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Encyclopedia > The New York Times
The New York Times

The January 9, 2008 front page of
The New York Times
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner The New York Times Company
Publisher Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr.
Staff Writers 350
Founded 1851
Price USD 1.25 Monday-Saturday
USD 4.00 Sunday
USD 4.00/5.00 Special Editions
Headquarters New York Times Building
620 Eighth Avenue
New York, NY 10018
Flag of the United States United States
Circulation 1,077,256 Daily
1,476,400 Sunday[1]
ISSN 0362-4331

Website: nytimes.com

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. It is owned by The New York Times Company, which publishes 15 other newspapers, including the International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe. It is the largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States. Nicknamed the "Gray Lady" for its staid appearance and style, it is often regarded as a national newspaper of record, meaning that it is frequently relied upon as the authoritative reference for modern events. Founded in 1851, the newspaper has won 98 Pulitzer Prizes,[2] more than any other newspaper.[3] The newspaper's title, like other similarly-named publications, is often abbreviated to the Times. Its motto, always printed in the upper left-hand corner of the front page, is: "All the news that's fit to print." is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. ... Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... A rendering of the New York Times Building The New York Times Building is a skyscraper currently under construction on the west side of Midtown. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... // A newspaper of record is a colloquial term that generally refers to a newspaper that meets at least one of two criteria: high standards of journalism, the articles of which establish a definitive record of current events, for use by future scholars, and/or compliance with the legal requirements necessary... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


The publisher is Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., a member of the family that has controlled the paper since 1896. Sulzberger is widely seen as being under increasing pressure lately as dissident investors have pressed the company for board representation as the company's circulation figures have plummeted amidst an industry-wide circulation downturn and a migration of readers and advertisers to the Internet. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

Contents

History

The New York Times was founded on September 18, 1851, by journalist and politician Henry Jarvis Raymond and former banker George Jones as the New-York Daily Times. The paper changed its name to The New York Times in 1857. The newspaper was originally published every day but Sunday, but during the Civil War the Times, along with other major dailies, started publishing Sunday issues. is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Henry Jarvis Raymond (24th January 1820 - 1869) was an American journalist born near the village of Lima, Livingston County, New York. ... George Jones (1811 – 1891) co-founded with Henry Jarvis Raymond the newspaper the New-York Daily Times, now the New York Times, publishing its first issue on September 18, 1851. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The paper's growing influence was seen when, in 1870 and 1871, a series of Times exposés targeting Boss Tweed ended the Tweed Ring's domination of New York's city hall.[4] 1869 Tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed. ... 1869 tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed William Marcy Tweed (April 3, 1823–April 12, 1878), known as Boss Tweed, was an American politician and political boss of Tammany Hall who became an icon of urban political machines. ... ...


In the 1880s, the Times transitioned from supporting Republican candidates to becoming politically independent; in 1884, the paper supported Democrat Grover Cleveland in his first presidential election. While this move hurt the Times's readership, the paper regained most of its lost ground within a few years. GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ...


The Times was acquired by Adolph Ochs, publisher of The Chattanooga Times, in 1896. In 1897, he coined the paper's slogan, "All The News That's Fit To Print," interpreted as a jab at competing papers in New York City (the New York World and the New York Journal American) known for lurid yellow journalism. Under his guidance, The New York Times achieved international scope, circulation, and reputation. Cover of Time Magazine (September 1, 1924) Adolph Simon Ochs (b. ... The Chattanooga Times Free Press is a local broadsheet newspaper located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. ... One of the New York Journals most infamous cartoons, depicting Philippine-American War General Jacob H. Smiths order Kill Everyone over Ten, from the front page on May 5, 1902. ... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ...


The paper moved its headquarters to 42nd Street in 1904, giving its name to Times Square, where the New Year's Eve tradition of lowering a lighted ball from the Times building was started by the paper. After nine years in Times Square, the paper relocated to 229 West 43rd Street. It remained there until spring 2007, and is now three blocks south at 620 Eighth Avenue. The original Times Square building, known as One Times Square, was sold in 1961. For the film of this name, see 42nd Street (film). ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... The world-famous Waterford Crystal Ball is lowered in Times Square, New York City, on New Years Eve Each year on New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square in Manhattan, New York City, a Ball made of crystal and electric lights is raised to the top of a... An up close image of the East face of One Times Square. ...


During the next two decades, the Times used new technology to obtain news and deliver it to readers. In 1904, the Times received the first on-the-spot wireless transmission from a naval battle, a report of the destruction of the Russian fleet at the Battle of Port Arthur in the Yellow Sea from the press-boat Haimun during the Russo-Japanese war. In 1910, the first air delivery of the Times to Philadelphia began. The Times' first trans-Atlantic delivery to London occurred in 1919. Finally, in 1920, a "4 A.M. Airplane Edition" was sent by plane to Chicago so it could be in the hands of Republican convention delegates by evening. For other uses, see Wireless (disambiguation). ... The Russian Navy or VMF (Russian: Военно-Морской Флот (ВМФ) - Voyenno- Morskoy Flot (VMF) or Military Maritime Fleet) is the naval arm of the Russian armed forces. ... Combatants Empire of Japan Russian Empire Commanders Admiral Heihachiro Togo Vice Admiral Shigeto Dewa Oskar Victorovich Stark Strength 15 battleships and cruisers with escorts 12 battleships and cruisers with escorts Casualties 90 men and slight damage 150 men and seven ships damaged The Battle of Port Arthur (Japanese: 旅順港閉塞作戦, Ryojunkō Heisoku... ... The first-known instance of a press boat dedicated to war correspondence during naval battles, the S.S. Haimun was a Chinese steamer ship commanded by war correspondent Lionel James in 1904 during the Russo-Japanese War for The Times. ... Belligerents Russian Empire Principality of Montenegro [1] Empire of Japan Commanders Emperor Nicholas II Aleksey Kuropatkin Stepan Makarov â€  Emperor Meiji Oyama Iwao Heihachiro Togo The Russo–Japanese War (Japanese: Nichi-Ro Sensō, Russian: Russko-Yaponskaya Voyna, Chinese: RìézhànzhÄ“ng, February 10, 1904–September 5, 1905) was a conflict... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... GOP redirects here. ...


