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Encyclopedia > The Music Man
The Music Man
Original Broadway Poster
Music Meredith Willson
Lyrics Meredith Willson
Book Meredith Willson
Productions 1957 Broadway
1980 Broadway revival

2000 Broadway revival Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Robert Meredith Willson (18 May 1902 – 15 June 1984) was an American composer and playwright, best known as the writer of The Music Man. ... Robert Meredith Willson (18 May 1902 – 15 June 1984) was an American composer and playwright, best known as the writer of The Music Man. ... Robert Meredith Willson (18 May 1902 – 15 June 1984) was an American composer and playwright, best known as the writer of The Music Man. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Awards Tony Award for Best Musical

The Music Man is a musical with book, music, and lyrics by Meredith Willson. The show is based on a story by Willson and Franklin Lacey. In 1957, the show became a hit on Broadway and spawned revivals and a popular film. It is still frequently produced by both professional and amateur theater companies. // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Robert Meredith Willson (18 May 1902 – 15 June 1984) was an American composer and playwright, best known as the writer of The Music Man. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ...

Contents

Background

Meredith Willson was inspired by his boyhood in Mason City, Iowa, in writing and composing his first musical, The Music Man.[1] He first approached producers Cy Feuer and Ernest Martin for a television special, and then MGM producer Jesse L. Lasky. After these and other unsuccessful attempts, Willson invited Franklin Lacey to help him edit and simplify the libretto. At this time, Willson considered eliminating a long piece of dialogue about the serious trouble facing River City parents. Willson realized it sounded like a lyric, and transformed it into the now-famous song, "Ya Got Trouble".[2] Mason City is a city in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, United States. ... Cy Feuer (born January 15, 1911 in Brooklyn, New York) is a producer and director of Broadway musicals. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Lasky in 1915. ...


The name of the character Marian Paroo was inspired by Marian Seeley of Provo, Utah, who met Meredith Willson during World War II, when she was a medical records librarian.[3] In the original production (and the film), the School Board was played by the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA),[4] the Buffalo Bills. Robert Preston claimed that he got the role of Harold Hill despite his limited singing range because, when he went to audition, they were having the men sing "Trouble". The producers felt it would be the most difficult song to sing, but with his acting background, it was the easiest for Preston.[citation needed] Provo is a city in and the county seat of Utah County, Utah, United States, located about 45 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Barbershop Harmony Society, also known as the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA), was the first of several organizations to promote and preserve Barbershop music as an art form. ... The Buffalo Bills were a barbershop quartet formed in Buffalo, New York. ...


Productions

After years of development, a change of producers, almost forty songs (twenty-two were cut), and more than forty drafts, the original Broadway production, directed by Morton DaCosta and choreographed by Onna White, opened on December 19, 1957, at the Majestic Theatre. It won five Tony awards, including Best Musical, even beating out West Side Story.[5] It remained at the Majestic for nearly three years before transferring to The Broadway Theatre to complete its 1,375-performance run. The original cast included Robert Preston (who went on to reprise his role in the 1962 screen adaptation) as Harold Hill, Barbara Cook as Marian, and Eddie Hodges as Winthrop, with Pert Kelton, David Burns and Iggie Wolfington in supporting roles. Eddie Albert replaced Preston later in the run. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Morton DaCosta (March 7, 1914 - January 26, 1989) was an American theatre and film director, film producer, writer, and actor. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... Onna White (March 24, 1922 – April 8, 2005) was a Canadian choreographer and dancer, nominated for eight Tony Awards. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre at 245 West 44th Street in Manhattan, New York City. ... The Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Awards, recognize achievement in live American theatre and are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League [1] at an annual ceremony in New York City. ... For other uses, see West Side Story (disambiguation). ... The Broadway Theatre, showing The Color Purple, May 2007 Entrance The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan. ... Robert Preston Meservey (June 8, 1918 - March 21, 1987), better known as Robert Preston, was an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... The Music Man is a 1962 film musical starring Robert Preston as Harold Hill and Shirley Jones as Marian Paroo. ... Barbara Cook (born October 25, 1927) is a Tony Award-winning American singer and actress who first came to prominence in the 1950s after creating roles in the Broadway musicals Candide and The Music Man, among others. ... Eddie Hodges (born 5 March 1947) is a former child actor and recording artist who left show business as an adult. ... Pert Kelton (1907-1968) was an American vaudeville, movie, and television actress. ... David Burns was born on Mott Street in New York Citys Chinatown on June 22, 1902. ... Ignatius Iggie Wolfington (October 14, 1920 - September 30, 2004) was an actor best known for playing Marcellus Washburn in the Broadway musical The Music Man. ... Edward Albert Heimberger (April 22, 1906 – May 26, 2005) was a popular Oscar and Emmy Award-nominated American stage, film, character actor, gardener, and humanitarian activist, perhaps best known for playing Bing Edwards in the Brother Rat films, or for his role in the 1960s television comedy Green Acres. ...


