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Encyclopedia > The Miracles
The Miracles
The most familiar incarnation of The Miracles. From left to right: Smokey Robinson, Claudette Rogers Robinson, Ronald White, Pete Moore, and Bobby Rogers.
The most familiar incarnation of The Miracles. From left to right: Smokey Robinson, Claudette Rogers Robinson, Ronald White, Pete Moore, and Bobby Rogers.
Background information
Also known as The Matadors, Smokey Robinson & the Miracles
Origin Detroit, Michigan, USA
Genre(s) R&B/soul
Years active 19551983; 1993—present
Label(s) End, Tamla/Motown, Columbia
Members
Bobby Rogers
Claudette Rogers (Robinson)
Dave Finley
Tee Turner
Mark Scott
Former members
Smokey Robinson
Ronnie White
Pete Moore
Marv Tarplin
Clarence Dawson
James Grice
Emerson Rogers
Billy Griffin
Sidney Justin
Donald Griffin

The Miracles (known from 1965 to 1972 as Smokey Robinson & the Miracles) is an American rhythm and blues group from Detroit, Michigan, notable as the first successful group act for Berry Gordy's Motown Records. The Miracles went on to become one of Motown's signature acts of the 1960s, during which time their original lead singer and founding member Smokey Robinson became one of the most successful songwriters and record producers of all time. Image File history File links Smokey-miracles-page-display. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... Claudette Marie Rogers Robinson (born in September 1942) is an African-American soul singer, a member of The Miracles from 1957 to 1972. ... Ronald Ronnie White (April 5, 1939 - August 26, 1995) was an African American soul singer and songwriter, notable as a founding member of The Miracles, and the only member to survive all of that groups lineup changes. ... Warren Pete Moore (born November 19, 1935 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as the bass singer for Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Robert Bobby Rogers (born February 19, 1940 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as a member of Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Detroit redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... End Records was acquired by Morris Levy and incorporated into Roulette Records. ... Motown Records, Inc. ... Robert Bobby Rogers (born February 19, 1940 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as a member of Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Claudette Marie Rogers Robinson (born in September 1942) is an African-American soul singer, a member of The Miracles from 1957 to 1972. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... Ronald Ronnie White (April 5, 1939 - August 26, 1995) was an African American soul singer and songwriter, notable as a founding member of The Miracles, and the only member to survive all of that groups lineup changes. ... Warren Pete Moore (born November 19, 1935 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as the bass singer for Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Marv Tarplin (born Marvin Tarplin in Detroit, Michigan) is a guitarist and songwriter, mostly associated with providing the guitar riffs for the popular Motown group The Miracles during the 1960s. ... Billy Griffin was only in his early 20s when he was chosen to replace Smokey Robinson as the lead singer of The Miracles in 1973. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... R&B redirects here. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Berry Gordy, Jr. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ...


During their nineteen year run on the American music charts, The Miracles charted over fifty hits and recorded in the genres of doo wop, soul, disco, and R&B. Twenty-six Miracles songs reached the Top Ten of the Billboard R&B singles chart, including four R&B number ones. Sixteen of the Miracles' songs charted within the Top 20 of the Billboard Hot 100, with seven songs charting within the Top Ten and two - 1970's "The Tears of a Clown" and 1975's "Love Machine" (Part 1) - reaching number-one. For the Lauryn Hill single, see Doo Wop (That Thing). ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music genre. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ... Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, formerly known by various names including Hot Soul Singles, Hot Black Singles, and Hot R&B Singles (before the hip-hop term was added in the late 1990s), is a chart released weekly by Billboard in the United States. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... The Tears of a Clown is a 1967 song by Smokey Robinson & the Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label, originally released on the 1967 album Make It Happen. ... Love Machine has been the name of at least two unrelated hit songs: It was a #3 hit for The Miracles in January 1976. ...


In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked Smokey Robinson & the Miracles [1] #32 on their list of The Immortals: 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[2]. This article is about the music magazine. ...