In the 1940s, the paper extended its breadth and reach. The crossword began appearing regularly in 1942, and the fashion section in 1946. The Times began an international edition in 1946. The international edition stopped publishing in 1967, when it joined the owners of the New York Herald Tribune and The Washington Post to publish the International Herald Tribune in Paris. The paper bought a classical radio station (WQXR) in 1946. The New York Times crossword puzzle is a daily puzzle found in The New York Times. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... WQXR is a radio station that broadcasts from New York City on 96. ...


The New York Times reduced its page width to 12 inches (300 mm) from 13.5 inches (340 mm) on August 6, 2007, adopting the width that has become the U.S. newspaper industry standard.[5]


Times v. Sullivan

The paper's involvement in a 1964 libel case helped bring one of the key United States Supreme Court decisions supporting freedom of the press, New York Times Co. v. Sullivan. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Freedom of the Press (or Press Freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Holding The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, protected a newspaper from being sued for libel in state court for making false defamatory statements about the official conduct of a public official, because the statements were not made with knowing or reckless disregard for the truth. ...


The United States Supreme Court established the actual malice standard for press reports to be considered defamatory or libelous. The malice standard requires the plaintiff in a defamation or libel case prove the publisher of the statement knew the statement was false or acted in reckless disregard of its truth or falsity. Because of the high burden of proof on the plaintiff, and difficulty in proving what is inside a person's head, such cases against public figures rarely succeed[citation needed]. Modal logic, or (less commonly) intensional logic is the branch of logic that deals with sentences that are qualified by modalities such as can, could, might, may, must, possibly, and necessarily, and others. ... Slander and Libel redirect here. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... In the common law, burden of proof is the obligation to prove allegations which are presented in a legal action. ...


The Pentagon Papers

Further information: History and background of New York Times Co. v. United States

In 1971, the Pentagon Papers, a secret United States Department of Defense history of the United States' political and military involvement in the Vietnam War from 1945 to 1971, were given ("leaked") to Neil Sheehan of The New York Times by former State Department official Daniel Ellsberg, with his friend Anthony Russo assisting in copying them. The Times began publishing excerpts as a series of articles on June 13. Controversy and lawsuits followed. Floyd Abrams This article reviews the history and background of . ... The Pentagon Papers is the colloquial term for United States-Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, a 47 volume, 7,000-page, top-secret United States Department of Defense history of the United States political and military involvement in the Vietnam War from 1945... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Cornelius Mahoney Neil Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist. ... Daniel and Patricia Marx Ellsberg - 2006 Jacob Appelbaum Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is a former American military analyst employed by the RAND Corporation who precipitated a national uproar in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, the U.S. militarys account of activities during the Vietnam War... Anthony Tony James Russo assisted Daniel Ellsberg, his friend and former colleague at the Rand Corp. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The papers revealed, among other things, that the government had deliberately expanded its role in the war by conducting air strikes over Laos, raids along the coast of North Vietnam, and offensive actions taken by U.S. Marines well before the public was told about the actions, and while President Lyndon B. Johnson had been promising not to expand the war. The document increased the credibility gap for the U.S. government, and hurt efforts by the Nixon administration to fight the war. Anthem Tiến Quân Ca (Army March) Location of North Vietnam Capital Hanoi Language(s) Vietnamese Government Socialist republic First president Ho Chi Minh Historical era Cold War  - Independence proclaimed (from Japan) September 2, 1945  - Recognized 1954  - Disestablished July 2, 1976 Area 157,880 km² Population  -  est. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 - April 22, 1994) was the thirty-sixth (1953–1961) Vice President, and the thirty-seventh (1969–1974) President of the United States. ...


When the Times began publishing its series, President Nixon became incensed. His words to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger included "people have gotta be put to the torch for this sort of thing..." and "let's get the son-of-a-bitch in jail." After failing to get the Times to stop publishing, Attorney General John Mitchell and President Nixon obtained a federal court injunction that the Times cease publication of excerpts. The newspaper appealed and the case began working through the court system. Nixon redirects here. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John Newton Mitchell (September 15, 1913 – November 9, 1988) was the first United States Attorney General ever to be convicted of illegal activities and imprisoned. ...


On June 18, 1971 the Washington Post began publishing its own series. Ben Bagdikian, a Post editor, had obtained portions of the papers from Ellsberg. That day the Post received a call from the Assistant Attorney General, William Rehnquist, asking them to stop publishing. When the Post refused, the U.S. Justice Department sought another injunction. The U.S. District court judge refused, and the government appealed. is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ...


On June 26, 1971 the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to take both cases, merging them into New York Times Co. v. United States 403 U.S. 713. On June 30, 1971 the Supreme Court held in a 6-3 decision that the injunctions were unconstitutional prior restraints and that the government had not met the burden of proof required. The justices wrote nine separate opinions, disagreeing on significant substantive issues. While it was generally seen as a victory for those who claim the First Amendment enshrines an absolute right to free speech, many felt it a lukewarm victory, offering little protection for future publishers when claims of national security were at stake. is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Holding In order to exercise prior restraint, the Government must show sufficient evidence that the publication would cause a “grave and irreparable” danger. ... // The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States Case citation is the system used in many countries to identify the decisions in past court cases, either in special series of books called reporters or law reports, or in a neutral form which will... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... First Amendment may refer to the: First Amendment to the United States Constitution First Amendment of the Constitution of Ireland Categories: ...


Pulitzer Prizes

Further information: Pulitzer Prizes awarded to the New York Times' staff.

The Times has won 98 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The New York Times newspaper has won 94 Pulitzer Prizes, far more than any other newspaper: // 1918: The New York Times, for the most disinterested and meritorious public service rendered by an American newspaper -- complete and accurate coverage of the war. ... The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. ...


Historical controversies

New York Times headlines on the mass murder of Armenians and Pontic Greeks
New York Times headlines on the mass murder of Armenians and Pontic Greeks[6]

The paper, like many news organizations, has often been accused of giving too little or too much coverage to events for reasons not related to objective journalism. One of these allegations is that before and during World War II, the newspaper downplayed accusations that the Third Reich had targeted Jews for expulsion and genocide, in part because the publisher, who was Jewish, feared the taint of taking on any "Jewish cause."[7] Image File history File linksMetadata Pontiangreeks. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Pontiangreeks. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Pontic Greek is a Greek language which was originally spoken on the shores of the Black Sea (Pontus). Pontics linguistic lineage stems from Attic Greek, and contains influences from Byzantine Greek, Turkish influence and some Persian and Caucasian borrowings. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... Look up Expulsion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ...


