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Encyclopedia > The New Yorker
The New Yorker
2004 cover with dandy Eustace Tilley, who debuted on the first cover and reappears on anniversary issues.

2004 cover with dandy Eustace Tilley, who debuted on the first cover and reappears on anniversary issues. New Yorker may refer to: the magazine, The New Yorker a resident of New York City the hotel New Yorker a named passenger train operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad between Detroit, MI and New York, NY This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Cover from The New Yorker Art by Rea Irvin This work is copyrighted. ... Sporty Parisian dandies of the 1830s: a girdle helped one achieve this silhouette. ...

Editor David Remnick
Categories Politics, Social issues, Popular Culture
Frequency 47 per year
Total Circulation 1,062,310[1]
First issue February 17, 1925
Company Advance Publications
Country United States
Language American English
Website newyorker.com
ISSN 0028-792X

The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. Originally a weekly, the magazine is now published 47 times per year with five (usually more expansive) issues covering two-week spans. David Remnick is an American journalist, writer, and magazine editor. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Advance Publications is an American media company owned by the descendants of S.I. Newhouse. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside of New York. It is well known for its commentaries on popular culture and eccentric Americana; its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literary reviews; its rigorous fact-checking and copyediting; its journalism about world politics and social issues; and its famous, single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... A diner, a style of restaurant that notably began in the United States. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... This article is in need of attention. ... A review is a piece of writing that discusses the authors opinion on a piece of publication, such as a movie, video game, musical composition, or novel. ... Copy editing is the process of an editor making formatting changes and other improvements to text. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... It has been suggested that World politics be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cartoons started in the 1930s and 40s. ...

Contents

History

The New Yorker debuted on February 17, 1925, with the February 21 issue. It was founded by Harold Ross and his wife, Jane Grant, a New York Times reporter. Ross wanted to create a sophisticated humor magazine—in contrast to the corniness of other humor publications such as Judge, where he had worked, or Life. Ross partnered with entrepreneur Raoul H. Fleischman to establish the F-R Publishing Company and established the magazine's first offices at 25 West 45th Street in Manhattan. Ross edited the magazine until his death in 1951. For the first, occasionally precarious, years of its existence, the magazine prided itself on its cosmopolitan sophistication. The New Yorker famously declared in the debut issue: "It has announced that it is not edited for the old lady in Dubuque." is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. ... Jane Grant (1892-1972) was a New York City journalist who co-founded The New Yorker with her first husband, Harold Ross. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Judge was a magazine published in the United States of America around the turn of the century. ... Philippe Halsmans famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe Life generally refers to two American magazines: A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936; A publication created by Time founder Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country United States State Iowa County Dubuque Incorporated 1833 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Roy D. Buol  - City manager Michael C. Van Milligen Area  - City 71. ...


Although the magazine never lost its touches of humor, it soon established itself as a preeminent forum for serious journalism and fiction. Shortly after the end of World War II, John Hersey's essay Hiroshima filled an entire issue. In subsequent decades the magazine published short stories by many of the most respected writers of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Ann Beattie, John Cheever, Alice Munro, Haruki Murakami, Vladimir Nabokov, John O'Hara, Philip Roth, J.D. Salinger, Irwin Shaw, John Updike, E.B. White and Richard Yates. Publication of Shirley Jackson's The Lottery drew more mail than any other story in The New Yorker's history. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... John Hersey, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 John Richard Hersey (June 17, 1914 – March 24, 1993) was an American writer and journalist. ... Hiroshima (ISBN 0-679-72103-7) is the title of a magazine article written by Pulitzer Prize winner John Hersey that appeared in The New Yorker in August 1946, exactly one year after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, at 8:15 a. ... Ann Beattie (born September 8, 1947) is an American short story writer and novelist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alice Ann Munro, née Laidlaw (born 10 July 1931) is an award-winning Canadian short story writer who is widely considered an important writer in that form. ... Haruki Murakami , born January 12, 1949) is a popular contemporary Japanese writer and translator. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков, pronounced ) (April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899, Saint Petersburg – July 2, 1977, Montreux) was a Russian-American, Academy Award nominated author. ... John Henry OHara (31 January 1905 – 11 April 1970) was an American writer. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey) is an American novelist. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye, as well as his reclusive nature; he has not published any new work since 1965 and has not granted a formal interview since 1980. ... Irwin Shaw (né Irwin Gilbert Shamforoff, February 27, 1913 - May 16, 1984) was an American Jewish playwright, screen writer and author. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American writer. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. ... Richard Yates (February 3, 1926 - November 7, 1992) was an American novelist and short story writer, a chronicler of mid-20th century mainstream American life, often cited as artistically residing somewhere between J.D. Salinger and John Cheever. ... This article is about the author. ... The Lottery is a short story by Shirley Jackson, first published in the June 28, 1948 issue of The New Yorker. ...


