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Encyclopedia > The Lion in Winter

The Lion in Winter is a 1966 Broadway play by James Goldman, who also cinematically adapted it in 1968 for the film directed by Anthony Harvey and a 2003 film by Andrei Konchalovsky. Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... James Goldman (June 30, 1929 - October 28, 1998) was an American playwright, and screenwriter, and brother of William Goldman. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthony Harvey (born June 3, 1931) is a British film editor and director. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Andron Sergeyevich Mikhalkov-Konchalovsky (Russian: ) (born August 20, 1937 in Moscow) is an acclaimed Russian film writer and director. ...

Contents

Production history

Original Broadway production

The play's premier was in the Ambassador Theatre, New York City on 3 March 1966, directed by Noel Willman featuring Rosemary Harris as Queen Eleanor and Robert Preston as King Henry II, and Christopher Walken as a King Philip of France. The production was nominated for two Tony Awards and Rosemary Harris was awarded the Best Actress prize. It had a run of 92 performances. The Ambassador Theatre is a Broadway theatre. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Noel Willman as the sinister Dr. Ravna in the Hammer horror film The Kiss of the Vampire (1963) Noel Willman (August 4, 1918 in Derry, Ireland - December 14, 1988 in New York) was a British actor and theatre director. ... Rosemary Harris (born September 19, 1930[1] in Ashby, Suffolk, England) is an Academy Award nominated English actress and a member of the American Theatre Hall of Fame. ... Robert Preston Meservey (June 8, 1918 - March 21, 1987), better known as Robert Preston, was an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ...


Revival

The play was revived in March, 1999, at the Criterion Center Stage Right, with Stockard Channing as Queen Eleanor and Laurence Fishburne as King Henry II, in directed by Michael Mayer. Channing was nominated for a best actress Tony prize, and the production ran for 93 performances. Stockard Channing press kit photo Stockard Channing (born Susan Antonia Williams Stockard on February 13, 1944) is an American actress. ... Laurence Fishburne III (b. ... Michael Mayer (b. ...


Film adaptations

Main article, see The Lion in Winter (1968 film)

The film was nominated for 7 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Peter O'Toole), Best Director (Anthony Harvey), and Best Costume Design. The film won three Academy Awards: Best Actress (Katharine Hepburn), Best Screenplay (James Goldman), and Best Score (John Barry). The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... Peter Seamus OToole (Peter James OToole) (born August 2, 1932 (accepted but presumed date) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic American star of film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (Aliénor dAquitaine in French), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] –April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Anthony Harvey (born June 3, 1931) is a British film editor and director. ... James Goldman (June 30, 1929 - October 28, 1998) was an American playwright, and screenwriter, and brother of William Goldman. ... John Barry. ...

Main article, see The Lion in Winter (2003 film)

The Lion in Winter is a 2003 made-for-television remake of the 1968 film. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress. ... Patrick Stewart OBE (born July 13, 1940) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated English film, television and stage actor. ... Andron Sergeyevich Mikhalkov-Konchalovsky (Russian: ) (born August 20, 1937 in Moscow) is an acclaimed Russian film writer and director. ...

Synopsis

The Lion in Winter occurs in Christmas 1183 at Henry Plantagenet's château and primary residence in Chinon, Anjou, in the Angevin Empire, in contemporary France. The play opens with the arrival of his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine from prison; the story immediately centres on the personality conflicts and shifting alliances among the estranged couple and their adult sons and heirs to the throne: Prince Richard the Lionheart (1157-1199, the future King Richard I of England 1189-1199), Prince Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany (1158-1186), and Prince John (1166-1216, the future King John I of England 1199-1216). Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... Illustration of Chinon, circa 1892 For other uses, see Chinon (disambiguation). ... Modern département of Maine-et-Loire, which largely corresponds to Anjou Anjou is a former county (c. ... The term Angevin Empire describes a collection of states ruled by the Angevin Plantagenet dynasty. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (Aliénor dAquitaine in French), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] –April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ... Geoffrey Plantagenet (September 23, 1158 – August 19, 1186) was Duke of Brittany between 1181 and 1186, through his marriage with the heiress Constance. ... John of England depicted in Cassells History of England (1902) John (French: Jean) (December 24, 1166/67–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from 1199 to 1216. ...


Also in the château, pursuing their own intrigues with the royal family are King Philip II of France, the son of Eleanor's ex-husband, and Philip II's half-sister Alais, a daughter of Louis VII. Alais was betrothed to Richard I, but is Henry II's mistress; in reality, Henry had many mistresses and bastards. The "Rosamund" mentioned in the film was Henry II's mistress until she died. Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe II Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Alys, Countess of the Vexin (4 October 1160 – c. ... Mistress is the feminine form of the word master. ...


The Lion in Winter is fictional: there was no Christmas Court at Chinon in 1183; there was a Christmas court at Caen in 1182; none of the dialogue and action is historic, though the outcomes of the characters and the background are historically accurate. The article on the Revolt of 1173-1174 describes the historical events leading to the play's events. Caen (pronounced /kɑ̃/) is a commune of northwestern France. ... The Revolt of 1173–1174 was a rebellion against Henry II of England by three of his sons, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine and rebel supporters. ...


See also

Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (Aliénor dAquitaine in French), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] –April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... The Revolt of 1173–1174 was a rebellion against Henry II of England by three of his sons, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine and rebel supporters. ... El Cid (1961) starring Charlton Heston, a movie with direct heritage to the Romantics, it helped mold popular perceptions of the Middle Ages in the middle 20th century. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Lion in Winter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (324 words)
The Lion in Winter is a 1966 Broadway play by James Goldman.
The film was made in 1968 but it was thirty-five years before a major cast member died: Katharine Hepburn in 2003.
A television production of The Lion in Winter was first shown on May 23, 2004.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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