The original cast recording was released by Capitol Records on January 20, 1958 in stereophonic & monaural versions and held the #1 spot on the Billboard charts for twelve weeks, remaining on the charts for a total of 245 weeks. The cast album was awarded "Best Original Cast Album" at the first Grammy Awards ceremony in 1958 and was inducted in 1998 as a Grammy Hall of Fame Award winner.[6] A cast recording or original cast recording is a recording of a musical that is intended to document the songs as they were performed in the show and experienced by the audience. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label owned by EMI and located in Hollywood, California. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Stereophonic means having two channels of audio. ... Label for 1. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... A cast recording or original cast recording is a recording of a musical that is intended to document the songs as they were performed in the show and experienced by the audience. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...

After eight previews, the first Broadway revival, directed and choreographed by Michael Kidd, opened on June 5, 1980, at the New York City Center, where it ran for 21 performances. The cast included Dick Van Dyke as Hill, Meg Bussert as Marian, and Christian Slater as Winthrop. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 370 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (388 × 628 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Music Man 1980 Playbill This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 370 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (388 × 628 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Music Man 1980 Playbill This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who... Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... The cover of the Playbill issue about The Producers. ... Michael Kidd (born Milton Greenwald 12 August 1919) is an Jewish-American film and stage choreographer. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... New York City Center Logo New York City Center is a 2,750-seat performing arts venue located on West 55th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in Manhattan, New York City. ... Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... Meg Bussert (born October 21, 1949) is an American actress and singer and a university professor. ... Christian Slater(born August 18, 1969) is an American actor. ...


After twenty-two previews, the second Broadway revival, directed and choreographed by Susan Stroman, opened on April 27, 2000 at the Neil Simon Theatre, where it ran for 699 performances. The cast included Craig Bierko (making his Broadway debut) as Hill and Rebecca Luker as Marian. Robert Sean Leonard and Eric McCormack portrayed Hill later in the run. Susan Stroman (born October 17, 1954 in Wilmington, Delaware) is a Broadway director, choreographer, and performer. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Neil Simon Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 250 West 52nd Street in midtown-Manhattan. ... Craig Bierko (born August 18, 1964 in Rye Brook, New York, USA) is an American actor most famous for his role as Max Baer in the film Cinderella Man. ... Rebecca Luker is an American musical theatre actress and soprano who has appeared in several prominent Broadway productions. ... Robert Sean Leonard (born Robert Lawrence Leonard on February 28, 1969, in Ridgewood, New Jersey) is a Tony Award-winning American actor who is most noted for his role as aspiring actor Neil Perry in the 1989 film Dead Poets Society. ... Eric McCormack (born on April 18, 1963 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian actor of Scottish and Cherokee Canadian descent. ...