Another serious charge is the accusation that the Times, through its coverage of the Soviet Union by correspondent Walter Duranty, helped cover up the Ukrainian genocide by Josef Stalin in the 1930s.[8][9] Walter Duranty Walter Duranty (1884–1957) was a Liverpool-born British journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for a set of stories he wrote in 1931 as The New York Times Moscow correspondent, covering Joseph Stalins Five-Year Plan to industrialize the Soviet Union. ... Child victim of the Holodomor Map of Ukrainian SRR in 1932-1933 (7 Oblast`s (Regions) + Moldavian ASSR) administrative borders given in light grey The Ukrainian famine (1932-1933), or Holodomor (Ukrainian: Голодомор), was one of the largest national catastrophes of the Ukrainian nation in modern history with direct loss of... (Russian, in full: Ио́сиф Виссарио́нович Ста́лин [Iosif Vissarionovich Stalin]; December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953) was the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s to his death in 1953 and General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1922-1953...


In 1965, the Times published a story about a Jewish man turned neo-Nazi, Dan Burros. Burros killed himself minutes after the paper came out with the story.[10] Daniel Dan Burros (March 5, 1937 – October 31, 1965) was an American neo-nazi who committed suicide when The New York Times revealed his Jewish origin. ...


The Times has been accused by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting of giving partial coverage of events in the 1980s in Central America, in particular by insisting on human rights violations committed in Nicaragua, to the detriment of other abuses during the Salvadoran Civil War, the Guatemalan Civil War or under the dictatorship in Honduras.[11] Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR), is a media criticism organization based in New York, New York, founded in 1986. ... Combatants Salvadoran Government: Salvadoran Armed Forces, National Police, Treasury Police, Death Squads Revolutionary Forces: FMLN FDR ERP RN PRTC Commanders Roberto DAubuisson Álvaro Magaña José Guillermo García José Napoleón Duarte Alfredo Cristiani Cayetano Carpio† Leonel González Schafik Handal Joaquin Villalobos Nidia Díaz Strength About... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The History of Honduras concerns the history of Honduras. ...


Until 2004, the Times had a policy of not using the term Armenian Genocide.[12] Despite publishing dozens of articles about the Armenian Genocide,[13] the Times shied away from using the term in its articles as part of its editorial policy. The Turkish Government denies genocide occurred. Times columnist and former reporter Nicholas D. Kristof, who is of Armenian descent, has criticized in his Times column the ongoing denial of the Armenian Genocide by the Turkish government. Armenian Genocide photo. ... This article is about the Republic of Turkey. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... Nicholas D. Kristof Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American political scientist, author, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist specializing in East Asia. ...


The Times today

The new New York Times headquarters building.
The new New York Times headquarters building.

The New York Times trails in circulation only to USA Today and The Wall Street Journal. The newspaper is currently owned by The New York Times Company, in which descendants of Adolph Ochs, principally the Sulzberger family, maintain a dominant role. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixels, file size: 1. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. ... Cover of Time Magazine (September 1, 1924) Adolph Simon Ochs (b. ... The Sulzberger family are a Jewish family in the United States. ...


The Times has been going through a downsizing for several years, offering buyouts to workers and cutting expenses,[14] in common with a general trend among print newsmedia. At the end of 2005 it had over 350 full time reporters and about 40 photographers, in addition to hundreds of free-lance contributors who work for the paper more occasionally.


In addition to its New York City headquarters, the Times has 16 news bureaux in New York State, 11 national news bureaux and 26 foreign news bureaux.[15] It has sought to strengthen its status as a national newspaper by increasing printing locations to 20, allowing early morning distribution in additional markets.


In March 2007, the paper reported a circulation of 1,120,420 copies on weekdays and 1,627,062 copies on Sundays.[16] In the New York City metropolitan area, the paper costs $1.25 Monday through Saturday and $4 on Sunday. Elsewhere the Sunday edition costs $5. New home delivery subscribers receive a discount.[17] The metropolitan area of New York City, also called Greater New York or Greater New York City is defined by the U.S. Census as the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT Metropolitan Statistical Area based on broad social and economic integration, which is divided into...


The newspaper continues to own the classical music radio station WQXR (96.3 FM) and formerly owned its AM sister, WQEW (1560 AM). The classical music format was simulcast on both frequencies until the early 1990s, when the big-band and standards music format of WNEW-AM (now WBBR) moved from 1130 AM to 1560. The AM station changed its call letters from WQXR to WQEW. By the beginning of the 21st century, the Times had begun leasing WQEW to ABC Radio for its Radio Disney format, which continues on 1560 AM. Disney became the owner of WQEW in 2007. WQXR is a radio station that broadcasts from New York City on 96. ... WQEW 1560 AM is a Radio Disney affiliate. ... WBBR is a radio station, broadcasting at 1130 AM in New York City. ... For other uses, see ABC Radio (disambiguation). ... Radio Disney is a radio network based in Dallas, Texas in the United States broadcasting music and other content targeted at children and young teenagers. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ...


The Times had a separate television guide from March 1988 to April 2006. It was the last major newspaper to outsource its television guide's editorial to a syndication service such as Tribune Media Services, though the latter company compiled the guide's TV grids. Blurbs (short, haiku-like summaries) for the listings of theatrical and television movies were based on the opinions of Times critics but edited to succinct form by the former film critic Howard Thompson[18] from the section's inception in 1988 until a year before his death in 2002, then by Lawrence Van Gelder, Gene Rondinaro, Tim Sastrowardoyo, Neil Genzlinger, and Anita Gates. Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... Howard Thompson (1919-10 March 2002) was an American journalist, most of whose career of nearly forty years was at The New York Times. ... Lawrence Van Gelder is an American journalist who has worked at several different New York City-based newspapers in his long career. ... Rahadyan Timoteo Sastrowardoyo — born 1963 in New York City — is a writer, editor and photographer. ... Neil Genzlinger is an American playwright, editor and critic of books[1], theatre[2] and television[3]. He frequently writes for The New York Times, where he is a copy editor. ...


