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Encyclopedia > The Netherlands
Koninkrijk der Nederlanden
Kingdom of the Netherlands
Flag of the Netherlands Coat of arms of the Netherlands
Flag Coat of arms
Motto: Je Maintiendrai
(Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold)
Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe
Capital Amsterdam1
52°21′N 04°52′E
Largest city Amsterdam
Official language(s) Dutch2
Government Parliamentary democracy
Constitutional monarchy
 - Queen Beatrix
 - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende
Independence Eighty Years' War 
 - Declared July 26, 1581 
 - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain
Accession to EU March 25, 1957
Area  
 - Total 41,526 km² (131st)
  16,033 sq mi 
 - Water (%) 18.41%
Population  
 - July 2005 est. 16,299,000 (59th)
 - 2001 census 16,105,285
 - Density 395/km² (15th)
1,023/sq mi 
GDP (PPP) 2006 estimate
 - Total 625.271 billion (23rd)
 - Per capita $ 30,500 (15th)
HDI (2003) 0.943 (12th) – high
Currency Euro 3 (€ EUR)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .nl
Calling code +31
1 The Hague is the seat of the government
2 In Friesland the Frisian language is also an official language, and Low Saxon and Limburgish are officially recognised as regional languages
3 Prior to 2001: Dutch Guilder (ƒ NLG)

The Netherlands (Dutch: Nederland; IPA pronunciation: /"ne:dərlɑnt/) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden), which is formed by the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba. The Netherlands is a constitutional monarchy, located in northwestern Europe. It borders the North Sea to the north and west, Belgium to the south, and Germany to the east. The current borders were formed in 1839. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... This has been converted to Image:Netherlands coat of arms large. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The national flag of the Netherlands, with its three equal horizontal bands coloured red (top), white and blue is the oldest tricolour still in use today. ... The Coat of Arms of The Netherlands (click for larger image) The Coat of Arms of The Netherlands (click for larger image) The Greater Coat of Arms of the Realm, (or “Grote Rijkswapen”), is the personal Coat of Arms of the Monarch (Queen Beatrix). ... This page lists state and national mottos for the worlds independent states and if applicable, their component states. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognzed either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Wilhelmus van Nassouwe (William of Nassau) is the national anthem of the Netherlands. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This is a list of national capitals of the world in alphabetical order. ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... An official language is a language that is given a privileged legal status in a state, or other legally-defined territory. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies and the latter being republics A parliamentary system, also known as parliamentarianism (and parliamentarism in U.S. English), is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Netherlands have been an independent monarchy since March 16, 1815, and have been governed by members of the House of Orange-Nassau since. ... Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands (born as Beatrix Wilhelmina Armgard prinses der Nederlanden, prinses van Oranje-Nassau, prinses van Lippe-Biesterfeld) (born January 31, 1938), has been the Queen of the Kingdom of the Netherlands since April 30, 1980. ... The Prime Minister of the Netherlands (Minister-President in Dutch) is the chairman of the council of ministers and active executive authority of the Dutch government. ... (L to R): Silvio Berlusconi, Romano Prodi, António Vitorino and Jan Peter Balkenende. ... The Eighty Years War, or Dutch Revolt, was the war of secession between the Netherlands and the Spanish king, that lasted from 1568 to 1648. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... Events January 16 - English Parliament outlaws Roman Catholicism April 4 - Francis Drake completes a circumnavigation of the world and is knighted by Elizabeth I. July 26 - The Northern Netherlands proclaim their independence from Spain in the Oath of Abjuration. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 17 - Englands Long Parliament passes the Vote of No Address, breaking off negotiations with King Charles I and thereby setting the scene for the second phase of the English Civil War. ... The European Union (EU) is an intergovernmental and supranational union of 25 member states. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... Map of countries by population This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population, with population figures estimated for 1 July 2005 (rounded to the nearest 1,000). ... World map of the population density in 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries/dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The figures in the following table are based on areas including inland water bodies (lakes, reservoirs, rivers). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Map of world GDP (PPP) by country using the IMF and World Bank lists for 2004 There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP), the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. ... Map of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita, based on the 2005 IMF data. ... World map indicating HDI of UN member states, 2003. ... World map indicating HDI of UN member states, 2003. ... The euro (currency sign: €; banking code: EUR) is the official currency of the European Union and single currency for over 300 million Europeans in the following twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain; collectively also known as the... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of UTC+1 time zone, 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... It has been suggested that leap second be merged into this article or section. ... Map of the world color-coded with areas in blue observing daylight saving time. ... Time zones of Europe: Pale colours indicate countries without daylight saving Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... It has been suggested that leap second be merged into this article or section. ... The following is a list of currently existing Internet Top-level domains (TLDs). ... .nl is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the Netherlands. ... A telephone dial This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ... Capital Leeuwarden Queens Commissioner drs. ... Frisian is a Germanic group of closely related languages, spoken by around half a million members of an ethnic group living on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany. ... Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nedersaksisch, Neddersassisch, Plattdüütsch or Nedderdüütsch) is any of a variety of Low German dialects spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands. ... Limburgish, or Limburgian or Limburgic (Dutch: Limburgs, German: Limburgisch, French: Limbourgeois) is a group of Franconian varieties, spoken in the Limburg and Rhineland regions, near the common Dutch/Belgian/German border. ... The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (ECRML) is a European treaty (CETS 148) adopted in 1992 under the auspices of the Council of Europe to protect and promote historical regional and minority languages in Europe. ... The gulden (sometimes guilder in English), represented by the symbol Æ’ or fl. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ...


The Netherlands is often referred to by the name Holland. This is, however, misguided, since the provinces of North and South Holland in the western Netherlands are only two of the country's twelve provinces. (For more on this and other naming issues see below under 'naming conventions'.) Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. ... The Netherlands are known under various terms both in English as well as in other languages. ...


The Netherlands is a densely populated and geographically low-lying country (its name literally means "low countries" or "low lands") and is popularly known for its windmills, clogs (wooden shoes), dikes, tulips, bicycles, and social tolerance. Its liberal policies receive international attention, such as those concerning drugs, prostitution, same-sex marriage, abortion and euthanasia. The country is host to the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court at The Hague. World map of the population density in 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Pitstone Windmill, believed to be the oldest windmill in the British Isles A windmill is an engine powered by the wind to produce energy, often contained in a large building as in traditional post mills, smock mills and tower mills. ... We are all looking fsorward to a great sseason in 2005. ... A dike (or dyke) is an earthen wall, constructed as a defence or as a boundary. ... Species See text Tulip (Tulipa) is a genus of about 100 species of flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. ... This racing bicycle is built using lightweight, shaped aluminium tubing and carbon fiber stays and forks. ... The cross of the war memorial and a menorah for Hanukkah coexist in Oxford. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Oral medication Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same sex (i. ... Euthanasia (from Greek: ευθανασία -ευ good, θανατος death) is the practice of ending the life of an individual or an animal who is suffering from a terminal disease or a chronically painful condition in a painless or minimally painful way either by lethal injection, drug overdose, or by the withdrawal of medical support. ... Peace Palace, seat of the ICJ. The International Court of Justice (known colloquially as the World Court or ICJ; French: Cour internationale de justice) is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. ... Official logo of the ICC. The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ...

Contents


Capital

Main article: Capital of the Netherlands

Amsterdam is the capital city (hoofdstad), and The Hague (Dutch: Den Haag or 's-Gravenhage) is the Netherlands' seat of government (regeringszetel), the home of the monarch (residentie), and the location of most foreign embassies. For other uses, see Netherlands (disambiguation). ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ... The seat of government is the location of the government for a political entity. ...


