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Encyclopedia > The Maltese Falcon (1941 film)
The Maltese Falcon
Directed by John Huston
Produced by Hal B. Wallis (executive producer)
Henry Blanke (associate producer)
Written by John Huston
based on the novel by Dashiell Hammett
Starring Humphrey Bogart
Mary Astor
Peter Lorre
Sydney Greenstreet
Gladys George
Barton MacLane
Lee Patrick
Music by Adolph Deutsch
Cinematography Arthur Edeson
Editing by Thomas Richards
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) October 3, 1941
Running time 101 min.
Language English
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

The Maltese Falcon is a 1941 Warner Bros. film written and directed by John Huston, based on the novel of the same name by Dashiell Hammett, and starring Humphrey Bogart as private investigator Sam Spade, Mary Astor as his femme fatale client, Sydney Greenstreet in his film debut, and Peter Lorre. The film was Huston's directorial debut and was nominated for three Academy Awards. The Maltese Falcon This is a copyrighted poster. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ... Henry Blanke (b. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hardboiled detective novels and short stories. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ... Sydney Hughes Greenstreet (December 27, 1879 – January 18, 1954) was an English actor. ... Gladys George (born September 13, 1900; died December 8, 1954) was an American actress. ... Barton MacLane (December 25, 1902—January 1, 1969) was an American actor. ... Lee Patrick (November 22, 1901 – November 21, 1982) was an American theater and film actress. ... Adolph Deutsch (October 20, 1897 - January 1, 1980) was an Academy Award-winning composer, songwriter, conductor and arranger. ... Arthur Edeson (October 24, 1891 - February 14, 1970) was a film cinematographer. ... Thomas Richards (8 January 1899 – 4 January 1946) was an American film editor. ... “WB” redirects here. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 1941 in film involved some significant events. ... “WB” redirects here. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... This article is about the novel. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hardboiled detective novels and short stories. ... Bogart redirects here. ... A private investigator, private detective, PI, or private eye, is a person who undertakes investigations, usually for a private citizen or some other entity not involved with a government or police organization. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version of The Maltese Falcon, directed by John Huston Sam Spade was the leading character in the novel and movie The Maltese Falcon (1931). ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Convicted spy Mata Hari made her name synonymous with femme fatale during WWI. A femme fatale (plural: femmes fatales) is an alluring and seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire, often leading them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations. ... Sydney Hughes Greenstreet (December 27, 1879 – January 18, 1954) was an English actor. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


The story concerns the entanglement of a San Francisco private investigator with three greedy, unscrupulous and murderous adventurers who compete with each other to obtain a fabulous jewel-encrusted statuette of a falcon worth millions.


The Maltese Falcon has been named as one of the greatest films of all time by Roger Ebert,[1] and Entertainment Weekly,[2] and was cited by Panorama du Film Noir Américain, the French book that coined the term film noir, as the first film of that genre.[3] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ...


The film premiered on October 3, 1941 in New York City and in 1989 was selected for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.[4]

is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...

Contents

Background

The antihero protagonist of Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon, private investigator Sam Spade, is based on the author's experiences as a private detective for the Pinkerton Detective Agency in San Francisco. Hammett not only invested Spade with characteristics drawn from his own personality but also gave him his own first name, Samuel, which Hammett had discarded when he launched his career as a writer. Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hardboiled detective novels and short stories. ... This article is about the novel. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version of The Maltese Falcon, directed by John Huston Sam Spade was the leading character in the novel and movie The Maltese Falcon (1931). ... Pinkerton guards escort strikebreakers in Buchtel, Ohio, 1884 The Pinkerton National Detective Agency was a private U.S. security guard and detective agency established by Allan Pinkerton in 1850. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


Hammett also drew upon his years as a detective in creating many of the other characters for The Maltese Falcon, which from elements of two of his stories published in Black Mask magazine in 1925, “The Whosis Kid,” and “The Gutting of Couffignal.”[5] The novel itself was serialized in five parts in Black Mask in 1930 before being published in book form that same year by Alfred A. Knopf. For information on Black Mask, the surrealist group, see Black Mask (NYC). ...


The 1941 film is the third film version of the novel. The first, released in 1931, starred Ricardo Cortez as Sam Spade, while the second, called Satan Met a Lady, was a loose adaptation that turned the story into a light comedy, with the characters renamed. It was released in 1936 and starred Warren William and a young Bette Davis, only five years into her long film career. The Maltese Falcon is a 1931 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Dashiell Hammett. ... Ricardo Cortez, born Jacob Krantz (September 18, 1899 - April 28, 1977), was a film actor from Vienna, Austria. ... Satan Met a Lady is a 1936 film based on the novel The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. ... Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ...


Warner Brothers had been prevented by the Hays Office censors from re-releasing the 1931 version due to its "lewd" content, which is possibly what caused them to go into production in 1941 with a new, cleaned-up version. (It was not until after 1966 that unedited copies of the 1931 film could legally be shown in the U.S.) Ironically, the 1941 film still managed to sneak some homosexual innuendo past the censors. Warner Bros. ... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Censor. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ...


Plot

"In 1539, the Knights Templar of Malta paid tribute to Charles V of Spain by sending him a Golden Falcon encrusted from beak to claw with rarest jewels -- but pirates seized the galley carrying this priceless token and the fate of the Maltese Falcon remains a mystery to this day."[6] Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ...

Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart with Brigid O'Shaughnessy (Mary Astor)
Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart with Brigid O'Shaughnessy (Mary Astor)

In San Francisco in 1941, private investigators Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart) and Miles Archer (Jerome Cowan) meet a beautiful new client - Miss Ruth Wonderly (Mary Astor) - who asks them to locate her missing sister, there with a man named Floyd Thursby. Wonderly is meeting Thursby and hopes her sister will be with him. After they receive a substantial retainer, Archer volunteers to follow her that night and help get her sister back. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... A private investigator, private detective, PI, or private eye, is a person who undertakes investigations, usually for a private citizen or some other entity not involved with a government or police organization. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version of The Maltese Falcon, directed by John Huston Sam Spade was the leading character in the novel and movie The Maltese Falcon (1931). ... Bogart redirects here. ... Cowan in The Maltese Falcon Jerome Cowan (October 6, 1897 - January 24, 1972) appeared in over 100 films but is probably best remembered for his role as the doomed private eye partner of Sam Spade, Miles Archer, in The Maltese Falcon. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...


