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Encyclopedia > The Matrix series

The Matrix series consists primarily of three films, The Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. The films are set in the same universe. The characters and settings of the series are further explored in other media, including animation, comics, and video games. Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... The Matrix is a science fiction/action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss and Hugo Weaving. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... It has been suggested that The City (The Matrix) be merged into this article or section. ... Animation is the technique of filming a sequence of drawings or positions of models to create an illusion of movement. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... This article is about computer and video games. ...


The series depicts a complex science fiction story incorporating many philosophical elements. Other influences include cyberpunk, mythology, Hong Kong action films (particularly "heroic bloodshed" and martial arts movies), computer science and philosophy of mind. Concepts of several religions are also explored, including Hinduism, Christianity, Gnosticism and Buddhism. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Berlins Sony Center in Potsdamer Platz reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... // The word mythology (Greek: μυθολογία, from μυθος mythos, a story or legend, and λογος logos, an account or speech) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use supernatural events or characters to explain the nature of the universe and humanity. ... Hong Kong action cinema is the principal source of the Hong Kong film industrys global fame. ... Heroic Bloodshed, or Hong Kong Blood Opera (HKBO), refers to a genre of action film originating from Hong Kong revolving around stylised action sequences and common themes such as brotherhood, honour, and violence. ... Martial arts film is a film genre that originated in the Pacific Rim. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... A Phrenological mapping of the brain. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian Subcontinent. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ...

Contents

The Matrix franchise

Animatrix
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Animatrix

The series began with 1999's The Matrix. The film, directed by the Wachowski brothers and produced by Joel Silver, was highly successful, earning $456 million worldwide and beating Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace for the Academy Award for Visual Effects. The movie's mainstream success led to the greenlighting of the next two films of the trilogy, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. It was a number of years and several iterations of scripts before the final movies were approved. The two sequels, which tell a continuous story rather than being stand-alone episodes, were filmed simultaneously and released six months apart. Animatrix DVD cover (fair use). ... Animatrix DVD cover (fair use). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Old Farts by the Sometimes-United Nations. ... The Matrix is a science fiction/action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss and Hugo Weaving. ... Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Jewish-American Hollywood film producer. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... To greenlight a project, in the context of the movie business, is to formally approve production finance, thereby allowing the project to move forward from the development phase to pre-production and, barring disasters, principal photography. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Stand-alone is a loaded word, used to refer to various categories of computer programs, but rarely in a consistent fashion. ...


In acknowledgement of the Japanese anime that was a strong influence on the Matrix series, The Animatrix was produced. This is a collection of nine animated short films intended to further flesh out the concepts, history, characters and setting of the series. The Animatrix project was overseen by the Wachowski brothers, but they wrote only four of the segments themselves and did not direct any of them. Much of the project was created by notable figures from the world of Japanese animation. Four of the films were originally released on the series' official website, one was shown in cinemas with Dreamcatcher, one was shown MTV and MTV2, and the others first appeared with the DVD release of all nine shorts shortly after the release of The Matrix Reloaded. The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) Anime ) (IPA pronunciation: in Japanese, but typically or in English) is an abbreviation of the word animation. Outside Japan, the term most popularly refers to animation... Animatrix The Animatrix is a major part of the Matrix series, a collection of nine animated short films set in that fictional universe. ... Animation is the technique of filming a sequence of drawings or positions of models to create an illusion of movement. ... Dreamcatcher (2003) is a movie adapted from the Stephen King novel of the same name. ...


In May 2003, at the same time as The Matrix Reloaded appeared in cinemas in the United States, Enter the Matrix was released. The first of three video games related to the films, it told a story running parallel to Reloaded and featured scenes shot during the filming of the movie, but specially for the game. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Enter the Matrix is the first video game based on the Matrix series. ...


November 5 2003 saw both the conclusion to the film trilogy and an unprecedented event: the simultaneous worldwide release of a major motion picture, when The Matrix Revolutions hit cinema screens worldwide at exactly the same time. November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


Two more Matrix video games were released in 2005. The MMORPG The Matrix Online continues the story beyond Revolutions, while The Matrix: Path of Neo allows players to control the series' protagonist Neo in scenes from the film trilogy. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Players interacting in Ultima Online. ... The Matrix Online (MxO) is a MMORPG developed by Monolith Productions. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In addition, several comics and short stories based on the series — some written by the Wachowskis, others by guest writers — have been released on the official website. Many of these have since been collected in two printed volumes. Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


Reception of sequels

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While the first movie was extremely successful, the quality of the sequels is still a matter of debate. Some fans and professional critics believe they exceed the quality and conceptual heights of the first film, while others found the later films disappointing. [2] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...


Upon release, The Matrix Reloaded received mixed reviews. Some said that "The Matrix Reloaded is first class high-voltage entertainment with stunt sequences that are absolutely breathtaking and will have you sitting on the edge of your seat" [3] whereas others claimed that it had been "hyped beyond the point where it [could] possibly deliver". [1] Fans responded that it was not possible to fully appreciate it without experiencing the entire series, including The Matrix Revolutions, The Animatrix and the video game Enter the Matrix. This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Animatrix The Animatrix is a major part of the Matrix series, a collection of nine animated short films set in that fictional universe. ... Enter the Matrix is the first video game based on the Matrix series. ...


Several sequences in Reloaded were sources of controversy whereby some either loved or hated these scenes with generally little middle-ground. On the negative side, a so-called "rave scene" in the human city of Zion was particularly vilified by some,[4] as were the various conversations between characters on the subjects of causality, purpose and the humans' dependence on machines; some felt these concepts were not as well-integrated into the screenplay as those of the original film, with entire scenes devoted to such discussions[5]. A rave (sometimes referred to as a rave party) is an all-night dance event where DJs and other performers play electronic dance music and rave music. ... The philosophical concept of causality, the principles of causes, or causation, the working of causes, refers to the set of all particular causal or cause-and-effect relations. ...


When The Matrix Revolutions was finally released, a common complaint was that it did not give satisfying answers to the questions raised in Reloaded [6][7], and instead raised new ones.