History

Main article: History of the Netherlands

Under Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, leader of the Burgundian empire and king of Spain, the region was part of the Seventeen Provinces of the Netherlands, which also included most of present-day Belgium, Luxembourg, and some land of France and Germany. 1568 saw the start of the Eighty Years' War between the provinces and Spain. In 1579, the northern half of the Seventeen Provinces declared itself independent from Spain, and they formed the Union of Utrecht, which is seen as the foundation of the modern Netherlands. Philip II, the son of Charles V, was not prepared to let them go that easily and war continued until 1648 when Spain finally recognised Dutch independence. The Conspiracy of Julius Civilis, completed in 1661 by Rembrandt, the best-known painter of the Dutch Golden Age. ... Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Aragon and Castile. ... Coat of arms of the 2nd duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: Bourgogne) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Pre-Indo-European people, Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks. ... The Seventeen Provinces were a personal union of states in the Low Countries in the 16th century, roughly covering the current Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, a good part of the North of France (Artois, Nord) and a small part of Germany. ... The Eighty Years War, or Dutch Revolt, was the war of secession between the Netherlands and the Spanish king, that lasted from 1568 to 1648. ... The Union of Utrecht (Dutch: Unie van Utrecht) is a treaty signed on January 23, 1579 in Utrecht, the Netherlands, unifying the northern provinces of the Netherlands, until then under control of Spain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Aragon and Castile. ...


After gaining formal independence from the Burgundy-Spanish Empire under King Philip IV, the Dutch grew to become one of the major seafaring and economic powers of the 17th century during the period of the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. In the era, referred to as the Dutch Golden Age, colonies and trading posts were established all over the globe. (See Dutch colonial empire) Coat of arms of the 2nd duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: Bourgogne) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Pre-Indo-European people, Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks. ... The flag of the Spanish Empire. ... Philip IV (Spanish: Felipe IV,), (April 8, 1605 – September 17, 1665). ... This article is about the Dutch United Provinces. ... Rembrandt The Nightwatch (1642) The Dutch Golden Age (1584-1702) was a period in Dutch history, roughly spanning the 17th century, in which Dutch trade, science, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world. ... A trading post is a place where trading of goods takes place. ... A map showing the territory that the Netherlands held at various points in history. ...


Many economic historians regard the Netherlands as the first thoroughly capitalist country in the world. In early modern Europe it featured the wealthiest trading city (Amsterdam) and the first full-time stock exchange. The inventiveness of the traders led to insurance and retirement funds as well as such less benign phenomena as the boom-bust cycle, the world's first asset-inflation bubble, the tulip mania of 1636–1637, and according to Murray Sayle, the world's first bear raider - Isaac le Maire, who forced prices down by dumping stock and then buying it back at a discount[1] For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of potential financial loss. ... Pamphlet from the Dutch tulipomania, printed in 1637 Anonymous 17th-century watercolor of the Semper Augustus, the most famous bulb, which sold for a record price. ...


After briefly being incorporated in the First French Empire under Napoleon, the Kingdom of the Netherlands was formed in 1815, consisting of the present day Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. In addition, the king of the Netherlands became hereditary Grand Duke of Luxembourg. Belgium rebelled and gained independence in 1830, while the personal union between Luxembourg and the Netherlands was severed in 1890 as a result of ascendancy laws which prevented Queen Wilhelmina from becoming Grand Duke. The First French Empire, commonly known as the French Empire or the Napoleonic Empire, covers the period of the domination of France and much of continental Europe by Napoleon I of France. ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David. ... The Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg (House of Nassau-Weilburg, agnatically the House of Bourbon) consists of the extended family of the sovereign Grand Duke. ... A personal union is a political union of two or more entities that, internationally, are considered separate states, but through established law, share the same head of state —hence also whatever political actions are vested in the head of state, but no (or very few) others. ... For other uses, see Wilhelmina (disambiguation). ...


The Netherlands possessed several colonies, most notably the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) and Suriname (the latter was traded with the British for New Amsterdam, now known as New York). These 'colonies' were first administered by the Dutch East India Company and the Dutch West India Company, both collective private enterprises. Three centuries later these companies got into financial trouble and the territories in which they operated were taken over by the Dutch government (in 1815 and 1791 respectively). Only then did they become official colonies. The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands-Indië) was the name of the colonies set up by the Dutch East India Company, which came under administration of the Netherlands during the 19th century (see Indonesia). ... New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was the name of the 17th century fortified settlement on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614-1674) situated originally between 38 and 42 degrees latitude. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Dutch colonial possessions, with the Dutch East India Company possessions marked in a paler green, surrounding the Indian Ocean plus Saint Helena in the mid-Atlantic. ... Dutch West India Company (Dutch: West-Indische Compagnie or WIC) was a company of Dutch merchants. ...


During the 19th century, the Netherlands was slow to industrialise compared to neighbouring countries, mainly due to its unique infrastructure of waterways and reliance on wind power. The Netherlands remained neutral in World War I, but was invaded by Nazi Germany in 1940, forcing it to become a member of the allied forces during World War II. The country was quickly overrun and then occupied. While a significant number of Dutch citizens collaborated with the occupiers and 50,000 Dutch citizens volunteered to fight in Russia with the Waffen SS, the country remained officially an occupied state rather than a German ally.[2] During the occupation over 100,000 Dutch Jews were murdered in the Holocaust along with significant numbers of Dutch Roma (gypsies). The 21st Army Group conducted military operations to liberate The Netherlands after the breakout from Normandy, and British, Canadian, Polish and American soldiers fought on Dutch soil beginning in September 1944 until the entire country was liberated in May 1945. By the end of the war malnutrition and starvation were rife among the population. After the war, the Dutch economy prospered again, being a member of the Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) and European Economic Community unions. The Netherlands was among the twelve founding members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) and among the six founding members of the European Coal and Steel Community, which would later evolve into the European Union. Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First World War, also known as... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Waffen-SS recruitment poster: Volunteer for the Waffen-SS The Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was the combat arm of the Schutzstaffel. ... Selection at the Auschwitz camp in 1944, where the Nazis chose whom to kill immediately and whom to use as slave labor or for medical experimentation. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as gypsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, the southern part of the United States and the Middle East. ... (Redirected from 21st Army Group) The British 21st Army Group was an important Allied force in the European Theatre of World War II. Commanded by Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery it initially controlled all ground forces in Operation Overlord. ... Combatants Allied Powers Nazi Germany Commanders Dwight D. Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel (Heeresgruppe B) Strength 326,000 (by June 11) Unknown, probably some 1,000,000 in France by early June, but split... Satellite image of the Benelux countries Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Benelux Benelux (or Bénélux) is an economic union in Western Europe comprising three neighbouring monarchies, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... Members of the European Coal and Steel Community The European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) was founded in 1951 (Treaty of Paris), by France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands to pool the steel and coal resources of its member-states. ...

Flag of The Netherlands
Flag of The Netherlands

The Netherlands have been an independent monarchy since March 16, 1815, and have been governed by members of the House of Orange-Nassau since. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 3636 KB) Summary The national flag of The Netherlands. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 3636 KB) Summary The national flag of The Netherlands. ...

Naming conventions

Main article: Netherlands (terminology)

Various terms have been used in English to refer to the Netherlands and its inhabitants. The Netherlands are known under various terms both in English as well as in other languages. ...


'(The) Netherlands' is the official name of the European part of the 'Kingdom of the Netherlands'. The term 'Holland' is commonly used as a synonym for the Netherlands, but the word Holland derives from a district in the west of the country that currently makes up two of the twelve provinces, namely North Holland and South Holland. The country's people and language are called 'Dutch'. The term 'Low Countries' is used sometimes to refer to the Netherlands, but technically it refers to a bigger region in Western Europe, including Belgium and Luxembourg. Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. ... Capital Haarlem Queens Commissioner Mr. ... South Holland (Dutch Zuid-Holland) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country on the North Sea coast. ... The Low Countries, the historical region of de Nederlanden, are the countries (see Country) on low-lying land around the delta of the Rhine, Scheldt, and Meuse (Maas) rivers. ...