That night, a call informs Spade that Archer has been shot and killed, but before he goes to the murder scene he tells his secretary Effie Perrine (Lee Patrick) to break the news to Archer's wife, Iva (Gladys George), and to keep her away from him. At the scene, police detective Tom Polhaus (Ward Bond) shows Spade the murder weapon, a rare English handgun. Spade tells Polhaus that Archer was tailing Thursby, but refuses to give any more information. Spade then calls Wonderly’s hotel but finds that she has checked out with no forwarding address. Lee Patrick (November 22, 1901 – November 21, 1982) was an American theater and film actress. ... Gladys George (born September 13, 1900; died December 8, 1954) was an American actress. ... Ward Bond (April 9, 1903 - November 5, 1960) was an American film actor. ... The Webley-Fosbery Self-Cocking Automatic Revolver was an unusual, recoil-operated, automatic revolver designed by Lieutenant Colonel George Vincent Fosbery, VC and produced by the Webley and Scott company from 1901 to 1915. ...


Returning to his apartment, Spade is visited by Polhaus and his superior, Lt Dundy (Barton MacLane), a tough and uncompromising cop. They grill Spade about the case he and Archer were working on but he refuses to name his client. They tell him that Thursby has been shot dead and suggest that Spade had time to do it. Barton MacLane (December 25, 1902—January 1, 1969) was an American actor. ...


The next morning Spade is visited by Iva who embraces him passionately, and asks if he killed Archer so that the two of them can be together — but Effie suggests to Spade the possibility that Iva might be the killer. Spade meets with Wonderly - now calling herself Brigid O’Shaughnessy - and assures her that he's kept her identity secret from the police, but lets her know that he is aware the story about her sister was fake. She explains that Thursby was her partner, carried a gun and probably killed Archer, but claims to have no idea who killed Thursby. Spade agrees to find out who’s behind the killings, but makes her pay him most of the money she has on hand.

Peter Lorre as Joel Cairo

At his office, Spade meets Joel Cairo (Peter Lorre), who offers him a $5,000 fee to find a “black figure of a bird”. When Spade is distracted, Cairo pulls a gun on him to search the office, but Spade knocks the gun away and knocks Cairo out. Spade goes through Cairo's possessions, inspecting his money and his three passports from different countries. When Cairo revives, he asks if Spade has the bird he's looking for, but Spade doesn't, so Cairo hires him to find it. They discuss terms until Cairo politely asks for his weapon back. He promptly turns it on Spade again to search the office, much to Spade's amusement. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ...


Later that evening, Spade realizes that he is being followed and loses the man, then visits Brigid, telling her about his meeting with Cairo. They fence verbally, and Spade kisses her, but demands she tell him what's going on. They go to Spade’s apartment so that Brigid can meet with Cairo. When Cairo shows up, they grill each other about the black bird’s whereabouts, and Cairo becomes agitated when Brigid mentions that “the Fat Man” is in San Francisco. When Brigid insults Cairo, he tries to pull a gun on her, but Spade slaps him down.


The two police detectives show up at Spade's door wanting to talk, but he won't let them in. When they hear Cairo's cry for help from inside, they go in anyway and are told conflicting stories about what happened. Dundy wants to bring them all in, but Spade tells them they were being ribbed and Brigid and Cairo back him up. Cairo leaves, followed by the police, and Spade gets Brigid to tell him more about the black bird and herself, most of it apparently fabricated.


In the morning, Spade goes to Cairo's hotel, where he spots the man who's been following him sitting in the lobby. He speaks to him to send a message to the "Fat Man", but Wilmer (Elisha Cook, Jr.) feigns ignorance and tells him to “shove off”, so Spade gets the house detective to throw Wilmer out. Cairo arrives, saying that he's been grilled by the police all night, but has stuck to Spade's "goofy" cover story. When Spade returns to his office, he learns that Kasper Gutman (Sydney Greenstreet), the "Fat Man", has gotten his message and wants to talk to him. After sending Brigid off with Effie for safekeeping, and cold-shouldering Iva, Spade goes to Gutman's hotel suite. Gutman greets Spade warmly, gives him a drink and begins to talk about the Falcon, but becomes deliberately evasive, causing Spade to put on an act of becoming violently angry. He smashes his glass and storms out, giving Gutman a deadline of 5:30 that evening to cooperate with him. As he goes into the elevator, we see Joel Cairo coming out of another one, on his way to Gutman's suite. Diminutive character actor Elisha Cook Jr. ... Sydney Hughes Greenstreet (December 27, 1879 – January 18, 1954) was an English actor. ...


After being questioned by the District Attorney, and telling him off, Spade is accosted by Wilmer to take him to Gutman at gunpoint. Before they get to the hotel suite, Spade overpowers him, taking his weapons, and then humiliates him by handing the weapons over to Gutman. Gutman and Spade sit down to more drinks, while Gutman elaborately relates the checkered history of the Maltese Falcon, which ends with the Falcon in the home of a Russian general in Istanbul. Gutman tried to buy it, but when the general refused to sell, Gutman sent in some "agents" to steal it. "Well, sir," Gutman says, "they got it, but I haven't got it." Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ...

Sam Spade with the Maltese Falcon
Sam Spade with the Maltese Falcon

Gutman offers Spade $25,000 for the bird, and one-fourth of the proceeds from its sale. Spade's vision blurs and he passes out on the floor: his drink has been spiked. Wilmer kicks Spade in the face in revenge for embarrassing him, and he and Gutman and Cairo (who has been in the other room) depart, leaving Spade alone and unconscious.


When Spade revives, he immediately calls Effie to talk to Brigid, and learns that she is not with her. He searches Gutman's suite and finds a newspaper with the arrival time of the freighter La Paloma from Hong Kong circled. He goes to the dock but the ship is on fire. A dock officer informs him that the crew and passengers all got off safely, and he returns to his office.