Influences and interpretations

Literature

The story makes numerous historical and literary references, including Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Judeo-Christian imagery about Messianism, Buddhism, Gnosticism and the novels of William Gibson, especially Neuromancer. Gibson popularized the concept of a world-wide computer network with a virtual reality interface, which was named "the matrix" in his Sprawl Trilogy. However, the concept and name apparently originated even earlier in the 1976 serial The Deadly Assassin on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which featured a virtual reality known as the Matrix. The first writer about a virtual reality, populated with unsuspecting victims, was Daniel F. Galouye with Simulacron Three in 1964. John Tenniels illustration for A Mad Tea-Party, 1865 Illustration by Arthur Rackham Facsimile page from Alices Adventures Under Ground Alices Adventures in Wonderland is a work of childrens literature by the British mathematician and author, Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, written under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. ... Judeo-Christian (or Judaeo-Christian) is a term used to describe the body of concepts and values which are thought to be held in common by Judaism and Christianity, and typically considered (along with classical Greco-Roman civilization) a fundamental basis for Western legal codes and moral values. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Messiah. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948, Conway, South Carolina) is an American-born science fiction author resident in Canada since 1968. ... Neuromancer (ISBN 0006480411), by William Gibson, is the most famous early cyberpunk novel and won the so-called science-fiction triple crown (the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and the Hugo Award) after being published in 1984. ... A computer network is a system for communication between computers. ... Virtual reality (VR) is a technology which allows a user to interact with a computer-simulated environment, be it a real or imagined one. ... The Sprawl-trilogy, of which Neuromancer is the first part. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The Deadly Assassin is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 30 to November 20, 1976. ... A broadcast of the long-running and popular British science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC about a mysterious time-travelling adventurer known as The Doctor, who explores time and space with his companions, fighting evil. ... The Matrix, in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, is a massive computer system on the planet Gallifrey that acts as the repository of the combined knowledge of the Time Lords. ... Daniel F. Galouye (1920-1976) was an American science fiction writer. ... The science fiction novel Simulacron-3 was first published in 1964 by Daniel F. Galouye in the United States. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


The concept of artificial intelligence overthrowing or enslaving mankind had previously been touched on by hundreds of science fiction stories. Many have commented that The Matrix was inspired by the work of Philip K. Dick, not only dealing with issues of Gnosticism and prophetic visions but also the war against the machines in a post-apocalyptic world. The idea of a world controlled by machines and all of humanity living underground goes back to the 1909 short story The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster. // Hondas intelligent humanoid robot AI redirects here. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. ... Prophecy, in a broad sense, is the prediction of future events. ... The end of civilization or the end of the world are phrases used in reference to human extinction scenarios, doomsday events, and related hazards which occur on a global scale. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Machine Stops is a short science fiction story by E. M. Forster. ... E. M. Forster aged 36 in 1915 Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970) was an English novelist, short story writer, and essayist. ...


The plot of The Matrix bears some resemblance to the basic plot of Gibson's Neuromancer. This is not necessarily surprising, since both The Matrix and Neuromancer are roughly in the same cyberpunk sub-genre of science fiction (a sub-genre which Neuromancer did much to establish and on which it has had a pervasive influence). In both stories a computer hacker is recruited to perform a particularly difficult task. Some of the relevant conventions related to the genre include the tough-guy hacker/cracker hero, his optional female sidekick, and the more-or-less malevolent artificial intelligences. Berlins Sony Center in Potsdamer Platz reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Hackers are sometimes portrayed as mysterious and strange. ... From the Greek , in mythology and folklore, a hero (male) or heroine (female). ... Don Quixote and Sancho Panza unsuccessfully confront windmills. ...


Several illustrative differences between the two works also exist. For example, Gibson's human Turing Police are tasked to limit the growth of artificial intelligences. The Agents of The Matrix, by contrast, are AIs who curtail human development. Gibson shows humans working alongside the AI Wintermute; their eventual triumph is presented as a victory for the "good guys". Again in contrast, the human-AI collaboration in The Matrix—Cypher defecting to the agents—appears to undermine all that good and right stand for. From this standpoint, some narrative elements of The Matrix can be seen as inversions of those in Neuromancer.


One other connection between the two is the use of a location called Zion. In Neuromancer, Zion is an orbital colony founded by Rastafarians, where the main characters dock before traveling to Freeside, the giant orbital station where the final act of the novel takes place. In The Matrix, Zion is the underground home of the free humans (never seen on-screen in the first movie, but featured prominently in the two sequels). It is possible that this is only a coincidence, and that Zion is used as a generalized metaphor for a mythical city which could be considered to be the last hope for humanity. However, given the obvious influences of Neuromancer on The Matrix, and the appearance of many Rastamen in Zion, it is likely that the name Zion is used both as a metaphor (including its meaning to the Rastafari movement) and as a gesture of homage to Gibson. The Dormition Church, situated on the modern Mount Zion Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia Rasta, or the Rastafari movement, is a religion and philosophy that accepts Haile Selassie I, the former (and last) emperor of Ethiopia, as Jah (the Rasta name for God incarnate, from a shortened form of Jehovah found in Psalms 68:4 in the King... In the The Matrix films, Zion was the last human city, which existed deep underground to hide itself from its enemies as well as for warmth. ... Haile Selassie I Rasta, or the Rastafari movement of Jah people, is a religious movement that reveres Haile Selassie I, the former emperor of Ethiopia, as King of Kings, Lord of Lords and the Lion of Judah. ... In language, a metaphor (from the Greek: metapherin) is a rhetorical trope defined as a direct comparison between two or more seemingly unrelated subjects. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ...


In addition, Neuromancer has undoubtedly contributed to the technology seen in The Matrix. In The Matrix, various skills can be loaded into humans jacked into the matrix. This is strikingly similar in concept to the Microsofts used in Neuromancer which also granted a variety of skills to the user. Also, accessing the matrix in both Neuromancer and The Matrix involves the use of a neural interface (a cyberspace deck in Neuromancer and the metal plugs in The Matrix). Furthermore, in The Matrix, the ability for a human's senses to be stimulated while jacked into the matrix resembles how Simstim functions in Neuromancer.


Some resemblances also exist to Frank Herbert's seminal novel, Dune, the concept of a war between humans and machines with religious overtones (Herbert's Butlerian Jihad). Frank Herbert (1920 - 1986) Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... The Butlerian Jihad is an epic turning point in the back-story of Frank Herberts fictional Dune universe. ...


Other similarities can be seen in Matrix Revolutions. Neo is blinded by a murder attempt and after that, Neo can still see, but in a "different way", reminding, again, Paul Muad'Dib in Dune Messiah. Just after that, Neo sees what can be called a "golden path", as is called the path, choice, Muad'Dib from Dune decided not to take, although in Matrix Revolutions, Neo takes this path.