Contents

History

Early years

The Miracles began with two young Detroit students, William Robinson and Ronald White, who had become friends and started singing together while in the fifth grade. Robinson, nicknamed "Smokey" because of his love of cowboy movies, started a doo-wop group called The Five Chimes in 1955 at Northern High School with himself, White, bass singer Pete Moore, Clarence Dawson, and James Grice. Within a half a year, Dawson and Grice had been replaced by cousins Emerson and Bobby Rogers, and the group's name had been changed to The Matadors. Rogers and Robinson were actually born on the same day - February 19, 1940 - in the same Detroit hospital, although they did not meet until they were fifteen years old. William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... Ronald Ronnie White (April 5, 1939 - August 26, 1995) was an African American soul singer and songwriter, notable as a founding member of The Miracles, and the only member to survive all of that groups lineup changes. ... For other uses, see Cowboy (disambiguation). ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... A basso (or bass) is a male singer who sings in the lowest vocal range of the human voice. ... Warren Pete Moore (born November 19, 1935 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as the bass singer for Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Robert Bobby Rogers (born February 19, 1940 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as a member of Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Emerson Rogers was drafted in 1956. He was replaced by his sister Claudette Rogers, who married Smokey Robinson in November 1959. In 1958, the group added guitarist Marv Tarplin, who had originally been the accompanist for The Primettes (later known as The Supremes). Conscription in the United States has been employed several times, usually during war but also during the nominal peace of the Cold War. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Claudette Marie Rogers Robinson (born in September 1942) is an African-American soul singer, a member of The Miracles from 1956 to 1972. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... Marv Tarplin (born Marvin Tarplin in Detroit, Michigan) is a guitarist and songwriter, mostly associated with providing the guitar riffs for the popular Motown group The Miracles during the 1960s. ... For other uses, see Supremes (disambiguation). ...


In 1958, the Matadors auditioned for the manager of Detroit soul star Jackie Wilson, who turned the group down because he felt their sound and four-man-one-woman lineup were too similar to The Platters, a popular vocal group. On their way out the door, the group ran into one of Wilson's chief songwriters, Berry Gordy, Jr. Gordy took a liking to the group, and eventually became the group's manager. In addition, Gordy worked closely with Robinson, the Matadors' chief songwriter, helping him to improve his songcraft. Jan. ... For the British author, see Jacqueline Wilson. ... The Platters were a successful vocal group of the early rock and roll era. ... Berry Gordy, Jr. ...


Gordy and his colleague Billy Davis had written a song called "Got a Job" as an answer song to "Get A Job", a recent hit by The Silhouettes. The Matadors recorded the single, and Gordy arranged a record deal for them with End Records. At this time, they changed their name to The Miracles, as "Matadors" had a masculine sound to it, and the group now included a woman. Gordy became the group's main outside collaborator, and he and Robinson wrote another Miracles single, "Bad Girl". Issued on Chess Records, "Bad Girl" became the group's first charting single, peaking at #93. Roquel Billy Davis, or Billy Davis, (July 11, 1932 - September 2, 2004) was producer of the song Id like to teach the world to sing, from the 1971 Coca-Cola TV advertisement. ... This is an incomplete list. ... The Silhouettes The Silhouettes were an American doo wop/R&B group, best known for their single Get A Job, which was a #1 hit on the Billboard magazine R&B singles chart and pop singles chart in 1958. ... End Records was acquired by Morris Levy and incorporated into Roulette Records. ... The Chess Records logo, as featured on this Memphis Slim single. ...


Frustrated by low financial returns due to the group's practice of selling their masters to various labels, Robinson suggested Gordy start his own record label. Thus, in 1959, Gordy founded Tamla Records (later Motown), and signed The Miracles as one of his first acts. By 1961, Robinson would be appointed vice-president of the corporation. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motown Records, Inc. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Miracles in the early 1960s. Clockwise from top left: Bobby Rogers, Marv Tarplin, Ronald White, Claudette Rogers, and Smokey Robinson. At the time of this photograph, Miracles member Pete Moore (not pictured) was serving in the US Army after being drafted.
The Miracles in the early 1960s. Clockwise from top left: Bobby Rogers, Marv Tarplin, Ronald White, Claudette Rogers, and Smokey Robinson. At the time of this photograph, Miracles member Pete Moore (not pictured) was serving in the US Army after being drafted.

ImageMetadata File history File links Themiracles-early60s. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Themiracles-early60s. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...

