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Encyclopedia > The New Republic
The New Republic
Editor Franklin Foer
Categories Editorial magazine
Frequency Twice per month
Circulation 60,000
Publisher CanWest Global Communications
First issue November 7, 1914
Company New Republic, Inc
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Website www.tnr.com
ISSN 0028-6583

The New Republic (TNR) is an American magazine of opinion published twice per month (published weekly before March 2007) and with a circulation between 40,000 and 65,000. The editor-in-chief is Martin Peretz. The current editor is Franklin Foer. Politically, the magazine has a reputation for supporting modern liberal public policies. In recent decades, its editorial perspective has emphasized strong support for U.S. military action and a "hawkish" foreign policy. Franklin Foer is an American political journalist and the current editor of The New Republic. ... Most circulated periodical magazines in the U.S. as of 2003. ... CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... New Republic can be: The New Republic, an American magazine. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Editor in chief is a publications primary editor. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... Franklin Foer is an American political journalist and the current editor of The New Republic. ... Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ...

Contents

New format

Starting with the March 19, 2007 issue, the magazine implemented major changes: is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

  • Decreased frequency: the magazine will now be published twice a month, or 24 times a year. This replaces the old plan of publishing 44 issues a year.
  • New design and layout: Issues will feature more visuals, new art and other "reader friendly" content.
  • More pages and bigger size: Issues will be bigger and contain more pages.
  • Improved paper: Sturdier covers and pages.
  • Increased newsstand price: Although the subscription prices aren't to change, the newsstand price will increase from $3.95 to $4.95.
  • Website redesign: The website will offer more daily content and new features.[1][2]

Politics

Domestically, the current version of TNR supports a largely centrist "business-friendly liberal" stance on fiscal issues and a liberal stance on certain social issues, notably gay rights. The magazine's outlook is associated with the Democratic Leadership Council and "New Democrats" like former President Bill Clinton and Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman, who received the magazine's endorsement in the 2004 Democratic primary. These policies, while seeking to achieve the ends of traditional social welfare programs, often use market solutions as their means, and so are often called "business-friendly". Typical of some of the policies supported by both TNR and the DLC during the 1990s were increased funding for the Earned Income Tax Credit program and reform of the Federal welfare system. Supply-side economics, the idea of giving tax cuts to the rich, received heavy criticism from senior editor Jonathan Chait.[3] On certain high-profile social issues, such as its support of same-sex marriage, TNR could be considered more progressive than the centrist mainstream of the Democratic Party establishment. In its March 2007 issue, The New Republic ran an article by Paul Starr (co-funder of the magazine's main rival, The American Prospect) where he defined the type of modern American liberalism in his article War and Liberalism: This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In U.S. politics, the New Democrats are an organized faction within the Democratic Party that emerged after the 1988 presidential election. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish-American Democratic politician and a current U.S. senator from Connecticut. ... John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... The United States federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes that low-income married or single working people pay (such as payroll taxes) and also frequently operates as a wage subsidy for low-income workers. ... This article is about financial assistance paid by government organizations. ... Jonathan Chait is a senior editor at The New Republic and a former assistant editor of The American Prospect. ... Paul Starr is a Pulitzer Prize-winning professor of sociology and public affairs at Princeton University. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ...

Liberalism wagers that a state... can be strong but constrained – strong because constrained... Rights to education and other requirements for human development and security aim to advance equal opportunity and personal dignity and to promote a creative and productive society. To guarantee those rights, liberals have supported a wider social and economic role for the state, counterbalanced by more robust guarantees of civil liberties and a wider social system of checks and balances anchored in an independent press and pluralistic society. – Paul Starr, volume 236, p. 21-24

Unsigned editorials prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq expressed strong support for military action, citing the threat of WMD as well as humanitarian concerns. Since the end of major military operations, unsigned editorials, while critical of the handling of the war, have continued to justify the invasion on humanitarian grounds, but no longer maintain that Iraq's WMD facilities posed any threat to the United States. In the November 27, 2006, issue, the editors wrote: This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"At this point, it seems almost beside the point to say this: The New Republic deeply regrets its early support for this war. The past three years have complicated our idealism and reminded us of the limits of American power and our own wisdom."[4]

On June 23, 2006, TNR owner Martin Peretz, in response to criticism of the magazine from the blog Daily Kos, wrote the following as a summary of TNR's stances on recent issues is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Daily Kos (IPA: ) is an American political blog, publishing news and opinion from a progressive point of view. ...