Suddenly a man (Walter Huston) bursts into the office, staggers toward Spade clutching a bundle wrapped in newspaper, and drops it, muttering “You know ... Falcon”. He collapses on the couch, dead. Spade inspects the dead man’s wallet and tells Effie that the man, who has been shot, is Captain Jacobi of the La Paloma. Looking inside the bundle, Spade grabs Effie hard by the wrist and says "We’ve got it, angel. We’ve got it." Walter Huston (April 6, 1884 – April 7, 1950) was a Canadian-born American actor. ...


The phone rings, and the secretary hears Brigid give an address and then scream before the line goes dead. Spade directs her to call the police after he’s gone and tell them how the captain died but not to mention the package, which he takes to a bus terminal baggage room and checks, mailing the claim check to himself at a postal box.


After the address Brigid gave turns out to be an empty lot, Spade returns home and finds her hiding in a doorway near his apartment. He takes her inside, where he finds Gutman, Cairo and Wilmer waiting for him, guns drawn. Gutman gives Spade $10,000 for the Falcon, but Spade tells them that part of his price is a fall guy he can turn over to the police for the murders of Archer, Thursby and Captain Jacobi, getting himself off the hook. Spade suggests that Wilmer is the best choice, since he certainly killed Thursby and Jacobi at least. After some intense negotiation, Gutman and Cairo agree to sacrifice Wilmer, who is knocked out in a scuffle. Spade gets the details of what happened and who killed whom, so that he can present a convincing story to the police along with Wilmer.


Just after dawn, Spade calls Effie, who brings him the bundle. In a frenzy, Gutman, Cairo and Brigid unwrap it, revealing a black statuette: the Maltese Falcon. Gutman inspects the bird, and to make sure it's the real thing, he begins to scrape away the enamel coating with a penknife. Growing increasing agitated, he cuts faster and faster, and finally cries out, "It's a fake!"[7]


Brigid adamantly insists that the bird is the same statuette she got from the Russian general, and Cairo explodes that it was Gutman's crude attempt to buy the bird that tipped off the general to its great value — he must have had a duplicate made for them to steal. "No wonder we had such an easy time stealing it!"


Cairo breaks down and weeps while Gutman regains control of himself, suggesting that he and Cairo go to Istanbul to continue their quest. He demands at gunpoint that Spade return the money he's been paid, but allows him to keep $1,000 for his "time and expenses". Gutman invites Spade to join them, saying "You're a man of nice judgment and many resources", but Spade declines.


Gutman and Cairo leave, and Spade calls the police and tells them where to pick them, and Wilmer, up. Spade angrily confronts the frightened Brigid, telling her he knows she killed Archer to implicate Thursby, her unwanted accomplice. "Well," he adds, "if you get a good break, you’ll be out in 20 years and you can come back to me then. I hope they don’t hang you, precious, by that sweet neck."

Brigid O'Shaugnessy (Mary Astor) as she is taken away to be arrested.
Brigid O'Shaugnessy (Mary Astor) as she is taken away to be arrested.

Brigid can’t believe that Spade will turn her over to the police. "You killed Miles" he says, "and you're going over for it." She appeals to him and his love for her. Spade doesn’t argue, saying: "When a man’s partner’s killed he’s supposed to do something about it. It doesn’t make any difference what you thought of him. He was your partner and you’re supposed to do something about it." Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...


Spade lets in the police and turns over the Falcon, the guns he's taken from Wilmer, Gutman and Cairo, the money Gutman gave him, which he says was a bribe for his silence, and last of all Brigid, explaining that she killed his partner. Brigid is taken away, and Polhaus picks up the statuette and asks what it is. Taking the Falcon, Spade replies, "The stuff that dreams are made of". Spade steps out into the hallway and sees Brigid staring vacantly through the bars of the elevator window as the film ends.


Cast

The main cast (left to right):Bogart, Lorre, Astor and Greenstreet
The main cast (left to right):Bogart, Lorre, Astor and Greenstreet
Actor Role Other notes
Humphrey Bogart Sam Spade private investigator
Mary Astor Brigid O'Shaughnessy the client
Sydney Greenstreet Kasper Gutman the "Fat Man"
Peter Lorre Joel Cairo adventurer
Barton MacLane Lieutenant Dundy homicide detective
Ward Bond Det. Sgt. Tom Polhaus homicide detective
Lee Patrick Effie Perrine Spade's secretary
Jerome Cowan Miles Archer Spade's partner
Gladys George Iva Archer Archer's wife
Elisha Cook Jr. Wilmer Cook Gutman's henchman
Walter Huston Captain Jacobi a freighter captain

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version of The Maltese Falcon, directed by John Huston Sam Spade was the leading character in the novel and movie The Maltese Falcon (1931). ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Sydney Hughes Greenstreet (December 27, 1879 – January 18, 1954) was an English actor. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ... Barton MacLane (December 25, 1902—January 1, 1969) was an American actor. ... Ward Bond (April 9, 1903 - November 5, 1960) was an American film actor. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cowan in The Maltese Falcon Jerome Cowan (October 6, 1897 - January 24, 1972) appeared in over 100 films but is probably best remembered for his role as the doomed private eye partner of Sam Spade, Miles Archer, in The Maltese Falcon. ... Gladys George (born September 13, 1900; died December 8, 1954) was an American actress. ... Diminutive character actor Elisha Cook Jr. ... Walter Huston (April 6, 1884 – April 7, 1950) was a Canadian-born American actor. ...

Production

Casting

First-time director John Huston was very careful when casting The Maltese Falcon, but Humphrey Bogart was not the first choice to play Sam Spade. Producer Hal Wallis initially offered the role to George Raft, who rejected it because he did not want to work with an inexperienced director. (Raft would go on turning down roles that Bogart would play and make famous, including the cynical hero of Casablanca.) The 42-year-old Bogart was delighted, however, to play a highly ambiguous character who is both honorable and greedy. Huston was particularly grateful that Bogart had quickly accepted the role, and the film helped to consolidate their lifelong friendship and set the stage for later collaboration on such films as The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); Key Largo (1948); and The African Queen (1951). Bogart's convincing interpretation became the archetype for a private detective in the film noir genre, providing him near-instant acclaim and rounding and solidifying his onscreen persona. It was The Maltese Falcon that Ingrid Bergman watched over and over again while preparing for Casablanca, in order to learn to interact and act with Bogart.[8] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ... Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ... Raft in They Drive by Night George Raft (September 26, 1895 - November 24, 1980) was an American film actor most closely identified with his portrayals of gangsters in crime melodramas of the 1930s and 1940s. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is John Hustons 1948 black and white adaptation of B. Travens eponymous 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Madre , in which two American down-and-outers (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) in 1920s Mexico hook up with an old-timer (Walter... Key Largo is a 1948 film starring Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall, Claire Trevor, and Lionel Barrymore. ... The African Queen is a 1951 film made by Horizon Pictures and Romulus Films, and distributed by United Artists. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR...