In its early decades, the magazine sometimes published two or even three short stories a week, but in recent years the pace has remained steady at one story per issue. While some styles and themes recur more often than others in New Yorker fiction, the magazine's stories are marked less by uniformity than by their variety, and they have ranged from Updike's introspective domestic narratives to the surrealism of Donald Barthelme and from parochial accounts of the lives of neurotic New Yorkers to stories set in a wide range of locations and eras and translated from many languages. Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 - July 23, 1989) was an American author of short fiction and novels. ...


The non-fiction feature articles (which usually make up the bulk of the magazine's content) are known for covering an eclectic array of topics. Recent subjects have included eccentric evangelist Creflo Dollar, the different ways in which humans perceive the passage of time, and Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Creflo Augustus Dollar, Jr. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Munchausen syndrome is a form of psychological disorder known as a factitious disorder. ...


The magazine is notable for its editorial traditions. Under the rubric Profiles, it has long published articles about a wide range of notable people, from Ernest Hemingway, Henry R. Luce, and Marlon Brando to Hollywood restaurateur Prince Michael Romanoff, magician Ricky Jay and mathematicians David and Gregory Chudnovsky. Other enduring features have been "Goings On About Town," a listing of cultural and entertainment events in New York, and "The Talk of the Town," a miscellany of brief pieces—frequently humorous, whimsical or eccentric vignettes of life in New York—written in a breezily light style, although in recent years the section often begins with a serious commentary. For many years, newspaper snippets containing amusing errors, unintended meanings or badly mixed metaphors ("Block That Metaphor") have been used as filler items, accompanied by a witty retort. And despite some changes having encroached, the magazine has kept much of its traditional appearance over the decades in typography, layout, covers and artwork. Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Ricky Jay Ricky Jay (b. ... The Chudnovsky Brothers are mathematicians known for their wide-ranging mathematical abilities, their home-built supercomputers, and their close working relationship. ...


Ross was succeeded by William Shawn (1951-1987), followed by Robert Gottlieb (1987-1992) and Tina Brown (1992-1998). Brown's nearly six-year tenure attracted the most controversy, thanks to her high profile (a marked contrast to that of the retiring Shawn) and changes she made to the magazine that had retained a similar look and feel for the previous half century. She included the use of color (several years before the New York Times also adopted color on its pages) and photography, less type on each page, and a generally more modern layout. More substantively, she increased the coverage of current events and hot topics such as celebrities and business tycoons and placed short pieces throughout "Goings on About Town," including a racy column about nightlife in Manhattan. A new letters to the editor page and adding authors’ bylines to their "Talk of the Town" pieces had the effect of making the magazine more personal and, along with the other changes, served to erode its perceived reputation for perhaps over-exquisite refinement. The current editor of The New Yorker is David Remnick, who took over in 1998 from Brown. The magazine was acquired by Advance Publications in 1985, the media company owned by S.I. Newhouse. William Shawn (August 31, 1907-December 8, 1992) was an American magazine editor who edited The New Yorker from 1952 until 1987. ... Robert Gottlieb served as editor of The New Yorker from 1987 until 1992. ... Tina Brown (born Christina Hambley Brown on November 21, 1953, in Maidenhead, England) is a British-born American magazine editor, columnist, and talk-show host. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... David Remnick is an American journalist, writer, and magazine editor. ... Advance Publications is an American media company owned by the descendants of S.I. Newhouse. ... Samuel Irving Newhouse (1895 - 1979) was a U.S. broadcasting businessman, magazine and newspaper publisher. ...