Also, Neo decides to sacrifice himself giving himself to the machines in order to save mankind, much alike to Paul Muad'Dib abandoning everyone to go to the desert in the Dune Messiah in order that his empire doesn't cause more deaths throughout the universe. The Matrix is only one of several pieces of fiction that have been influenced by this book. As one of the best-known and best-selling science fiction novels of all time, Dune has inspired many works both inside and outside science fiction genre. ...


The Invisibles

The film also shares many similarities with the first volume of Grant Morrison's counter-culture comic book The Invisibles, of which the Wachowski brothers have professed a familiarity (Morrison has gone so far as to claim that the Wachowskis have plagiarised the book).[8]. These similarities are as follows: Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960, Glasgow) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition or swimming against the tide. ... Cover to The Invisibles (v2) #1. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

  • Like Neo, the principal character in the early issues of The Invisibles (Dane MacGowan) is a young rebel who regularly breaks the law. They are both wanted by two opposing sides of an ancient conflict for their innate abilities (Dane's psychic; Neo has skills within the Matrix) and because they are predestined to be important in the war.
  • Like Neo, Dane's initiation involves taking a drug to commit himself to the "true" reality, then leaping from the top of a tall building.
  • One of the recurring elements in The Invisibles is the magic mirror, a strange, seemingly living substance similar to liquid metal, that can act as a doorway to reality. A similar magic mirror is touched by Neo in The Matrix. Like the mirror in The Matrix, the magic mirror can run all over the body of whoever touches it, seemingly consuming them but actually allowing them passage to other planes of reality/false reality.
  • In The Invisibles, the "evil" side controls the false reality that humanity is trapped in, and takes the form of figures of authority, including agents wearing black sunglasses and suits.
  • Meanwhile, the rebels - the only ones who are aware of what reality really is - are a rag-tag bunch of oddballs wearing highly stylised clothing who are forced to act as terrorists, striking back with their own reality-warping powers to free humankind. They also take up codenames after joining the rebellion. Both sides are similar to those in The Matrix.
  • The leader of the rebel cell (King Mob) that locates Dane is a bald man wearing round spectacles - similar to Morpheus in The Matrix.
  • The climactic arc of volume 1 of The Invisibles sees King Mob kidnapped and tortured by the enemy in order to make him give up the aliases and locations of the Invisible army. As a result, the other Invisibles in his cell - including Dane - must break in and free him.

Grant Morrison comments on the similarities in the interview linked to above, saying: "The truth of that one is that design staff on The Matrix were given Invisibles collections and told to make the movie look like my books. This is a reported fact. The Wachowskis are comic book creators and fans and were fans of my work, so it's hardly surprising. I was even contacted before the first Matrix movie was released and asked if I would contribute a story to the website. King Mob as drawn by Duncan Fegredo. ...


"It's not some baffling 'coincidence' that so much of The Matrix is plot by plot, detail by detail, image by image, lifted from Invisibles so there shouldn't be much controversy. The Wachowskis nicked The Invisibles and everyone in the know is well aware of this fact but of course they're unlikely to come out and say it."


Cinematic

The Matrix reused some of the film sets from Dark City, a movie filmed shortly before that was similar in plot and style but was not yet released long enough to have influenced the movies as The Matrix had already entered post-production by the time Dark City was released theatrically. The Matrix incorporates many other cinematic influences, ranging from explicit homage to stylistic nuances, some of which have been acknowledged by the Wachowski brothers.[citation needed] Dark City is a 1998 movie written and directed by Alex Proyas. ...


Its action scenes use a physics-defying style drawn directly from martial arts films, integrating Hong Kong-style wire work and kung fu (under the guidance of Yuen Wo Ping). The hyper-active gun fights recall the work of directors such as John Woo and Ringo Lam, while the shot composition during the build-up to Neo's climactic duel with Agent Smith is reminiscent of clichés of Western films (featuring close-ups of hips and complete with modern-day tumbleweed). Martial arts film is a film genre that originated in the Pacific Rim. ... Wire fu is an action film genre in which the actors use wire-work to perform amazing stunts of qing gong. ... Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ... Yuen Woo-ping is a martial arts choreographer and director. ... John Woo (Chinese: 吳宇森; Hanyu Pinyin: Wú YÇ”sÄ“n) (born 1 May 1946, in Guangzhou, China) is a Chinese film director and producer known especially for his Heroic bloodshed movies, which often include balletic violence. // Biography At age five Woos parents were faced with persecution and his Lutheran family... Ringo Lam (林嶺東; pinyin: Lin Lingdong; Cantonese: Lam Leng-tung) (born 1955) is a film director known for stylish action thrillers. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Western is an American genre in literature and film. ... Close Up is a half hour long New Zealand current affairs program produced by Television New Zealand. ... This article is about the plant. ...


In the film Total Recall (based on the short story We Can Remember It for You Wholesale by Philip K. Dick) Arnold Schwarzenegger's character is offered a red pill to return to reality, in precisely the same way that Neo is, while the action scenes of Strange Days take place in virtual reality. The premise of characters being trapped in a computer-generated world has also been used in the Red Dwarf novel Better Than Life, among others. The Matrix also uses a common science fiction setting in which a dystopian Earth has formed through a struggle between humanity and machinery or AI, in which a small human "resistance" must fight to save humanity. Total Recall is an American science fiction film released on June 1, 1990 starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Ronald Shusett, Dan OBannon, Jon Povill and Gary Goldman. ... We Can Remember It for You Wholesale is a short story by Philip K. Dick first published in Fantasy and Science Fiction in April 1966. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born on July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-born bodybuilder, actor and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... Strange Days is the title of a 1995 science fiction film directed by Kathryn Bigelow and produced and co-written by her ex-husband James Cameron. ... Red Dwarf is a British science fiction sitcom that ran for eight series, from 1988 to 1999. ... Better Than Life is a major concept in the Red Dwarf canon. ... A dystopia (or alternatively cacotopia) is a fictional society, usually portrayed as existing in a future time, when the conditions of life are extremely bad due to deprivation, oppression, or terror. ...