The role of the deceitful femme fatale Brigid O'Shaughnessy was originally offered to Geraldine Fitzgerald, but went to Mary Astor when Fitzgerald decided to appear in a stage play. Geraldine Fitzgerald Geraldine Fitzgerald (24 November 1913 - 17 July 2005) was an Irish-American actress. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...


The character of the sinister "Fat Man" Kasper Gutman was based on A. Maundy Gregory, an overweight British detective-turned-entrepreneur who was involved in many sophisticated endeavors and capers, including a search for a long-lost treasure not unlike the jeweled Falcon. However, the character was not easily cast, and it took some time before producer Hal Wallis solved the problem by suggesting that Huston give a screen test to Sydney Greenstreet, a veteran stage character actor who had never appeared on film. Greenstreet, who was then 61 years old and weighed between 280 and 350 pounds, impressed Huston with his sheer size, distinctive abrasive laugh, bulbous eyes, and manner of speaking. Greenstreet went on to be typecast in later films of the 1940s such as The Mask of Dimitrios (1944), The Verdict (1946) and Three Strangers (1946). The word typecasting (past participle typecast) can mean more than one thing: typecasting (programming) typecasting (acting) in acting This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Mask of Dimitrios (U.S. title: A Coffin for Dimitrios) (1939) is a novel by Eric Ambler. ... The Verdict is a 1982 film which tells the story of a down-on-his-luck lawyer who pushes a medical malpractice case in order to improve his own situation, but discovers along the way that he is actually doing the right thing. ...


Greenstreet's characterization had such a strong cultural impact that the "Fat Man" atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki during World War II was named after him.[9] (The appellation "Fat Man" for Gutman was created for the film - in the novel, although he is a fat man, he's referred to as "G.") This article is about the nuclear weapon used in World War II. For other uses, see Fat Man (disambiguation). ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


The character of Joel Cairo was based on a criminal Hammett captured for robbing Pinkerton’s in 1920 in Washington D.C. In Hammett's novel, the character is blatantly homosexual, but to avoid problems with the censors this was downplayed considerably, although he is still noticeably effeminate — for instance, Cairo's calling cards and handkerchiefs are scented with gardenias, he fusses about his clothes and becomes hysterical when blood from a scratch ruins his shirt, and he makes subtle fellating gestures with his cane during his interview with Spade. By contrast, in the novel Cairo is referred to as "queer" and "the fairy". Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Effeminacy is character trait of a male showing femininity, unmanliness, womanliness, weakness, softness and/or a delicacy, which contradicts traditional masculine, male gender roles. ... Species See text. ... Fellatio is oral sex performed upon the male human penis. ... For the novel by William S. Burroughs, see Queer (novel). ...


Elisha Cook Jr., a well-known character actor was cast by Huston as the henchman Wilmer. According to Huston, Cook “lived alone up in the High Sierra, tied flies and caught golden trout between films. When he was wanted in Hollywood, they sent word up to his mountain cabin by courier. He would come down, do a picture, and then withdraw again to his retreat.” Like Cairo (and even Gutman) the character of Wilmer has also been seen by many commentators as homosexual, primarily because of the use of "gunsel", meaning a young homosexual in a relationship with an older man, to describe him.[10][11][12] Diminutive character actor Elisha Cook Jr. ... A character actor is an actor, especially in motion pictures, who predominantly performs in similar roles throughout the course of a career. ...


Gladys George had made her mark on Broadway with her starring role in Lawrence Riley's Personal Appearance (1934) (adapted for the screen in 1936 as Go West, Young Man); this comedy's huge success had been credited in great part to her comic performance.[13] Her role as Archer's wife thus displays her versatility. Gladys George (born September 13, 1900; died December 8, 1954) was an American actress. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Lawrence Riley (1896-1974) was a successful American playwright and screenwriter. ... Personal Appearance (1934) is a stage comedy by the American playwright and screenwriter Lawrence Riley (1896–1974), which was a Broadway smash and the basis for the classic Mae West film Go West, Young Man. ... See also: 1933 in literature, other events of 1934, 1935 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Preparation

During his preparation for The Maltese Falcon, first-time director John Huston planned each second of the film to the very last detail, tailoring the screenplay with instructions to himself for a shot-for-shot setup, with sketches for every scene, so filming could proceed fluently and professionally. Like other directors, such as Alfred Hitchcock, Huston was adamant that the film keep to schedule, and that everything was methodically planned to the fullest to ensure that the film never went over budget. By providing the cast with a highly detailed script, Huston was able to let them rehearse their scenes with very little intervention. Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ...


Such was the extent and efficacy of his preparation of the script that almost no line of dialog was eliminated in the final edit of the film.[14] Except for some exterior night shots, Huston shot the entire film in sequence, which greatly helped his actors create their characters. The shooting went so smoothly that there was actually extra time for the cast to enjoy themselves, and Huston brought Bogart, Astor, Bond, Lorre and others to the Lakeside Golf Club near the Warner lot to relax in the pool, dine, drink and talk until midnight about anything other than the film they were working on.