To address this confusion some solutions have been proposed, for instance, in linguistics, the term Netherlandic has been coined[citation needed]. Linguistics is the scientific study of human language, and someone who engages in this study is called a linguist. ...


Politics

More information on politics and government of the Netherlands can be found at the Politics and government of the Netherlands series.

The Netherlands has been a parliamentary democracy since 1848 and a constitutional monarchy since 1815; before that it had been a republic from 1581 to 1806 and a kingdom between 1806 and 1810 (it was part of France between 1810 and 1813). The head of state is the monarch (at present Queen Beatrix). The monarch has today in practice a mainly ceremonial function but the constitution allows for the exertion of real power, should the responsible ministers subordinate themselves; an open conflict between them and the monarch — whose signature is needed for any law or warrant to come into effect — would lead to a constitutional crisis (see main article). Politics of the Netherlands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democracy and a constitutional monarchy, where the prime minister of the Netherlands is the chairman of the council of ministers, and of a pluriform multi-party system with about 15 parties at national elections. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies and the latter being republics A parliamentary system, also known as parliamentarianism (and parliamentarism in U.S. English), is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support... In a broad definition a republic is a state or country that is led by people who do not base their political power on any principle beyond the control of the people of that state or country. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands (born as Beatrix Wilhelmina Armgard prinses der Nederlanden, prinses van Oranje-Nassau, prinses van Lippe-Biesterfeld) (born January 31, 1938), has been the Queen of the Kingdom of the Netherlands since April 30, 1980. ... Politics of the Netherlands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democracy and a constitutional monarchy, where the prime minister of the Netherlands is the chairman of the council of ministers, and of a pluriform multi-party system with about 15 parties at national elections. ...


Dutch governments have since the 19th century always consisted of a coalition, as there was not a single political party large enough to get the majority vote. Formally, the monarch appoints the members of the government. In practice, once the results of parliamentary elections are known, a coalition government is formed (in a process of negotiations that has taken up to seven months), after which the government formed in this way is officially appointed by the monarch. The head of the government is the Prime Minister, in Dutch Minister President or Premier, a primus inter pares who is usually also the leader of the largest party in the coalition. The degree of influence the monarch has on actual government formation is a topic of ongoing speculation. A coalition government, or coalition cabinet, is a cabinet in parliamentary government in which several parties cooperate. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... First among equals is a phrase which indicates that a person is the most senior of a group of people sharing the same rank or office. ...


The parliament consists of two houses. The 150 members of the Lower House (Tweede Kamer, or Second Chamber) are elected every four years in direct elections. The provincial assemblies are directly elected every four years as well. The members of the provincial assemblies elect every two years a third of the members of the less important Senate (the Eerste Kamer, or First Chamber that is hereby fully indirectly elected within six years), that can merely reject laws, not propose or amend them. Together, the First and Second Chamber are known as the Staten-Generaal, the States General. Direct election is a term describing a system of choosing political officeholders in which the voters directly cast ballots for the person, persons or political party that they desire to see elected. ... Indirect election is a process in which voters in an election do not actually choose between candidates for an office but rather elect persons who will then make the choice. ... The Estates-General (Staten-Generaal) is the parliament of the Netherlands. ...


On February 7, 2006, the Second Chamber introduced the citizens' initiative right at the national level.[3] February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Tweede Kamer (second chamber) is the lower house of the Staten-Generaal, the parliament in the Netherlands. ...


Political scientists consider the Netherlands to be a classic example of a consociational state, traditionally explained by the necessity since the early middle ages for different social groups to cooperate in order to fight the water. Better founded hypotheses include a partial failing of feodalisation and the successful resistance against absolutism. This system of reaching an agreement despite differences is called the polder model in Dutch. Also, the Netherlands has long been a nation of traders, dominated by a freethinking bourgeoisie and for international trade one has to be tolerant of an other person's culture; at home, despite calvinism being till the 19th century the state religion, there was in practice much religious tolerance shown towards Catholics and Jews. Nevertheless Catholics were practically not allowed to hold government functions until the 19th century and in regards to Catholic, but also Jewish, church buildings, Protestant restrictions were observed. Until the middle of the 19th century Catholics were rarely allowed to build new churches which were visibly Catholic. The Netherlands tried between 1839 and 1940 to be a neutral country in most international affairs and thus managed to keep out of World War I (although this failed in World War II). As a result, the Dutch have a 'friendly' reputation in other countries, to the point that bearers of a Dutch passport often have relatively little difficulty getting into other countries, for visits or even for emigration purposes. Political scientists define a consociational state as a state which has major internal divisions along ethnic, religious, or linguistic lines, yet nonetheless manages to remain stable, due to consultation among the elites of each of its major social groups. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... The term absolutism can mean: A belief in absolute truth moral absolutism, the belief that there is some absolute standard of right and wrong political absolutism, a political system where one person holds absolute power, also called apolytarchy from Gr. ... The polder model is the Dutch version of corporatism. ... bourgeoisie is basically a trem that meens middle class. ... This page is about tolerance as a social concept. ... Calvinism is a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought, articulated by John Calvin, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century, and subsequently by successors, associates, followers and admirers of Calvin and his interpretation of Scripture. ... A state religion (also called an official religion, established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ... Freedom of religion is the individuals right or freedom to hold whatever religious beliefs he or she wishes, or none at all. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First World War, also known as... Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8...


However, the early years of the 21st century have seen a political change with the right wing in politics gaining on the left. This is illustrated by the quick rise (and fall) of the LPF. Pim Fortuyn, its founder, held former cabinets responsible for the presumed failing integration of immigrants. Lijst Pim Fortuyn (List Pim Fortuyn) is a political party in the Netherlands. ... Wilhelmus Simon Petrus Fortuijn, known as Pim Fortuyn (surname pronounced somewhat like for-TOYN, IPA: ), (February 19, 1948 – May 6, 2002), was a controversial, openly gay, charismatic politician in the Netherlands who formed his own party Lijst Pim Fortuyn (List Pim Fortuyn or LPF). ...


The present government is led by the cabinet Balkenende II. His cabinet's economic reforms and controversial immigration policies have resulted in a shift in public opinion to the left, showing from political polls and the 2006 municipal elections, in which the government coalition parties faced great losses in favour of the opposition parties, mainly the Labour Party (PvdA) and the Socialist Party (SP). Following the controversial decisions of minister Verdonk regarding the legal status of Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Dutch cabinet went into crisis on June 29, 2006, and prime minister Balkenende will hand in the resignation of his cabinet to the Queen on June 30. The second cabinet of Jan Peter Balkenende has been in office in the Netherlands from May 27, 2003. ... Rita Verdonk Drs. ... Ayaan Hirsi Ali Ayaan Hirsi Ali ( ), born Ayaan Hirsi Magan 13 November 1969 [1] in Mogadishu, Somalia, is a Dutch feminist and politician, daughter of Hirsi Magan Isse. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ...


On June 1 2005 the Dutch electorate voted in a referendum against the proposed EU Constitution by a majority of 61.6%, three days after the French had also voted against. June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... On 1 June 2005 a consultative referendum was held in the Netherlands to ask whether the country should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. ... The constitutional treaty as signed in Rome on 29 October 2004 by representatives of the EU member states The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe (TCE), commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ...


Dutch policies on recreational drugs, prostitution, same-sex marriage and euthanasia are among the most liberal in the world. Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational purposes rather than for work, medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same sex (i. ... Euthanasia (from Greek: ευθανασία -ευ good, θανατος death) is the practice of ending the life of an individual or an animal who is suffering from a terminal disease or a chronically painful condition in a painless or minimally painful way either by lethal injection, drug overdose, or by the withdrawal of medical support. ...