In a less known fashion, The Matrix also draws heavily on inspiration from David Cronenberg's 1981 sci-fi movie Scanners. The concept of psychic fights is crucial in both movies ; and the hero in Scanners is actually able to talk to computers, using phone booths very much like in The Matrix . Most importantly, the black and green Matrix source code that has become the movie's trademark are literally the same as those in the end credits for Scanners. It is also worth noting that Agent Smith looks eerily like Michael Ironside, and that in both movies, psychic fights between good and evil end with exhanges of bodies but not of the minds. Scanners is a 1981 Canadian sci-fi horror movie written and directed by David Cronenberg. ... Scanners is a 1981 Canadian sci-fi horror movie written and directed by David Cronenberg. ... A screensaver named XMatrix in XScreenSaver representing the digital rain The Matrix source code, Digital Rain or sometimes Green Rain is a fictional code first seen in the popular film The Matrix (1999) on the computer screens of Nebuchadnezzar. ... Scanners is a 1981 Canadian sci-fi horror movie written and directed by David Cronenberg. ... Michael Ironside (born Fred Ironside February 12, 1950 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian character actor. ...


The Wachowski brothers have cited Japanese animation as a strong source of inspiration; producer Joel Silver has stated that before making the first film, the Wachowskis showed him Ghost in the Shell[2] and then stated "We wanna do that for real".[3] The title sequence, the scene late in the movie where a character hides behind a column while pieces of it are blown apart by bullets, and a chase scene in a fruit market where bullets hit and burst watermelons, are practically identical to shots in Ghost in the Shell. There is a website that contains screenshots of similar scenes from both movies. Also, the movie borrows the idea of Ghost hacking, which was featured in the Ghost in the Shell movie. Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Jewish-American Hollywood film producer. ... Motoko Kusanagi from the manga Ghost in the Shell. ... Binomial name Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. ... This article is about the film adaptation. ... Motoko Kusanagi from the movie Ghost in the Shell (1995) Ghost in the Shell is a Japanese science fiction manga created by Masamune Shirow. ...


Mitsuhisa Ishikawa of Production I.G., which produced Ghost in the Shell, has commented, "I think [the visuals] inspired the Wachowski brothers a lot. That's probably because cyberpunk films are very difficult to describe to a third person. I'd imagine that The Matrix is the kind of film that was very difficult to draw up a written proposal for to take to film studios. That's one of the reasons why they used the video of Ghost in the Shell, because our film had already gained a certain recognition in America at that time. They used it as a promotional tool because the visual quality was very high."[4] Production IG was founded on December 15, 1987, by Mitsuhisa Ishikawa. ...


A scene near the end of the movie, in which Neo's breathing seems to buckle the fabric of reality in the corridor around him, as well as the "psychic children" scene in the Oracle's waiting room are evocative of similar scenes from the 1980s anime classic Akira. Parapsychology is the study of certain types of paranormal phenomena (parapsychology comes from the Greek para, “beside, beyond,” + psychology, derived from the Greek psyche, “soul, mind,” + logos “rational discussion”). The term was coined by Max Dessoir (1889). ... Make up your own damn mind. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Rioting mobs set the tone of urban chaos. ...


The extremely fast martial arts seen in the fighting scenes, particularly in the massive "Burly Brawl" between Neo and the Agent Smith clones in The Matrix Reloaded are very similar to the martial arts style depicted in the Japanese anime Dragon Ball Z. Dragon Ball Z is the long-running sequel to the anime Dragon Ball released in Japan and Hong Kong. ...


The general concept of a computer world that exists in connection to the real world is similar to the movie Tron as well as the anime series Serial Experiments Lain. Tron has several meanings: a movie, see Tron (film) an arcade game based on the movie, see Tron (arcade game) a German hacker whose nickname was Tron, see Tron (hacker) a real-time operating system kernel, see TRON Project. ... Serial Experiments Lain is an anime series by Ryutaro Nakamura and a PlayStation game of the same name. ...


The franchise's close relationship with animé continued with The Animatrix. Animatrix The Animatrix is a major part of the Matrix series, a collection of nine animated short films set in that fictional universe. ...


Clothing

Trinity's style has been influential ever since, but also believed to be based originally on Molly Millions.[citation needed]
Trinity's style has been influential ever since, but also believed to be based originally on Molly Millions.[citation needed]

Trench coats and sunglasses play a significant role in the Matrix cinematic feel and have largely inspired a similar subculture. This style seems to be generally influenced by the descriptions of characters in 1980s cyberpunk fiction (in which mirrorshaded lenses were an especially prominent icon), and more particularly by the iconic wardrobe of Chow Yun-Fat in John Woo's classic film A Better Tomorrow. Furthermore, it can be noted that in the first matrix film, Smith's sunglasses were rectangular, and Neo's were round. In the second film, Agent Smiths were a sort of round shape with more angles, suggesting a strong connection between character and sunglass shape. Viewers know whether a character or situation is being played out within the Matrix if central characters are wearing their characteristically dark clothing, complete with sunglasses of little use in the sunless realm of the real world. Sunglasses are worn whether it is day or night within the Matrix, adding to the sense of detachment from reality, the dark cyber atmosphere, and also the artificial, industrial environment that the characters live in. Symbolically, this may reflect the degree of vulnerability of the characters; many characters (Morpheus, Agent Smith) lose (or even break) their sunglasses during major battles, or discard them: a symbolic disposal of the tough, emotionless image. Download high resolution version (1022x1078, 176 KB)Trinity, the central female character of The Matrix movie trilogy, played by actress Carrie-Anne Moss. ... Download high resolution version (1022x1078, 176 KB)Trinity, the central female character of The Matrix movie trilogy, played by actress Carrie-Anne Moss. ... Trinity is the main female fictional character in The Matrix universe, played by actress Carrie-Anne Moss in the films The Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions and in the film segments of The Matrix: Path of Neo. ... Molly Millions (a. ... World War I example A trench coat is an enduringly popular item of clothing worn round the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chow Yun-Fat (Chinese: ; pinyin: Zhōu Rùnfā) (born May 18, 1955 on Lamma Island, Hong Kong) is a Hong Kong actor. ... John Woo (Chinese: 吳宇森; Hanyu Pinyin: Wú Yǔsēn) (born 1 May 1946, in Guangzhou, China) is a Chinese film director and producer known especially for his Heroic bloodshed movies, which often include balletic violence. // Biography At age five Woos parents were faced with persecution and his Lutheran family... From riches. ...