Another theatrical poster representation of the Maltese Falcon, one of many released
Another theatrical poster representation of the Maltese Falcon, one of many released

Huston used much of the dialog from the original novel,[15] removing all references to sex which the Hays Office had deemed to be unacceptable. The many "by gad"'s Greenstreet utters in the movie were inserted by the censors to replace "by God". Huston was also warned not to show excessive drinking. The director fought this, on the grounds that Spade was a man who put away a half bottle of hard liquor a day and showing him completely abstaining from alcohol would mean seriously falsifying his character.[8] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of guidelines governing the production of motion pictures. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Production Credits

  • Associate Producer - Henry Blanke
  • Director of Photography - Arthur Edeson
  • Dialogue director - Robert Foulk
  • Film Editor - Thomas Richards
  • Art Director - Robert M. Haas
  • Sound - Oliver S. Garretson
  • Gowns - Orry-Kelly
  • Makeup Artist - Perc Westmore (credited) and Frank McCoy (uncredited)
  • Music - Adolph Deutsch
  • Musical Director - Leo F. Forbstein
  • Production Management - Al Alleborn (uncredited)
  • Assistant Director - Claude Archer (uncredited)
  • Script supervisor - Meta Carpenter (uncredited)
  • Orchestrator - Arthur Lange (uncredited)

Arthur Edeson (October 24, 1891 - February 14, 1970) was a film cinematographer. ... Orry-Kelly was the professional name of John Orry Kelly (31 December 1897 - 27 February 1964), a prolific Hollywood costume designer. ... Adolph Deutsch (October 20, 1897 - January 1, 1980) was an Academy Award-winning composer, songwriter, conductor and arranger. ...

Cinematography

Director of Photography Arthur Edeson
Director of Photography Arthur Edeson

With its low-key lighting and inventive and arresting angles, the work of Director of Photography Arthur Edeson is one of the film’s great assets. Unusual camera angles – sometimes low to the ground, revealing the ceilings of rooms (a technique also used by Orson Welles and his cinematograher Gregg Toland on Citizen Kane) – are cleverly utilized, and emphasize the nature of the characters and their actions. Some of the most technically striking scenes involve Gutman, especially the scene where he explains the history of the Falcon to Spade, purposely drawing out his story so that the knockout drops he has slipped into Spade’s drink will take effect.[8] Meta Wilde, Huston's longtime script supervisor, remarked of this scene: Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Arthur Edeson (October 24, 1891 - February 14, 1970) was a film cinematographer. ... Arthur Edeson (October 24, 1891 - February 14, 1970) was a film cinematographer. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Gregg Toland (1904-1948) was an influential American cinematographer, most noted for his work on Orson Welles Citizen Kane. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ...

It was an incredible camera setup. We rehearsed two days. The camera followed Greenstreet and Bogart from one room into another, then down a long hallway and finally into a living room; there the camera moved up and down in what is referred to as a boom-up and boom-down shot, then panned from left to right and back to Bogart's drunken face; the next pan shot was to Greenstreet's massive stomach from Bogart's point of view. . . . One miss and we had to begin all over again.[16]

Film critic Roger Ebert says of this scene: Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...

Was the shot just a stunt? Not at all; most viewers don't notice it because they're swept along by its flow. And consider another shot, where Greenstreet chatters about the falcon while waiting for a drugged drink to knock out Bogart. Huston's strategy is crafty. Earlier, Greenstreet has set it up by making a point: "I distrust a man who says 'when.' If he's got to be careful not to drink too much, it's because he's not to be trusted when he does." Now he offers Bogart a drink, but Bogart doesn't sip from it. Greenstreet talks on, and tops up Bogart's glass. He still doesn't drink. Greenstreet watches him narrowly. They discuss the value of the missing black bird. Finally, Bogart drinks, and passes out. The timing is everything; Huston doesn't give us closeups of the glass to underline the possibility that it's drugged. He depends on the situation to generate the suspicion in our minds. (This was, by the way, Greenstreet's first scene in the movies.)[1]

Very nearly as visually evocative are the scenes involving Astor, almost all of which suggest prison: In one scene she wears striped pajamas, the furniture in the room is striped, and the slivers of light coming through the Venetian blinds suggest cell bars, as do the bars on the elevator cage at the end of the film when she takes her slow ride downward with the police, apparently on her way to execution. Huston and Edeson crafted each scene to make sure the images, action and dialog blended effectively, sometimes shooting closeups of characters with other cast members acting with them off camera.[8]


Falcon props

Analysis of the Maltese Falcon dimensions
Analysis of the Maltese Falcon dimensions

The "Maltese Falcon" itself is reportedly based on the "Kniphausen Hawk," a ceremonial pouring vessel made in 1697 for George William von Kniphausen, Count of the Holy Roman Empire. It is modeled after a hawk perched on a rock and is encrusted with red garnets, amethysts, emeralds and blue sapphires. The vessel is currently owned by the Duke of Devonshire and is an integral piece of the Chatsworth collection. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1296 × 1728 pixel, file size: 551 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Analysis of the Maltese falcon ornament used in the film The Maltese Falcon (1941 film). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1296 × 1728 pixel, file size: 551 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Analysis of the Maltese falcon ornament used in the film The Maltese Falcon (1941 film). ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Genera Accipiter Micronisus Melierax Urotriorchis Erythrotriorchis The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the bird sub-family Accipitrinae in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... Amethyst (SiO2) is a purple variety of quartz often used as an ornament. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Sapphire (disambiguation). ... The Dukes of Devonshire are members of the aristocratic Cavendish family in the United Kingdom. ... Chatsworth may mean: Chatsworth House Chatsworth, Ontario, Canada Chatsworth, Georgia Chatsworth, California Chatsworth, Illinois Chatsworth, Iowa Chatsworth, New Jersey Chatsworth, Durban, South Africa This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...