A new headquarters for the newspaper, New York Times Tower, is a skyscraper designed by Renzo Piano. It was occupied in June 2007 and is at 620 Eighth Avenue, between West 40th and 41st Streets, in Manhattan.[19] A rendering of the New York Times Tower The New York Times Tower is the new home of The New York Times Company publisher of the The New York Times, The Boston Globe, the International Herald Tribune, as well as other regional papers, and radio and television stations. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo. ... Eighth Avenue is a north-south avenue on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Modern controversies

Main article: Criticism of The New York Times

Jayson Blair was a New York Times reporter who was forced to resign from the newspaper in May 2003, after he was caught plagiarizing and fabricating elements of his stories. Critics point that Blair's race was the motivating reason for the Times initial reluctance to fire him. [20] In summer 2004, The New York Times then public editor (ombudsman), Daniel Okrent, wrote a piece on the Times liberal bias. ... Jayson Blair (born March 23, 1976, Columbia, Maryland) is an African American and former New York Times reporter who was forced to resign from the newspaper in May 2003, after he was caught plagiarizing and fabricating elements of his stories. ... For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ...


The Times has been accused of having a liberal or a conservative bias.[21][22][23][24][25][26] According to a 2007 survey of public perceptions of major media outlets, 40% believe the Times has a liberal slant and 11% believe it has a conservative slant.[27] In summer 2004, the newspaper's then public editor (ombudsman), Daniel Okrent, wrote a piece in which he concluded that the Times did have a liberal bias in coverage of certain social issues, gay marriage being the example he used. He claimed that this bias reflected the paper's cosmopolitanism, which arose naturally from its roots as a hometown paper of New York City. [28] Okrent did not comment at length on the issue of bias in coverage of "hard news," such as fiscal policy, foreign policy, or civil liberties. Okrent noted that the paper's coverage of the Iraq war was, among other things, insufficiently critical of the George W. Bush administration. Public Editor is an editorial position established by The New York Times in response to the Jayson Blair scandal. ... For the Canadian television series, see Ombudsman (TV series). ... Daniel Okrent (born April 2, 1948) is an American writer, editor and baseball fan. ... Recognized in some regions United States (MA, CA eff. ... Cosmopolitanism is the idea that all of humanity belongs to a single moral community. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Web presence

The Times has had a strong presence on the Web since 1995, and has been ranked one of the top Web sites. Accessing some articles requires registration, though this can be bypassed by using a link generator or in some cases through Times RSS feeds.[29] The website had 555 million pageviews in March 2005.[30] For RSS feeds from Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Syndication. ...


The domain nytimes.com attracted at least 146 million visitors annually by 2008 according to a Compete.com study.[31] NYT Company consolidation (which includes About.com) is the 12th most-visited parent company, with 37.7 million unique visitors as of March 2006.[32] Screenshot of About. ...


In September 2005, the paper decided to begin subscription-based service for daily columns in a program known as TimesSelect, which encompassed many previously free columns. Until being discontinued two years later, TimesSelect cost $7.95 per month or $49.95 per year,[33] though it was free for print copy subscribers and university students and faculty.[34][35] To work around this, bloggers often reposted TimesSelect material,[36] and at least one site once compiled links of reprinted material.[37]


On September 17, 2007, The Times announced that it would stop charging for access to parts of its Web site, effective at midnight the following day, reflecting a growing view in the industry that subscription fees cannot outweigh the potential ad revenue from increased traffic on a free site.[38] In addition to opening the entire site to all readers, Times news archives from 1987 to the present are available at no charge, as well as those from 1851 to 1922, which are in the public domain.[39] [40]


Times columnists including Nicholas Kristof and Thomas Friedman had criticized TimesSelect,[41][42] with Friedman going so far as to say "I hate it. It pains me enormously because it’s cut me off from a lot, a lot of people, especially because I have a lot of people reading me overseas, like in India ... I feel totally cut off from my audience."[43] Nicholas D. Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times whose specialty is East Asian affairs, especially those of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Thomas Lauren Friedman, OBE (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist. ...


The Times is also the first newspaper to offer a video game as part of its editorial content, Food Import Folly by Persuasive Games.[44] Computer and video games redirects here. ... Persuasive Games is a video game developer founded by Ian Bogost, a professor at Georgia Tech. ...


The Times Reader is a digital version of the Times. It was created via a collaboration between the newspaper and Microsoft. Times Reader takes the principles of print journalism and applies them to the technique of online reporting. Times Reader uses a series of technologies developed by Microsoft and their Windows Presentation Foundation team. It was announced in Seattle in April 2006 by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., Bill Gates, and Tom Bodkin. Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... This subsystem is a part of . ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Tom Bodkin is the Design Director at The New York Times. ...


Major sections

The newspaper is organized in three sections including the magazine, some like the Metro Section, are only found in the editions of the paper distributed in the Tri-State Area and not in the national or Washington, D.C., editions: NY-MA-CT Tripoint Marker CT-RI-MA Tripoint Marker The 38th point is actually a quadripoint, where 4 states meet (Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico) at the Four Corners Monument. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

1. News 
Includes International, National, Washington, Business, Technology, Science, Health, Sports, The Metro Section (almost always section B), Education, Weather, and Obituaries.
2. Opinion 
Includes Editorials, Op-Eds and Letters to the Editor.
3. Features 
Includes Arts, Movies, Theater, Travel, NYC Guide, Dining & Wine, Home & Garden, Fashion & Style, Crossword, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Times Magazine, and Week in Review

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business (also called firm or enterprise) is a legally recognized organizational entity designed to provide goods and/or services to consumers or corporate entities such as governments, charities or other businesses. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... Obituary for World War I death An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper, written or commissioned by the newspaper, and usually including a short biography. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... A letter to the editor [1] (sometimes abbreviated LTTE or LTE) is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern to its readers. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square grid of black and white squares. ... The New York Times Book Review is a weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

Style

When referring to people, the Times generally uses honorifics, rather than unadorned last names (except in the sports pages). The newspaper's headlines tend to be verbose, and, for major stories, come with subheadings giving further details, although it is moving away from this style. It stayed with an eight column format years after other papers had switched to six, and it was one of the last newspapers to adopt color photography, with the first color photograph on the front page appearing on October 16, 1997. In the absence of a major headline, the day's most important story generally appears in the top-right hand column, on the main page. An honorific is a term used to convey esteem or respect. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


The typefaces used for the headlines are custom variations of Cheltenham. The running text is set at 8.7 point Imperial.[45] “Font” redirects here. ... Cheltenham is an American typeface. ... Point, in typography, may also refer to a dot grapheme (e. ...