"The New Republic is very much against the Bush tax programs, against Bush Social Security 'reform,' against cutting the inheritance tax, for radical health care changes, passionate about Gore-type environmentalism, for a woman's entitlement to an abortion, for gay marriage, for an increase in the minimum wage, for pursuing aggressively alternatives to our present reliance on oil and our present tax preferences for gas-guzzling automobiles. We were against the confirmation of Justice Alito."[5] Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ...

The magazine has also published two articles concerning income inequality, largely criticizing conservative economists for their attempts to deny the existence or negative effect increasing income inequality is having on the United States. In its May 2007 issue the magazine ran the editoral, titled "Nice Ass," which points to the humanitarian beliefs of liberals for the recent plight of the American left. In another recent article the TNR hailed Denmark as an example that strong involvement in a country's economy can lead to great prosperity. Such editorials and articles exemplify the liberal political orientation of TNR.


History

Early years

The New Republic (TNR) was founded by Herbert Croly and Walter Lippmann through the financial backing of heiress Dorothy Payne Whitney and her husband, Willard Straight, who maintained majority ownership. The magazine's first issue was published on November 7, 1914. The magazine's politics were liberal and progressive, and as such concerned with coping with the great changes brought about by America's late-19th century industrialization. The magazine is widely considered important in changing the character of liberalism in the direction of governmental interventionism, both foreign and domestic. Among the most important of these was the emergence of the U.S. as a Great Power on the international scene, and in 1917 TNR urged America's entry into World War I on the side of the Allies. Herbert David Croly (January 23, 1869 - May 17, 1930) was a liberal political author. ... Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 - December 14, 1974) was an influential American writer, journalist, and political commentator. ... Dorothy Payne Whitney (January 23, 1887 - 1968) was an American-born social activist and philanthropist and a member of the prominent Whitney family. ... Willard Dickerman Straight (January 31, 1880 - December 1, 1918) was an American Investment banker and diplomat. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... One of the hallmarks of contemporary great power status is permanent membership on the United Nations Security Council. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Map of the World showing the participants in World War I. Those fighting on the Allies side (at one point or another) are depicted in green, the Central Powers in orange, and neutral countries in gray. ...


One consequence of World War I was the Russian Revolution of 1917, and during the inter-war years the magazine was generally positive in its assessment of the Soviet Union and its communist government. This changed with the start of the Cold War and the 1948 departure of leftist editor Henry A. Wallace to run for president on the Progressive ticket. After Wallace, TNR moved towards positions more typical of mainstream American liberalism. During the 1950s it was critical of both Soviet foreign policy and domestic anti-communism, particularly McCarthyism. During the 1960s the magazine opposed the Vietnam War, but was also often critical of the New Left. The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political and social upheavals in Russia, involving first the overthrow of the tsarist autocracy, and then the overthrow of the liberal and moderate-socialist Provisional Government, resulting in the establishment of Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... This article is about a form of government in which the state operates under the control of a Communist Party. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... The United States Progressive Party of 1948 was a political party that ran former Vice President Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for president and U.S. Senator Glen H. Taylor of Idaho for vice president in 1948. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Ideologies Communist internationals Prominent communists Related subjects Anti-communism refers to opposition to communism. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The New Left is a term used in different countries to describe left-wing movements that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s. ...


Up until the late 1960s, the magazine had a certain "cachet as the voice of re-invigorated liberalism", in the opinion of Eric Alterman, a commentator who has criticized the magazine's politics from the left. That cachet, Alterman wrote, "was perhaps best illustrated when the dashing, young President Kennedy had been photographed boarding Air Force One holding a copy".[6] Eric Alterman is a liberal American journalist, author, media critic, blogger, and educator, possibly best known for the political weblog named Altercation, which was hosted by MSNBC.com from 2002 until 2006, and now is hosted by Media Matters for America. ...