The Prime Minister of the Netherlands (Minister-President in Dutch) is the chairman of the council of ministers and active executive authority of the Dutch government. ... 3 November 1877: Jan Kappeyne van de Coppello (liberal) 19 August 1879: Theo graaf van Lynden van Sandenburg (conservative-protestant) 22 April 1883: Jan Heemskerk Abrahamzoon (conservative) 20 April 1888: Aeneas baron Mackay (ARP) 21 August 1891: Gijsbert van Tienhoven (liberal) 8 May 1894: Joan Röell (old liberal) 26...

Provinces

Map of the Netherlands, with red dots marking the capitals of the provinces and black dots marking the large cities. The national capital is Amsterdam, and the national seat of government is The Hague (Den Haag)
Main article: Provinces of the Netherlands

The Netherlands is divided into twelve administrative regions, called provinces, each under a Governor, who is called Commissaris van de Koningin (Commissioner of the Queen), except for the province Limburg where the commissioner is called Gouverneur (Governor) which underlines the more "non-Dutch" mentality. Download high resolution version (800x948, 116 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Netherlands Provinces of the Netherlands List of subnational entities List of islands of the Netherlands Ranked list of Dutch provinces Category:Maps of the Netherlands Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (800x948, 116 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Netherlands Provinces of the Netherlands List of subnational entities List of islands of the Netherlands Ranked list of Dutch provinces Category:Maps of the Netherlands Categories: GFDL images ... The modern day Netherlands are divided into twelve provinces (provincies in Dutch), listed below with their capital city: Map of the Netherlands, with provinces and capital cities See also the ranked list of Dutch provinces // Structure A Dutch province represents the administrative layer in between the national government and the... Province is a name for a subnational entity. ... A governor is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered company which has... Capital Maastricht Queens Commissioner L.J.P.M. (Leon) Frissen Religion (1999) Protestant 3% Catholic 80% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   2. ... A governor is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered company which has...

All provinces are divided into municipalities (gemeenten), 458 in total (1 January 2006). Capital Leeuwarden Queens Commissioner drs. ... Leeuwarden (Frisian: Ljouwert) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Friesland. ... The flag of Groningen Groningen is the northeast province of the Netherlands with a typical dialect (Gronings) with regional nuances. ... Groningen (or Grunn in the local dialect) is a municipality and a middle-size city in the north of the Netherlands, and capital of Groningen province. ... Capital Assen Queens Commissioner A.L. (Relus) ter Beek Religion (1999) Protestant 35% Catholic 8% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   2,642 km² (7th) 38 km² Population (2005)  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Density 483,173 (10th) 183/km² (12th) Inclusion 1796 Anthem Mijn Drenthe Official website www. ... Assen railway station Assen is a municipality and a city in the north eastern Netherlands, capital of the province of Drenthe. ... Emmen is either: Emmen, a town/municipality in the Netherlands Emmen, a town/municipality in Lucerne, Switzerland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Flag of Overijssel Overijssel is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern part of the country. ... Country: Netherlands Province: Overijssel Coordinates: 52°30′ N 6°5′ E Area - Land - Water 119. ... Enschede is a municipality and a city in the eastern Netherlands, in the province of Overijssel, in the Twente region. ... Flevoland is a province of the Netherlands. ... Lelystad ( â–¶ (help· info)) is a municipality and a city in the centre of the Netherlands, and it is the capital of the province of Flevoland. ... Almere can mean: A large lake that in early times was in the area of the southern part of the Zuiderzee, which see for more information. ... Capital Arnhem Queens Commissioner Jan Kamminga Area  - Total  - % water 2nd 5137 km²  ?% Population  - Total (2004)  - Density 4th 1,966,929 379/km² Anthem Ons Gelderland For the historical duchy also called Gelderland, see Guelders Gelderland (English also Guelders) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern... Arnhem is a municipality and a city in the east of the Netherlands, located on the Lower Rhine, and the capital of the Gelderland province. ... Nijmegen (Zuid-Gelders: Nèhméége) (obsolete spellings: Nijmwegen, Nymegen, Nieumeghen — known in German as Nimwegen, French as Nimègue, and Spanish as Nimega) is a municipality and a city in the east of the Netherlands, near the German border. ... Utrecht is the smallest province of the Netherlands, and is located in the center of the country. ... Utrecht ( (help· info)) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Utrecht. ... Capital Haarlem Queens Commissioner Mr. ... ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... South Holland (Dutch Zuid-Holland) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country on the North Sea coast. ... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ... Rotterdam Location Flag Country The Netherlands Province South Holland Population 604,819 (2005) Coordinates 51° 55 N.; 4° 30 E. Website www. ... Capital Middelburg Queens Commissioner drs. ... This is about the city in the Netherlands. ... North Brabant (Dutch: Noord-Brabant) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the south of the country, bordered by Belgium in the south, the Meuse River (Maas) in the north, Limburg in the east and Zeeland in the west. ... s-Hertogenbosch (literally The Dukes Forest in Dutch; translated in French as Bois-le-Duc), unofficially also called Den Bosch, is a municipality in the Netherlands, the capital of the province of North Brabant. ... Eindhoven is a municipality and a city located in the province of Noord-Brabant in the south of the Netherlands, originally at the confluence of the Dommel and Gender brooks. ... Capital Maastricht Queens Commissioner L.J.P.M. (Leon) Frissen Religion (1999) Protestant 3% Catholic 80% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   2. ... Maastricht (Dutch: Maastricht; Limburgish and city dialect: Mestreech) is a municipality, and capital of the province of Limburg. ... A municipality or general-purpose district (compare with: special-purpose district) is an administrative local area generally composed of a clearly defined territory and commonly referring to a city, town, or village government. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The country is also subdivided in water districts, governed by a water board (waterschap or hoogheemraadschap), each having authority in matters concerning water management. As of 1 January 2005 there are 27. The creation of water boards actually pre-dates that of the nation itself, the first appearing in 1196. In fact, the Dutch water boards are one of the oldest democratic entities in the world still in existence. January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Map of the Netherlands, with provinces and capital cities See also Provinces of the Netherlands. ... All provinces of the Netherlands are divided into municipalities (gemeenten), together 467 (2005); among these we can distinguish: those comprising one main city, town or village with the same name as the municipality, and possibly some additional villages; for example Utrecht, comprising the city Utrecht and the villages De Meern... This is a list of large cities and towns in the Netherlands, sorted by province. ...

Geography

Map of the Netherlands
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Map of the Netherlands
Main article: Geography of the Netherlands

A remarkable aspect of the Netherlands is the flatness of the country. About half of its surface area is less than 1 metre (3.3 ft) above sea level, and large parts of it are actually below sea level (see map showing these areas). An extensive range of dykes and dunes protects these areas from flooding. Numerous massive pumping stations keep the ground water level in check. The highest point, the Vaalserberg, in the south-eastern most point of the country, is 321 metres (1,053 ft) above sea level. A substantial part of the Netherlands, for example, all of Flevoland (the largest man-made island in the world) and large parts of Holland, has been reclaimed from the sea. These areas are known as polders. This has led to the saying "God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands." Image File history File links Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Maps of the Netherlands map of the Netherlands, converted directly from CIA World Factbook GIF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Maps of the Netherlands map of the Netherlands, converted directly from CIA World Factbook GIF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Geography of the Netherlands The Netherlands is one of the most geographically unique countries on Earth. ... A foot (plural: feet) is any of several old units of distance or length, measuring around a quarter to a third of a meter. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... A dike (or dyke) is an earthen wall, constructed as a defence or as a boundary. ... This article is about the sand formations, for other meanings see Dune (disambiguation) Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley National Park In physical geography, a dune is a hill of sand built by eolian (wind-related) processes. ... The Vaalserberg (Mount Vaals) is a hill of 321 metres in height, the highest point in the Netherlands. ... Flevoland is a province of the Netherlands. ... Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. ... Satellite image of Noordoostpolder, Netherlands (595. ...


