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Encyclopedia > The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe

Cover of 1950 first edition (hardcover)
Author C. S. Lewis
Illustrator Pauline Baynes
Cover artist Pauline Baynes
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Series The Chronicles of Narnia
Genre(s) Fantasy, children's literature
Publisher Geoffrey Bles
Publication date 1950
Media type Print (hardcover and paperback)
Pages 208 (modern hardcover)
ISBN ISBN 0-06-023481-4 (modern hardcover)
Followed by Prince Caspian

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. S. Lewis. Written in 1950 and set in approximately 1940, it is the first book of The Chronicles of Narnia and is the best known book of the series. Although it was written and published first, it is second in the series' internal chronological order, after The Magician's Nephew. Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.[1] Image File history File links TheLionWitchWardrobe(1stEd). ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Pauline Baynes (born 1922, in Hove, Sussex) is an English book illustrator, whose work encompasses more than 100 books. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Narnia redirects here. ... Childrens books redirects here. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN redirects here. ... For the film adaptation of the novel, see The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Narnia redirects here. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... TIME redirects here. ...


The book is dedicated to Lewis' god daughter, Lucy Barfield.

Contents

Character list

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe paperback edition. Cover art by Pauline Baynes.
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe paperback edition. Cover art by Pauline Baynes.
  • Peter Pevensie is the oldest of the Pevensie siblings that left London during WWII. At first, Peter disbelieves Lucy's stories about Narnia, but changes his mind when he sees it for himself. Peter is hailed as a hero for his part in the overthrow of the White Witch. He is eventually crowned as High King of Narnia, and becomes known as King Peter the Magnificent.
  • Susan Pevensie is the second oldest of the Pevensie children. She also does not believe in Narnia until she is actually there. She is crowned Queen Susan, and becomes known as Queen Susan the Gentle.
  • Edmund Pevensie is

the third of the Pevensie children. When he is in Narnia, he meets the White Witch who plies him with enchanted Turkish Delight. Tempted by the White Witch's promise of power and seemingly unending supplies of Turkish Delight, Edmund betrays his siblings, but eventually regrets his actions and repents. After he helps Aslan and the citizens of Narnia defeat the White Witch, he is crowned King of Narnia with his brother, and becomes known as King Edmund the Just. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 402 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (435 × 648 pixel, file size: 40 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hi how are you??? File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 402 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (435 × 648 pixel, file size: 40 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hi how are you??? File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Peter Pevensie is one of the major characters in the childrens fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Jadis, the White Witch is the key villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published book in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series, and the second chronologically. ... Susan Pevensie is one of the major characters in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series. ... Edmund Pevensie (1930 - 1949) is a major character in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia. ... For other uses, see Turkish Delight (disambiguation). ...

  • Lucy Pevensie is the youngest Pevensie child. She discovers the land of Narnia in the back of Professor Kirke's wardrobe. When Lucy tells her siblings, they refuse to believe her, particularly Edmund, who teases her mercilessly. After the restoration of Narnia, Lucy is crowned as Queen with her sister, Susan, and becomes known as Queen Lucy the Valiant.
  • Tumnus is a faun and the first person that Lucy meets in Narnia. Tumnus befriends her, despite being hired by the White Witch as a kidnapper. After getting toknow Lucy, he changes his mind about handing her over to the witch. This gets him in trouble and he is eventually arrested and turned into stone. He is later restored by Aslan and becomes a close friend of the Pevensies.
  • Queen Jadis, The White Witch is the self-proclaimed Queen of Narnia. Ruling with an iron fist, she had placed a spell on Narnia so that it is forever winter and never Christmas. She has the right to kill anyone she believes to be a traitor to Narnia, which happens often. Her magic wand can turn people and animals to stone. The White Witch's only fear is of the prophecy that tells of "two sons of Adam" and "two daughters of Eve" who will come to Narnia and ally with Aslan to overthrow her. (She is first shown in The Magician's Nephew.)
  • Aslan is the lion, and keeps everything on a balance in Narnia. He sacrifices himself to spare Edmund, and is resurrected in time to aid the citizens of Narnia and the Pevensie children in their battle against the White Witch and her minions.
  • Professor Kirke is a professor that is given custody of the Pevensies when they evacuate London. He is the only one who believes that Lucy did indeed visit Narnia, as he himself had been there as a boy, and tries to convince the other Pevensie children of her veracity. He is also the main character in The Magician's Nephew, Digory Kirke.
  • Mr. Beaver is friends with Tumnus, and he attempts to dethrone the White Witch and find Tumnus with Lucy, Susan, and Peter.
  • Mrs. Beaver is Mr. Beaver's wife. She helps the Pevensies by feeding them a good meal, and she is very optimistic.
  • Dwarf. The dwarf is the White Witch's (jade) right hand man. Although unnamed in the book, in the film he is known as Ginnarbrick.
  • Maugrim is a wolf pressed into service by the White Witch to hunt down and destroy the Pevensie children. He is the police commissioner of Narnia, their subordinates constitute the White Witch's police service. He is killed by Peter in the chapter "Peter's First Battle".
  • Father Christmas arrives when the Witch's spell of having no Christmas is broken. He gives each of the Pevensie children a gift (Edmund was with the White Witch), which ultimately will help them defeat the White Witch; and Mrs. Beaver is given a better sewing machine and Mr. Beaver gets his dam completed and free of leaks.
  • Giant Rumblebuffin is the giant who was brought back to life by Aslan. He was also the one who broke down the Witch's gate in the novel.