Peretz ownership and eventual editorship, 1974-1979

In March 1974, the magazine was purchased for $380,000[6] by Harvard University lecturer Martin Peretz,[7] from Gilbert Harrison.[6] Peretz was a veteran of the New Left who had broken with that movement over its support of various Third World liberationist movements, particularly the Palestine Liberation Organization. Peretz transformed TNR into its current form. Under his ownership, TNR has advocated both strong U.S. support for the Israeli government and a hawkish U.S. foreign policy.[6] On domestic policy, it has advocated a self-critical brand of liberalism, taking positions that range from traditionally liberal to neoliberalism. It has generally supported Democratic candidates for president, although in 1980 it endorsed the moderate Republican John B. Anderson, running as an independent, rather than the Democratic incumbent Jimmy Carter. Harvard redirects here. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... The New Left is a term used in different countries to describe left-wing movements that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s. ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic: ;   or Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyyah) is a multi-party confederation and is the organization regarded since 1974 as the sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people. ... War Hawk is a term originally used to describe a member of the House of Representatives of the Twelfth Congress of the United States (usually from the south & southwest) who advocated going to war against Great Britain in the War of 1812. ... For the school of international relations, see Neoliberalism in international relations. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Harrison continued editing the magazine from an office equipped with a Queen Anne desk and John Marin paintings, and thought he had Peretz's promise to let him continue running the magazine for three years. But by 1975, when Peretz became annoyed at having his own articles rejected for publication while he was pouring money into the magazine to cover its losses, he fired Harrison, and much of the staff, including Walter Pincus, Stanley Karnow, and Doris Grumbach, was either fired or quit, being replaced largely by young men from Harvard. Peretz himself became the editor and stayed in that post until 1979. As other editors have been appointed, Peretz has remained editor in chief.[6] John Marin (December 23, 1870 - October 2, 1953) was an early American modernist artist. ... Walter Haskell Pincus (born December 24, 1932) is a national security journalist for The Washington Post. ... Stanley Karnow is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who covered Asia from 1959 as chief correspondent for Time and Life. ...


Kinsley and Hertzberg editorships, 1979-1991

Michael Kinsley, a neoliberal, was editor (1979-1981; 1985-1989), alternating twice with Hendrick Hertzberg (1981-1985; 1989-1991), who has been called "an old-fashioned social democrat". Kinsley was only 28 years old when he first became editor and was still studying law[6] at George Washington University. Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... The term neoliberalism is used to describe a political-economic philosophy that had major implications for government policies beginning in the 1970s – and increasingly prominent since 1980 – that de-emphasizes or rejects positive government intervention in the economy, focusing instead on achieving progress and even social justice by... Hendrick Hertzberg is a political writer. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ...


Writers for the magazine during this era included neoliberals Mickey Kaus and Jacob Weisberg along with Charles Krauthammer, Fred Barnes, Morton Kondracke, Sidney Blumenthal, Robert Kuttner, Ronald Steel, Michael Walzer, and Irving Howe.[6] Mickey Kaus is a journalist and author best known form writing Kausfiles, a mostly political blog featured on Slate. ... Jacob Weisberg (born 1964) is an American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as editor of Slate magazine. ... Charles Krauthammer (born March 13, 1950 in New York City[1][2]), is a Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist and commentator. ... Fred Barnes may be: Fred Barnes (1885-1938) was an English music hall artist. ... Morton M. Kondracke (born April 28, 1939) is an American political commentator and journalist. ... Sidney Blumenthal was born in Chicago in 1948 and educated at Brandeis University(BA in Sociology in 1969). ... Robert Kuttner is the co-founder and current editor-in-chief of The American Prospect, which was created in 1990 as an authoritative magazine of liberal ideas, according to its mission statement. ... Image:Mwalzer large. ... Irving Howe (1920 – 1993), was born Irving Horenstein in New York, the son of immigrants who ran a small grocery store that went out of business during the Great Depression. ...


During the 1980s the magazine generally supported President Ronald Reagan's anti-Communist foreign policy, including provision of aid to the Nicaraguan Contras. It has also supported both Gulf Wars and, reflecting its belief in the moral efficacy of American power, intervention in "humanitarian" crises, such as those in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo during the Yugoslav wars. Reagan redirects here. ... For other uses, see Contra. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...


The magazine also became known for its originality and unpredictability in the 1980s. It was widely considered a "must read" across the political spectrum. An article in Vanity Fair judged TNR "the smartest, most impudent weekly in the country," and the "most entertaining and intellectually agile magazine in the country." According to Alterman, the magazine's prose could sparkle and the contrasting views within its pages were "genuinely exciting". He added, "The magazine unarguably set the terms of debate for insider political elites during the Reagan era."[6]


With the less predictable opinions, more of them leaning conservative than before, the magazine won the respect of many conservative opinion leaders and 20 copies were messengered to the Reagan White House each Thursday afternoon. Norman Podhoretz called the magazine "indispensable", and George Will said it was "currently the nation's most interesting and most important political journal." National Review described it as "one of the most interesting magazines in the United States."[6] Norman Podhoretz (b. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ...