Since the late 1990s, The New Yorker has taken advantage of computer and Internet technologies for the release of current and archival material. The New Yorker maintains a website with some content from the current issue (plus exclusive web-only content) at www.newyorker.com. As well, The New Yorker's cartoons are available for purchase at www.cartoonbank.com. A complete archive of back issues from 1925 to April 2006 (representing more than 4,000 issues and half a million pages) is available on nine DVD-ROMs or on a small portable hard drive.


A New Yorker look-alike, Novy Ochevidets (The New Eyewitness), was launched in Russia in 2004. It folded in January, 2005 after five months of circulation.


Cartoons

The cartoon editor of The New Yorker for years was Lee Lorenz, who first began cartooning in 1956 and became a New Yorker contract contributor in 1958. After serving as the magazine's art editor from 1973 to 1993 (when he was replaced by Françoise Mouly), he continued in the position of cartoon editor until 1998. His book, The Art of the New Yorker: 1925-1995 (Knopf, 1995), was the first comprehensive survey of all aspects of the magazine's graphics. In 1998, Robert Mankoff took over as cartoon editor, and since then Mankoff has edited at least 14 collections of New Yorker cartoons. Lee Lorenz is a cartoonist. ... Françoise Mouly (b. ... Robert Mankoff is the current cartoon editor for the New Yorker magazine. ...


The New Yorker's stable of cartoonists has included many important talents in American humor, including Charles Addams, Charles Barsotti, George Booth, Roz Chast, Sam Cobean, Helen Hokinson, Mary Petty, George Price, Charles Saxon, Otto Soglow, Saul Steinberg, William Steig, Richard Taylor, Barney Tobey, James Thurber, Richard Decker and Gahan Wilson. Charles Samuel Addams (January 7, 1912–September 29, 1988) was an American cartoonist known for his particularly black humor and macabre characters. ... Charles Barsotti is a 30-year veteran cartoonist of The New Yorker, a signature artist whose rounded, elegant, sparsely detailed style evokes both the traditional world of a Thurber and the contemporary sensibility of a Roz Chast. ... George Booth (June 28, 1926-) is a New Yorker cartoonist. ... Roz Chast (born November 26, 1954) is an American cartoonist and is a staff cartoonist for The New Yorker. ... Sam Cobeans humor graced the pages of The New Yorker magazine in the 1940s & 50s. ... Helen Hokinson (born June 29, 1893 in Mendota, Illinois; died November 1, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) was an American cartoonist and a staff cartoonist for The New Yorker. ... George Price (9 June 1901 - 12 January 1995) was a United States cartoonist. ... Charles David Saxon (November 13, 1920-December 6, 1988) was an American cartoonist. ... Otto Soglow (December 23, 1900-April 3, 1975) was an American cartoonist best known for his comic strip The Little King. ... Saul Steinberg (June 15, 1914 - May 12, 1999) was a cartoonist and illustrator, best known for his work for The New Yorker magazine. ... William Steig (November 14, 1907 – October 3, 2003) was a prolific American cartoonist, sculptor and, later in life, an author of popular childrens literature. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930) is an author, cartoonist, and illustrator in the United States. ...