There were several 11-1/2 inch tall Falcon props made for use in the film due to the fact that Humphrey Bogart dropped the original during shooting. The original Falcon is on display to this day in Warner Brothers' movie museum, and its tail feathers are visibly dented from Bogart's accident. Some of the copies of the Falcon were cast of plastic resin, and some of lead. Only two 45 lb. lead Falcons and two 5 lb., 5.4 oz resin Falcons are verified to be in existence today. One lead Falcon has been displayed for years at various venues. The second, which was marred at the end of the movie by Sydney Greenstreet, was a gift to William Conrad from studio chief Jack L. Warner. It was auctioned off in December 1994, nine months after Conrad's death, for $398,500 to Ronald Winston of Harry Winston, Inc. At that time, it was the highest price at which a movie prop had ever been sold. It was used to model a 10 lb. gold replica displayed at the 69th Academy Awards. The replica has Burmese ruby eyes, interchangeable claws (one set of gold, one set of coral) and has a platinum chain in its beak with a 42.98 flawless diamond at the end. Its value is estimated at well over $8 million. The lead and resin Falcons are valued in excess of $2 million. For other uses, see Plastic (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... Conrad in Cannon William Conrad (September 27, 1920 – February 11, 1994), born William Cann, was an American actor and narrator in radio, film and television noted for his gifted use of a marvelous baritone voice, as well as for his sizable girth. ... This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Look up replica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 69th Academy Awards were dominated by movies produced by independent studios, financed outside of mainstream Hollywood, leading to 1997 being dubbed The Year of the Independents. All but one of the nominees for Best Picture were low-budget independent movies (the next ceremony dominated by indie fims would be... Anthem Kaba Ma Kyei Capital Naypyidaw Largest city Yangon Official languages Burmese Demonym Burmese Government Military junta  -  Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council Than Shwe  -  Prime Minister Soe Win  -  Acting Prime Minister Thein Sein Establishment  -  Bagan 849–1287   -  Taungoo Dynasty 1486–1752   -  Konbaung Dynasty 1752–1885   -  Colonial rule... This article is about the mineral. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Extant Subclasses and Orders Alcyonaria    Alcyonacea    Helioporacea Zoantharia    Antipatharia    Corallimorpharia    Scleractinia    Zoanthidea [1][2]  See Anthozoa for details For other uses, see Coral (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mineral. ...


Soundtrack

The music for The Maltese Falcon was written by Adolph Deutsch, who later went on to win an Academy Award for his incidental music for Oklahoma! in 1955. The Soundtrack to the The Maltese Falcon (1941 film) starring Humphrey Bogart was performed by Adolph Deutsch who later went on the win an Academy Award for his composition in Oklahoma! in 1955. ... Adolph Deutsch (October 20, 1897 - January 1, 1980) was an Academy Award-winning composer, songwriter, conductor and arranger. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The 1943 musical play Oklahoma!, written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein), was adapted into an Academy Award–winning musical film in 1955, starring Gordon MacRae, Shirley Jones (in her film debut), Rod Steiger, Charlotte Greenwood, Gloria Grahame, Gene Nelson, James Whitmore...


The recording was re-released in 2002 with the soundtracks to other film works of Deutsch, including George Washington Slept Here, The Mask of Dimitrios, High Sierra, and Northern Pursuit. The Mask of Dimitrios (U.S. title: A Coffin for Dimitrios) (1939) is a novel by Eric Ambler. ... High Sierra (1941) is an early heist film and film noir written by John Huston and W.R. Burnett from the novel by W.R. Burnett. ... Northern Pursuit is a 1943 World War II film starring Errol Flynn. ...


Release

Soundtrack cover
Soundtrack cover

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

DVD release

The DVD was released on June 1, 2006 with a new Dolby Digital mono soundtrack. It includes the original theatrical trailer, as well as a trailer for the earlier 1936 film adaptation of the novel, Satan Met a Lady, and trailers of other Humphrey Bogart films such as The Petrified Forest, High Sierra, Casablanca, To Have and Have Not, and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. The DVD also includes an essay, A History of the Mystery, examining the mystery and film noir genres through the decades. is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dolby Digital is the marketing name for a series of lossy audio compression technologies by Dolby Laboratories. ... The Petrified Forest (1936) is a predecessor to film noir, with an original screenplay by Delmer Daves and Charles Kenyon derived from the play by Robert E. Sherwood. ... High Sierra (1941) is an early heist film and film noir written by John Huston and W.R. Burnett from the novel by W.R. Burnett. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... To Have and Have Not cover To Have and Have Not is a 1937 novel by Ernest Hemingway about Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain who runs contraband and guns between Cuba and Florida. ... The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is John Hustons 1948 black and white adaptation of B. Travens eponymous 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Madre , in which two American down-and-outers (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) in 1920s Mexico hook up with an old-timer (Walter... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ...


Another notable special feature is a Turner Classic Movies documentary, Becoming Attractions: The Trailers of Humphrey Bogart. Hosted by TCM's Robert Osborne, the 45-minute feature traces Bogart's evolution from a heavy in the 1930s to a romantic leading man in the '40s, and his return to playing bad men late in that decade. Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Robert Joline Osborne is an American actor and film historian best known for his work as the host of the Turner Classic Movies network since its inception in 1994. ...


Reception

On its release, The Maltese Falcon received significant acclaim from both critics and the public, and its reputation has been growing ever since. In 1942, it was nominated for three Academy Awards: the film was nominated for Best Picture, Sydney Greenstreet for Best Supporting Actor, and John Huston for Best Adapted Screenplay. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ...


As a result of the film's success, Warner Brothers immediately made plans to produce a sequel entitled The Further Adventures of the Maltese Falcon, which Huston was to direct in early 1942. However, due to the fact that Huston was now in high demand and the major cast members were unavailable, the sequel was never made.[8] Warner Bros. ...


The film has been named as one of the greatest films of all time by Roger Ebert[1] and Entertainment Weekly,[2] and the American Film Institute ranked it #23 in their list of the best 100 movies in American cinema as well as #26 in their list of the top 100 thrilling movies in American cinema. Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ...


The quote that Bogart ends the film with, "The stuff that dreams are made of" (a misquotation from The Tempest[17]), was chosen as #14 on the AFI's list of top movie quotes in cinematic history.[18] Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...


The Maltese Falcon (1941) has been deemed "culturally significant" by the Library of Congress and in 1989 was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.[4] Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Cultural impact

The CBS radio network created a 30-minute adaptation of The Maltese Falcon on The Screen Guild Theater with actors Bogart, Astor, Greenstreet and Lorre all reprising their roles. This radio segment was originally released on September 20, 1943, and was played again on July 3, 1946.[19] On May 18, 1950, another adaptation was broadcast on The Screen Guild Theater starring Bogart and his wife Lauren Bacall. In addition, there was an adaptation on Lux Radio Theater on February 8, 1943, starring Edward G. Robinson, Gail Patrick, and Laird Cregar. This article is about the broadcast network. ... The Screen Guild Theater was a popular radio anthology series during the Golden Age of Radio that began airing on the CBS network on January 8, 1939 and lasted for fourteen seasons and 527 episodes. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Betty Joan Perske (born on September 16, 1924), better known as Lauren Bacall, is a Golden Globe– and Tony Award–winning, as well as Academy Award–nominated, American film and stage actress. ... Lux Radio Theater, one of the genuine classic radio anthology series (NBC Blue Network (1934-1935); CBS (1935-1954); NBC (1954-1955)) adapted first Broadway stage works, and then (especially) films to hour-long live radio presentations. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ... Gail Patrick (born June 20, 1911 – died July 6, 1980) was an American actress. ... Laird Cregar in This Gun for Hire (1942) Laird Cregar (28 July 1913, Philadelphia – 9 December 1944, Los Angeles) was an American actor. ...