In years past, the Dutch coastline has changed considerably due to human intervention and natural disasters. Most notable in terms of land loss are the 1134 storm, which created the archipelago of Zeeland in the south west, and the 1287 storm, which killed 50,000 people and created the Zuyderzee (now dammed in and renamed the IJsselmeer — see below) in the northwest, giving Amsterdam direct access to the sea. The St. Elizabeth flood of 1421 and the mismanagement in its aftermath destroyed a newly reclaimed polder, replacing it with the 72 square kilometres (28 sq mi) Biesbosch tidal floodplains in the south-centre. The most recent parts of Zeeland were flooded during the North Sea Flood of 1953 and 1,836 people were killed, after which the Delta Plan was executed. An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ... Landsat photo The Zuider Zee (pronounced , Dutch: Zuiderzee, pronounced ) was a shallow inlet of the North Sea in the northwest of the Netherlands, extending about 100 km inland and at most 50 km wide, with an overall depth of about 4 to 5 meters and a coastline of about 300... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A square mile is an Imperial unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (5,280 feet, 1,760 yards, 1,609. ... Satellite image of the Rhine-Meuse delta, showing the Biesbosch (8) The Biesbosch (Reed Woods) is one of the largest natural parks of the Netherlands. ... // The North Sea flood of 1953 and the associated storm combined to create a major natural disaster which affected the coastlines of England and the Netherlands on the night of 31 January 1953 – 1 February 1953. ... Oosterscheldekering, the largest of 13 Delta Works dams. ...

Satellite image of the Netherlands (ca. May 2000)
Satellite image of the Netherlands (ca. May 2000)

The disasters were partially man-made; the people drained relatively high lying swampland for use as farmland. This drainage caused the fertile peat to compress and the ground level to drop, locking the land users in a vicious circle whereby they would lower the water level to compensate for the drop in ground level, causing the underlying peat to compress even more. The vicious circle is unsolvable and remains to this day. Up until the 19th century peat was dug up, dried, and used for fuel, further adding to the problem. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1232x1602, 540 KB) Satellite image of the Netherlands in May 2000. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1232x1602, 540 KB) Satellite image of the Netherlands in May 2000. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


To guard against floods, a series of defenses against the water were contrived. In the first millennium, villages and farmhouses were built on man-made hills called terps. Later, these terps were connected by dikes. In the 12th century, local government agencies called "waterschappen" (English "water bodies") or "hoogheemraadschappen" ("high home councils") started to appear, whose job it was to maintain the water level and to protect a region from floods. (The water bodies are still around today performing the exact same function.) As the ground level dropped, the dikes by necessity grew and merged into an integrated system. In the 13th century, windmills came into use to pump water out of the areas by now below sea level. The windmills were later used to drain lakes, creating the famous polders. In 1932, the Afsluitdijk (English "Closure Dike") was completed, blocking the former Zuyderzee (Southern Sea) off from the North Sea and thus creating the IJsselmeer (IJssel Lake). It became part of the larger Zuiderzee Works in which four polders totalling 1,650 square kilometres (637 sq mi) were reclaimed from the sea. Satellite image of Noordoostpolder, Netherlands (595. ... Afsluitdijk The Afsluitdijk (Closure-dike) is a major dam in the Netherlands, constructed between 1927 and 1933 and running from Den Oever on Wieringen in North Holland province, to the village of Zurich (mun. ... Traditional boat on the IJsselmeer Landsat photo This 2000 satellite image shows Southern Flevoland covered with active farming. ... Satellite image of the IJssel basin River IJssel, sometimes called Gelderse IJssel (Gelderland IJssel) to avoid confusion with its Holland counterpart, is a 120 km long branch of the Rhine in the Dutch provinces of Gelderland and Overijssel. ... The 32 km long Afsluitdijk separates the IJsselmeer from the North Sea, protecting thousands of km² of land. ...


After the 1953 disaster, the Delta project, a vast construction effort designed to end the threat from the sea once and for all, was launched in 1958 and largely completed in 2002. The official goal of the Delta project was to reduce the risk of flooding in Holland to once per 10,000 years. (For the rest of the country, the protection-level is once per 4,000 years.) This was achieved by raising 3,000 kilometres (1,864 mi) of outer sea-dikes and 10,000 kilometres (6,200 mi) of inner, canal, and river dikes to "delta" height, and by closing off the sea estuaries of the Zeeland province. New risk assessments occasionally incur additional Delta project work in the form of dike reinforcements. The Delta project is the single largest construction effort in human history and is considered by the American Society of Civil Engineers as one of the seven wonders of the modern world. Oosterscheldekering, the largest of 13 Delta Works dams. ... A mile is any of a number of units of distance, each in the magnitude of 1–10 km. ... Estuaries and coastal waters are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing numerous ecological, economic, cultural, and aesthetic benefits and services. ... The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) is a professional body, founded in 1852, to represent members of the civil engineering profession worldwide. ... The Seven Wonders of the World (or the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) is a widely-known list of seven remarkable constructions of classical antiquity. ...


Because of the high cost of maintaining the polders some have argued that maybe some of the deepest polders should be given up. Additionally, the Netherlands is one of the countries that may suffer most from climatic change. Not only is the rising sea a problem, but also erratic weather patterns may cause the rivers to overflow. These flooded polders might then be used as water catchments to take part of the blow. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years Climate change refers to the variation in the Earths global climate or regional climates over time. ...


The country is divided into two main parts by three rivers Rhine (Rijn), Waal, and Meuse (Maas). The south-western part of the Netherlands is actually one big river delta of these rivers. These rivers not only function as a natural barrier, but also as a cultural divide, as is evident in the different dialects spoken north and south of these great rivers and the (previous) religious dominance of Catholics in the south and Calvinists in the north. Loreley At 1,320 kilometres (820 miles) and an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second, the Rhine (Dutch Rijn, French Rhin, German Rhein, Italian: Reno, Romansch: Rein, ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe. ... Edited Satellite image of the Rhine-Waal fork, showing the beginning of river Waal (green). ... Meuse near Grave The Meuse (Dutch Maas) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. ... Nile River delta, as seen from Earth orbit. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ...


The predominant wind direction in the Netherlands is south-west, which causes a moderate maritime climate, with cool summers and mild winters. It has been suggested that The Cool Western Temperate Maritime Climate be merged into this article or section. ...

National parks in the Netherlands were defined in the 1960s as areas of at least 10 km², consisting of natural terrains, water and/or forests, with a special landscape and flora and fauna. ...