Several of the magazine's cartoons have climbed to a higher plateau of fame: In Carl Rose's cartoon of a mother saying, "It's broccoli, dear," the daughter responds, "I say it's spinach and I say the hell with it." The catch phrase "back to the drawing board" originated with the 1934 Peter Arno cartoon showing an engineer walking away from a crashed plane, saying, "Well, back to the old drawing board." In Mankoff's drawing set in an office overlooking the city, a man on the phone says, "No, Thursday's out. How about never -- is never good for you?" Carl Rose is a cartoonist whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, Popular Science, The Saturday Evening Post, and elsewhere. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Peter Arno (1904 - 1968) was a U.S. cartoonist. ...


The most reprinted is Peter Steiner's 1993 drawing of two dogs at a computer, with one saying, "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog." According to Mankoff, Steiner and the magazine have split more than $100,000 in fees paid for the licensing and reprinting of this single cartoon, with more than half going to Steiner. [2][3]


Over seven decades, many hardcover compilations of cartoons from The New Yorker have been published, and in 2004, Mankoff edited The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker, a 656-page collection with 2004 of the magazine's best cartoons published during 80 years, plus a double CD set with all 68,647 cartoons ever published in the magazine. This features a search function allowing readers to search for cartoons by a cartoonist's name or by year of publication. The newer group of cartoonists in recent years includes Pat Byrnes, Frank Cotham, Michael Crawford, Drew Demavich, J.C. Duffy, Zachary Kanin, Michael Maslin, Mick Stevens and Jack Ziegler. The notion that some New Yorker cartoons have punchlines so non sequitur that they are impossible to understand became a subplot in the Seinfeld episode, "The Cartoon". This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the sitcom. ... The Cartoon is the one-hundred and sixty-nineth episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...

Art Spiegelman's cover for the issue of September 24, 2001. Spiegelman, who lives in Lower Manhattan, later reprised this image for the front cover of his book, In the Shadow of No Towers (Pantheon, 2004), a graphic novel about the 9/11 attacks.
Art Spiegelman's cover for the issue of September 24, 2001. Spiegelman, who lives in Lower Manhattan, later reprised this image for the front cover of his book, In the Shadow of No Towers (Pantheon, 2004), a graphic novel about the 9/11 attacks.

In April 2005 the magazine began using the last page of each issue for The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest. Captionless cartoons by The New Yorker's regular cartoonists are printed each week. Captions are submitted by readers, and three are chosen as finalists. Readers then vote on the winner, and any U.S. resident age 18 or older can vote. Each contest winner receives a print of the cartoon (with the winning caption), signed by the artist who drew the cartoon. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 434 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (507 × 700 pixel, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover of The New Yorker This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 434 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (507 × 700 pixel, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover of The New Yorker This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Art Spiegelman (born February 15, 1948) is an American comics artist, editor, and advocate for the medium of comics, best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning comic memoir, Maus. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


Politics

Traditionally, the magazine's politics have been essentially liberal and non-partisan. However, in recent years, the editorial staff has at times taken a somewhat more left-wing partisan stance. Coverage of the 2004 U.S. presidential campaign, led by editorial writer Hendrik Hertzberg and then-political correspondent Philip Gourevitch, strongly favored Democratic candidate John Kerry. In its November 1, 2004 issue, the magazine broke with 80 years of precedent and issued a formal endorsement of Kerry in a long editorial, signed "The Editors", which specifically criticized the policies of the Bush administration. [4] Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Presidential election results map. ... Hendrik Hertzberg is an American journalist and author. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