Not all characters within the Matrix wear glasses, but as a general rule, the rebels wear sunglasses with rounded lenses, and adversaries such as Agents wear 'evil-looking' glasses with corners or angles. Notably, Cypher, the rebel who betrays Morpheus to the Agents, wears rectangular sunglasses, thus signifying his role as a "bad guy". Agent Smith's sunglasses change after his transformation in The Matrix Reloaded from the square Agent-style into lenses shaped similarly to the protein capsule of certain viruses. It is also notable that Agent Smith's sunglasses and Neo's look strikingly similar except for the jagged versus curved designs. The sunglasses used in this movie were custom-made on the set, although replicas are widely available. See the article about Agent Smith for the stylistic genealogy of the Agents. This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Groups I: dsDNA viruses II: ssDNA viruses III: dsRNA viruses IV: (+)ssRNA viruses V: (-)ssRNA viruses VI: ssRNA-RT viruses VII: dsDNA-RT viruses A virus (Latin, poison) is a microscopic particle that can infect the cells of a biological organism. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...

Dreadlocks are a frequent view in Zion
Dreadlocks are a frequent view in Zion

Generally, secondary characters seem to follow the alternative fashion of the 1990s, particularly the Indie and Rasta subcultures. It should be noted that the Rasta look seems to be very common of the humans in Zion, if we consider the concept of Zion to be part of the Rastafari movement. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Rastaman with long dreadlocks. ... In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... Rasta hairstyle Rastafarianism is a religious movement that believes in the divinity of former emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia. ... The Dormition Church, situated on the modern Mount Zion Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... Haile Selassie Ras Tafari was the title used by Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia during his time as tenure Regent and Crown Prince (1916-1928). ...


However, the practical reasoning behind the use of sunglasses in the filming on the movie is that the natural reaction of a person is to blink when the eye views the muzzle flash from a firearm. Sunglasses were used in the film so the audience does not see the actors blinking during gunfight scenes. The glasses also provided limited eye protection from the flying debris of the first movie's "Government Lobby" shootout.[citation needed]


Ethnicity

As seen in all three of the movies, the cast is multiethnic. Nonetheless, there is a particular angle to this which is interesting to explore with regard to the humans of the city of Zion. Most of the free-born people (as opposed to those who have been freed from The Matrix) here tend to be mixed-race. This aspect is rather accurate in depicting demographically what a small secluded population would be like. Racial diversity would progressively die out with inter-racial couples forming constantly. Another interesting example of this was portrayed by director Simon Wells in the 2002 remake of the movie The Time Machine, where the Eloi, the last surviving humans in a post-apocalyptic world, are all of a non-specific mixed-race. Simon Wells is the great-great grandson of H.G. Wells. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Time Machine is a novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1895, later made into two films of the same title. ...


Philosophy

Elements of philosophy, theology and ontology are heavily present in The Matrix. Students of Gnosticism will notice many of its themes touched upon. There are also many references to Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Christianity, with concepts of enlightenment, nirvana and rebirth. Further references to Buddhism and Hinduism include the free will versus fate debate, the use of the Hindu mantras in the movie's soundtrack, perception, the concept of Maya, Karma and various ideas about the nature of existence. In many ways The Matrix is about a kind of reality enforcement, hyperreality or, some might say, an awareness that the physical world is an illusion. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason) means reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God. ... In philosophy, ontology (from the Greek , genitive : of being (part. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian Subcontinent. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... Taoism (sometimes written as Daoism) is the English name for: (a) a philosophical school based on the texts the Tao Te Ching (ascribed to Laozi and alternately spelled Dào Dé Jīng) and the Zhuangzi. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... . It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Spiritual enlightenment. ... [ (Devanagari , Pali: Nibbāna निब्बान -- Chinese: 涅槃; Pinyin: niè pán), literally extinction and/or extinguishing (ie, of the passions) is a mode of being that is free from mind-contaminants (Kilesa) such as lust, anger or craving. ... According to Hinduism, every living being is an eternally existing spirit (the soul or the self). ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian Subcontinent. ... Free will is the philosophical doctrine that holds that our choices are ultimately up to ourselves. ... Destiny refers to a predetermined course of events. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ... The word, Perception, comes from the latin word, capere, meaning to take, the prefix per- means completely. In psychology and the cognitive sciences, perception is the process of acquiring, interpreting, selecting, and organizing sensory information. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Maya (illusion). ... Karma(Sanskrit: from the root , to do, [meaning deed] meaning action, effect, destiny) means (the result of) action, generally taken as a term that comprises the entire cycle of cause and effect. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... The term Consensus reality has two usages: either in reference to the overall space-time reality thats believed to exist irrespective of anyones perceptions, if you adhere to the materialist philosophy, or as the predominent agreed-upon version of reality if you dont. ... In semiotics and postmodern philosophy, Hyperrealism (not to be confused with surrealism) is a term to describe a symptom of an evolved, postmodern culture. ...


There have been several books and websites written about the philosophy of The Matrix. One of the major debates arising from the film is the philosophical question, is our world reality or is it merely an illusion which is billions of years old? Similar questions have also been raised in other science fiction films such as eXistenZ and The Thirteenth Floor (both of which were released the same year as The Matrix, receiving relatively less attention in box office sales and ratings), Total Recall, The Truman Show and Abre los ojos (remade as Vanilla Sky). This theory had also been developed by the philosopher Nick Bostrom, Are you living in a computer simulation? This page as shown in the AOL 9. ... Reality in everyday usage means everything that exists. The term reality, in its widest sense, includes everything that is, whether it is observable, accessible or understandable by science, philosophy, or any other system of analysis. ... An illusion is a distortion of a sensory perception. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... eXistenZ is a 1999 film by Canadian director David Cronenberg. ... Movie Poster The Thirteenth Floor is a 1999 film released to cinemas in Germany and the United States (as The 13th Floor). ... The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Total Recall is an American science fiction film released on June 1, 1990, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Ronald Shusett, Dan OBannon, Jon Povill and Gary Goldman. ... The Truman Show is a 1998 movie directed by Peter Weir, written by New Zealander Andrew Niccol, and starring Jim Carrey. ... Open Your Eyes redirects here. ... Vanilla Sky is a 2001 film which has been variously characterized by published film critics as an odd mixture of science fiction, romance, and reality warp [2], part Beautiful People fantasy, part New Age investigation of the Great Beyond[3] a love story, a struggle for the soul, or an... Nick Bostrom (Boström in the original Swedish) is a philosopher at the University of Oxford, and known for his work on the anthropic principle. ...