Lucy Pevensie (1932 - 1949) is a fictional character in C. S. Lewis The Chronicles of Narnia. ... In C. S. Lewiss fictional world of Narnia, Mr. ... Jadis, the White Witch is the key villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published book in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series, and the second chronologically. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... For other uses, see Aslan (disambiguation). ... Digory Kirke (1888 - 1949) is a human character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Digory Kirke (1888 - 1949) is a human character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Maugrim is a powerful wolf and one of the White Witchs servants in the book The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis. ... Excerpt from Josiah Kings The Examination and Tryal of Father Christmas (1686), published shortly after Christmas was reinstated as a holy day in England Father Christmas is the name used in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and several other Commonwealth countries, for the gift-bringing figure of Christmas...

Plot summary

The Second World War has just begun and four children, Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy Pevensie, are evacuated from London in 1940 to escape the Blitz. They are sent to live with Professor Digory Kirke, who lives in a country house in the English countryside with his housekeeper, Mrs MacReady, as well as three servants called Ivy, Margaret, and Betty. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Peter Pevensie is one of the major characters in the childrens fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. ... Susan Pevensie is one of the major characters in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series. ... Edmund Pevensie (1930 - 1949) is a major character in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia. ... Lucy Pevensie (1932 - 1949) is a fictional character in C. S. Lewis The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Evacuations of civilians in Britain during World War II began prior to the Battle of Britain and the Blitz. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... Digory Kirke (1888 - 1949) is a human character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Holkham Hall, one of the grandest English country houses not only displayed the owners fashionable and cultivated tastes, but was the epicentre of a vast landed estate, providing employment to hundreds The English country house is generally accepted as a large house or mansion, once in the ownership of an... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... A housekeeper is an individual responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of the interior of a residence. ... Servant has a number of meaning: A servant is another word for domestic worker, a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ...


One rainy day shortly after the children arrive, they decide to explore the big house. Lucy, the youngest of the children, is curious about the wardrobe in an empty room, but discovers that the door to it is a portal to a snow-covered forest with a gaslight post in the centre. There she meets a faun, who introduces himself as Tumnus and invites her home for tea. He tells her that the land is called Narnia and it is ruled by the ruthless White Witch, who ensures that it is always Winter but never Christmas. Look up Wardrobe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A portal in fiction is a magical or technological doorway that connects two distant locations. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about a community of trees. ... Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ... A faun, as painted by Hungarian painter Pál Szinyei Merse In Roman mythology, fauns are place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. ... In C. S. Lewiss fictional world of Narnia, Mr. ... This article is about tea, the meal. ... Narnia is a fantasy world created by C. S. Lewis as a location for his Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven fantasy novels for children. ... Jadis, the White Witch is the key villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published book in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series, and the second chronologically. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