After the September 11, 2001 attacks, cartoonist and cover artist Art Spiegelman (who is married to the magazine's art editor, Françoise Mouly) created with Mouly, for the September 24, 2001 issue, a memorable black-on-black cover with the dark silhouette of the buildings visible only when held in a certain light or angle. He later resigned in protest of what he saw as the magazine's self-censorship in its political coverage. The magazine hired investigative journalist Seymour Hersh to report on military and security issues, and he has produced a number of widely-reported articles on the 2003 Invasion of Iraq and the subsequent occupation by US forces. His revelations in The New Yorker about abuses in the Abu Ghraib prison and the Pentagon's contingency plans for invading Iran and helping terrorist groups in Iran (e.g., Pejak) were reported around the world. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Art Spiegelman (born February 15, 1948) is an American comics artist, editor, and advocate for the medium of comics, best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning comic memoir, Maus. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Seymour Myron Sy Hersh (born April 8, 1937 Chicago) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author based in Washington, DC. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker magazine on military and security matters. ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Abu Ghraib cell block The Abu Ghraib prison (Arabic: سجن أبو غريب; also Abu Ghurayb) is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km (20 mi) west of Baghdad. ... This article is about the United States military building. ...


Films

The magazine's former editor, William Shawn, is portrayed in Capote (2005) and Infamous (2006). The magazine has been the source of a number of films. Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) was adapted from Sally Benson's short stories. The Swimmer (1968), starring Burt Lancaster, was based on a John Cheever short story from The New Yorker, and Brian De Palma's Casualties of War (1989) began as a New Yorker article by Daniel Lang. Charlie Kaufman based Adaptation (2002) on Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief, which she first wrote for The New Yorker. Brokeback Mountain (2005) is an adaptation of the short story by Annie Proulx which first appeared in the October 13, 1997 issue of The New Yorker, and The Namesake (2007) was similarly based on Jhumpa Lahiri's novel which originated as a short story in the magazine. Away From Her, adapted from Alice Munro's short story "The Bear Came Over The Mountain," debuted at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. Capote is an Academy Award-winning 2005 biographical film about Truman Capote (played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, who won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal) on a writing assignment for The New Yorker. ... Infamous (Previously: Have You Heard?; and Every Word Is True USA working title) is a forthcoming film from Warner Independent Pictures, due to be released in September 2006. ... Sally Benson (September 3, 1897 - July 19, 1972) was a St. ... Burt Lancaster (November 2, 1913 – October 20, 1994) was an Oscar-winning American film actor, noted for his athletic physique (a rare thing for leading men of that time), distinct smile (which he called The Grin) and, later, his willingness to play roles that went against his initial tough guy... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a prolific, and controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... Casualties of War is a 1989 war drama about the Vietnam War, starring Michael J. Fox and Sean Penn. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Adaptation (disambiguation). ... Susan Orlean (born October 31, 1955) is an American journalist whose feature writing drolly but affectionately considers softer subjects than some of those covered by her colleagues. ... This article is about the motion picture. ... Edna Annie Proulx (pronounced ) (born August 22, 1935) is an American journalist and author. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For the film of the same name, see The Namesake (film) The Namesake (2003) is the second book by author Jhumpa Lahiri. ... Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa Lahiŗi) is a contemporary Indian American author based in New York City. ... Away From Her is a Canadian film, currently in post-production and scheduled for release in late 2006. ...

Example of former semicolon usage from issue of October 27, 1980. On the third line, the semicolon after "cormorants" appears before the closing quotation mark.

This work is copyrighted. ... A semicolon (  ;  ) is a punctuation mark. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...

Style

One uncommonly formal feature of the magazine's in-house style is the placement of diaeresis marks in words with repeating vowels—such as reëlected and coöperate—in which the two vowel letters indicate separate vowel sounds. The magazine also continues to use a few spellings that are otherwise little used, such as "focusses" and "venders". An Identity Standards Manual page—for the graphic design branch of corporate identity design and branding. ... In linguistics, a, diaeresis, or dieresis (AE) (from Greek (diaerein), to divide) is the modification of a syllable by distinctly pronouncing one of its vowels. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


The magazine does not put the titles of plays or books in italics but simply sets them off with quotation marks. When referring to other publications that include locations in their names, it uses italics only for the "non-location" portion of the name, such as the Los Angeles Times or the Chicago Tribune. The symbol ″, while technically the double-prime, is also used to mean inch. ...