Economy

Main article: Economy of the Netherlands

The Netherlands has a prosperous and open economy in which the government has reduced its role since the 1980s. Industrial activity is predominantly in food-processing (for example Unilever and Heineken), chemicals (for example DSM), petroleum refining (for example Royal Dutch Shell), and electrical machinery (for example Philips). Slochteren has one of the largest natural gas fields in the world, which has so far (2006) resulted in a total revenue of 159 billion € since the mid 1970's. With just over half of the reserves used up and an expected continued rise in oil prices, the revenues over the next few decades are expected to be at least that much.[4] A highly mechanised agricultural sector employs no more than 4% of the labour force but provides large surpluses for the food-processing industry and for exports. The Dutch rank third worldwide in value of agricultural exports, behind the US and France. Other important parts of the economy are international trade (Dutch colonialism started with cooperative private enterprises such as the VOC), banking and transport (for example the Rotterdam harbour). The Netherlands successfully addressed the issue of public finances and stagnating job growth long before its European partners. // Overview The Netherlands is a prosperous and open economy in which the government has successfully reduced its role since the 1980s. ... An open economy is an economy in which people, including businesses, can trade in goods and services with other people and businesses in the international community at large. ... Unilever (Euronext: UNA, LSE: ULVR, NYSE: UN) is an Anglo-Dutch company that owns many of the worlds consumer product brands in foods, beverages, cleaning agents and personal care products. ... Heineken (or Heineken Brouwerijen) is a Dutch beer brewer, established in 1863 when Gerard Adriaan Heineken purchased a brewery in Amsterdam. ... DSM (in full Koninklijke DSM N.V., or Royal DSM N.V.) is a multinational chemicals company. ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Petroleum (from Greek petra – rock and elaion – oil or Latin oleum – oil ) or crude oil is a thick, dark brown or greenish liquid. ... Royal Dutch Shell plc/Koninklijke Nederlandse Shell NV is an Anglo Dutch oil company which is amongst the largest energy corporations in the world, and one of the six supermajors (vertically integrated private-sector oil, natural gas, and petrol companies), along with BP, ExxonMobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips and Total. ... Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. (Royal Philips Electronics N.V.), usually known as Philips, (Euronext: PHIA, NYSE: PHG) is one of the largest electronics companies in the world. ... Slochteren is a municipality in the northeastern Netherlands. ... Natural gas rig Oil and natural gas are produced by the same geological process: anaerobic decay of organic matter deep under the Earths surface. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... International trade is the exchange of goods and services across international boundaries or territories. ... VOC is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: A historic trade organization (Verenigde Oost-indische Compagnie); see Dutch East India Company A group of chemical compounds; see Volatile Organic Compounds Vehicle operating costs Voice of the customer Creative Voice file, a proprietary audio format developed by... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Rotterdam Location Flag Country The Netherlands Province South Holland Population 604,819 (2005) Coordinates 51° 55 N.; 4° 30 E. Website www. ...


As a founding member of the Euro, the Netherlands replaced its former currency, the Guilder, on January 1, 1999 along with the other adopters of the single European currency, with the actual Euro coins and banknotes following on January 1, 2002. However, in the first years of the third millennium, economic and employment growth came to a standstill, which the government tried to resolve by cutting into its expenses. The euro (currency sign: €; banking code: EUR) is the official currency of the European Union and single currency for over 300 million Europeans in the following twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain; collectively also known as the... The gulden (sometimes called guilder in English), represented by the symbol ƒ or fl. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The euro (EUR or €) is the currency of 12 European Union (EU) member states (Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain), four European microstates that had currency agreements with EU member states (Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican City State), and two parts... The Euro symbol The euro (EUR or €) is the single currency for 12 European Union member states. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


In 2003 the economy shrunk 0.9%. In 2004, the recession was over and the economy began its slow recovery with a meagre 1.3% growth. The CPB ("Centraal Plan Bureau", Central Planning Bureau), a think tank of leading Dutch economists linked with the government, expects a recovery of the economy in 2005, with a growth of 2.25%. In 2004, inflation was 1.2%, the lowest level since 1989.

  • Economic data for the Netherlands: Dutch English

This is a list of companies from the Netherlands. ...

Demographics

Main article: Demographics of the Netherlands
Demographics of Netherlands, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands.
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Demographics of Netherlands, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands.

The Netherlands is the 15th most densely populated country in the world, with 395 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,023 sq mi)—or 484 people per square kilometre (1,254/sq mi) if only the land area is counted, since 18.4% is water. Partly because of this it is also one of the most densely cabled countries in the world. Internet penetration is at 66.2% the 7th highest in the world.[5] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Possible meanings: Faro Airport (Portugal) Federation of Astrobiology Organizations Financial Aid Office Food and Agriculture Organization This page expands a three-character combination which might be any or all of: an abbreviation, an acronym, an initialism, a word in English, or a word in another language. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries/dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The figures in the following table are based on areas including inland water bodies (lakes, reservoirs, rivers). ...


According to CBS Statline, the official statistics bureau of the Netherlands, the ethnic origins of the citizens are very diverse. The vast majority of the population however still remains Dutch. They were: 80.8% Dutch, 5.6% other European (including 2.4% German), 2.4% Indonesian (Indo-European, Indo-Dutch, Moluccan), 2.2% Turks, 2.0% Surinamese, 1.9% Moroccan, 0.8% Antillean and Aruban, and 4.2% other. However, this does not include the whole Kingdom of the Netherlands (such as the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba, which have a non-European majority community), and only include the population in the Netherlands itself. The Netherlands also has a resident population of some 200,000 people of mixed Dutch and Indonesian descent (Indonesia being a former colony of the Netherlands). This article is about the continent. ... Indo, Indo-European or Eurasian is a term used to describe people of European and Indonesian ancestry, in particular, people of Dutch and Indonesian ancestry. ... The Maluku Islands (also known as the Moluccas, Moluccan Islands or simply Maluku) are an archipelago in Indonesia, and part of the larger Malay Archipelago. ... Motto: Libertate unanimus (Latin: Unified by freedom) Anthem: Anthem without a title Capital Willemstad Largest city Willemstad Official language(s) Dutch Government Queen Governor Prime minister Beatrix Frits Goedgedrag Emily de Jongh-Elhage Dependent area of Kingdom of the Netherlands Area  - Total    - Water (%)   960 km² (~170th) 371 sq mi  Negligible... The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands-Indië) was the name of the colonies set up by the Dutch East India Company, which came under administration of the Netherlands during the 19th century (see Indonesia). ...


There are no cities with a population over 1 million in the Netherlands, but the 'four big cities' as they are called (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht) can in many ways be regarded as one 'big city' agglomeration, the Randstad ('fringe city') with about 7 million inhabitants and an agricultural 'green heart' (het Groene Hart). This is illustrated by the idea to create a circular train network with a frequency and carriages similar to a metropolitan railway. Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... Rotterdam Location Flag Country The Netherlands Province South Holland Population 604,819 (2005) Coordinates 51° 55 N.; 4° 30 E. Website www. ... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ... Utrecht ( (help· info)) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Utrecht. ... The main municipalities of the Randstad; note that the marked areas are not just the built-up areas but the whole municipalities The Randstad is an agglomeration in the Netherlands. ... The Metropolitan Line is part of the London Underground. ...


The 5 largest cities are, in order of population:

Eindhoven is the only of these cities that is not located in the Randstad. Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates Website www. ... Rotterdam Location Flag Country The Netherlands Province South Holland Population 604,819 (2005) Coordinates 51° 55 N.; 4° 30 E. Website www. ... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ... This article is about the city in the Netherlands; there is also a region known as (the) Hague in France. ... Utrecht ( (help· info)) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Utrecht. ... Eindhoven is a municipality and a city located in the province of Noord-Brabant in the south of the Netherlands, originally at the confluence of the Dommel and Gender brooks. ... Eindhoven is a municipality and a city located in the province of Noord-Brabant in the south of the Netherlands, originally at the confluence of the Dommel and Gender brooks. ... The main municipalities of the Randstad; note that the marked areas are not just the built-up areas but the whole municipalities The Randstad is an agglomeration in the Netherlands. ...


The population of the Netherlands is physically the tallest in the world, with an average height of 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) for adult males and 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) for adult females. A few centuries ago, it was among the shortest. The reasons for the increase in height are uncertain (CBS 2006).