Comics

Aside from a weekly roundup of reprints of editorial cartoons from other newspapers, the Times does not have its own staff editorial cartoonist, nor does it feature a comics page or Sunday comics section. This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ...

College Point is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. ... Map of Edison Township in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1651 Incorporated March 17, 1870 (as Raritan Township) Government  - Type Faulkner Act Mayor-Council  - Mayor Jun Choi Area  - Township  30. ... Billerica (IPA: [bɪl. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Ann Arbor redirects here. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: Country United States State Missouri County Boone Government  - Mayor Darwin Hindman Area  - City  59 sq mi (138. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... Springfield is an unincorporated community in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... Gastonia is a city in Gaston County in North Carolina, a state in the southeastern United States. ... Spartanburg is the largest city in and the county seat of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Broward Established 27 March 1911 Government  - Type Commission-Manager  - Mayor Jim Naugle Area [1]  - City 36. ... A view of Lakelands business district, early 1920s Lakeland is a city in Polk County, Florida, United States, located approximately midway between Tampa and Orlando along Interstate 4. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... Coordinates: , Country United States State Washington County King Founded May 28, 1890 Government  - Mayor Suzette Cooke Area  - City  28. ... Location of Concord in California. ... Motto: A Balanced City Location of Torrance in the County of Los Angeles Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Government  - Mayor Frank Scotto Area  - Total 20. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ...

Ownership

The Ochs-Sulzberger family, one of the United States' great newspaper dynasties, have owned the Times since 1896. After the publisher went public in the 1960s, the family continued to exert control through its ownership of the vast majority of Class B voting shares. Class A shareholders cannot vote on many important matters relating to the company, while Class B shareholders can vote on all matters. Ochs refers to: Adolph (Simon) Ochs, Jewish reporter of Bavarian immigrant background Iphigene Bertha Ochs, daughter of Adolph, married Arthur Hays Sulzberger Arthur Ochs Punch-Sulzberger, son of Iphigene Philip David Phil Ochs Greatest Hits (Phil Ochs) Interview with Phil Ochs Phil Ochs at Newport Phil Ochs In Concert Phil... Sulzberger is a surname and may refer to: Arthur Hays Sulzberger (1891-1968), publisher of The New York Times from 1935 to 1961 Arthur Ochs Sulzberger (born 1926), publisher of The New York Times from 1963 to 1992 Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ...


Dual-class structures caught on in the mid-20th century as families such as the Grahams of the Washington Post Company sought to gain access to public capital without losing control. Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal, had a similar structure and was controlled by the Bancroft family (it was bought by the News Corporation in 2007). Many regard family ownership as a way to promote journalistic excellence by insulating newsroom decisions from short-term financial pressures.[citation needed] Dow Jones & Company (NYSE: DJ), based in the United States is a publishing and financial information firm. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ...


Major Class A shareholders, as of December 31, 2006, include the Sulzberger family (19%), T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (14.99%), Private Capital Management Inc. (9.34%), MFS Investment Management (8.28%) and Morgan Stanley Investment Management Inc. (7.15%).[46] Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ...


The Ochs-Sulzberger family trust controls roughly 88 percent of the company's class B shares.[46] Any alteration to the dual-class structure must be ratified by six of eight directors who sit on the board of the Ochs-Sulzberger family trust. The Trust board members are Daniel H. Cohen, James M. Cohen, Lynn G. Dolnick, Susan W. Dryfoos, Michael Golden, Eric M. A. Lax, Arthur O. Sulzberger, Jr. and Cathy J. Sulzberger.[46]


Current management and employees[47]

Publisher

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

Masthead

The News Sections[48]

  • Bill Keller, Executive Editor (2003- )
  • Jill Abramson, Managing Editor (News)
  • John M. Geddes, Managing Editor (Production)
  • Jonathan Landman, Deputy Managing Editor
  • Dean Baquet, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Richard L. Berke, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Tom Bodkin, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Susan Edgerley, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Glenn Kramon, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Gerald Marzorati, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Michele McNally, Assistant Managing Editor
  • William E. Schmidt, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Craig R. Whitney, Assistant Managing Editor
  • Clark Hoyt, Public Editor[49]
 

Business Management[50] Bill Keller (born January 18, 1949) is executive editor of The New York Times. ... Jill Abramson is the current managing editor of The New York Times. ... John M. Geddes is an American journalist and one of two managing editors of The New York Times, along with Jill Abramson. ... Johnathan Landman is an American journalist and deputy managing editor at Landman became deputy managing editor responsible for digital journalism for The Times in August 2005. ... Dean P. Baquet (born in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American journalist. ... Tom Bodkin is the Design Director at The New York Times. ... Gerald Marzorati is the editor of the New York Times Magazine. ... Michele McNally is an American photo editor who has been the assistant managing editor for photography at The New York Times since 2005. ... Clark Hoyt is an American journalist who is currently the public editor of the New York Times, serving as the readers representative. He is the newspapers third public editor, or ombudsman, after Daniel Okrent and Byron Calame. ...

  • Janet L. Robinson, Chief Executive Officer, The New York Times Company
  • Scott H. Heekin-Canedy, President, General Manager
  • Dennis L. Stern, Senior V.P., Deputy General Manager
  • Denise F. Warren, Senior V.P., Chief Advertising Officer
  • Alexis Buryk, Senior V.P., Advertising
  • Thomas K. Carley, Senior V.P., Planning
  • Yasmin Namini, Senior V.P., Circulation and Marketing
  • David A. Thurm, Senior V.P., Chief Information Officer
  • Roland A. Caputo, V.P., Chief Financial Officer
  • Terry L. Hayes, V.P., Labor Relations
  • Thomas P. Lombardo, V.P., Production
  • Muriel Watkins, V.P., Human Resources
  • Christian L. Edwards, President, News Services
  • Vivian Schiller, Senior V.P., General Manager, Nytimes.Com
  • Michael Oreskes, Editor, International Herald Tribune

Janet L. Robinson[1] became president and chief executive officer of The New York Times Company on December 27, 2004. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ...