The success of the 2000 revival prompted a 2003 television movie starring Matthew Broderick as Hill and Kristin Chenoweth as Marian, with Victor Garber, Debra Monk, and Molly Shannon in supporting roles. Contemporary rethinking of the legendary Broadway musical and 1962 film, updated to reflect a few early twenty-first-century sensibilities. ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is a Tony Award-winning American film and stage actor who is best known for his roles as the title character in Ferris Buellers Day Off and the adult Simba in Disneys The Lion King. ... Kristi Dawn Chenoweth (born July 24, 1968) is an American singer and Tony Award-winning American musical theatre, film, and television actress. ... Victor Joseph Garber (born on March 16, 1949 in London, Ontario, Canada) is a six-time Emmy Award-nominated Canadian film, stage and television actor and singer. ... Debra Monk (born February 27, 1949) is an actress and author. ... Molly Helen Shannon (born September 16, 1964) is an Emmy-nominated American actress and writer. ...


Willson recorded his trials and tribulations in getting the show to Broadway in his book But He Doesn't Know The Territory.


Synopsis

Act One

On a train leaving Rock Island, Illinois, Charlie Cowell and other travelling salesmen in the car begin a heated argument about credit ("Rock Island"). Charlie and another salesman tell the others about a con man known as "Professor" Harold Hill, whose scam is to convince parents he can teach their musically disinclined children to play musical instruments. He takes pre-paid orders for instruments and uniforms with the promise that he will form a band, and then he skips town and moves on to the next one before he's exposed. The train arrives in River City, Iowa, and a stranger on the train stands up and declares, "Gentlemen, you've intrigued me. I think I'll have to give Iowa a try." He picks up his suitcase, clearly labelled Professor Harold Hill, and exits the train. Rock Island may refer to: Rock Island, a census-designated place in Broward County, Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Scam and Confidence Man redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The townspeople of River City describe their reserved, "chip-on-the-shoulder attitude" ("Iowa Stubborn"). Marcellus, Harold's old friend, tells him that Marian, the librarian who gives piano lessons, is the only one in town who knows about music. The local billiard parlor just got a new pool table, and as part of his scheme, Harold convinces River City parents "that game with the fifteen numbered balls is the devil's tool" ("Trouble"). Harold follows Marian home and flirts with her, but she rejects his advances. At home, Marian gives a piano lesson to a little girl named Amaryllis while arguing with her mother, Mrs. Paroo, about the stranger who followed her home and her "standards where men are concerned" ("Piano Lesson/If You Don't Mind My Saying So"). Marian's self-conscious, lisping younger brother Winthrop arrives home, and Amaryllis, who secretly likes him, asks Marian who she should say goodnight to on the evening star since she doesn't have a sweetheart. Marian tells her to just say "Goodnight My Someone." Iowa Stubborn is the title of a song by Meredith Willson from his 1957 musical play The Music Man. ... For the programming language, see Lisp (programming language). ...


The next day is the Fourth of July, and Mayor Shinn is leading the morning festivities in the high school gym, with the help of his wife, Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn ("Columbia, Gem of the Ocean"). Harold Hill interrupts the proceedings with a brilliant solution to the pool table problem: A boys' band! He leads the excited townspeople in "Seventy-Six Trombones". Mayor Shinn, who owns the billiard parlor, tells the feuding school board to get Harold's credentials, but Harold teaches them to sing as a Barbershop Quartet instead ("Ice Cream/Sincere"). Harold also sets up Zaneeta, the mayor's oldest girl, with Tommy Djilas, a boy from the wrong side of town, and persuades Tommy to become his assistant. Marian rejects Harold again, and he explains to Marcellus that "The Sadder But Wiser Girl" is the one he wants. The town ladies are very excited about the band and the ladies' dance committee Harold plans to form. He asks them about Marian, and they tell him she had an affair with old miser Madison, who gave the town the library; they also warn Harold that she advocates dirty books ("Pick-a-Little, Talk-a-Little"). The school board arrives to collect Harold's credentials, but he leads them in singing "Goodnight, Ladies" and slips away. These fireworks over the Washington Monument are typical of Fourth of July celebrations In the United States, Independence Day, also called the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. ... Seventy-Six Trombones is the signature song from the 1957 musical play The Music Man, written by Meredith Willson. ... Barbershop harmony is a style of unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ...