Success at Motown: 1960 - 1967

After three unsuccessful singles, The Miracles' fourth Tamla single, "Shop Around" backed with "Who's Lovin' You" (1960), became their first Motown hit. "Shop Around" was the first Motown song to reach #1 on the national R&B charts, and the first to sell over a million copies. Both sides of this record became standards for R&B and rock musicians for several decades afterwards. In the wake of this success, the Miracles became the first Motown act to perform on Dick Clark's American Bandstand in February 1961. "Shop Around" was followed by many more hits, including "You Really Got a Hold on Me" (Top 10) (1962),"What's So Good About Goodbye" (1962), "Mickey's Monkey" (Top 10) (1963), "Going to a Go-Go" (1965), "My Girl Has Gone" (1965), "The Tracks Of My Tears" (1965), and their signature song, "Ooo Baby Baby" (1965). Shop Around is a 1960 single by The Miracles (credited as The Miracles featuring Bill Smokey Robinson) for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... Whos Lovin You is a Motown soul song, written in 1960 by William Smokey Robinson. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ... Dick Clark, host of American Bandstand American Bandstand was a long-running dance music television show that aired in various versions from 1952 to 1989. ... Youve Really Got a Hold on Me is a 1963 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Miracles Doin Mickeys Monkey is a 1963 album by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Going to a Go-Go is a song recorded by Smokey Robinson and The Miracles in 1965 and included on the album of the same name. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The Tracks of My Tears is a 1965 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... Ooo Baby Baby is a 1965 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label, today considered the groups signature song. ...


During this period, The Miracles were the most popular group on the label. The Miracles' success paved the way for all future Motown stars, and the group was the headlining act of the Motor Town Revue, a nationwide package concert touring show which showcased Motown artists. The group also influenced a significant number of outside performers as well, particularly The Beatles, who covered The Miracles' "You Really Got a Hold on Me" on their second album, With the Beatles. John Lennon of the Beatles acknowledged Smokey Robinson as one of his favorite writers, and named the Miracles' "I've Been Good To You" as one of his favorite songs. George Harrison also greatly admired Robinson and paid tribute to him in his 1976 song 'Pure Smokey'. The Motortown Revue was the name given to the package tours of Motown artists in the 1960s. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Youve Really Got a Hold on Me is a 1963 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ...


Behind the scenes, Robinson handled most of the songwriting and production for not only the Miracles, but for most of the acts on Motown during this early period. During the first half of the 1960s, Robinson tutored labelmates The Supremes and The Temptations. Indeed, by the time each group had its breakthrough hit in 1964, the Miracles had already issued a double-LP greatest hits album, Greatest Hits from the Beginning. The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... “Temptations” redirects here. ... For a list of albums known simply as Greatest Hits, see List of albums titled Greatest Hits. ... Greatest Hits from the Beginning is a compilation double LP by The Miracles released in 1965. ...


In addition to penning their own material, Miracles Robinson, White, Rogers, Tarplin, and Moore wrote for many of their labelmates as well. Motown hits written, but not recorded, by members of the Miracles include songs for the Temptations ("The Way You Do The Things You Do", "My Girl", "Since I Lost My Baby", "Get Ready"), Mary Wells ("My Guy", "The One Who Really Loves You", "Two Lovers"), Marvin Gaye ("I'll Be Doggone", "Ain't That Peculiar"), The Marvelettes ("Don't Mess With Bill"), The Contours ("First I Look At The Purse), and Brenda Holloway ("When I'm Gone"). The Way You Do the Things You Do is a 1964 hit single by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label. ... This article is about the 1964 Temptations song. ... Since I Lost My Baby is a 1965 hit single recorded by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label. ... For other uses, see Get Ready (disambiguation). ... My Guy is a 1964 #1 hit single recorded by Mary Wells for the Motown label. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... Ill Be Doggone was a 1965 hit song for American soul music legend Marvin Gaye. ... Aint That Peculiar was a 1965 hit single for American soul music legend Marvin Gaye. ... The Marvelettes was an American singing girl group on the Motown label. ... The Contours were one of the early soul singing groups signed to Motown Records. ... Brenda Holloway (born June 21, 1946 in Atascadero, California) is an African-American singer and songwriter best known for her period as a recording artist for the Motown label during the 1960s. ...