Credit for its quality and popularity was often assigned to Kinsley, whose wit and critical sensibility were seen as enlivening a magazine that had for many years been more conventional in its politics, and Hertzberg, a former writer for The New Yorker and speechwriter for Jimmy Carter. For other uses, see New Yorker. ...


Hertzberg and Kinsley not only alternated as editor but also alternated as the author of the magazine's lead column, "TRB from Washington". Its perspective was described as left-of-center in 1988.[8] Left wing redirects here. ...


A final ingredient that led to the magazine's increased stature in the 1980s was its "back of the book" or literary, cultural and arts pages, which were edited by Leon Wieseltier. Peretz discovered Wieseltier, then working at Harvard's Society of Fellows, and put him in charge of the section. Wieseltier reinvented the section along the lines of The New York Review of Books, allowing his critics, many of them academics, to write longer, critical essays instead of mere book reviews. Alterman calls the hire "probably [...] Peretz's single most significant positive achievement" in running the magazine. During other changes of editors, Wieseltier has remained as cultural editor. Under him the section has been "simultaneously erudite and zestful", according to Alterman, who adds, "Amazingly, a full generation later, it still sings."[6] Leon Wieseltier is a Jewish-American writer, critic, and magazine editor. ... This article is about the literary magazine. ...


Sullivan editorship, 1991-1996

In 1990, Andrew Sullivan, a 28-year-old gay Catholic from Britain, became editor and took the magazine in a somewhat more conservative direction, though the majority of writers remained liberal or neoliberal. Hertzberg soon left the magazine to return to The New Yorker. Kinsley left the magazine in 1996 to found the online magazine Slate.[6] Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a libertarian conservative author and political commentator, distinguished by his often personal style of political analysis. ... Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). ...


Sullivan invited Charles Murray to contribute a controversial 10,000-word article that contended blacks may be, as a whole, less intelligent than whites due to genetics. The magazine also published a very critical article about Hillary Clinton's health care plan by Elizabeth McCaughey, an article that Alterman called "the single most influential article published in the magazine during the entire Clinton presidency". Sullivan also published a number of pieces by Camille Paglia.[6] Charles Murray Charles Alan Murray (born 1943) is a controversial libertarian American political scientist. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... Betsy McCaughey Ross (born 1949) was the lieutenant-governor of the state of New York from 1994 to 1998, during the first term of governor George Pataki. ... Camille Anna Paglia (born April 2, 1947 in Endicott, New York) is an American social critic, author and teacher. ...


Ruth Shalit, a young writer for the magazine in the Sullivan years, was repeatedly criticized for plagiarism. To fact-check her stories, Sullivan called on Stephen Glass, who later was found to have made up quotes, anecdotes and facts in his articles.[6] Ruth Shalit was born in 1971. ... A screenshot of the webpage that Glass had created to try to prove his claim that Jukt Micronics existed. ...


Kelly, Lane, Beinart, Foer editorships, 1996 to present

After Sullivan stepped down in 1996, Michael Kelly served as editor for a year. Kelly, who also wrote the TRB column, was intensely critical of President Clinton during his tenure as editor and afterward.[6] Michael Kelly (1957-2003) was an editor-at-large of the Atlantic Monthly and a columnist for the Washington Post. ...


Chuck Lane held the position between 1997 and 1999. During Lane's tenure, the Stephen Glass scandal became public. Peretz has written that Lane "put the ship back on its course," for which Peretz said he was "immensely grateful." But Lane was later fired by Peretz and only got the news when a Washington Post reporter called Lane to comment on it.[6] Charles Chuck Lane is a journalist who is currently a staff writer for the Washington Post. ... A screenshot of the webpage that Glass had created to try to prove his claim that Jukt Micronics existed. ... ...


Peter Beinart, a third editor who took over when he was 28 years old,[6] followed Lane and served as editor from 1999 to 2006. Peter Beinart (born 1971) is a journalist and editor-at-large for The New Republic, having served as editor of TNR from November 1999 until March 2006. ...