The next day, Harold walks into the library, but Marian ignores him. He sings "Marian the Librarian," leading the teenagers in the library in dance. For a moment, Marian forgets her decorum and dances with Harold. He kisses her, and she tries to slap him. He ducks, and she hits Tommy Djilas instead. Harold signs up all the boys in town to be in his band, including Winthrop ("Gary, Indiana"). Mrs. Paroo likes Harold and tries to find out why Marian is not interested. Marian describes her ideal man ("My White Knight"). Marian tries to give Mayor Shinn evidence against Harold that she found in the Indiana State Educational Journal, but he and the rest of the townspeople are too excited about "The Wells Fargo Wagon," which is bringing the band instruments, to listen. When Marian sees how happy Winthrop is with his new cornet, she begins to fall in love with Harold. She tears the incriminating page out of the Journal before giving the book to Mayor Shinn.


Act Two

The ladies rehearse their classical dance in the school gym while the school board practices their quartet ("It's You") for the ice cream social. Marcellus and the teenagers enter the gym and take over, dancing the "Shipoopi". Harold grabs Marian to dance with her, and all the teenagers join in. Marian tells Harold she has some questions about Winthrop's cornet. He says he doesn't need to learn notes. Professor Hill says this is his new Think System, and he arranges to call on Marian to discuss it. The town ladies ask Marian to join their dance committee, since she was so dear dancing with Professor Hill ("Pick-a-Little, Talk-a-Little" (reprise)). As for the supposedly dirty books, they eagerly tell Marian, "The Professor told us to read those books, and we simply adored them all!" “Shipoopi” is a song in the 1957 musical The Music Man. ...


That night, the school board tries to collect Harold's credentials again, but he gets them to begin singing "Lida Rose" and slips away. Marian, meanwhile, is sitting on her front porch thinking of Harold, and, in counterpoint, asks herself, "Will I Ever Tell You?". Winthrop returns home after spending time with Harold and tells Marian and Mrs. Paroo about Harold's hometown, "Gary, Indiana". As Marian waits alone for Harold, Charlie Cowell enters with evidence against Harold, hoping to tell Mayor Shinn. He has to leave on the next train, but stops to flirt with Marian. She tries to delay him so he doesn't have time to deliver the evidence, eventually kissing him. As the train whistle blows, she pushes him away. Charlie angrily tells Marian that Harold has a girl in "every county in Illinois, and he's taken it from every one of them – and that's 102 counties!" Gary redirects here. ...


Harold arrives, and after he reminds her of the untrue rumors he's heard about her, she convinces herself that Charlie invented everything he told her. They agree to meet at the footbridge, where Marian tells him the difference he's made in her life ("Till There Was You"). Marcellus interrupts and tells Harold that the uniforms have arrived. He urges Harold to take the money and run, but Harold refuses to leave, insisting, "I've come up through the ranks... and I'm not resigning without my commission". He returns to Marian, who tells him that she knows he's a fraud, but she still loves him. He said he was a graduate of Gary Conservatory, Gold-Medal Class of '05, but the town wasn't even built until '06! Harold walks her home, and she sings "Goodnight my Someone" while he sings "Seventy-Six Trombones". Harold realizes that he is in love with Marian, and each sings the other's song. Till There Was You is a song written by Meredith Willson for his 1957 musical play The Music Man, and which also appeared in the 1962 movie version. ...


Meanwhile, Charlie Cowell, who has missed his train, arrives at the ice cream social and denounces Harold Hill as a fraud. The townspeople begin an agitated search for Harold. Winthrop is heartbroken and tells Harold that he wishes Harold never came to River City. But Marian tells Winthrop that she believes everything Harold ever said, for it did come true in the way every kid in town talked and acted that summer. She and Winthrop urge Harold to get away. He chooses to stay and sings to Marian ("Till There Was You" (reprise)) as the townspeople handcuff and lead him away. Mayor Shinn is leading a meeting in the high school gym to decide what to do with Harold, asking, "Where's the band? Where's the band?" Tommy enters as a drum major, followed by the kids in uniform with their instruments. Marian urges Harold to lead the band, and when he does, he is rewarded with unanticipated redemption: uncritical parents marvel and cheer as the River City Boys' Band performs the Minuet in G. Harold is released into Marian's arms, and everyone lives happily ever after.