Culture

Main article: Culture of the Netherlands
Erasmus (1466–1536)
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Erasmus (1466–1536)

The Netherlands has had many well-known painters. The 17th century, when the Dutch republic was prosperous, was the age of the "Dutch Masters" such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Johannes Vermeer, Jan Steen and many others. Famous Dutch painters of the 19th and 20th century are Vincent van Gogh and Piet Mondriaan. M. C. Escher is a well-known graphics artist. Willem de Kooning was born and trained in Rotterdam, although he is considered to have reached acclaim as an American artist. A (in)famous Dutch master art forger is Han van Meegeren This article deals with the culture of the Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (809x1145, 122 KB) The Dutch philosopher Desiderius Erasmus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (809x1145, 122 KB) The Dutch philosopher Desiderius Erasmus. ... Desiderius Erasmus in 1523 Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... This article is about the Dutch painter. ... Milkmaid (1658-1660) Johannes Vermeer or Jan Vermeer (October 31, 1632 - buried on December 15, 1675) was a Dutch painter, who lived and worked in Delft. ... Self Portrait as a Lutenist (1660-63) Jan Havickszoon Steen (born 1626 (?) in Leiden, died January 1, 1679 in Leiden) was a Dutch painter of the 17th century (also known as the Dutch Golden Age). ... The following list is a partial list of painters. ... Vincent Willem van Gogh (March 30, 1853–July 29, 1890) was a Dutch painter, classified as a Post-Impressionist. ... Image:MondriaanPiet. ... Hand with Reflecting Sphere (Self-Portrait in Spherical Mirror), 1935. ... Willem de Koonings Woman V (1952-53) Willem de Kooning (April 24, 1904 – March 19, 1997) was an abstract expressionist painter, born in Rotterdam, Netherlands. ... Rotterdam Location Flag Country The Netherlands Province South Holland Population 604,819 (2005) Coordinates 51° 55 N.; 4° 30 E. Website www. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Han van Meegeren, byname of Henricus Antonius van Meegeren (Deventer, October 10, 1889 - Valeriuskliniek Amsterdam, December 30, 1947), was a Dutch painter and master art forger. ...


The Netherlands is the country of philosophers Erasmus of Rotterdam and Spinoza, and all of Descartes' major work was done there. The Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens (1629–1695) discovered Saturn's moon Titan and invented the pendulum clock. Desiderius Erasmus in 1523 Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... Steven de Spinoza (November 24, 1632 – February 21, 1677), named Stefan Spinoza by his synagogue elders and known as Bento de Espinosa or Bento dEspiñoza in his native Amsterdam, was a Dutch philosopher. ... For other things named Descartes, see Descartes (disambiguation). ... Christiaan Huygens Christiaan Huygens (pronounced in English (IPA): ; in Dutch: ) (April 14, 1629–July 8, 1695), was a Dutch mathematician and physicist; born in The Hague as the son of Constantijn Huygens. ... A pendulum clock uses a pendulum as its time base. ...


In the Dutch Golden Age, literature flowered as well, with Joost van den Vondel and P. C. Hooft as the two most famous writers. In the 19th century, Multatuli wrote about the bad treatment of the natives in Dutch colonies. Important 20th century authors include Harry Mulisch, Jan Wolkers, Simon Vestdijk, Cees Nooteboom, Gerard van het Reve and Willem Frederik Hermans. Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl was published after she died in the Holocaust and translated from Dutch to all major languages. Rembrandt The Nightwatch (1642) The Dutch Golden Age (1584-1702) was a period in Dutch history, roughly spanning the 17th century, in which Dutch trade, science, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Joost van den Vondel (1587-1679) was born in the Große Witschgasse in Cologne. ... Sculpture of P.C. Hooft in the castle Muiderslot Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft (* March 16, 1581 - † May 21, 1647), was a Dutch historian, poet and playwright from the period known as the Dutch Golden Age. ... photo courtesy of Robertson/Kerr Photography Eduard Douwes Dekker (2 March 1820 - 19 February 1887), better known by his pen name Multatuli, was a Dutch writer famous for his satirical novel, Max Havelaar (1860) in which he denounced the abuses of colonialism in the former Dutch colony of Indonesia. ... Harry Mulisch Harry Mulisch (born July 29, 1927) is a Dutch author. ... Jan Hendrik Wolkers (born Oegstgeest, 26 October 1925) is a Dutch author and artist. ... Simon Vestdijk (October 17, 1898-March 23, 1971) was a Dutch writer. ... Cees Nooteboom, born Cornelis Johannes Jacobus Maria Nooteboom, July 31, 1933, in the Hague, Netherlands is a Dutch author. ... Gerard Reve (December 14, 1923) is a Dutch writer. ... The Dutch writer Willem Frederik Hermans (September 1, 1921–April 27, 1995) is considered one of the three most important authors in the Netherlands in the postwar period, along with Harry Mulisch and Gerard Reve. ... Anne Frank Her handwriting, translated: This is a photo as I would wish myself to look all the time. ... The cover of the UK edition shows Annes first diary notebook The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank was published in Dutch in 1947 (and in English in 1952), using extracts from the diary she kept while in hiding during the Nazi occupation of The Netherlands. ...


See also: List of museums in the Netherlands, Sport in the Netherlands, Music of the Netherlands, List of Dutch people, Public holidays in the Netherlands The list of museums is a link page for any museum anywhere. ... Like in most countries, sport is being practised by many inhabitants of the Netherlands, mostly at recreational level. ... The Netherlands has multiple musical traditions, mostly related to nearby German and Belgian forms. ... This is a list of Dutch people who are famous and/or have an article: // Art Architecture Jaap Bakema, (1914-1981), architect Hendrik Petrus Berlage, (1856-1934), architect J. H. van den Broek, (1898-1978), architect Pierre Cuypers, (1827-1921), architect Willem Marinus Dudok, (1884-1974), architect Aldo van Eyck... Holidays in the Netherlands: Categories: | | ...


Replicas of Dutch buildings can be found in Huis ten Bosch, Nagasaki, Japan. A similar Holland Village is being built in Shenyang, China. Nagasaki City Hall Mayor {{{Mayor}}} Address 〒850-8685 Nagasaki-shi, Sakura-machi 2-22 Phone number 095-825-5151 Official website: www1. ... Shenyang (Simplified Chinese: 沈阳; Traditional Chinese: 瀋陽; pinyin: Shěnyáng; English formerly Mukden) is the capital of Liaoning province in China. ...


Windmills, tulips, wooden shoes, and Delftware pottery are among the items associated with the Netherlands. Pitstone Windmill, believed to be the oldest windmill in the British Isles A windmill is an engine powered by the wind to produce energy, often contained in a large building as in traditional post mills, smock mills and tower mills. ... Species See text Tulip (Tulipa) is a genus of about 100 species of flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. ... We are all looking fsorward to a great sseason in 2005. ... Delft pottery design on a BA Boeing 767 Delft pottery is typically the blue and white pottery generally made in the Netherlands around the town of Delft. ...


Efteling is a famous amusement park in the Netherlands. Efteling (Dutch: De Efteling) is the largest and most popular theme park in The Netherlands, and one of the leading theme parks in Europe. ...


Languages

The official language is Dutch, which is spoken by practically all inhabitants. Another official language is Frisian, which is spoken in the northern province of Friesland and has a strong resemblance to Dutch, German and especially English. Frisian is co-official only in the province of Friesland, although with a few restrictions. Several dialects of Low Saxon (Nedersaksisch in Dutch) are spoken in much of the north and east and are recognised by the Netherlands as regional languages according to the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. To the south, the Dutch language shifts into other varieties of Low Franconian and German, which may or may not be best classified as Dutch, most notably West Flemish. One of these, Limburgish, which is spoken in the south-eastern province of Limburg has been recognised as a minority language since 1997. There is a tradition of speaking foreign languages in the Netherlands: about 75% of the total population speaks English, 55–60% speaks German and about 17% speaks French. Frisian is a Germanic group of closely related languages, spoken by around half a million members of an ethnic group living on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany. ... Capital Leeuwarden Queens Commissioner drs. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nedersaksisch, Neddersassisch, Plattdüütsch or Nedderdüütsch) is any of a variety of Low German dialects spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands. ... The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (ECRML) is a European treaty (CETS 148) adopted in 1992 under the auspices of the Council of Europe to protect and promote historical regional and minority languages in Europe. ... Low Franconian is any of several West Germanic languages spoken in The Netherlands, northern Belgium, and South Africa. ... West Flemish (in West Flemish, Vlaemsch) is a group of dialects, spoken in parts of the Netherlands, Belgium, and France. ... Limburgish, or Limburgian or Limburgic (Dutch: Limburgs, German: Limburgisch, French: Limbourgeois) is a group of Franconian varieties, spoken in the Limburg and Rhineland regions, near the common Dutch/Belgian/German border. ... Capital Maastricht Queens Commissioner L.J.P.M. (Leon) Frissen Religion (1999) Protestant 3% Catholic 80% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   2. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Religion

