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Encyclopedia > The Lovett School
The Lovett School
Name

The Lovett School

Address

4075 Paces Ferry Road Atlanta, GA 30327-3099

Established

1926

Community

Suburban

Students

Coeducational

Grades

Kindergarten to 12

Headmaster

William S. Peebles IV

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Southern Association of Independent Schools The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... The Southern Association of Independent Schools is a U.S.-based voluntary organization of more than 275 independent elementary and secondary schools through the South, representing more than 147,000 students. ...

Mascot

the Lovett Lion

Colors

Blue and White

Motto

"Omnia ad Dei Gloriam"

Newspaper
Yearbook

The Lovett Leonid

School Website

www.lovett.org

The Lovett School is a coeducational, kindergarten through twelfth grade independent school located in north Atlanta, Georgia. Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Twelfth grade (called Grade 12 in some regions, also known as senior year in the U.S.) is the final year of required education in the United States and many other nations. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... Atlanta redirects here. ...


History



In September 1926 Mrs. Eva Edwards Lovett, an innovative educator who emphasized the development of the whole child, officially began The Lovett School with 20 boys and girls in Grades 1-3 at a former home in Midtown Atlanta. By 1936, Lovett was able to become a true country day school, with a move to a wooded campus north of the city off West Wesley Road.


From 1936 to 1954, the school successfully grew under Mrs. Lovett's leadership, with her emphasis placed on progressive education, where children learn by doing and not "the usual exclusive concern with textbook knowledge." In the mid-1950s, plans for the continued direction of the school upon Mrs. Lovett's retirement were taken into consideration, and the school merged with The Cathedral of St. Philip. Plans were made to construct a larger school with improved facilities. The 1960-61 school year opened at 4075 Paces Ferry Road--Lovett's current location--with an enrollment of 1,024 students, representing all grades except the 12th. In June 1962, Lovett's first senior class graduated, all having been accepted at colleges and universities of their choice.


The years 1963 through 1966 were difficult ones in Lovett's history with the beginning of integration. Lovett certainly was not the last stronghold of segregation, but it was certainly one of the most publicized. In 1963 Martin Luther King III applied to Lovett and was denied admission by the board of trustees--despite the objections of the governing Episcopal Diocese, which was in favor of open churches and open schools. But Lovett's trustees argued that they were not in defiance since the school was not originally founded by the Episcopal Church. As a result, the Reverend McDowell, an Episcopal priest, resigned as headmaster, and the school's admission policy was revised to free itself of ecclesiastical jurisdiction of The Cathedral of St. Philip. However, by 1967, Lovett's admission policy had been revised to adopt a non-discriminatory policy of evaluating students without regard to race or religion. (The policy has since been expanded several times, and now reads: "The Lovett School admits students of any race, color, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. The Lovett School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin in administration of its employment practices, educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic or other school-administered programs.")


By 1964, both the elementary and high schools were accredited by the Georgia Commission of Accreditation (and each year subsequently), and the Upper School was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Universities. Aggressive campus building projects continued through the 1960s, '70s and '80s, bringing to campus the Kilpatrick Stadium, Loridans House, Smith Natatorium, Vasser Woolley Library, Fuqua Center, Wallace Gym, Hite Wellness Center, and more. In the early 1980s, Lovett became one of the select groups of schools in the country that was invited to nominate seniors for the prestigious Jefferson Scholarship at the University of Virginia and the Morehead Scholarship at the University of North Carolina. In 1992, the school philosophy was reviewed, and a mission statement was developed. The school also purchased more than 500 acres of rainforest, known as Siempre Verde, in Ecuador for the purpose of establishing a research and education center. In 1995 Lovett began hosting Summerbridge Atlanta (now known as Breakthrough Atlanta) , an academic enrichment program for middle school students from Atlanta's public schools.


During the 1998-99 school year, The Lovett School Board of Trustees worked in earnest toward a new strategic plan. Working committees met to plan for the school's future in the areas of governance, educational environment, co-curricular programs, character education, inclusivity, faculty/staff, technology, facilities, and endowment/development. The school was named an "independent school of distinction" in its Fall 1999 interim review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.