The Matrix follows all phases of the Campbellian monomyth arc with near-literal precision, including even minor details like the circular journey, the crucial battle happening underground, and even the three-headed immortal enemy (the three agents). Joseph Campbell For other articles with similar names, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


The character of the Oracle is strongly similar to that of the Oracle of ancient Greek legend. In particular, her warning to Neo that he is faced with a choice between saving his own life, or Morpheus' is very reminiscent of the warning that the Oracle gave to King Leonidas when setting out for the Battle of Thermopylae. In the Greek legend, she warns Leonidas that either his city will be left in ruins, or that a Spartan king must die, thus Leonidas is left with the choice of his own life or the survival of his city. It could be further argued that had Neo chosen to save his own life, Smith would have gained the access codes he needed from Morpheus and the city of Zion would have fallen. Thus, ultimately, Neo's choice was the same as that of Leonidas: his own life, or the fate of a city. Make up your own damn mind. ... An oracle is a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Greek mythology is the body of myths and stories developed by the ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... Leonidas at Thermopylae, by Jacques-Louis David (1814) Leonidas (Greek: Λεωνίδας) was a king of Sparta, the 17th of the Agiad line. ... Combatants Greek-city states Persia Commanders Leonidas I of Sparta † Xerxes I of Persia Strength 300 Spartans 700 Thespians 6,000 other Greek allies 2 200,000–1,700,0001 Casualties 300 Spartans and 700 Thespians; no more than 1,500 Greeks in total 20,000 (Modern estimates) 50,000...


The ideas behind The Matrix have been explored in old philosophical texts on epistemology, such as Plato's allegory of the cave and Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy. In a well-known Solipsistic thought experiment, the subject is a brain in a vat of liquid; in the Matrix, Neo is a body in a vat. The idea of a choice whether or not to take the red pill and accept reality also resembles a famous thought experiment posed in the 1970s by American philosopher Robert Nozick. Epistemology or theory of knowledge is the branch of philosophy that studies the nature and scope of knowledge. ... Illustration of Platos cave Platos allegory of the cave is perhaps the best-known of his many metaphors, allegories, and myths. ... René Descartes René Descartes (IPA: , March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Cartesius, worked as a philosopher and mathematician. ... Meditations on First Philosophy (subtitled In which the existence of God and the real distinction of mind and body, are demonstrated) is a philosophical treatise written by René Descartes first published in Latin in 1641. ... The word solipsism (Latin: solus, alone + ipse, self) is used for two related yet distinct concepts: An epistemological position that ones own perceptions are the only things that can be known with certainty. ... In philosophy, physics, and other fields, a thought experiment (from the German Gedankenexperiment) is an attempt to solve a problem using the power of human imagination. ... Subject (philosophy) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In philosophy, the brain-in-a-vat is any of a variety of thought experiments intended to draw out certain features of our ideas of knowledge, reality, truth, mind, and meaning. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ...


Postmodern thought plays a tangible role in the movie. In an opening scene, Neo hides an illegal minidisk in a false copy of Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation, a work that describes modern life as a hyperreal experience of simulation based upon simulation. Interpretations of The Matrix often reference Baudrillard's philosophy to demonstrate that the movie is an allegory for contemporary experience in a heavily commercialized, media-driven society, especially of the developed countries. Nevertheless, Jean Baudrillard himself rejected the assimilation of his work with the Matrix series and refused to work with the Wachowskis[9]. Postmodernity (also called post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is a term used by philosophers, social scientists, art critics and social critics to refer to aspects of contemporary art, culture, economics and social conditions that are the result of the unique features of late 20th century and early 21st century... // Overview The MiniDisc logo A MiniDisc (MD) is a disc-based data storage device intended for storage of digitized audio. ... Jean Baudrillard (born July 29, 1929) is a cultural theorist, philosopher, political commentator, sociologist, and photographer. ... Simulacra and Simulation (Simulacres et Simulation in French), published in 1981, is a philosophical treatise by Jean Baudrillard. ... In semiotics and postmodern philosophy, Hyperrealism (not to be confused with surrealism) is a term to describe a symptom of an evolved, postmodern culture. ... Wooden mechanical horse simulator during WWI. A simulation is an imitation of some real thing, state of affairs, or process. ... An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative mode of representation conveying a meaning other than (and in addition to) the literal. ...


The famous quote by Morpheus "pulled over our eyes to blind us from the truth" is a direct copy of Charles Peirce statement[10]. Charles Sanders Peirce (pronounced purse), (September 10, 1839 – April 19, 1914) was an American polymath, born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


Marxism

Some academics have argued that the Matrix series is consistent with a Marxist analysis of society. Professor Martin Danahay and then PhD candidate David Rieder co-wrote a chapter of the book The Matrix and Philosophy, edited by William Irwin, in which they argue that the movie gives a visual image of Marx’s ideas, particularly in the scene where Morpheus tells new recruit Neo that the computers have reduced him to nothing more than a battery. Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... Marxism refers to the philosophy and social theory based on Karl Marxs work on one hand, and to the political practice based on Marxist theory on the other hand (namely, parts of the First International during Marxs time, communist parties and later states). ...


Being slaves to the machine, "[h]umans in The Matrix must produce electricity to run the machines that enslave them, just as workers in Marx’s analysis must produce surplus value through their work," Danahay explained. "Also, the rebels in the movie liberate Morpheus from an office, and they rescue Neo from his white-collar job. The rebels are trying to get workers to wake up and realize they are being exploited, which is one of Marx’s aims, too." [5]. Surplus value, according to Marxism, is unpaid labour that is extracted from the worker by the capitalist, and serves as the basis for capitalist accumulation. ... White-collar workers perform tasks which are less physically laborious yet often more highly paid than blue-collar workers, who do manual work. ...


Danahy and Rider also argue that rebellion against the machines' domination is an analogy for the modern-day workplace with the evil agents dressed like corporate executives, and Neo escaping from his cubicle to escape them. When he ambushes the evil agents later in the movie, they are in an office high-rise complete with impersonal decor. (Source: Arlington Star-Telegram, June 10, 2003).