Songs and music

Act I
  • "Rock Island" - Salesmen, Charlie, Harold
  • "Iowa Stubborn" - Townspeople of River City, Farmer, Farmer's Wife
  • "Trouble" (a.k.a. "Ya Got Trouble", "Trouble in River City") - Harold, Townspeople
  • "Piano Lesson" - Marian, Mrs. Paroo, Amaryllis
  • "Goodnight, My Someone" - Marian
  • "Seventy-six Trombones" - Harold, Boys and Girls
  • "Sincere" - Quartet (Olin Britt, Oliver Hix, Ewart Dunlop, Jacey Squires)
  • "The Sadder-But-Wiser Girl" - Harold, Marcellus
  • "Pick a Little, Talk a Little" - Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn and the Ladies
  • "Goodnight Ladies" - Quartet
  • "Marian The Librarian" - Harold
  • "My White Knight" - Marian
  • "The Wells Fargo Wagon" - Winthrop, Townspeople
Act II
  • "It's You" - Quartet, Eulalie and Ladies
  • "Shipoopi" - Marcellus Washburn, Harold, Marian, Tommy Djilas, Zaneeta Shinn and Kids
  • "Pick a Little, Talk a Little" (Reprise)- Eulalie, Ladies
  • "Lida Rose" - Quartet
  • "Will I Ever Tell You?" - Marian
  • "Gary, Indiana" - Winthrop, Marian, Mrs. Paroo
  • "Lida Rose" (Reprise)- Quartet
  • "Till There Was You" - Marian, Harold
  • "Seventy-six Trombones" / "Goodnight, My Someone" (Reprise)- Marian, Harold
  • "Till There Was You" (Reprise)- Harold
  • "Finale" - Company

"Lida Rose" and "Will I Ever Tell You," sung first separately and then simultaneously, are among the rare examples of Broadway counterpoint–songs with separate lyrics and separate melodies that harmonize and are designed to be sung together. Similarly, "Goodnight, My Someone" is the same tune, in waltz time, as the march-tempo "Seventy-six Trombones." Willson's counterpoint, along with two counterpoint song pairs from Irving Berlin musicals, are lampooned in the 1959 musical Little Mary Sunshine. It combines three counterpoint songs: "Playing Croquet," "Swinging," and "How Do You Do?" Rock Island is a city in Rock Island County, Illinois, United States. ... Iowa Stubborn is the title of a song by Meredith Willson from his 1957 musical play The Music Man. ... Seventy-Six Trombones is the signature song from the 1957 musical play The Music Man, written by Meredith Willson. ... “Shipoopi” is a song in the 1957 musical The Music Man. ... Till There Was You is a song written by Meredith Willson for his 1957 musical play The Music Man, and which also appeared in the 1962 movie version. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was a Russian-born naturalized American composer and lyricist, and one of the most prolific American songwriters in history. ... Little Mary Sunshine is an American musical in emulation of older operetta, with book, music, and lyrics by Rick Besoyan. ...


The first recording of "Till There Was You" to be released came before the original cast album version. Promotional copies of the 45 rpm single, Capitol P3847, were released on November 26th, 1957, even before the Broadway production had premiered. Produced by Nelson Riddle, it featured his orchestra and 17-year-old vocalist Sue Raney. Till There Was You is a song written by Meredith Willson for his 1957 musical play The Music Man, and which also appeared in the 1962 movie version. ... Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. ... Sue Raney (born June 18, 1940) is an American jazz singer. ...