Despite their success, the Miracles were beset with a number of personal problems during the early and mid-1960s. During the first Motor Town Revue tour, Smokey Robinson caught the Asian flu, requiring Claudette Robinson to take over his role as lead singer until he recovered. In addition, Pete Moore was drafted into the US Army, and remained away from the group for over a year. Smokey and Claudette Robinson made plans to begin a family, but the rough life of touring caused Claudette to have several miscarriages. In early 1964, Claudette decided to retire from the road and remain at home in Detroit. From this point on, Claudette did not tour with the Miracles or appear in any official group photographs or on television, although she continued to sing backup with the group in the studio until 1972. The Motortown Revue was the name given to the package tours of Motown artists in the 1960s. ... The Avian Flu was a pandemic outbreak of influenza that originated in China in 1957 and spread worldwide that same year. ... Miscarriage or spontaneous abortion is the natural or spontaneous end of a pregnancy at a stage where the embryo or the fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined in humans at a gestation of prior to 20 weeks. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Smokey Robinson & the Miracles: 1965 - 1971

After Claudette Robinson's departure, the remaining Miracles appeared in The T.A.M.I. Show, a 1964 concert film which also featured The Supremes, Marvin Gaye, The Beach Boys, Chuck Berry , The Rolling Stones, and James Brown & the Famous Flames. The Miracles also appeared on many of the popular variety television programs of the period, including The Ed Sullivan Show, Shindig!, Hullabaloo, The Mike Douglas Show, and Britain's Ready Steady Go. Acknowledging Robinson's presence upfront, the Miracles changed their name to "Smokey Robinson & the Miracles" in 1965, although they were billed as simply "The Miracles" on their 45s until "The Love I Saw in You Was Just a Mirage", a Top 20 pop hit, in 1967. On that song's flip side was "Come Spy with Me"; The Miracles sang the original theme to the 1967 20th Century Fox film of the same name. Movie poster for The T.A.M.I. Show is a concert film recorded in 1964 and released theatrically in 1965. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... Shindig! was the name of a music variety show which was aired every week on the American ABC network from September 16, 1964 to January 8, 1966. ... Guest host Petula Clark introducing her new single, Round Every Corner, on the October 25, 1965 broadcast Hullabaloo was a musical variety series that ran on NBC from January 12, 1965 through August 29, 1966. ... The Mike Douglas Show was an American daytime television talk show hosted by Mike Douglas that ran from 1961 to 1982. ... Ready Steady Go or simply RSG was one of the UKs first rock / pop music TV programmes. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ...


After scoring a few more major hits such as "(Come 'Round Here) I'm The One You Need" (1966),the Top 10 "I Second That Emotion" (1967), and "More Love" (1967), The Miracles' career began to falter somewhat during the late 1960s. The group still continued to chart hits, including "If You Can Want" (1968), "Special Occasion" (1968), and the Top 10 "Baby, Baby Don't Cry" (1969). However, their position as the label's preeminent act had been long usurped by Diana Ross & the Supremes, their former protégés. Constantly away from home and his family, Smokey Robinson began planning to leave the group for a solo career, which would allow him time to remain at home more often and concentrate on his role as vice-president of Motown Records . Robinson told White, Moore, and Rogers of his intentions in 1969, but Robinson decided to stay for two more years when the group's 1970 single "The Tears of a Clown" became their biggest hit to date. I Second That Emotion is a 1967 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... More Love is a 1980 single from Kim Carness album Romance Dance. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tears of a Clown is a 1967 song by Smokey Robinson & the Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label, originally released on the 1967 album Make It Happen. ...


"The Tears of a Clown" had, in fact, been recorded in 1967 for the album Make It Happen, and became the group's first US number-one hit (and their only number-one hit with Smokey Robinson) , the first Motown record ever to reach number-one in the United Kingdom. Also in 1970, the group was given its own ABC television special, The Smokey Robinson Show, which guest-starred The Temptations and The Supremes. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Make It Happen is a 1967 album by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles. ...


Exit Smokey Robinson, enter Billy Griffin

After one more Top 20 hit in late 1971, "I Don't Blame You At All", Robinson announced that he would indeed leave the Miracles, and the group began a six-month farewell tour of the United States. Coinciding with this tour was the release of the group's final studio album with Robinson, Flying High Together (1972). The lead single, "We've Come Too Far To End It Now", became a Top 10 R&B hit. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...


Robinson's final performance as a Miracle was at the Carter Barron Amphitheater in Washington, DC on July 16, 1972. For this performance, Claudette Rogers Robinson rejoined the group onstage for the first time in eight years. At the conclusion of the concert, which Motown later released as a live album entitled "Smokey Robinson & The Miracles:1957-1972", Robinson introduced the group's new lead singer, Billy Griffin. Griffin was introduced to national television audiences on NBC'S The Midnight Special, on an episode guest-starring The Miracles and hosted by Smokey Robinson, broadcast on July 13, 1973. Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Billy Griffin was only in his early 20s when he was chosen to replace Smokey Robinson as the lead singer of The Miracles in 1973. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The Midnight Special was a musical television series that ran from 1972 until 1983. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


