned to have been "raised" to godhood rather than having existed before the universe. As is usual in D&D, the gods are demonstrably real; Thor and others have appeared in the comic several times. It is stated in Start of Darkness that each pantheon has greater control over the geographical area after which they are named, as Tiger (one of the Southern Gods) prevents Thor from directly intervening in events transpiring outside his territory. Another god, "Banjo the Clown," was created by Elan; though Banjo was nothing more than a hand puppet, Elan was able to use it to create small examples of divine power, apparently because any god in the OOTS world gets power based on the number of its worshippers; however, because Banjo never gained more than a handful of followers, he quickly lost power. Vaarsuvius is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ...


Characters

The comic's central protagonists, known collectively as "The Order of the Stick," are: This is a list of characters from the webcomic The Order of the Stick. ...

  • Roy Greenhilt (Human Fighter, Lawful Good[8]): A reversal of the "dumb fighter" cliché,[9] specialized in the greatsword. Competent and shrewd, Roy is the Order's long-suffering leader and the instigator of most of their adventures.
  • Durkon Thundershield (Dwarven Cleric, confirmed as Lawful and non-Evil [10]): Fights with hammer and shield, and a broad assortment of divine spells. Playing close to type, Durkon is wise and stolid, but often taken aback by his companions' exploits. He traveled with Roy for over three years before they founded the Order. He has his own set of problems which he rarely discloses, unlike Belkar (eg. fear of trees, gullible, etc.) He worships Thor, and thus has abilities such as calling down lightning from the heavens.
  • Vaarsuvius (Elven Wizard, Non-evil): Brilliant and powerful, though somewhat lacking in people skills and at times overtly pedantic. Vaarsuvius' gender is deliberately ambiguous. Vaarsuvius' brilliance is often hindered because it is immensely boring — in one case putting a whole room of goblins to sleep merely by describing the spell about to be used, rather than actually using it.
  • Haley Starshine (Human Rogue, "Chaotic Good-ish"[11]): The Order's resident archery expert and lock-picker. Generally deceptive and materialistic, Haley occasionally displays a surprisingly altruistic side. Fights with a longbow. Since Roy's death, Haley has been the party leader. She has had a longtime crush on Elan that has only recently come to fruition.
  • Elan (Human Bard/Dashing Swordsman, Chaotic Good[12]): Elan is the happy-go-lucky, childlike member of the Order. While not very wise or bright, he has a heart of gold. He is currently in a relationship with Haley. He always means well, but relies mainly on his considerable charm and fool's luck to get him through life. Elan fights with a rapier his mentor Julio Scoundrél gave him, and also uses bardic music and illusion spells in battle - which are usually ineffective, but have been known to serve him well once or twice. He is the only member of the Order whose standard outfit has changed since his first appearance; this could be due to learning to be a dashing swordsman, or that he simply hasn't got round to changing back into his normal clothes.
  • Belkar Bitterleaf (Halfling Ranger/Barbarian, Chaotic Evil [13][14]): An erratic and vicious yet lovable killer, ruled wholly by his impulses, Belkar fights with two daggers and would happily kill fellow party members for XP.

The comic's central antagonists include: Roy Greenhilt is a major character in the webcomic, The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, fighter is one of the base character classes. ... In Dungeons & Dragons and some similar role-playing games, alignment refers to the moral and ethical perspective of the player characters, non-player characters, monsters, and societies in the game. ... Durkon Thundershield is a character from The Order of the Stick, created, written and drawn by Rich Burlew. ... This article is about the mythical creature. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the cleric is one of the base character classes. ... Vaarsuvius is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. ... For other uses, see Elf (disambiguation). ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, wizard is one of the base character classes. ... For other uses, see Androgyny (disambiguation). ... Haley Starshine is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, rogue or thief is one of the base character classes. ... In Dungeons & Dragons and some similar role-playing games, alignment refers to the moral and ethical perspective of the player characters, non_player characters, monsters, and societies in the game. ... Elan (IPA: //)[1] is a major character in the webcomic, The Order of the Stick, written and drawn by Rich Burlew. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, bard is one of the base character classes. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, alignment is a categorisation of the ethical and moral perspective of people, creatures and societies. ... Belkar Bitterleaf is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. ... Halfling is another name for J. R. R. Tolkiens hobbit and is a fictional race sometimes found in fantasy novels and games. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, ranger is one of the base character classes. ... The Barbarian is a core class in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game and is one of the base character classes presented in the Players Handbook. ... In Dungeons & Dragons and some similar role-playing games, alignment refers to the moral and ethical perspective of the player characters, non_player characters, monsters, and societies in the game. ...