Characters

Main characters
  • Prof. Harold Hill — a con man, pretending to be a traveling salesman; falls for Marian
  • Marian Paroo — a librarian and the town's piano teacher; falls for Harold Hill
  • Winthrop Paroo — Marian's lisping younger brother who hasn't talked since the death of his father
  • Mrs. Paroo — Marian's Irish mother
  • Mayor George Shinn — a blustery politician
  • Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn — the mayor's wife and the head of the "Woman's Auxiliary Club"
  • The Barbershop Quartet — four bickering school board members (Olin Britt, Oliver Hix, Ewart Dunlop and Jacey Squires)
  • Pickalittle Ladies — Eulalie's four gossipy friends, Alma Hix, Mrs. Squires, Ethel Toffelmier and Maud Dunlop
  • Marcellus Washburn — Harold's friend, no longer a con-man, dating his boss's niece, Ethel Toffelmier
Secondary characters
  • Amaryllis — Marian's young piano student
  • Tommy Djilas — a young man "from the wrong side of town" who is pushed towards Zaneeta by Prof. Harold Hill
  • Zaneeta and Gracie Shinn — the mayor's eldest and youngest daughters
  • Charlie Cowell — a rival salesman who tries to expose Prof. Harold Hill as a con man
  • Constable Locke — the man that attempts to punish Tommy Djilas for what he does to Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn

Setting

The play's fictional setting, "River City, Iowa", is based partly on Willson's own birthplace, Mason City, Iowa. The "river" in River City is probably the Mississippi, near Davenport, Iowa: the Rock Island conductor's announcing "River City, Ioway! Cigarettes illegal in this state" implies crossing the Mississippi from Rock Island, Illinois, into Iowa at Davenport. Alternate history Campaign setting Fantasy world Fictional battlegrounds Fictional buildings Fictional city Fictional company Fictional counties Fictional country Fictional schools List of fictional Cambridge colleges List of fictional Oxford colleges Fictional universe List of fictional universes Future history Imaginary country Imaginary state Imaginary union Multiverse Mythical place Parallel universe Phantom... Mason City is a city in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Motto: Working together to serve you Location in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country State County Scott County Incorporated 1839 Government  - Mayor Ed Winborn Area  - City  64. ... Rock Island is a city in Rock Island County, Illinois, United States. ...


The character of Mayor Shinn indicates that the year is 1912, but the song "Trouble" contains both a reference to Captain Billy's Whiz-Bang, a monthly humor magazine that didn't begin publication until October 1919, and the nonalcoholic "near-beer" Bevo, which was first produced in 1916. Near beer was originally a term for malt beverages with little or no alcohol (one half of one percent or less) mass-marketed during Prohibition in the United States. ... Bevo was a non-alcoholic malt beverage, or near beer, brewed in the United States by Anheuser-Busch. ...


Awards and nominations

2000 revival cast recording
2000 revival cast recording
1958 Tony Award nominations
1958 Theatre World Award
1959 Tony Award nominations
  • Tony Award for Best Stage Technician – Sammy Knapp (WINNER)
1981 Theatre World Award
  • Theatre World Award – Meg Bussert (WINNER)
2000 Tony Award nominations
2000 Theatre World Award
  • Theatre World Award – Craig Bierko (WINNER)
2000 Drama Desk Award nominations
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Revival of a Musical – Produced by Dodger Theatricals (Des McAnuff, Michael David, Rocco Landesman, Doug Johnson, Robin De Levita, Ed Strong, Sherman Warner), The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Elizabeth Williams, Anita Waxman, Kardana-Swinsky Productions, Lorie Cowen Levy, Dede Harris
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Musical – Craig Bierko
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actress in a Musical – Rebecca Luker
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Choreography – Susan Stroman
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Director of a Musical – Susan Stroman
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Orchestrations – Doug Besterman
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design of a Musical – Thomas Lynch
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design – William Ivey Long

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who is voted the best non-starring actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who is voted the best non-starring actor in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Conductor and Musical Director [1] // In the following list, the winner is displayed first; the non-winning nominees, where known, are second. ... The Tony award for Choreography has been awarded since 1947. ... The Theatre World Award is an American honor given annually to an actor or an actress in recognition of an outstanding breakout performance in their New York City stage debut. ... The Tony Award for Best Revival (Musical) has been awarded since 1994. ... The Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Scenic Design is the Tony Award given to a designer for outstanding set design of either a play or musical. ... ... The Tony award for Choreography has been awarded since 1947. ... The Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical has been given since 1960. ... The Tony Award for Best Orchestrations has been given since 1997. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ...