Franklin Foer took over from Beinart in March 2006. In the magazine's first editorial under Foer, it said "We've become more liberal … We've been encouraging Democrats to dream big again on the environment and economics [...]".[6] Foer is the brother of novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Everything Is Illuminated (2002). Franklin Foer is an American political journalist and the current editor of The New Republic. ... Jonathan Safran Foer This American author is not to be confused with the Australian media personality John Safran. ... This article is about the book. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Other prominent writers who edited or wrote for the magazine in these years include senior editor and TRB columnist Jonathan Chait, Lawrence Kaplan, John Judis and Spencer Ackerman.[6] Jonathan Chait is a senior editor at The New Republic and a former assistant editor of The American Prospect. ... John Judis is an American author and journalist. ... Spencer Ackerman is a blogger and senior correspondent for The American Prospect. ...


In 2005, TNR created its blog, called The Plank, which is written by Michael Crowley, Franklin Foer, Jason Zengerle, and other TNR staff. The Plank is meant to be TNR's primary blog, replacing the magazine's first three blogs, &c., Iraq'd, and Easterblogg. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The magazine remains well known, with references to it occasionally popping up in popular culture. Lisa Simpson was once portrayed as a subscriber to The New Republic for Kids. Matt Groening, The Simpsons' creator, once wrote for TNR.[citation needed] In the pilot episode of the HBO series Entourage aired first on July 18, 2004, Ari Gold asks Eric Murphy: "Do you read The New Republic? Well, I do, and it says that you don't know what the fuck you're talking about." Lisa Marie Simpson is a character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Yeardley Smith; Lisa is the only character Smith voices on a regular basis. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Chronology Entourage is the pilot episode from Season 1 of the dramedy television series Entourage. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Entourage is an Emmy Award-winning HBO original series created by Doug Ellin that chronicles the rise of Vincent Chase — a young A-list movie star — and his childhood friends from Queens, New York City as they navigate the unfamiliar terrain of Hollywood, California. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ariel A. Ari Gold is a character on the comedy-drama television series Entourage. ... Eric E Murphy is a character on the dramedy television series Entourage. ...


End of Peretz's ownership, 2007

Until February 2007, The New Republic was owned by Martin Peretz, New York financiers Roger Hertog and Michael Steinhardt, and Canadian media conglomerate CanWest.[9] Roger Hertog is an American philanthropist and chairman emeritus of the Manhattan Institute. ... Michael Steinhardt (b. ... CanWest Global Communications Corp. ...


In late February 2007, Peretz sold his share of the magazine to CanWest, which announced that a subsidiary, CanWest Media Works International, had acquired a full interest in the publication. Peretz retained his position as editor-in-chief.[10]


Circulation

The New Republic's average paid circulation for 2006 was 61,024 copies per issue, a decline of 40 percent since 2000.

The New Republic Average Paid Circulation
Year Avg Paid Circ  % Change
2000[11] 101,651
2001[11] 88,409 -13.0
2002[12] 85,069 -3.8
2003[13] 63,139 -25.8
2004[14] 61,675 -2.3
2005[15] 61,771 0.2
2006[16] 61,024 -1.2

Controversies

Stephen Glass scandal

In 1998, features writer Stephen Glass was revealed in a Forbes magazine investigation to have fabricated a story called "Hack Heaven". A TNR investigation found that most of Glass' stories had used or been based on fabricated information. The story of Glass's fall and TNR editor Chuck Lane's handling of the scandal was dramatized in a 2003 film Shattered Glass, based on a 1998 article in Vanity Fair.[17] A screenshot of the webpage that Glass had created to try to prove his claim that Jukt Micronics existed. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Chuck Lane is a journalist who is currently a staff writer for the Washington Post. ... Shattered Glass is a 2003 film about the fast rise and steep fall of Stephen Glasss journalistic career at the The New Republic magazine during the mid-1990s when his serial journalistic fraud was exposed. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ...


Ruth Shalit plagiarism

In 1995, writer Ruth Shalit was fired for repeated incidents of plagiarism and an excess of factual errors in her articles.[18] Ruth Shalit was born in 1971. ... For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ...