  • Xykon (Human Lich Sorcerer) is an extremely powerful lich sorcerer whose plot to gain unlimited power is putting the entire universe in danger. He tends to have a rather lax attitude and short attention span, and is rarely a serious character.
  • Redcloak (Goblin Cleric), Xykon's second-in-command, is a very powerful goblin cleric who is almost always a more competent leader than his boss. Has referred to himself as "High Priest of the Dark One." Has been referred to by Miko as "The Bearer of the Crimson Mantle." He holds a deep childhood grudge against humans, whom he views much like mankind views goblinkind. In particular, he despises the Sapphire Guard, who in turn despise the Crimson Mantle.
  • The Linear Guild is an opposing adventuring party comprising 'evil opposites' of the Order's members, led by Elan's twin brother, Nale.
  • Miko Miyazaki (Human Monk/Paladin) was a paladin of the Sapphire Guard, who mistakenly believed the Order to be in league with Xykon. Currently deceased after destroying Soon's gate, as she believed the Gods had intended her to do, though as Lord Soon pointed out afterwards, 'we all make mistakes'.

Xykon is the main villain of the webcomic The Order of the Stick, created and written by Rich Burlew. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, the lich is an undead creature; a spellcaster who seeks to defy death by magical means. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the sorcerer is one of the base character classes. ... This article is about the undead creature. ... Redcloak is a major villain of the webcomic The Order of the Stick, created and written by Rich Burlew. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, goblins are a very common and fairly weak race of evil humanoid monsters. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the cleric is one of the base character classes. ... The Linear Guild are a fictional team of villains from the webcomic The Order of the Stick, created and written by Rich Burlew. ... For other uses, see Evil twin (disambiguation). ... Miko Miyazaki was a fictional character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, by Rich Burlew. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, monk is one of the base character classes. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, paladin is one of the base character classes. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, paladin is one of the base character classes. ...

Critical Reaction and Awards

Due to its deep understanding of roleplaying [15] (and, specifically, Dungeons and Dragons), The Order of the Stick has been hailed as "'must' reading"[16] for comic readers who play such games. While critics sometimes cite the insular nature of in-jokes regarding the D&D rules[17] that crop up regularly (especially in the early part of the comic's run), the comic is just as often seen as being accessible to casual readers without such gaming knowledge.[18][16] The comic has been praised for its "shrewd writing"[19] and "increasingly intricate and cleverly scripted adventures",[17], as well as its execution.[20] The original Dungeons & Dragons set Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) published by Gary Gygax and David Arneson in January 1974. ...


The comic's stick figure art has received more mixed reviews, with some critics praising its "surprisingly expressive art"[19] while others denounce its simple geometric characters as only "good for someone who isn't really an artist"[21]. Burlew has defended his art style several times in public statements, stating that it was chosen deliberately rather than due to lack of proficiency at drawing[22] and pointing out that the primary goal of comic art is to communicate the actions of the characters, which his style does as well as any other.[23] Burlew has also addressed similar criticisms of his art within the comic several times, either by contrasting his usual art with more realistic drawings [2] or by simply putting self-deprecating dialogue regarding his style into the mouths of characters [3].


The Order of the Stick has been nominated for eight Web Cartoonist's Choice Awards, of which it has won five. It was named Best Gaming Comic and Best Long Form Comic in 2007, Best Fantasy Comic in 2006, and tied for Best Fantasy Comic in 2005. No Cure for the Paladin Blues, the comic's second print compilation, won a 2007 Gold ENnie award. [24] The Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art in New York City included The Order of the Stick #443 in its first webcomic-only exhibit, Infinite Canvas: The Art of Webcomics. [25] The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards (WCCA) is an annual event, since the summer of 2001, in which online cartoonists nominate and select outstanding webcomics in a variety of categories. ... The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards is an award voted on by the cartoonists themselves, much like the Academy Awards. ... The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards is an award voted on by the cartoonists themselves, much like the Academy Awards. ... The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards is an award voted on by the cartoonists themselves, much like the Academy Awards. ... The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards is an award voted on by the cartoonists themselves, much like the Academy Awards. ... The ENnies are annual, fan-based awards for tabletop role-playing game products and publishers. ... MoCCA Mondays: Robert Sikoryak, Danny Fingeroth, Arie Kaplan, Jerry Robinson and Eddy Friedfeld The Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (MoCCA) is currently located in New York City at 594 Broadway, Suite 401, between Houston and Prince streets. ...


Publications

The Order of the Stick books are published by Giant in the Playground Games, a small press publishing company formed by OOTS creator Rich Burlew. The books are widely distributed to both online and brick-and-mortar retailers in the hobby game market[26][27], as well as to comic book direct retailers.


In order of publication:

  • The Order of the Stick: Dungeon Crawlin' Fools (2005) ISBN 0-9766580-0-3. Volume 1, strips 1-121, 120 pp. full color.
  • The Order of the Stick: On the Origin of PCs (2005) ISBN 0-9766580-1-1. Print-exclusive prequel, "Volume 0", 72 pp. black-and-white.
  • The Order of the Stick: No Cure for the Paladin Blues (November 2006) ISBN 0-9766580-3-8. Volume 2, strips 121a-300, 244 pp. full color.
  • The Order of the Stick: Start of Darkness (June 2007) ISBN 978-0-9766580-4-7. Print-exclusive prequel, "Volume -1", 96 pp. black-and-white with color insert.
  • The Order of the Stick: War And XPs (expected Fall 2007). Volume 3, full color.[28]

The game

In partnership with APE Games, Giant in the Playground released the first OotS game, The Order of the Stick Adventure Game: The Dungeon of Dorukan. The game, which was released in September 2006, utilizes both cards and a board and has strong influences from games such as Talisman and Dungeon!, as well as the less known "Kings & Things". The Talisman 2nd edition game cover featured a striking fantasy image. ... Dungeon! is a 1975 adventure board game designed by David R. Megarry, Gary Gygax, Michael Gray, Steve Winter and S. Schwab, published by TSR, Inc. ...