Similarly, the Maoist International Movement has adopted the Matrix as one of its favourite films asserting that they "could not have asked for more in a two and a half hour Hollywood movie" and views it as an exercise in dialectics in which a new mode of production is explored, the "battery mode of production". [6] The Maoist Internationalist Movement (MIM) is a Maoist organization based primarily in the United States. ... Broadly speaking, a dialectic (Greek: διαλεκτική) is an exchange of propositions (theses) and counter-propositions (antitheses) resulting in a disagreement. ... In the writings of Karl Marx and the Marxist theory of historical materialism, a mode of production (in German: Produktionsweise, meaning the way of producing) is a specific combination of: productive forces: these include human labor-power, tools, equipment, buildings and technologies, materials, and improved land social and technical relations...



There are also elements of conspiracy theories. Similar to John Carpenter's They Live, the Matrix is presented as the 'System', which secretly controls everything and which, according to the theorists, will eventually consume everyone. In the Matrix, high positions in companies and organisations are held only by those who are part of the System (programs, like Smith or Ramakandra). The Agents are those who uphold the 'order' and keep the 'conspiracy' safe, like the Men in Black of pop culture. A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ... They Live is a 1988 film directed by John Carpenter, who also wrote the screenplay under the pseudonym Frank Armitage. The movie was based on the short story Eight OClock in the Morning by Ray Nelson. ... Common depiction of the Men in Black. ...


Furthermore, the city of Zion may be seen as a socialist city as it must be to allow the humans to survive. No form of money or commerce is ever seen, the public has access to food and facilities. The citizens share tasks and labor is volunteered as seen by Zee's shell making and no entity steals the labor of others. This could be seen as a form of primitive communism. Primitive communism, according to Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, is the original society of humanity. ...


See also: the philosophy section of the Official Matrix website.


Science

Although sunlight could only dimly penetrate the atmosphere in the movie, it should be noted that the reason given in the movie for computers enslaving humans makes no sense from a thermodynamic (physical) point of view. The chemical energy required to keep a human being alive is vastly greater than the bio-electric or thermal energy that could be harvested; human beings, like all living beings, are not energy sources, but rather energy consumers. It would be vastly more effective to burn the organic matter to power a conventional electrical generator. More practical power sources available could be used, such as nuclear power, geothermal power, tidal power, fusion reactors or any other not yet imagined sources. The use of these power sources is also more sensible from a military perspective; it does not make sense why the machines would use humans as a power source when there was a very real threat that humans could leave the Matrix and attack the machines. The machines could have wiped humans out completely, ending the constant war that had plagued Earth for centuries. Prism splitting light Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... A Lego RCX Computer is an example of an embedded computer used to control mechanical devices. ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek thermos meaning heat and dynamics meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and volume on physical systems at the macroscopic scale by analyzing the collective motion of their particles using statistics. ... In chemistry, a chemical bond is the force which holds together atoms in molecules or crystals. ... Combustion or burning is a complex sequence of chemical reactions between a fuel and an oxidant accompanied by the production of heat or both heat and light in the form of either a glow or flames. ... Organic has several meanings and related topics. ... An electrical generator is a device that moves electrical energy from a mechanical energy source using electromagnetic induction. ... A nuclear power station. ... Geothermal power plant in the Philippines Look up geothermal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Tidal power is a means of electricity generation achieved by capturing the energy contained in moving water mass due to tides. ... The Sun is a natural fusion reactor. ...



Some people have pointed out the possibility that the laws of thermodynamics could work differently in real life than in the Matrix (to make it harder for people to suspect they are being used as a power source), or that the machines have technology not yet imaginable by humans, and thus the known laws of science are impossible to apply in this situation (Morpheus mentions that the human power source is "combined with a form of fusion"). Another possibility is that of the exploitation of latent electrokinetic abilities in human beings as demonstrated by Neo's destruction of a Sentinel in The Matrix Reloaded. On the other hand, Morpheus speaks of physical laws like gravity applying both to the real world and within its simulation, and the scenes we see within the real world are certainly consistent with physical laws as we know them. Entropy, however, can't be the machines' invention, because if it did not exist in their world, or if the direction of energy flow was sometimes concentrated instead of dissipated, the machines either could not exist, or would not require a constant source of energy to operate, mutually exclusive to the idea that humans blocked most sunlight from Earth to cut them off from their primary source of power. The deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reaction is considered the most promising for producing fusion power. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... In thermodynamics, entropy, symbolized by S, is a state function of a thermodynamic system defined by the differential quantity , where dQ is the amount of heat absorbed in a reversible process in which the system goes from the one state to another, and T is the absolute temperature. ...


Critical fans have speculated that the machines were actually using the humans' brains as components in a massively parallel neural network computer, and that the characters were simply mistaken about the purpose. A massively parallel neural network computer based on human brains might also be more energy-efficient to run than equivalent computer components, solving the thermodynamic paradox associated with the use of human bodies over conventional electrical generators. The characters' error would then be reflected in the "Zion Historical Archive" of "The Second Renaissance". In fact, this was very close to the original explanation. Because the writers felt that non-technical viewers would have trouble understanding this explanation, they abandoned it in favor of the "human power source" explanation. The neural-network explanation, however, is presented in the film's novelization and Neil Gaiman's short story "Goliath", featured on the Matrix website and in the first volume of The Matrix Comics. Parallel computing is the simultaneous execution of the same task (split up and specially adapted) on multiple processors in order to obtain results faster. ... Simplified view of an artificial neural network A neural network is a system of interconnecting neurons in a network working together to produce an output function. ... It has been suggested that Operation Dark Storm be merged into this article or section. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is a British author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many graphic novels. ...


It is also established later in the trilogy that the machines and humans are interdependent for reasons more philosophical than technological.


Books

Official

  • The Art of the Matrix by Spencer Lamm (Newmarket Press, 2000) ISBN 1-55704-405-8
  • The Matrix Comics by various (Titan Books, 2003) ISBN 1-84023-806-2
  • The Matrix Comics Volume 2 by various (Titan Books, 2005) ISBN 1-84576-021-2
  • The Matrix Shooting Script by Larry and Andy Wachowski (with introduction by William Gibson) (Newmarket Press, 2002) ISBN 1-55704-490-2
  • The Matrix Online Prima Official Game Guide (Prima Games, 2005) ISBN 0-7615-4943-9
  • The Matrix: Path of Neo Official Strategy Guide (Brady Games, 2005) ISBN 0-7440-0658-9

William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948, Conway, South Carolina) is an American-born science fiction author resident in Canada since 1968. ...