Formerly, when a word or phrase in quotation marks came at the end of a phrase or clause that ended with a semicolon, the semicolon would be put before the trailing quotation mark; now, however, the magazine follows the usual American punctuation style and puts the semicolon after the second quotation mark. A semicolon (  ;  ) is a punctuation mark. ... The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ...


The New Yorker's signature display typeface, used for its nameplate and headlines and the masthead above The Talk of the Town section, is Irvin, named after its creator, the designer-illustrator Rea Irvin. [5]


Contributors

Main article: List of New Yorker Contributors

The following is a list of current and past contributors to The New Yorker, along with the dates they served and their chief areas of interest. ...

Audience

A recent report indicates that there were 996,000 subscribers in 2004. The total number of subscribers has been increasing at about a 3% annual pace over the last several years. Despite the magazine's New York focus, its subscription base is expanding geographically; in 2003 there were more subscribers in California (167,000) than in New York (166,000) for the first time in the magazine's history. The average age of subscribers rose from 46.8 in 2004 to 48.4 in 2005, compared with a rise of 43.8 to 44.0 for the nation, and a rise from 45.4 to 46.3 for news magazine subscribers. The average household income of a New Yorker subscriber was $80,957 in 2005, while the average income for a U.S. household with a subscription to a news magazine was $67,003, and the U.S. average household income was $51,466.


Eustace Tilley

The magazine's first cover, of a dandy peering at a butterfly through a monocle, was drawn by Rea Irvin. The gentleman on the original cover is referred to as "Eustace Tilley," a character created for The New Yorker by Corey Ford. Eustace Tilley was the hero of a series entitled "The Making of a Magazine," which began on the inside front cover of the August 8 issue that first summer. He was a younger man than the figure of the original cover. His top hat was of a newer style, without the curved brim. He wore a morning coat and striped trousers. Ford borrowed Eustace Tilley's last name from an aunt—he had always found it vaguely humorous. "Eustace" was selected for euphony, although Ford may have borrowed the name from Eustace Taylor, his fraternity brother from Delta Kappa Epsilon at Columbia College of Columbia University. Sporty Parisian dandies of the 1830s: a girdle helped one achieve this silhouette. ... Superfamilies and families Superfamily Hedyloidea: Hedylidae Superfamily Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae Superfamily Papilionoidea: Papilionidae Pieridae Nymphalidae Lycaenidae Riodinidae A butterfly is an insect of the order Lepidoptera. ... The first cover of The New Yorker, 1925: Eustace Tilley quizzes a butterfly A monocle is a type of corrective lens used to correct the vision in only one eye. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Two men wearing formal morning dress at a wedding in 1929. ... Euphony describes flowing and aesthetically pleasing speech. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... Columbia College is the main undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the universitys main campus of Morningside Heights in the Borough of Manhattan in the City of New York. ...


Tilley was always busy, and in illustrations by Johann Bull, always poised. He might be in Mexico, supervising the vast farms that grew the cactus for binding the magazine's pages together. The Punctuation Farm, where commas were grown in profusion, because Ross had developed a love of them, was naturally in a more fertile region. Tilley might be inspecting the Initial Department, where letters were sent to be capitalized. Or he might be superintending the Emphasis Department, where letters were placed in a vise and forced sideways, for the creation of italics. He would jump to the Sargasso Sea, where by insulting squids he got ink for the printing presses, which were powered by a horse turning a pole. It was told how in the great paper shortage of 1882 he had saved the magazine by getting society matrons to contribute their finery. Thereafter dresses were made at a special factory and girls employed to wear them out, after which the cloth was used for manufacturing paper. Raoul Fleischmann, who had moved into the offices to protect his venture with Ross, gathered the Tilley series into a promotion booklet. Later, Ross took a listing for Eustace Tilley in the Manhattan telephone directory. An image of the distribution and size of eel larvae shows the approximate location of the Sargasso Sea. ...


Traditionally, the Tilley cover illustrated here is reused every year on the issue closest to the anniversary date of February 21, though on several occasions a newly drawn variation has been substituted.