Department heads

  • Laura Chang, science news editor
  • Susan Chira, foreign news editor
  • Suzanne Daley, national news editor
  • Trip Gabriel, style editor
  • Lawrence Ingrassia, financial news editor
  • Tom Jolly, Sports editor
  • Scott Veale, Arts and Leisure editor
  • William McDonald, obituaries editor
  • Alison Mitchell, education editor
  • Katherine J. Roberts, editor, The Week in Review
 

Laura Chang (born in Seattle, Washington) is an American journalist who has been the science editor of The New York Times since 2004. ... Susan D. Chira (born in New York City) is an American journalist. ... Suzanne M. Daley is an American journalist who has been the national editor for The New York Times since 2005. ... Tom Jolly (born 1955) is an American journalist who has been the sports editor of The New York Times since February 2003. ... Joseph A. Sexton is an American journalist who has been the metropolitan news editor of The New York Times since 2006. ... Will Shortz (b. ... Sam Sifton (born 1966) is an American journalist who has been the cultural news editor of The New York Times since May, 2005[1]. His previous posts at the Times include deputy dining editor (2001); dining editor (2001-04); and deputy culture editor (2004-2005). ... Gerald Marzorati is the editor of the New York Times Magazine. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Sam Tanenhaus (born October 31, 1955) is an American author, historian and biographer. ... The New York Times Book Review is a weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed. ...

Bureau chiefs

Domestic bureaus

 

Foreign bureaus Dean P. Baquet (born in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American journalist. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Kirk Johnson (born June 29, 1972) is a professional heavyweight boxer from North Preston, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... Jesse Underwood[1] McKinley (born 1971) is an American journalist who is the San Francisco bureau chief of The New York Times. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... William Yardley (1632-May 6, 1693) was an early settler of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ...

 

Foreign bureaus (cont.) Warren McClamroch Hoge (born 1941[1]) is an American journalist, much of whose long career has been at The New York Times. ... UN redirects here. ... James Courtwright McKinley, Jr. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Simon Romero is an American journalist who has been the Caracas, Venezuela correspondent for The New York Times since 2006. ... Nickname: Motto: Ave María Santísima, sin pecado concebida, en el primer instante de su ser natural. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... John F. Burns on PBS Newshour (August 25, 2004). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Steven J. Erlanger is an American journalist who has been the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times since July 2004. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Nicholas Kulish is a journalist who has been a member of the editorial board of The New York Times since September 2005[1]. He will begin reporting for the Times as Berlin bureau chief in the late summer of 2007. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Simon Romero is an American journalist who has been the Caracas, Venezuela correspondent for The New York Times since 2006. ... Bogota redirects here. ... Howard W. French (born 1958) is a New York Times reporter as well as an author. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Mark Aurel Landler (born October 26, 1965 in Stuttgart, Germany[1]) is a journalist who has been the European economic correspondent of The New York Times, based in Frankfurt, Germany, since July 2002[2]. // Landler began his career at the Times in 1987 as a copy boy, after graduating from... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ...

Charles Ian Fisher (born 1965) is an American journalist who has been the Rome bureau chief of The New York Times since 2004. ... The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. ... Ethan Bronner (born 1954) is deputy foreign editor of the New York Times, and a frequent essayist on foreign affairs. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... James Glanz is an American journalist who was recently named to be the next Baghdad bureau chief of The New York Times[1]. Glanz joined the Times in 1999[2]. Articles he wrote with Eric Lipton and others on the World Trade Center were chosen as a finalist for a... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Sabrina Tavernise (born in Hartford, Connecticut[1]) is an American journalist who is currently the Istanbul bureau chief of The New York Times. ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Constantinople Ottoman period 1453 as Constantinople (internationally) and various other names in local languages Turkish Republic period 1923 as Constantinople, officially renamed as Istanbul in... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... Culture Tourist Attractions Delhi offers a multitude of interesting places and attractions to the visitor, so much so that it becomes difficult to decide from where to begin exploring the city. ... Lydia Frances Polgreen (born 1975) is an American journalist who has been the West Africa bureau chief of The New York Times, based in Dakar, Senegal, since 2005[1]. Ms. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Dakar is the capital city of Senegal, located on the Cap-Vert peninsula at the countrys Atlantic coast. ... Jeffrey A. Gettleman (born 1972) is an American journalist who has been the East Africa bureau chief of The New York Times, based in Nairobi, Kenya, since 2006. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  Geographic East Africa, including the UN subregion and East African Community East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Location of Nairobi Coordinates: , Country Province HQ City Hall Founded 1899 Constituencies of Nairobi List Makadara Kamukunji Starehe Langata Dagoretti Westlands Kasarani Embakasi Government  - Mayor Geoffrey Majiwa Area  - City 684 km² (264. ... This article is about the city in South Africa. ... Christopher John Chivers is an American journalist who reports for The New York Times. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Joseph Kahn (born 1964) is an American journalist who has been the Beijing bureau chief of The New York Times since July of 2003. ... Peking redirects here. ... Norimitsu Onishi ) is a Canadian journalist born in Ichikawa, Chiba Prefecture, Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ...

Columnists

Op-Ed Columnists

Business Columnists David Brooks (b. ... Gail Collins may mean: Gail Collins (journalist), a columnist for the New York Times. ... Maureen Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is a Washington D.C.-based columnist for The New York Times. ... Thomas L. Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist, columnist, and author, currently working as an Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nicholas D. Kristof Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American political scientist, author, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist specializing in East Asia. ... William Bill Kristol (born December 23, 1952 in New York City) is an American conservative pundit, inspired in part by the ideas of Leo Strauss. ... Paul Krugman Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist. ... Frank Rich (born June 2, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for The New York Times who focuses on American politics and popular culture. ...