Lee Siegel

Long-time contributor, critic, and senior editor Lee Siegel had maintained a blog on the TNR site dedicated primarily to art and culture until an investigation revealed that he had collaborated in posting comments to his own blog under an alias aggressively praising Siegel, attacking his critics and claiming not to be Lee Siegel when challenged by an anonymous detractor on his blog.[19][20] The blog was removed from the website and Siegel was suspended from writing for the print magazine;[21] he resumed writing for TNR in April, 2007. Siegel was also controversial for his coinage "blogofascists" which he applied to "the entire political blogosphere", though with an emphasis on leftwing or center-left bloggers such as Daily Kos and Atrios.[22] Lee Siegel (born December 5, 1957) is a New York writer and cultural critic who has written for Harpers, The New Republic, The Nation, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and many other publications. ... Daily Kos (IPA: ) is an American political blog, publishing news and opinion from a progressive point of view. ... Duncan Bowen Black (born February 18, 1972), better known by his pseudonym Atrios (IPA pronunciation: ), is an American liberal blogger living in Philadelphia. ...


Spencer Ackerman

In 2006, associate editor Spencer Ackerman was fired by Foer. Describing it as a "painful" decision, Foer attributed the firing to Ackerman's "insubordination": disparaging the magazine on his personal blog,[23] saying that he would “skullfuck” a terrorist's corpse at an editorial meeting if that was required to "establish his anti-terrorist bona fides" and sending Foer an e-mail where he said—in what according to Ackerman was intended to be a joke—he would “make a niche in your skull” with a baseball bat. Ackerman, by contrast, argued that the dismissal was due to “irreconcilable ideological differences.” He believed that his leftward drift as a result of the Iraq War and the actions of the Bush administration was not appreciated by the senior editorial staff.[24] Within 24 hours of being fired by The New Republic, Ackerman was hired as a senior correspondent for a rival magazine, The American Prospect. Spencer Ackerman is a blogger and senior correspondent for The American Prospect. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ...


Scott Thomas Beauchamp controversy

In July 2007, after The New Republic published an article by an American soldier in Iraq titled "Shock Troops," allegations of inadequate fact-checking were leveled against the magazine. Critics alleged that the piece contained inconsistent details indicative of fabrication. The identity of the anonymous soldier, Scott Thomas Beauchamp, was revealed. Beauchamp was married to Elspeth Reeve, one of the magazine’s three fact-checkers. As a result of the controversy, the New Republic and the United States Army launched investigations, reaching different conclusions.[25][26][27] As of October 2007, both sides were standing behind their stories. The Scott Thomas Beauchamp controversy concerns the publication of a series of diaries by Scott Thomas Beauchamp (b. ... Scott Thomas Beauchamp (b. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


Editors

  1. Herbert Croly (1914-1930)
  2. Bruce Bliven (1930-1946)
  3. Henry A. Wallace (1946-1948)
  4. Michael Straight (1948-1956)
  5. Gilbert A. Harrison (1956-1975)
  6. Martin Peretz (1975-1979)
  7. Michael Kinsley (1979-1981; 1985-1989)
  8. Hendrik Hertzberg (1981-1985; 1989-1991)
  9. Andrew Sullivan (1991-1996)
  10. Michael Kelly (1996-1997)
  11. Charles Lane (1997-1999)
  12. Peter Beinart (1999-2006)
  13. Franklin Foer (2006-present)[9]

Before Wallace's appointment in 1946, the masthead listed no single editor in charge but gave an editorial board of four to eight members. Walter Lippmann, Edmund Wilson, and Robert Morss Lovett, among others, served on this board at various times. The names given above are the first editor listed in each issue, always the senior editor of the team. Herbert David Croly (January 23, 1869 - May 17, 1930) was a liberal political author. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... Michael Straight Michael Whitney Straight, (September 1, 1916 – January 4, 2004) was an American magazine publisher, novelist, patron of the arts, and a member of the prominent Whitney family. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... Hendrik Hertzberg is an American journalist and author. ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a libertarian conservative author and political commentator, distinguished by his often personal style of political analysis. ... Michael Kelly (1957-2003) was an editor-at-large of the Atlantic Monthly and a columnist for the Washington Post. ... Charles Chuck Lane is a journalist who is currently a staff writer for the Washington Post. ... Peter Beinart (born 1971) is a journalist and editor-at-large for The New Republic, having served as editor of TNR from November 1999 until March 2006. ... Franklin Foer is an American political journalist and the current editor of The New Republic. ... Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 - December 14, 1974) was an influential American writer, journalist, and political commentator. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... Robert Morss Lovett (December 25, 1870 - February 8, 1956) was an American academic, writer, editor, political activist, and government official. ...