Griffin's arrival marked the departure of not only Smokey Robinson, but Claudette Robinson and Marv Tarplin as well. Tarplin continued to tour and work with Smokey Robinson, while his replacement, Griffin's brother Donald, became the Miracles' new guitarist. The Miracles continued, scoring two more Top 40 hits: 1973's #13 hit "Do It Baby", and 1976's #1 hit "Love Machine (Part 1)", the group’s biggest hit. The Miracles also scored a Top 10 R&B hit with "Don't Cha Love It". However, the group's other releases failed to match the success of "Love Machine", and The Miracles never managed to regain their former fame. In 1977, they left Motown for Columbia Records, where their releases failed to make an impact. For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Love Machine was a Billboard Magazine Hot 100 #1 single by The Miracles in the United States in 1976. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


Later years

In 1978, Billy Griffin and Pete Moore retired from performing to concentrate on songwriting. Griffin later went on to enjoy a briefly successful solo career in the 1980s, scoring a hit with "Hold Me Tighter in the Rain" in 1982. Ronnie White and Bobby Rogers recruited new member Dave Finley. After reuniting with Smokey Robinson on the Motown 25 television special in 1983, the Miracles essentially disbanded and ceased to perform. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever was a 1983 television special produced by Suzanne de Passe for Motown Records, to commemorate Motowns twenty-fifth year of existence. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ...


Motown held a 35th anniversary retrospective for the Miracles in 1993, and Ronnie White and Bobby Rogers decided to reunite the group. The two of them and Dave Finley recruited Sidney Justin (formerly of Shalamar) as the new fourth member, and began making personal appearances and touring. White, the last founding member remaining in the group, died of leukemia in 1995, and the other three members carried on as a trio for some time. In 1987, Smokey Robinson was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist. In a move that has since proved controversial, the other original Miracles - Bobby Rogers, Ronnie White, Pete Moore, Marv Tarplin, and Claudette Robinson - were not inducted. The Miracles as a unit were honored with the national Rhythm and Blues Foundation's Pioneer Award in 1997, and inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2001. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Hewett, Watley, and Daniel Shalamar was an American musical group of the 1970s and 1980s that was originally a disco-driven vehicle created by Soul Train booking agent Dick Griffey. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (Greek leukos λευκός, white; aima αίμα, blood) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The Rhythm and Blues Foundation is an independent American nonprofit organization dedicated to the historical and cultural preservation of rhythm and blues music. ... The Vocal Group Hall of Fame was organized to honor what they term the Greatest Vocal Groups in the World. The Hall of Fame is headquartered in Sharon, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


A video retrospective of the Miracles' work, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles: The Definitive Performances, was released on DVD by Motown Records and Universal Home Video in late 2006. It featured new interview footage with original Miracles Smokey Robinson, Pete Moore, and Bobby Rogers. In early 2007, "The Tracks of My Tears" became the fourth Miracles song to be inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. The other inducted songs are "Shop Around" (inducted 2006), "The Tears of a Clown" (inducted 2002), and "You've Really Got a Hold on Me" (inducted 1998). Three Miracles songs, "The Tracks Of My Tears", "Ooo Baby Baby", and "Shop Around" are in Rolling Stone magazine's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time", and their 1965 Going To A Go-Go album is on Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time". In addition, "Going to a Go-Go", "The Tracks of My Tears", and "You've Really Got a Hold on Me " are on The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's list of "The 500 Songs That Helped Shape Rock and Roll". Retrospective (from Latin retrospectare, look back) generally means to take a look back at events that already have taken place. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... The Grammy Hall of Fame Award is a special Grammy award established in 1973 to honor recordings that are at least twenty-five years old and that have qualitative or historical significance. Alphabetical listing by title: List of Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipients A-D List of Grammy Hall... This article is about the magazine. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ...