According to the governmental statistics agency (CBS) 30% of the population consider themselves to be Roman Catholic, 20% Protestant (predominantly Dutch Reformed) and 8% 'other denominations'. 42% consider themselves unaffiliated. Church attendance however is much lower than these figures may suggest: some 70% of the population 'rarely or never' visit a house of worship (be it a church, mosque, synagogue or temple), and even then it is mostly for occasions like weddings and baptisms. Most Protestants live in the northern provinces while the southern provinces, Noord-Brabant and Limburg, are mainly Roman Catholic, along with some regions in the east of the country like Twente in Overijssel. Statistics Netherlands is a Dutch governmental institution that gathers statistical information about the Netherlands. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Protestantism is one of three primary branches of Christianity. ... The Dutch Reformed village church of St. ... North Brabant (Dutch: Noord-Brabant) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the south of the country, bordered by Belgium in the south, the Meuse River (Maas) in the north, Limburg in the east and Zeeland in the west. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Twente (or Twenthe) is a non-administrative region in the eastern Netherlands, containing the most urbanised and easterly part of the province of Overijssel. ... Flag of Overijssel Overijssel is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern part of the country. ...


The largest part of the 'other denominations', at 920,000, are Muslim immigrants mainly living in the bigger cities, mostly from Morocco and Turkey, and their descendants. The other denominations also include some 200,000 Hindus (1.3% of the population), mostly descendants of indentured servants who migrated from India to the former Dutch colony of Surinam around 1900. For other uses, including people named Islam, see Islam (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An indentured servant is a labourer under contract (an indenture--explained below) to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person or a company/corporation, often without any monetary pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials, training, or passage to a new country. ...


Prior to the Holocaust about 140,000 Jews lived in the Netherlands (earning Amsterdam the nickname of 'Jerusalem of the West'); however, the vast majority of Dutch Jewry were murdered in the Holocaust. The Jewish population of the Netherlands today is estimated between 30,000 and 40,000. The major centre for Jewish life in the Netherlands is Amsterdam, with significant numbers living in Rotterdam and Den Haag. There are synagogues in most large towns; most Dutch Jews are Liberal rather than Orthodox in practice. Selection at the Auschwitz camp in 1944, where the Nazis chose whom to kill immediately and whom to use as slave labor or for medical experimentation. ... Selection at the Auschwitz camp in 1944, where the Nazis chose whom to kill immediately and whom to use as slave labor or for medical experimentation. ... Rotterdam Location Flag Country The Netherlands Province South Holland Population 604,819 (2005) Coordinates 51° 55 N.; 4° 30 E. Website www. ... This article is about the city in the Netherlands; there is also a region known as (the) Hague in France. ... Liberal Judaism is a term used by some communities worldwide for what is otherwise also known as Reform Judaism or Progressive Judaism. ... Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary...


See also: History of the Jews in the Netherlands From the end of the 16th century until World War II, The Netherlands played a pivotal role in world Jewry. ...


Miscellaneous topics

Click on a province button. This will bring you to catagory of that province
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
Help
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Image File history File links NetherlandsNavigationButtonUnanimated. ... Abortion was deemed illegal in the Netherlands under the Penal Code of 1886. ... City rights are a medieval phenomenon in the history of the Low Countries. ... < Netherlands // Telephone Telephones - main lines in use: 10. ... The drug policy of the Netherlands is based on two principles: Drug use is a public health issue, not a criminal matter A distinction between hard drugs and soft drugs exists It is a pragmatic policy. ... A map showing the territory that the Netherlands held at various points in history. ... The Dutch are the native inhabitants of the Netherlands. ... Episode of the Belgian Revolution of 1830, Egide Charles Gustave Wappers (1834), in the Musée dArt Ancien, Brussels The Belgian Revolution was a conflict in the United Kingdom of the Netherlands that began with a riot in Brussels in August 1830 and eventually led to the establishment of... Education in the Netherlands is characterized by division: education is oriented towards the needs and background of the pupil. ... Euthanasia (from Greek: ευθανασία -ευ good, θανατος death) is the practice of ending the life of an individual or an animal who is suffering from a terminal disease or a chronically painful condition in a painless or minimally painful way either by lethal injection, drug overdose, or by the withdrawal of medical support. ... This is a list of extinct animals of the Netherlands. ... The Netherlands abandoned its traditional policy of neutrality after World War II. The Dutch have since become engaged participants in international affairs. ... Logo of the Netherlands Algemene Inlichtingen-en Veiligheidsdienst (AIVD) / General Intelligence and Security Service Algemene Inlichtingen-en Veiligheidsdienst (AIVD), formerly known as the BVD (Binnenlandse Veiligheidsdienst) is the General Intelligence and Security Service of the Netherlands. ... The geology of the Netherlands is very much influenced by its very low position. ... In the Netherlands there is an income tax, which is roughly as follows. ... The Dutch Football League is organized by the Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbal Bond (KNVB, Royal Dutch Football Association). ... The military of the Netherlands is composed of four branches, all of which carry the prefix royal: The Army, the regular, land based army branch. ... Although the Netherlands do not have weapons of mass destruction made by itself. ... Laws of the Netherlands. ... Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... Prostitution is legal in the Netherlands. ... Holidays in the Netherlands: Categories: | | ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is an international non-governmental organisation doing research on and advocating for freedom of the press. ... The Netherlands has allowed same-sex marriage since April 1, 2001. ... Statistics Netherlands is a Dutch governmental institution that gathers statistical information about the Netherlands. ... A telephone number in the Netherlands is a sequence of usually 10 decimal digits (0-9) that is used for identifying a destination telephone line in the Dutch telephone network. ... In the Netherlands, there are several broadcast companies. ... Tourism in the Netherlands Keukenhof is a major tourist destination in the Netherlands The Netherlands is a densely populated country with famous cities like Amsterdam known for the Rijksmuseum (the national museum), canals, the castle and its cosy pubs. ... Transportation in the Netherlands // Rail transport Railway tracks (2001) all standard gauge (1. ... The Netherlands has 56,538 Scouts (as of 2004) and 56,998 Guides (as of 2003) served by Scouting Nederland. ...

External links

Find more information on the Netherlands by searching Wikipedia's sister projects:

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 News stories from Wikinews Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ...

History, geography and politics

Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Microfiche is one of the most compact analog storage media in common use. ...

Moving to the Netherlands

  • Just Landed Netherlands - Useful info for moving to the Netherlands
  • Dutch news: Radio Netherlands, Expatica
  • NL Planet - English language resources, background information and free forums

Travel

  • World66's guide to the Netherlands A travel guide written by its users.
  • Netherlands Travel Guide
  • Picture Gallery of Netherlands

Miscellaneous

  • Deltaworks Online - Flood protection and water management in the Netherlands
  • Keukenhof Flower Gardens Stunning pictures of the flower garden in Netherlands.
  • Track.nl - An Internet search-engine that specialises in the Netherlands.
  • The Dutch Royal Family
  • Dutch for English speakers (from Wikibooks)
  • List of approx. 1500 tall buildings in the Netherlands
  • Gezellig Canada for Dutch Canadians
  • Gezellig USA (America) for Dutch Canadians

Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is part of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Japan Goes Dutch", London Review of Books [April 5, 2001]: 3-7).
  2. ^ Bishop, Chris. Hitler's Foreign Legions: Foreign Volunteers in the Waffen-SS 1940-1945 ISBN 1904687377
  3. ^ Web reference
  4. ^ web reference
  5. ^ internetworldstats.com

References

  • Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, 2006. Health statistics through 2000 (data table in English). Retrieved June 17, 2006.
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