Notable contributors

1910s-1940s

John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... W. E. B. DuBois William Edward Burghardt DuBois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an African-American civil rights activist, sociologist, freemason, and scholar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Wizard of Oz (1939 film). ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films. ... John T. Flynn John Thomas Flynn (October 25, 1882-1964) was a U.S. journalist. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... For the American writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff. ...

1950s-1960s

Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... Karl Paul Reinhold Niebuhr (June 21, 1892 – June 1, 1971) was a Protestant theologian best known for his study of the task of relating the Christian faith to the reality of modern politics and diplomacy. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey[1]) is a famous American novelist. ...

1980s-1990s

Frederic W. Barnes, an American journalist, author, and conservative political commentator, is the executive editor of the news publication The Weekly Standard, co-host with Mort Kondracke of The Beltway Boys on the Fox News Channel, and also regularly appears on Foxs Special Report with Brit Hume. ... Jeane Kirkpatrick Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (November 19, 1926 â€“ December 7, 2006) was an American ambassador and an ardent anticommunist. ... Joshua Muravchik is a Jewish author and a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. ... Eric Breindel was a Jewish neoconservative former editorial page editor of the New York Post. ... Irving Kristol (born January 22, 1920, New York City) is considered the founder of American neoconservatism. ... Edward Nicolae Luttwak (born 1942) is an economist and historian known for his many publications on military strategy and international relations. ... Michael Ledeen (born August 1, 1941) is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. ... Ronald Radosh is an American historian specializing in the espionage case of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. ... Robert Kagan (born September 26, 1958) is an American neoconservative scholar and political commentator. ... Charles Krauthammer (born March 13, 1950 in New York City[1][2]), is a Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist and commentator. ...

1990s-present

Fouad A. Ajami (Arabic:فؤاد عجمی; b. ... Scott Thomas Beauchamp (b. ... Paul Berman is a prominent liberal American intellectual. ... Simon Blackburn (born 1944) is a British academic philosopher also known for his efforts to popularise philosophy. ... Jonathan Chait is a senior editor at The New Republic and a former assistant editor of The American Prospect. ... Niall Ferguson Niall Ferguson (b. ... A screenshot of the webpage that Glass had created to try to prove his claim that Jukt Micronics existed. ... Shattered Glass is a 2003 film about the fast rise and steep fall of Stephen Glasss journalistic career at the The New Republic magazine during the mid-1990s when his serial journalistic fraud was exposed. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Johann Hari (born January 21, 1979) is a British journalist and writer. ... John Judis is an American author and journalist. ... Tony Judt (born 1948, London, England) is a British historian, author and professor. ... Michael Oren (born in 1955) is an Israeli historian and writer. ... Camille Anna Paglia (born April 2, 1947 in Endicott, New York) is an American social critic, author and teacher. ... Dale Peck (born 1967 on Long Island, New York) is an American novelist. ... George Pelecanos is an American author of detective fiction. ... Steven Pinker Steven Arthur Pinker (born September 18, 1954) is a prominent Canadian-born American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, and popular science writer known for his spirited and wide-ranging advocacy of evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. ... Richard Allen Posner (born January 11, 1939, in New York City) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ... Amartya Kumar Sen CH (Hon) (Bengali: Ômorto Kumar Shen) (born 3 November 1933), is an Indian economist, philosopher, and a winner of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences (Nobel Prize for Economics) in 1998, for his contributions to welfare economics for his work on famine, human development theory... Lee Siegel (born December 5, 1957) is a New York writer and cultural critic who has written for Harpers, The New Republic, The Nation, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and many other publications. ... Image:Mwalzer large. ... Alan Wolfe is a political scientist and author. ... Gordon S. Wood (born 1933) is Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History at Brown University and the recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution. ... James Wood (born 1965 in Durham, United Kingdom) is a literary critic and novelist. ...