 

News Columnists Floyd Norris is the chief financial correspondent of The New York Times and The International Herald Tribune. ... Gretchen Morgenson Gretchen C. Morgenson (born January 2, 1956 in State College, Pennsylvania) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who writes the Market Watch column for the Sunday Money & Business section of the New York Times newspaper. ... Joseph Nocera, an American journalist, lives in Northampton, Massachusetts. ...

Science Columnists Dave Anderson (born May 6, 1929 in Troy, New York) is an American sportswriter based in New York City. ... There are two individuals named Dan Berry. The cartoonist Daniel Barry Daniel Barry, November 7, 1923- January 1997 was a cartoonist. ... Roger Cohen is a biweekly columnist for the International Herald Tribune, which is itself a publication of The New York Times. ... Clyde Haberman (born 1944) is an American journalist who is currently a columnist for The New York Times. ... Adam Liptak (born September 2, 1960 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American journalist, lawyer and instructor in journalism[1]. He is currently the national legal correspondent for The New York Times. ... William C. Rhoden, (born ?) is a sports columnist for the New York Times. ... George Vecsey is a non-fiction author and sports columnist for the New York Times. ... John Vinocur is a journalist who writes about politics and sports for the Paris-based newspaper, The International Herald Tribune. ...

John Tierney (b. ...

Other notable personnel

Dith Pran (born September 27, 1942 – March 30, 2008) was a photojournalist best known as a refugee and Cambodian Genocide survivor and was the subject of the Academy Award-winning film The Killing Fields. ... Sydney H. Schanberg (born January 17, 1934 in Clinton, Massachusetts) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The George Polk Awards is an American journalism award. ... Linda Greenhouse is a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter for The New York Times covering the United States Supreme Court. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... New York Times critic Michiko Kakutani. ... Christopher Lehmann-Haupt has worked in the field of books all of his professional career. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jon Pareles is an American journalist who is chief music critic at the arts section of the New York Times. ... Allan M. Siegal is an American journalist who spent nearly all of his long career at The New York Times. ... William G. Connolly, is a co-author of The New York Times style guide and a member of the executive committee of the American Copy Editors Society. ... The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage is a style guide (copyright 1999) by Allan M. Siegal and William G. Connolly. ... Neil Strauss is a Los Angeles-based author and journalist who writes for The New York Times and Rolling Stone, where he is a contributing editor. ... David E. Sanger — born on July 5, 1960 in White Plains, New York — is White House correspondent for The New York Times. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Don Van Natta Jr. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Sheryl WuDunn is a Chinese American journalist and editor for The New York Times. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Eric Asimov (born July 17, 1957 in Bethpage, New York) is the Chief Wine Critic of The New York Times, a position he has held since June, 2004. ... David Pogue is a New York Times personal technology columnist, Emmy-winning tech correspondent for CBS News Sunday Morning, and tech guest for NPRs Morning Edition. ... A.O. Scott (born July 10, 1966) is a film critic for The New York Times newspaper. ... Manohla Dargis is one of the chief film critics for The New York Times. ... Stephen Holden is an American writer, music critic, and film critic. ...

Former management and employees

Publishers

Cover of Time Magazine (September 1, 1924) Adolph Simon Ochs (b. ... Arthur Hays-Sulzberger (1891 - 1968) was the publisher of the New York Times (1935-61). ... Arthur Ochs Punch Sulzberger (b. ... Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

Executive editors

Turner Catledge (1901--1983) was an American journalist who worked for the New York Times, later becoming vice-chairman of the company. ... James Scotty Reston James Barrett Reston (3 November 1909 – 12 June 1995) (nicknamed Scotty) was a prominent American journalist whose career spanned the mid 1930s to the early 1990s. ... Abraham Michael A.M. Rosenthal (May 2, 1922 – May 10, 2006), born in Sault Ste. ... Max Frankel is a journalist. ... Joseph Lelyveld (born April 5, 1937) was executive editor of the New York Times from 1994 to 2001. ... Howell Raines was Executive Editor of The New York Times from 2001 until his resignation following the Jayson Blair scandal in 2003. ...

Other personnel

Kurt Alexander Eichenwald (born June 28, 1961) was a writer and investigative reporter at The New York Times newspaper until October 2006, when he resigned to become an investigative reporter with Condé Nasts forthcoming business magazine, Portfolio -- which plans to mail out its premier issue in late April 2007. ... John Betram Oakes(1993-2003) was an editor and an editorial writer with the New York Times, a decorated American veteran of WWII, and a pioneer to the field of environmental journalism. ... Howard Thompson (1919-10 March 2002) was an American journalist, most of whose career of nearly forty years was at The New York Times. ... Adam Clymer (born April 27, 1937 in New York City) is an American journalist. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