In Popular culture

The Music Man's popularity has led its being mentioned, quoted, parodied or pastiched in a number of media, including television, films and popular music.

Television

The Music Man's has been parodied in a number of TV shows, including The Simpsons episode "Marge vs. the Monorail" written by Conan O'Brien. At some point during the second Broadway revival, O'Brien was approached about playing the role of Harold Hill for a brief run, but he ultimately could not fit it into his schedule. He says, on the DVD commentary track for the aforementioned Simpsons episode, that it was the hardest choice he's ever had to make professionally, because The Music Man is one of his favorites. O'Brien did, however, as host of the 58th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, sing a parody version of "Trouble" in his opening monologue targeting NBC and their slide in the ratings. Simpsons redirects here. ... Marge vs. ... Conan Christopher OBrien (born April 18, 1963)[1] is an Emmy Award-winning American television host and TV writer, best known as host of NBCs Late Night with Conan OBrien. ...


In Episode 22 of Boston Legal titled "Men to Boys", the character of Alan Shore sings a parody of the song "Trouble" to convince patrons of a restaurant to not eat the trout. In an episode of The Nanny, Fran goes to her high school reunion, where one of her friends' dates sings "Seventy-six Trombones". Several Music Man songs were used in Ally McBeal.[citation needed] In the Angel episode "Destiny" in season 5, the character Eve says "we've got trouble with a capital T, that rhymes with P, that stands for prophecy." Boston Legal is an American dramedy television series that began airing on ABC on October 3rd, 2004. ... The Nanny was a 1965 British suspense film starring Bette Davis as a psychotic governess suspected of killing one of her charges. ... For the character, see Ally McBeal (character). ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... For other uses, see Destiny (disambiguation). ...

Film

In the 1960 movie, The Apartment, the main character, C.C. Baxter, asks Fran Kubelik on a date to the original Broadway production of The Music Man. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Apartment is a 1960 romantic comedy-drama directed by Billy Wilder, and starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, and Fred MacMurray. ...


In the movie "The Wedding Singer" Robbie teaches Rosie to sing "'Til There Was You" for her 50th wedding anniversary.

Popular music

The song "Till There Was You" was covered by the Beatles in 1963 on their second album With the Beatles. It is the only showtune the Beatles covered, and one of the songs they performed on the Ed Sullivan Show. The alternative rock band The Shins is named after the Shinn family in The Music Man. James Russell Mercer chose the name for the band because his father loved The Music Man.[citation needed] Till There Was You is a song written by Meredith Willson for his 1957 musical play The Music Man, and which also appeared in the 1962 movie version. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948, to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by Ed Sullivan. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... The Shins is a United States indie rock group comprising singer, songwriter and guitarist James Russell Mercer, keyboardist/guitarist/bassist Martin Crandall, bassist/guitarist Dave Hernandez, drummer Jesse Sandoval, and Eric Johnson of the Fruit Bats. ... James Russell Mercer is lead singer of The Shins. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Original 1962 Movie Soundtrack CD booklet
  2. ^ Bloom, Ken and Vlastnik, Frank. Broadway Musicals: The 101 Greatest Shows of all Time, pp. 215-16. Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, New York, 2004. ISBN 1-57912-390-2
  3. ^ "A Pair of Marians". American Libraries, the journal of the American Library Association, March 2005 issue, p. 12
  4. ^ SPEBSQSA is now known as The Barbershop Harmony Society.
  5. ^ Filichia, Peter. Let's Put on a Musical! p. 52. VNU Business Media, Inc, 1993. ISBN 0-8230-8817-0
  6. ^ Official Grammy Awards site (The Grammy Foundation), accessed March 9, 2008

American Libraries is the official publication of the American Library Association. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... The Barbershop Harmony Society, also known as the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA), was the first of several organizations to promote and preserve Barbershop music as an art form. ...

External links


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The Music Man is a musical play with book, music, and lyrics by Meredith Willson (story by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey), which opened on Broadway at the Majestic Theatre on December 19, 1957.
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The Music Man is spoofed in The Simpsons episode "Marge vs. the Monorail" written by Conan O'Brien.
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