The "View of the World" cover

The "View of the World" cover
The "View of the World" cover

Saul Steinberg created 85 covers and 642 internal drawings and illustrations for the magazine. His most famous work is probably its March 29, 1976 cover, an illustration titled "View of the World from 9th Avenue," sometimes referred to as "A Parochial New Yorker's View of the World" or "A New Yorker's View of the World," which depicts a map of the world as seen by self-absorbed New Yorkers. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 440 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (506 × 690 pixel, file size: 600 KB, MIME type: image/png) // Drawn by Saul Steinberg. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 440 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (506 × 690 pixel, file size: 600 KB, MIME type: image/png) // Drawn by Saul Steinberg. ... Saul Steinberg (June 15, 1914 - May 12, 1999) was a cartoonist and illustrator, best known for his work for The New Yorker magazine. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ninth Avenue / Columbus Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... Parochialism means being provincial, being narrow in scope, or considering only small sections of an issue. ... This article is about narcissism as a word in common use. ...


The illustration is split in two, with the bottom half of the image showing Manhattan's 9th Avenue, 10th Avenue, and the Hudson River (appropriately labeled), and the top half depicting the rest of the world. The rest of the United States is the size of the three New York City blocks and is drawn as a square, with a thin brown strip along the Hudson representing "Jersey", the names of five cities (Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Las Vegas, Kansas City, and Chicago) and three states (Texas, Utah, and Nebraska) scattered among a few rocks for the U.S. beyond New Jersey. The Pacific Ocean, perhaps half again as wide as the Hudson, separates the U.S. from three flattened land masses labeled China, Japan and Russia. For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... View of Amsterdam Avenue looking south from the Columbia University overpass between West 116th and 117th Streets View north from the overpass Tenth Avenue / Amsterdam Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Vegas redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ...


The illustration—humorously depicting New Yorkers' self-image of their place in the world, or perhaps outsiders' view of New Yorkers' self-image—inspired many similar works, including the poster for the 1984 film Moscow on the Hudson; that movie poster led to a lawsuit, Steinberg v. Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., 663 F. Supp. 706 (S.D.N.Y. 1987), which held that Columbia Pictures violated the copyright that Steinberg held on his work. // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... Moscow on the Hudson is a 1984 comedy starring Robin Williams, and directed by Paul Mazursky. ... Steinberg v. ... // The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States Case citation is the system used in common law countries such as the United States, England and Wales, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Australia and India to uniquely identify the location of past court... The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction comprises the following counties: New York, Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ...


Popular culture references

The New Yorker has been referenced in a wide variety of popular works of fiction, including the television shows Seinfeld (The Cartoon), The West Wing, The Simpsons (The Sweetest Apu), Friends, Sex and the City, and Frasier, as well as the novel The Devil Wears Prada and the film Adaptation. The Family Guy episode Brian Goes Back to College, in which the family dog is invited to work at The New Yorker, was acknowledged in a New Yorker review of Family Guy.[6] This article is about the sitcom. ... The Cartoon is the one-hundred and sixty-nineth episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The West Wing is an American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin that was originally broadcast from 1999 to 2006. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... “The Sweetest Apu” is the nineteenth episode of The Simpsons’ thirteenth season. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ... Sex and the City is a popular American cable television program. ... Frasier was an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... The Devil Wears Prada (2003) is a best selling novel by Lauren Weisberger about a young woman who, freshly graduated from college, is hired as a personal assistant to a powerful fashion magazine editor, a job that becomes hellish as she struggles to keep up with her bosss capricious... For other uses, see Adaptation (disambiguation). ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... “Brian Goes Back to College (and Stewie Goes with Him for Obvious Comedic Reasons)” is an episode from season four of FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ...