Unofficial

  • Jacking In to the Matrix Franchise: Cultural Reception and Interpretation by Matthew Kapell and William G. Doty (Continuum International, 2004) ISBN 0-8264-1587-3
  • Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in "The Matrix" by Glenn Yeffeth (Summersdale, 2003) ISBN 1-84024-377-5
  • Matrix Warrior: Being the One by Jake Horsley (Gollancz, 2003) ISBN 0-575-07527-9
  • The "Matrix" and Philosophy: Welcome to the Desert of the Real by William Irwin (Open Court, 2002) ISBN 0-8126-9502-X
  • More Matrix and Philosophy by William Irwin (Open Court, 2005) ISBN 0-8126-9572-0
  • Like a Splinter in Your Mind: The Philosophy Behind the "Matrix" Trilogy by Matt Lawrence (Blackwell, 2004) ISBN 1-4051-2524-1
  • The Matrix (British Film Institute, 2004) ISBN 1-84457-045-2
  • Matrix Revelations: A Thinking Fan's Guide to the Matrix Trilogy by Steve Couch (Damaris, 2003) ISBN 1-904753-01-9
  • Beyond the Matrix: Revolutions and Revelations by Stephen Faller (Chalice Press, 2004) ISBN 0-8272-0235-0
  • The "Matrix" Trilogy: Cyberpunk Reloaded by Stacy Gillis (Wallflower Press, 2005) ISBN 1-904764-32-0
  • Exegesis of the Matrix by Peter B. Lloyd (Whole-Being Books, 2003) ISBN 1-902987-09-8
  • The Gospel Reloaded by Seay Garrett (Pinon Press, 2003) ISBN 1-57683-478-6
  • The "Matrix": What Does the Bible Say About... by D. Archer (Scripture Union, 2001) ISBN 1-85999-579-9
  • Journey to the Source: Decoding Matrix Trilogy by Pradheep Challiyil (Sakthi Books 2004) ISBN 0-9752586-0-5
  • Exploring the Matrix: Visions of the Cyber Present by Karen Haber (St. Martin's Press, 2003) ISBN 0-312-31358-6
  • Philosophers Explore The Matrix by Christopher Grau (Oxford University Press, 2005) ISBN 0-19-518107-7

Matthew Kapell (August 14, 1969-) is a historian and anthropologist best known for his 2004 edited volume (with William G. Doty) Jacking In to the Matrix Franchise: Cultural Reception and Interpretation. ... William G. Doty is professor emeritus of religious studies and religion at the University of Alabama. ...

See also

Collective unconscious is a term of analytical psychology originally coined by Carl Jung. ... The unconscious mind (or subconscious) is the aspect (or puported aspect) of the mind of which we are not directly conscious or aware. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

References

  1. ^ The Matrix… Reloaded or overloaded? URL retrieved 2 February 2006.
  2. ^ Joel Silver, interviewed in "Scrolls to Screen: A Brief History of Anime" featurette on The Animatrix DVD.
  3. ^ Joel Silver, interviewed in "Making The Matrix" featurette on The Matrix DVD.
  4. ^ Mitsuhisa Ishikawa, interviewed in The South Bank Show, episode broadcast 19 February 2006 [1]
  5. ^ http://utamagazine.uta.edu/fall_2003/discoveries/matrix.html
  6. ^ http://www.etext.org/Politics/MIM/movies/review.php?f=long/matrix.txt

Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Jewish-American Hollywood film producer. ... Animatrix The Animatrix is a major part of the Matrix series, a collection of nine animated short films set in that fictional universe. ... Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Jewish-American Hollywood film producer. ... The Matrix is a science fiction/action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss and Hugo Weaving. ... The South Bank Show is a British television arts magazine show, presented by Melvyn Bragg and seen in over 60 countries — including Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA. Its stated aim is to bring both high art and popular culture to a mass audience. ...

External links

The Matrix series
Films The Matrix  | The Matrix Reloaded  | The Matrix Revolutions
The Animatrix Final Flight of the Osiris | The Second Renaissance | Kid's Story | Program | World Record | Beyond | A Detective Story | Matriculated
Soundtracks The Matrix: Original Motion Picture Score | The Matrix: Music from the Motion Picture | The Matrix Reloaded: The Album
The Matrix Revolutions: Music From The Motion Picture | The Animatrix: The Album | Enter The Matrix: Original Soundtrack From The Videogame
Games Enter the Matrix | The Matrix Online | The Matrix: Path of Neo
Characters Neo | Trinity | Morpheus | Smith (Agent Smith) | Agents | Oracle | Architect | Niobe | Merovingian | Persephone | Seraph | Deus Ex Machina | Minor human characters | Programs and machines
Locations The Matrix | Mega City | Club Hel | Mobil Ave | Zero One (Machine City) | Zion | List of ships in the Matrix series
Cast and crew Wachowski brothers | Keanu Reeves | Laurence Fishburne | Carrie-Anne Moss | Hugo Weaving | Jada Pinkett Smith | Owen Paterson | John Gaeta | Geof Darrow | Steve Skroce
Other topics Matrix digital rain | The Matrix character names | The Matrix Revisited | The Ultimate Matrix Collection
Related topics Bullet time | Cyberpunk | Digitalism | The Hero's Journey | Martial arts film | Messiahs in fiction | Virtual reality
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The Matrix series - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5166 words)
The Matrix series consists primarily of three films, The Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions.
In acknowledgement of the Japanese anime that was a strong influence on the Matrix series, The Animatrix was produced.
The Matrix reused some of the film sets from Dark City, a movie filmed shortly before that was similar in plot and style but was not yet released long enough to have influenced the movies as The Matrix had already entered post-production by the time Dark City was released theatrically.
MATRIX II (4392 words)
MATRIX II "Valarian, Valdamar, *Matrix II: The Abduction and Manipulation of Humans Using Advanced Technology*.
It also discusses the abduction of human children and how to handle adjustment of the child to the experience, multi-generational scenarios and cases, human multidimensional anatomy and how it can be manipulated by technology, and elements of advanced technology possessed by the government.
*Matrix III* discusses all the aspects of the natural electromagnetic fields of the earth, holographic aspects of the universe and consciousness, morphological fields, hard-to-find data on the human brain and neurophysiology, brain structures and consciousness, and brain circuitry as applied to human consciousness and behavior.
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