In 1975, Columbia released a spoof of The Maltese Falcon called The Black Bird, starring George Segal as Sam Spade, Jr., with Patrick and Cook reprising their roles as Effie and Wilmer from the 1941 version. In 1974, during production for this film, one of the seven plaster figurines of the original 1941 Falcon on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art was stolen, and it was alleged that the “disappearance” of the figurine was staged as a publicity stunt for the Segal film. If it was, it backfired, since news accounts of the missing Falcon exceeded those of the Segal film.[20] In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The Black Bird (1975) is a movie released December 25th 1975 staring George Segal and Stephane Auran. ... George Segal George Segal (born February 13, 1934) is a well-known Jewish American film and stage actor who was born in Great Neck, Long Island, New York. ... The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, also known as LACMA, is the official art museum of the County of Los Angeles, California. ...


In 1988, the film was parodied in "The Big Goodbye," a first-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Captain Jean-Luc Picard, played by Patrick Stewart, is a fan of detective stories of the early 20th Century, including the fictional Dixon Hill, a stand-in for Sam Spade. In a holodeck simulation, Picard-as-Hill is opposed by Cyrus Redblock, whose name is a play on "Sydney Greenstreet." Redblock is looking for "the item," which is never identified, but is meant to stand in for the Falcon. Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Big Goodbye is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, first broadcast January 11, 1988. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional Star Trek character portrayed by Patrick Stewart. ... This article is about the actor. ... Dixon Hill is fictional detective in the Star Trek universe, a homage to Sam Spade set in 1940s San Francisco. ... A holodeck on the Enterprise-D; the arch and exit are prominent. ...


There is a homage to the film in Overdrawn at the Memory Bank, a made-for-TV movie that gained some notoriety by being mocked on Mystery Science Theatre 3000. Famed Marvel Comics supervillain the Kingpin is also supposedly based on Sydney Greenstreet's character of Kasper Gutman. Overdrawn at the Memory Bank was a 1983 television movie. ... From left to right, Crow T. Robot, Joel Robinson, and Tom Servo. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... The Kingpin (Wilson Fisk) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics villain who has battled many Marvel crime-fighters; most often Spider-Man, Daredevil and The Punisher. ... Sydney Hughes Greenstreet (December 27, 1879 – January 18, 1954) was an English actor. ...


In an episode of Get Smart that parodies the film, Maxwell Smart travels to Mexico on a case to find the Tequila Mockingbird, a parody of the title To Kill a Mockingbird. For the updated film based on the TV series, see Get Smart (film). ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a Southern Gothic bildungsroman novel by Harper Lee. ...


An episode from the first season of The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries is called The Maltese Canary and the title card is in black-and-white colors. The character of Sam Spade also stars in the episode, and his place as a detective is taken over by Granny until his return from a tournament. The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries is an animated television series which aired from 1995 to 2002 on Kids WB and was later re-run on Cartoon Network. ... Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... Granny in Canary Row. ...


An episode of Batman: The Animated Series entitled "Perchance To Dream" features Batman quoting the line, "The stuff dreams are made of." The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ...


Production details

  • The unbilled appearance of the great character actor Walter Huston, in a small cameo role as the freighter captain who delivers the Falcon to Spade’s office, was done as a good luck gesture for his son, John Huston, on his directorial debut. The elder Huston had to promise Jack Warner that he would not demand a dime for his little role before he was allowed to stagger into Spade’s office.
A standard Webley-Fosbery
A standard Webley-Fosbery
  • The revolver used to shoot Miles is correctly identified by Spade as a Webley-Fosbery. The Webley was an experiment to get a handgun to automatically reload and cock itself between shots. Unlike a typical semi-automatic pistol with a moving slide, this was a revolver that used its backward momentum to cock the hammer and rotate the cylinder, readying it for the next pull of the trigger. Webleys are rare and considered very valuable by collectors. There was an eight shot .38 calibre version (unusual in itself as most revolvers carry six, or occasionally five, rounds), and a six-shot .455 calibre version. In the film, the .455 version was incorrectly described as the eight shot weapon and the name mispronounced as "Foresby".
  • Contrary to popular belief, Bogart (as Spade) does not wear a trench coat in this film, although he does wear an unbelted wool overcoat in outdoor scenes. The popular association of the trench coat with Bogart began when he wore the item in Casablanca.
  • Ronson "Touch Tip" lighters are used throughout the film. These lighters, popular in the 1930s and early 1940s, came in a variety of configurations.
  • The Maltese Falcon is considered a classic example of a MacGuffin, a plot device that motivates the characters of the story but otherwise has little relevance.[21]