References

  1. ^ Top 100 ABC magazines by average circulation 2006, First Six Months 2006
  2. ^ Fleishman, Glenn (2000-12-14). Cartoon Captures Spirit of the Internet. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  3. ^ Peter Steiner's "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog."
  4. ^ "The Talk of the Town" (November 1, 2004)
  5. ^ Consuegra, David. American Type Design and Designers. New York: Allworth Press, 2004.
  6. ^ http://www.newyorker.com/critics/television/articles/060116crte_television

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Graffiti and street art emerged in New York as part of the Zoo York subculture in the 1970s. ... The Essjay controversy was a February 2007 incident where a prominent English Wikipedia administrator known as Essjay was found to have made false claims about his academic qualifications and professional experience in a telephone interview with The New Yorker. ... The following is a list of current and past contributors to The New Yorker, along with the dates they served and their chief areas of interest. ... The media of New York City is internationally influential, with some of the most important newspapers, largest publishing houses, most prolific television studios, and biggest record companies in the world. ... The New Yorkistan cover of The New Yorker New Yorkistan is the title of the cover art for the 2001-12-10 edition of The New Yorker magazine. ...

Books

  • Ross and the New Yorker by Dale Kramer (1951)
  • The Years with Ross by James Thurber (1959)
  • Ross, the New Yorker and Me by Jane Grant (1968)
  • Here at the New Yorker by Brendan Gill (1975)
  • About the New Yorker and Me by E.J. Kahn (1979)
  • Onward and Upward: A Biography of Katharine S. White by Linda H. Davis (1987)
  • At Seventy: More about the New Yorker and Me by E.J. Kahn (1988)
  • Katharine and E.B. White: An Affectionate Memoir by Isabel Russell (1988)
  • The Last Days of The New Yorker by Gigi Mahon (1989)
  • Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of the New Yorker by Thomas Kunkel (1997)
  • Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker: The Invisible Art of Editing by Ved Mehta (1998)
  • Here But Not Here: My Life with William Shawn and the New Yorker by Lillian Ross (1998)
  • The World Through a Monocle: The New Yorker at Midcentury by Mary F. Corey (1999)
  • Some Times in America: and a life in a year at the New Yorker by Alexander Chancellor (1999)
  • Gone: The Last Days of the New Yorker, by Renata Adler (2000)
  • Letters from the Editor: The New Yorker's Harold Ross edited by Thomas Kunkel (2000; letters covering the years 1917 to 1951)
  • Defining New Yorker Humor by Judith Yaross Lee (2000)
  • NoBrow: The Culture of Marketing - the Marketing of Culture by John Seabrook (2000)
  • New Yorker Profiles 1925-1992: A Bibliography compiled by Gail Shivel (2000)
  • About Town: The New Yorker and the World It Made by Ben Yagoda (2000)
  • A Life of Privilege, Mostly by Gardner Botsford (2003)
  • Christmas at The New Yorker: Stories, Poems, Humor, and Art (2003)
  • Maeve Brennan: Homesick at the New Yorker by Angela Bourke (2004)
  • Let Me Finish by Roger Angell (Harcourt, 2006)

James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... Jane Grant (1892-1972) was a New York City journalist who co-founded The New Yorker with her first husband, Harold Ross. ... Lillian Ross (born June 8, 1927) is an American journalist and author who has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1949. ... Ben Yagoda (born 22 February 1954 in New York City) is a professor of journalism at the University of Delaware. ...

Blogs about The New Yorker

  • Emdashes Interviews, links, and reviews devoted to all things New Yorker, including a column by staffers who answer questions about the magazine
  • The Rest is Noise Blog by New Yorker music critic Alex Ross
  • S/FJ Blog by New Yorker pop music critic Sasha Frere-Jones
  • I hate the new yorker A blog by one consistently unimpressed yet astonishingly loyal reader
  • Drunken Volcano Haiku synopsis of The New Yorker
  • Malcolm Gladwell Blog by New Yorker writer

Alex Ross (b. ... Sasha (Alexander) Frere-Jones (b. ...

Audio

External links


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