References

  1. ^ "Frequency Change FAQ", The New Republic. 
  2. ^ Katharine Q. Seelye. "New Republic Cuts Back, but Bulks Up Its Image", New York Times, 2007-02-24. Retrieved on 2007-02-25. 
  3. ^ Chait, J. (10 September, 2007). Feast of the Wingnuts: How economic crackpots devoured American politics. The New Republic, 237, pp. 27-31.
  4. ^ "Obligations", The New Republic, 2006-11-27. Retrieved on 2006-11-18. 
  5. ^ Martin Peretz. "A Message From TNRS Lieberman-Loving NeoCon Owner", 2006-06-23. Retrieved on 2006-10-29. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab [1]Alterman, Eric, "My Marty Peretz Problem -- And Ours", The American Prospect, June 18, 2007, accessed July 3, 2007
  7. ^ Peretz, Martin. Three Decades of The New Republic. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  8. ^ Stephenson, D. Grier Jr., Bresler, Robert J., Freidrich, Robert J., Karlesky, Joseph J., editors, American Government, New York: Harper & Row, 1988, ISBN 0-06-040947-9, pp. 166, 171
  9. ^ a b Carr, David. "Franklin Foer Is Named Top Editor of New Republic", The New York Times, 2006-02-28. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  10. ^ Seelye, Katharine Q. (2007-02-28), "New Republic's Editor in Chief Sells His Share of the Magazine", The New York Times: Section C, Pg. 2
  11. ^ a b Circulation for all ABC Magazines, 2001 v 2000. Magazine Publishers of America. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  12. ^ Circulation for all ABC Magazines, 2002 v 2001. Magazine Publishers of America. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  13. ^ Circulation for all ABC Magazines, 2003 v 2002. Magazine Publishers of America. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  14. ^ Circulation for all ABC Magazines, 2004 v 2003. Magazine Publishers of America. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  15. ^ Circulation for all ABC Magazines, 2005 v 2004. Magazine Publishers of America. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  16. ^ Circulation for all ABC Magazines, 2006 v 2005. Magazine Publishers of America. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  17. ^ Buzz Bissinger. "Shattered Glass", Vanity Fair, 1998-09. 
  18. ^ "Diversity Had Nothing to Do With Reporter's Deceit", Washington Post, 2003-05-13. Retrieved on 2006-10-29. 
  19. ^ Coda to Kincaid. The New Republic (08.25.06). Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  20. ^ Brad DeLong (1 September 2006). Franklin Foer Apologizes.... Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  21. ^ Franklin Foer. An Apology to Our Readers. The New Republic. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  22. ^ Lee Siegel. "Il.Duce.blogspot.com", The New Republic, 28 July 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  23. ^ Spencer Ackerman. Too Hot For TNR. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  24. ^ Michael Calderone. "Off The Record", New York Observer, 2006-10-30. Retrieved on 2006-12-31. 
  25. ^ Army Private Discloses He Is New Republic's Baghdad Diarist
  26. ^ Doubts Raised by 'Baghdad Diarist'
  27. ^ Michael Goldfarb, Weekly Standard, Fact or Fiction?

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Katharine Q. Seelye is a political reporter for the New York Times. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Primary sources

  • Groff Conklin, ed. New Republic Anthology: 1914-1935, 1936.
  • Cowley Malcom. And I Worked at the Writer's Trade 1978.
  • Wickenden, Dorothy (1994). The New Republic Reader. ISBN 0-465-09822-3

Groff Conklin (September 6, 1904 - 1968) was a noted science fiction anthologist, born Edward Groff Conklin in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. ...

Secondary sources

  • Mott Frank L. A History of American Magazines. Vol. 3. Harvard University Press, 1960.
  • Seideman; David. The New Republic: A Voice of Modern Liberalism 1986
  • Steel Ronald. Walter Lippmann and the American Century 1980

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
AlterNet: MediaCulture: A Reply to the New Republic (970 words)
While the New Republic presented a much-needed liberal national security strategy, their effort amounts to a sophisticated version of More of the Same.
By coincidence, New Republic editor Peter Beinart simultaneously published an elegantly written, passionately argued 5,683-word essay addressing himself to exactly the same problem and deploying the same historical example as a guidepost to the future.
New Yorker reporter Nicholas Lemann surveyed a group of them and came away with a remarkably consistent – and painfully prescient – set of analyses.
New Republic (Star Wars) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2795 words)
The New Republic was founded on the same premise that the Old Republic was a thousand years earlier--to have a representative parliamentary body govern the galaxy in a fair and equal manner--and it was designed to correct the problems that brought about the Old Republic's downfall.
The New Republic's ultimate goal, as founder Mon Mothma said, was "to become the New Republic in fact as well as name." Unfortunately for the dreams of Mothma and the Alliance, the institution quickly fell afoul of political infighting of the likes seen in the waning days of the Old Republic.
The New Republic is a voluntary confederation organized on republican principles under a common Charter and in accordance with the ideals and purposes embodied in the Declaration of a New Republic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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