The Dungeon of Dorukan is designed for 2-6 people, aged twelve and older. Each player controls one member of the OotS team to explore the dungeon and hunt down Xykon. The player is able to train their chosen member with a variety of shtick cards. Each character provides a different gaming experience, but the players always have the ability to either aid or harm their team mates. A shtick (Yiddish: שטיק) (or schtick) is an expression which refers to a comic theme or gimmick. ...


A second, stand-alone game, The Order of the Stick Adventure Game: The Linear Guild, is set to be released by APE Games in the Fall.[28] Players will be able to take on the parts of Nale, Thog, Sabine, and other members of the Linear Guild in their own dungeon adventure, or they can combine the materials in the game with those from the Dungeon of Dorukan set for a massive Order of the Stick vs. Linear Guild head-to-head adventure. The Linear Guild are a fictional team of villains from the webcomic The Order of the Stick, created and written by Rich Burlew. ...


References

  1. ^ New Edition. Episode 1.
  2. ^ No More OOTS in Dragon Magazine.
  3. ^ Cambell, T. "What We Don't Know", Broken Frontier, May 31, 2007. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  4. ^ The Great Kazoo. Episode 198.
  5. ^ Teenage Boys Are CR 1. Episode 100.
  6. ^ The Best Part of Waking Up. Episode 317.
  7. ^ What's My Motivation. Episode 204.
  8. ^ Served with a Side Order of Whoop-Ass. Episode 343.
  9. ^ Cast strip. Order of the Stick.
  10. ^ Scanning.... Episode 202.
  11. ^ Truth. Episode 393.
  12. ^ A Song for the Departed. Episode 445.
  13. ^ http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showpost.php?p=559967&postcount=4
  14. ^ Keepin' the Little Man Down. Episode 489.
  15. ^ Tayler, Howard. "What, Exactly, Is an "Erf?"", Schlock Mercenary: Blogünder Schlock, January 14, 2007. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  16. ^ a b Mishler, James. "The Order of the Stick: Dungeon Crawlin' Fools", Comic Buyer's Guide, January 2006, No. 1613.
  17. ^ a b Bowman, Donna; Murray, Noel; Phipps, Keith; Robinson, Tasha. "Comics of Note 4205", The A.V. Club, February 1, 2006. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  18. ^ Summers, Matt. "The Order of the Stick by Rich Burlew", ComixTalk.com, August 2005. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  19. ^ a b Grossman, Lev. "Webcomics Are the New Blogs: The Order of the Stick", TIME.com, January 31, 2007. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  20. ^ Burns, Eric. "Wait... thumbnailed graphic... parentheses... my God, Eric's SNARKING A WEBCOMIC!". Websnark, July 6, 2005. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  21. ^ Lesnick, Josh. "Artistic Critiques...", Josh Lesnick's Horsejournal, June 10, 1007. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  22. ^ Burlew, Rich. How come your art sucks so much? Can't you draw?, Giant in the Playground Site FAQ
  23. ^ Israel, Cecily. "Order of the Interview: Rich Burlew". Sequential Tart, March 1, 2007. Retrieved on November 9, 2007
  24. ^ 2007 ENnie Award nomination announcement.
  25. ^ Tyrell, Gary. "This Woman Wants to Bring Webcomics Into the Rarified World of Museums", Fleen, September 14, 2007. Retrieved on November 8, 2007
  26. ^ Greater Games Industry Catalog, Fall 2007, page 151.
  27. ^ Alliance Games Distribution listing for Giant in the Playground Games. Retrieved on November 9, 2007
  28. ^ a b GTS Special: Order of the Stick Fall 2007 Releases. GamingReport.com, April 26, 2007. Retrieved on November 9, 2007

is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Howard Tayler is the creator of the webcomic Schlock Mercenary. ... Schlock Mercenary is a webcomic by Howard Tayler that follows the adventures of a mercenary company aboard a starship in a 31st-century space opera setting. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Lev Grossman is an American writer, notably the author of Codex. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Order of the Stick (index) - Comixpedia (1305 words)
Durkon orders the finest beer in human lands and after tasting it, mistakenly believes it to be moose urine.
The Order of the Stick are fighting goblins within Dorukan's Dungeon when their gaming group suddenly upgrades to 3.5 Edition.
The Order all gain a level while they head down a level and Vaarsuvius gains access to a new spell level.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m