See also

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
The New York Times
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Patrick Fitzgerald, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois CIA leak grand jury investigation (rel. ... Democracy Now! logo. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ... Daniel and Patricia Marx Ellsberg - 2006 Jacob Appelbaum Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is a former American military analyst employed by the RAND Corporation who precipitated a national uproar in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, the U.S. militarys account of activities during the Vietnam War... Lies of Our Times ((LOOT) A Magazine to Correct the Record) was published between January 1990 and December 1994. ... The media of New York City is internationally influential, with some of the most important newspapers, largest publishing houses, most prolific television studios, and biggest record companies in the world. ... The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ... The Pentagon Papers is the colloquial term for United States-Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, a 47 volume, 7,000-page, top-secret United States Department of Defense history of the United States political and military involvement in the Vietnam War from 1945... The Plame affair refers to the political controversy surrounding allegations by critics of the Bush administration that White House officials deliberately leaked Valerie Plame’s identity as an undercover U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operative as political retaliation against her husband, retired ambassador Joseph C. Wilson. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Saba, Jennifer (2008-04-28). New FAS-FAX: Steep Decline at 'NYT' While 'WSJ' Gains. Editor & Publisher. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  2. ^ New York Times Company : Company : Awards : Pulitzer Prizes : NYTimes Media Group
  3. ^ Pulitzer Prize on topics.nytimes.com
  4. ^ The New York Times Company: New York Times Timeline 1851-1880
  5. ^ "In Tough Times, a Redesigned Journal". "A long slow decline in circulation across the industry since the mid-1980s and the chance to save money have prompted other newspapers, including The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times, to reduce size." 
  6. ^ The general pattern of related New York Times reporting for the period concerned can be captured here.
  7. ^ Leff, Laurel [2005-03-21]. Buried by the Times: The Holocaust and America's Most Important Newspaper (hardback, paperback), New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-81287-9. 
  8. ^ New York Times Statement About 1932 Pulitzer Prize Awarded to Walter Duranty. The New York Times Company. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  9. ^ Beichman, Arnold (2003-06-12). Pulitzer-Winning Lies. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  10. ^ "Parents Claim Body of Klan Leader Who Killed Self on Exposure as Jew", Washington Post, 1965-11-02, p. A4. 
  11. ^ Questionnaire for the New York Times on Its Central America Coverage, FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting), February 1998
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  13. ^ "Armenian Genocide Contemporary Articles". Armeniapedia. Retrieved on 2006-07-04. 
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  17. ^ Times home delivery discount
  18. ^ Feature: Howard Thompson | 12/25/2002 | Citypaper.com
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  20. ^ Jayson Blair: A Case Study of What Went Wrong at The New York Times December 10, 2004 By Kristina Nwazota of PBS
  21. ^ Time: "The Next War in Iraq."
  22. ^ The Nation:http://www.thenation.com/doc/20050418/baker
  23. ^ Russ Baker
  24. ^ Washington Post
  25. ^ Media Matters on William Safire: http://mediamatters.org/items/200410110010
  26. ^ Eric Alterman : http://www.thenation.com/doc/20030224/alterman2
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  28. ^ Okrent, Daniel (2004-07-25). "Is The New York Times a Liberal Newspaper?" (Public Editor column). The New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-09-24.
  29. ^ New York Times Link Generator (presented by reddit)
  30. ^ The New York Times. The New York Times Company Reports NYTimes.com's Record-Breaking Traffic for March. BusinessWire. Retrieved on 2006-07-04.
  31. ^ New York Times attracts 140m visitors online yearly
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  33. ^ What Is TimesSelect?. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  34. ^ Who is eligible to get TimesSelect for free?. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  35. ^ TimesSelect is now free for University Students and Faculty. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  36. ^ Farivar, Cyrus (2006-09-22). Goof Lets Times' Content Go Free. Retrieved on 2006-07-04.
  37. ^ Tabin, John. Never Pay Retail. Retrieved on 2006-07-04.
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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR), is a media criticism organization based in New York, New York, founded in 1986. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TIME redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GamePolitics. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Amster, Linda; and Dylan Loeb McClain. Kill Duck Before Serving: Red Faces at The New York Times: A Collection of the Newspaper's Most Interesting, Embarrassing and Off-Beat Corrections. New York: St. Martin's, 2002. ISBN 0312284276 ISBN 978-0312284275
  • Berry, Nicholas O. Foreign Policy and the Press: An Analysis of the New York Times' Coverage of U.S. Foreign Policy (Greenwood. 1990)
  • Calhoun, Chris, ed. 52 McGs.: The Best Obituaries from Legendary New York Times Reporter Robert McG. Thomas. New York: Scribner, 2001. ISBN 0743215621 ISBN 978-0743215626
  • Davis, Elmer. History of the New York Times, 1851-1921 (1921)
  • Hess, John. My Times: A Memoir of Dissent, Seven Stories Press, 2003, cloth, ISBN 1-58322-604-4; trade paperback, Seven Stories Press, 2003, ISBN 1-58322-622-2
  • Jones, Alex S. and Susan E. Tifft. The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind The New York Times. Back Bay Books, 2000, ISBN 0-316-83631-1.
  • Members of the staff of The New York Times. The Newspaper: Its Making and Its Meaning. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1945.
  • Mnookin, Seth. Hard News: The Scandals at The New York Times and Their Meaning for American Media, Random House, 2004, cloth, ISBN 1-4000-6244-6.
  • Robertson, Nan. The Girls in the Balcony: Women, Men and The New York Times. Random House, 1992. ISBN 039458452X ISBN 978-0394584522
  • Siegal, Allan M. and William G. Connolly The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage, revised edition. New York: Times Books, 1999. ISBN 0-8129-6388-1. Self-indexed.
  • Talese, Gay. The Kingdom and the Power, World Publishing Company, 1969, ISBN 0-8446-6284-4.

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Seth Mnookin (born April 27, 1972) is an American writer and journalist. ... Nan C. Robertson (born July 11, 1926 in Chicago[1]) is an American journalist and author. ... Allan M. Siegal is an American journalist who spent nearly all of his long career at The New York Times. ... William G. Connolly, is a co-author of The New York Times style guide and a member of the executive committee of the American Copy Editors Society. ... The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage is a style guide (copyright 1999) by Allan M. Siegal and William G. Connolly. ... Gay Talese Gay Talese (born February 7, 1932) is an American author. ...

External links

  • The New York Times on the Web
  • Official history of the Times
  • Daniel Okrent, "THE PUBLIC EDITOR; Is The New York Times a Liberal Newspaper?" New York Times, July 25, 2004
  • Fit and Unfit to Print: the Wall Street Journal replies to the Times on the subject of the press's obligations in wartime
The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Presented by The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards are a set of awards presented to the worlds best websites. The awards have been given out since 1996. ...

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The New York Times > Member Center > Site Help > The New York Times Privacy Policy Highlights (860 words)
The New York Times may perform statistical analyses of subscribers and their subscribing and purchasing patterns for product development purposes and to generally inform advertisers about the nature of our subscriber base.
If, at any time, you prefer not to receive traditional mail or telephone solicitations originated by The New York Times Home Delivery Department and its third party affiliates, you may choose to opt-out.
The New York Times is a TRUSTe licensee and you may contact TRUSTe if you feel a privacy question is not properly addressed.
The New York Times - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6026 words)
The New York Times was founded on September 18, 1851 by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones (as the New-York Daily Times).
In 1964, the paper was the defendant in a libel case known as New York Times Co. v.
In October 2005, Times reporter Judith Miller was released from prison after an 85-days, when she agreed to testify to Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald’s grand jury after receiving a personal waiver, both on the phone and in writing, of her earlier confidential source agreement with Lewis "Scooter" Libby.
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