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Encyclopedia > The Mountains of Mourne

The lyrics to the song The Mountains of Mourne were written in 1896 by the 19th Century Irish musician Percy French. It is normally sung to the the same tune used by Thomas Moore (1779-1852) for his song Bendemeer's Stream. 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Percy French (May 1, 1854–January 24, 1920) was one of Irelands foremost songwriters and entertainers in his day. ... For the Australian co-founder of Moore Theological College, see Thomas Moore (Australia). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The song is representative of French's many works concerning the Irish_diaspora in both its subject matter and its maudlin and somewhat priggish tone, especially when compared with his many comic songs. The Irish diaspora consists of Irish emigrants and their descendants in countries such as the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Quebec and Australia. ...


The Mountains_of_Mourne of the title are located in County Down in present-day Northern Ireland. The granite Mountains of Mourne are located in the first proposed national park of Northern Ireland. ... County Down, (An Dún in Irish) is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland, covering an area of 2,448 km² (945 square miles). ... Northern Ireland is one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ...


Lyrics

 'The Mountains of Mourne' by Percy French (1896) 
 Oh, Mary, this London's a wonderful sight, With people all working by day and by night. Sure they don't sow potatoes, nor barley, nor wheat, But there's gangs of them digging for gold in the street. At least when I asked them that's what I was told, So I just took a hand at this digging for gold, But for all that I found there I might as well be Where the Mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea. 
 I believe that when writing a wish you expressed As to know how the fine ladies in London were dressed, Well if you'll believe me, when asked to a ball, They don't wear no top to their dresses at all, Oh I've seen them meself and you could not in truth, Say that if they were bound for a ball or a bath. Don't be starting such fashions, now, Mary McCree, Where the Mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea. 
 You remember young Peter O'Loughlin, of course, Well, now he is here at the head of the force. I met him today, I was crossing the Strand, And he stopped the whole street with a wave of his hand. And there we stood talkin' of days that are gone, While the whole population of London looked on. But for all these great powers he's wishful like me, To be back where the dark Mourne sweeps down to the sea. 
 There's beautiful girls here, oh never you mind, With beautiful shapes nature never designed, And lovely complexions all roses and cream, But let me remark with regard to the same: That if that those roses you venture to sip, The colors might all come away on your lip, So I'll wait for the wild rose that's waiting for me In the place where the dark Mourne sweeps down to the sea. 


Music (MIDI) (http://12121.hostinguk.com/mourne.mid)


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mountains of Mourne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (387 words)
Located in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland, the granite Mountains of Mourne (or Mourne Mountains; or Na Beanna Boirche in Irish) are among the best known of the mountains on the island of Ireland.
The Mourne Mountains are partly owned by the National Trust and see a large number of visitors every year; their highest mountain is Slieve Donard at 850 m (2707 ft).
It is a 35 km (22 mile) dry-stone wall that crosses 15 summits, constructed to define the boundaries of the 36 kmĀ² (9000 acre) area of land purchased by the Belfast Water Commissioners in the late 1800s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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