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixel Image in higher resolution (804 × 537 pixel, file size: 55 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source:http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixel Image in higher resolution (804 × 537 pixel, file size: 55 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source:http://www. ... The Webley-Fosbery Self-Cocking Automatic Revolver was an unusual, recoil-operated, automatic revolver designed by Lieutenant Colonel George Vincent Fosbery, VC and produced by the Webley and Scott company from 1901 to 1915. ... For other uses, see Revolver (disambiguation). ... The Webley-Fosbery Self-Cocking Automatic Revolver was an unusual, recoil-operated, automatic revolver designed by Lieutenant Colonel George Vincent Fosbery, VC and produced by the Webley and Scott company from 1901 to 1915. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... World War I example For the film, see Trenchcoat (film). ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Ronson Lighters History Ronsons was a large factory making gas lighters in the town of Leatherhead, Surrey. ... This article is about the plot device. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Ebert, Roger "The Maltese Falcon (1941)." rogerebert.com. 13 May 2001. 24 February 2007.
  2. ^ a b Entertainment Weekly. The 100 Greatest Movies of All Time. New York: Entertainment Weekly Books, 1999.
  3. ^ Sklar, Robert. Film: An International History of the Medium. [London]: Thames and Hudson, [c. 1990].
  4. ^ a b List of National Film Registry (1988-2003).
  5. ^ Dashiell Hammett. Introduction to The Maltese Falcon (1934 edition). Retrieved on April 15, 2007.
  6. ^ This statement is incorrect, as the Knights Templar, founded in 1119, were disbanded by 1312, after King Philip IV of France had declared them heretics so that he could confiscate their wealth. However, a second order of religious knights, the Knights Hospitaller, were in fact based in Malta from 1530 to 1798 (as a result of their long years on Malta they were sometimes called the Knights of Malta). The Knights Hospitaller did obtain Malta from Emperor Charles V and they did pay him an annual fee of one Maltese falcon...but not, so far as is known, a jeweled bird as proposed in the book and films.
  7. ^ Notice that, when Gutman is slicing away energetically at the Falcon, a quick cutaway shot shows him standing still with his arms not moving—an obvious insert of a shot from earlier in the scene. Simultaneously, the voice saying, "It's a fake, a phony, it's lead", is clearly not Gutman's, nor anyone else's in the room at the time. The line was obviously dubbed in by another actor.
  8. ^ a b c d e Mills, Michael (1998). The Maltese Falcon. Palace Classic Films. moderntimes.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  9. ^ Serber, Robert and Crease, Robert (1998). Peace & War: Reminiscences of a Life on the Frontiers of Science. New York: Columbia University Press, p. 104. ISBN 0231105460. 
  10. ^ gunsel. Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved on 2007-03-07.
  11. ^ Michael Quinion. gunsel. World Wide Words. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  12. ^ Spotlight on. ..Eros. Take Our Word For It. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  13. ^ Lax, Eric. Audio commentary for Disc One of the 2006 three-disc DVD special edition of The Maltese Falcon.
  14. ^ Huston decided that the final scene of the novel and the script, in which Spade returns disgustedly to Iva Archer, would not be filmed, believing the film should end the way it was, and thus making Spade's character more honorable as the story progressed. Lax, Eric. Audio commentary for Disc One of the 2006 three-disc DVD special edition of The Maltese Falcon.
  15. ^ The only major section of the novel which wasn't used at all in the film is the story of a man named "Flitcraft", which Spade tells to Brigid while waiting in his apartment for Cairo to show up.
  16. ^ Grobel, Lawrence (1989), The Hustons (Paperback ed.), Cooper Square Press, <http://www.amazon.com/Hustons-Lawrence-Grobel/dp/0815410263>
  17. ^ Shakespeare, William The Tempest, Act IV, Sc 1, line 155
  18. ^ AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes
  19. ^ Terrace, Vincent (1999). Radio Programs, 1924-1984:A Catalog of Over 1800 Shows. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. ISBN 0-7864-0351-9. 
  20. ^ Kahn, Michael. "Maltese Falcon stolen from San Francisco restaurant." washingtonpost.com. 13 February 2007. 25 February 2007.
  21. ^ Dirks, Tim. Movie Review: "The Maltese Falcon". Filmsite.org. Retrieved on 2008-02-15.

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... Film about the two sisters Stanley and Roy Timberlake. ... Across the Pacific is a 1942 thriller set on the eve of the United States entry into World War II. 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The Asphalt Jungle is a 1950 film noir directed by John Huston. ... The Red Badge of Courage is a 1951 film by John Huston, based on the Stephen Crane novel of the same name. ... The African Queen is a 1951 film made by Horizon Pictures and Romulus Films, and distributed by United Artists. ... Moulin Rouge is a 1952 movie directed by John Huston. ... Beat the Devil is a 1953 film directed by John Huston and starring Humphrey Bogart. ... Moby Dick is a 1956 adaptation of Herman Melvilles novel Moby-Dick. ... This article is about the 1957 film. ... The Barbarian and the Geisha is a 1958 film directed by John Huston and starring John Wayne. ... Roots of Heaven is a film based on the novel by Romain Gary. ... The Unforgiven is an American western film released in 1960. ... The Misfits is a 1961 American film, written by Arthur Miller, directed by John Huston, and starring Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, Montgomery Clift, Eli Wallach, and Thelma Ritter. ... Freud the Secret Passion also known as Freud (1962) is a American biographical film drama based on the life Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, directed by John Huston. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Casa Iguana hotel in Mismaloya The Night of the Iguana is a 1964 film based on the play by Tennessee Williams. ... Reflections in a Golden Eye is a 1941 novel by Carson McCullers that deals with the theme of repressed homosexuality. ... This article is about the 1967 film, for other uses of this name, see Casino Royale. ... The Kremlin Letter is a 1970 film, released by 20th Century-Fox. ... Fat City is a 1972 John Huston-directed film starring: Stacy Keach as Tully Jeff Bridges as Ernie Susan Tyrrell as Oma Candy Clark as Faye Nicholas Colasanto - Wayne Mahan as Buford Wills Art Aragon One of John Hustons later triumphs. ... The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean is a 1972 western movie written by John Milius, directed by John Huston, and starring Paul Newman (at the height of his career, between Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting). ... The MacKintosh Man is a 1973 cold war spy thriller film made by the Newman-Foreman Company and Warner Bros. ... The Man Who Would Be King is a 1975 film adapted from the Rudyard Kipling story of the same title. ... Wise Blood (German titles Der Ketzer or Die Weisheit des Blutes) is a 1979 drama film directed by John Huston and based on the novel by Flannery OConnor. ... Phobia is a mystery/thriller film released in 1980. ... Escape to Victory is a 1981 film about Allied prisoners of war who are interned in a Nazi prison camp during World War II. It was directed by John Huston and stars Michael Caine and Sylvester Stallone. ... This is about the 1982 film. ... Under the Volcano is a 1984 film directed by John Huston and stars Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, Anthony Andrews and Katy Jurado. ... Prizzis Honor is a 1985 comedy film that tells the story of a mob hit man and hit woman who fall in love with each other, even though they have been hired to kill each other. ... The Dead is a 1987 film directed by John Huston, starring his daughter Anjelica Huston. ...

 
 

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