The 2000-01 academic year was a very special one for Lovett. First and foremost, the school celebrated its 75th anniversary. The school came together to "Celebrate the Legacy and Continue the Vision" in many ways, including a history exhibition, a commemorative calendar, special chapel services, and an Open House and Gala that brought alumni, former faculty and staff, and many friends of the school back to campus for an extraordinary celebration. The 2000-01 school year also marked the introduction of Lovett's Character Pledge, developed by a committee of parents and staff in keeping with the goals of Lovett's Strategic Plan 2000. The Character Pledge reads as follows: "We, who are members of the Lovett community, seek to live lives of good character. We believe that good character grows from daily acts of honesty, respect, responsibility, and compassion. We pledge ourselves to develop these ideals with courage and integrity, striving to do what is right at all times." The school also embarked on Continuing the Vision: The 75th Anniversary Campaign, Lovett's largest and most ambitious fund-raising campaign ever ($55 million for Phase I). This campaign is raising the funds necessary to complete Phase I of the Master Campus Plan, a blueprint for dramatically improving the quality of student and faculty life. In 2001, construction began on the plan, which included a new Lower and Upper School and other projects that sought to increase green space and reduce the clutter of cars on campus.


2002-03 marked the last year for Lovett's pre-kindergarten program, and the school continues today as a Kindergarten through Grade 12 institution. Headmaster Jim Hendrix retired from Lovett in 2003, and was replaced by William S. Peebles IV. Under Peebles's fresh leadership, work has begun on a new strategic plan and Phase II of the Master Campus Plan, to include a new Middle School and community center.


Notable Alumni (Chronological Order)

Charlotte Laws Charlotte Laws (born May 11, 1960) is an American author, local Los Angeles politician, community activist, and animal rights advocate. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Animal liberation redirects here. ... Knox Culpepper is a football player from Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article relates to sports. ... Head coach Mark Richt 7th year, 66–19–0 Home stadium Sanford Stadium Capacity 92,746 - Grass Conference SEC - Eastern First year 1892 Athletic director Damon Evans Website georgiadogs. ... R. Shane Kimbrough was among the first candidates selected for astronaut training in the United States following the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... Gale Morgan Harold III (born on July 10, 1969 in Decatur, Georgia, United States) is an American actor. ... // Queer As Folk (US) Based on the British series of the same name, Showtimes Queer as Folk presents the American version. ... Vanished was an American television drama series of hour-long episodes produced by Twentieth Century Fox. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... This article relates to sports. ... Head coach Mark Richt 7th year, 66–19–0 Home stadium Sanford Stadium Capacity 92,746 - Grass Conference SEC - Eastern First year 1892 Athletic director Damon Evans Website georgiadogs. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Adam Nelson is an elite American shotputter. ... Shot put The shot put is an athletics (track and field) event involving putting (throwing in a pushing motion) a heavy metal ball, also called the shot, as far as possible. ... George Lombard (born September 14, 1975, in Atlanta, Georgia) is a Major League Baseball outfielder for the Washington Nationals. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... Michael Brent Abernathy (born September 23, 1977 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a minor league first baseman for the Washington Nationals affiliate Columbus Clippers. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... An infielder is a baseball player who plays on the infield, the dirt portion of a baseball diamond between first base and third base. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... This article is about the sport. ... Christine Helen Lakin (born January 25, 1979, in Dallas, Texas) is an American actress. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Other nicknames The Horseshoes Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Audio Theater - Lovett School (210 words)
The "recreation" of a live broadcast from a typical 5000 watt network affiliate station was presented as reminiscences from radio's golden age.
The serial episode "Dancer in the Dark," was written by an Atlanta writer, Thomas E. Fuller, originally for The Atlanta Radio Theatre Company, and was adapted for the Middle School production.
Henry Howard, from The Atlanta Radio Theatre Company taught the students sound effect techniques, microphone techniques and generally consulted on how live radio drama was put together.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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