Today, the Miracles are comprised of classic-era members Bobby Rogers and Claudette Robinson, along with Dave Finley, Tee Turner, and new lead singer Mark Scott. The group continues to tour and perform, and, in 2001, The Miracles were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. Claudette Marie Rogers Robinson (born in September 1942) is an African-American soul singer, a member of The Miracles from 1957 to 1972. ... This article is about the year. ... The Vocal Group Hall of Fame was organized to honor what they term the Greatest Vocal Groups in the World. The Hall of Fame is headquartered in Sharon, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


Cover versions

The Miracles, Motown's first group, are also the most covered Motown group of all time. Almost all of their hits were self-written, making them unique among Motown acts. Many of the Miracles' songs have been major hits or important recordings for other artists. Among these are:

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Members

(*) Claudette Robinson retired from performing in 1964 to start a family. Although she does not appear in any official Miracles photographs, after this point, she continued to sing backup with the group on record for as long as her husband Smokey Robinson was a member. William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Ronnie White (April 5, 1939 - August 26, 1995) was an African American soul singer and songwriter, notable as a founding member of The Miracles, and the only member to survive all of that groups lineup changes. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Warren Pete Moore (born November 19, 1935 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as the bass singer for Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Bobby Rogers (born February 19, 1940 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as a member of Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Claudette Marie Rogers Robinson (born in September 1942) is an African-American soul singer, a member of The Miracles from 1957 to 1972. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marv Tarplin (born Marvin Tarplin in Detroit, Michigan) is a guitarist and songwriter, mostly associated with providing the guitar riffs for the popular Motown group The Miracles during the 1960s. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Billy Griffin was only in his early 20s when he was chosen to replace Smokey Robinson as the lead singer of The Miracles in 1973. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


Discography

For a detailed listing of albums and singles, see Miracles discography. The Miracles circa 1966. ...

The Miracles circa 1966. From left to right: Pete Moore,Bobby Rogers, Ronnie White, and Smokey Robinson
The Miracles circa 1966. From left to right: Pete Moore,Bobby Rogers, Ronnie White, and Smokey Robinson

Image File history File links Smokey-miracles-anthology. ... Image File history File links Smokey-miracles-anthology. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Warren Pete Moore (born November 19, 1935 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as the bass singer for Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Robert Bobby Rogers (born February 19, 1940 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American soul singer, notable as a member of Motown group The Miracles from 1956 on. ... Ronald Ronnie White (April 5, 1939 - August 26, 1995) was an African American soul singer and songwriter, notable as a founding member of The Miracles, and the only member to survive all of that groups lineup changes. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ...

Top Twenty US and UK singles

Shop Around is a 1960 single by The Miracles (credited as The Miracles featuring Bill Smokey Robinson) for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... Youve Really Got a Hold on Me is a 1962 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... The Miracles Doin Mickeys Monkey is a 1963 album by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... Ooo Baby Baby is a 1965 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label, today considered the groups signature song. ... The Tracks of My Tears is a 1965 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... Going to a Go-Go is a song recorded by Smokey Robinson and The Miracles in 1965 and included on the album of the same name. ... I Second That Emotion is a 1967 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label. ... The Tears of a Clown is a 1967 song by Smokey Robinson & the Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label, originally released on the 1967 album Make It Happen. ... Love Machine was a Billboard Magazine Hot 100 #1 single by The Miracles in the United States in 1976. ...

Top Forty albums

Greatest Hits from the Beginning is a compilation double LP by The Miracles released in 1965. ... Going to a Go-Go is an album by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles. ... Make It Happen is a 1967 album by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles. ... Greatest Hits, Vol. ... Time Out For Smokey Robinson & The Miracles is 1969 album by Motown group Smokey Robinson & The Miracles. ... City of Angels is the fourth album by the Motown soul group The Miracles, released on Motowns Tamla label in September of 1975. ...

References

  1. ^ Smokey Robinson and The Miracles. Bob Seger. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  2. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.

3.the Cleveland Plain Dealer Februrary 15th 1998 Miracles RRHOF Controversy http://www.fleetwoodmac.net/penguin/archive/dealer.htm 4. Future Rock Hall: The MIRACLES :[[1]] The MIRACLES' 50TH ANNIVERSARY [[2]] 5.Why aren't THE MIRACLES in THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME ? [[3]]


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Miracle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1017 words)
According to many religions, a miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning 'something wonderful', is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified.
Sometimes the term miracle may refer to the action of a supernatural being that is not a god.
All claims of miracles are premature until such time as complete knowledge of all natural laws is held by all making and examining the claim and the miracle is demonstrated to be not natural.
Miracle - definition of Miracle - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (1307 words)
Miracle is a term used by adherents of many religions for what they say is an intervention by God in the universe.
The description of most miracles in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and in the Christian New Testament are generally the same as the modern-day definition of the word: God intervenes in the laws of nature.
The idea of miracles that contravened the laws of nature were hard to accept; however, at the same time they affirmed the truth of the accounts in the Tanakh.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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