Lucy returns through the wardrobe, having spent hours in Narnia, only to find that just a few seconds have passed in England. She is unable to convince the other children about her adventure, as the wardrobe is now just a wardrobe. Edmund, the next youngest of the four siblings, is particularly spiteful towards Lucy. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Several weeks later, having forgotten about Narnia, Lucy and Edmund hide in the wardrobe while playing hide-and-seek. He fails to catch up with Lucy, and is approached by an extremely pale lady on a sledge pulled by a white reindeer, who introduces herself as the Queen of Narnia, and provides him with some magical Turkish delight. She promises to make him a Prince and eventually King of Narnia, and persuades him to bring the other children to her house. Image File history File links Tm_narnia1. ... Image File history File links Tm_narnia1. ... Rendering in visual art and technical drawing means the process of creating, shading and texturing of an image, especially a photorealistic one. ... Lucy Pevensie (1932 - 1949) is a fictional character in C. S. Lewis The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Narnia is a fantasy world created by C. S. Lewis as a location for his Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven fantasy novels for children. ... Hide and seek is a childrens game. ... For the cricket meaning, see Sledging (cricket) A sled, sledge or sleigh is a vehicle with runners for sliding instead of wheels for rolling. ... Caribou redirects here. ... For other uses, see Turkish Delight (disambiguation). ...


Lucy and Edmund meet in the woods and return together through the wardrobe. During their conversation, Lucy mentions the White Witch and Edmund realises that she is none other than the lady who has befriended him. When they arrive back in England, Edmund lies to Peter and Susan, claiming that he and Lucy were just playing and that the wardrobe is no more than an ordinary one, leaving Lucy very upset. Jadis, the White Witch is the key villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published book in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series, and the second chronologically. ...


Shortly thereafter, all four children hide in the wardrobe to avoid Mrs McReady and find themselves in Narnia. Lucy guides them to Tumnus's cave, only to discover that Tumnus has been captured just as the White Witch had threatened and his cave ransacked by Maugrim, chief of the White Witch's secret police. The children are sheltered by a pair of talking beavers named Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver, who recount an ancient prophecy that when two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve fill the four thrones at Cair Paravel, the witch's power will fail. The beavers tell of the true king of Narnia — a great lion called Aslan — who has been absent for many years, but is now "On the move again." For other uses, see Beaver (disambiguation). ... Mr. ... Mrs. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... Cair Paravel is the capital of Narnia in The Chronicles of Narnia. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aslan (disambiguation). ...


Edmund, still in the thrall of the witch, runs off to the White Witch's castle and the others do not notice his departure until it is too late to recall him. Realising that they have been betrayed, the others set off to find Aslan. When Edmund reaches the White Witch, she treats him harshly and, taking him with her, sets off to catch the other children.


However, her power is failing and a thaw strands her sleigh. The other children reach Aslan, and a penitent Edmund is rescued just as the witch is about to kill him.


Calling for a truce, the witch demands that Edmund be returned to her, as an ancient law gives her possession of all traitors. Aslan, acknowledging the law, offers himself in Edmund's place and the witch accepts.


Aslan is sacrificed by the witch, but comes back to life due to the "Deeper magic", which holds that when someone who has committed no treachery willingly sacrifices himself for a traitor, death is reversed, and the martyr returns to life.


During a final battle, the witch is defeated and killed by Aslan.


The children become kings and queens, and spend many years in Narnia, growing to maturity, before returning to our world, where they find themselves children again, at the moment at which they originally left.


Commentary

The story takes inspiration from the Gospel themes of betrayal, death, resurrection, and redemption. In the subsequent books, there is a nod in the direction of the Trinity concept, with Aslan in the Christ-role and a passing reference to the "Emperor over the Sea" as God the Father. In addition, there are various allusions to Christ's execution, including the humiliation prior to his death and the splitting of the curtain in the Temple, represented by the cracking of the stone table. The cracking of the stone table, probably more accurately reflects the abolishment of the Old Law or commandments. The book is not intended to be a retelling of Biblical stories in another form; it simply borrows ideas from them so as to illustrate basic conceptions of Christianity (and some other ideas as well — Platonic philosophy among them). Additionally, the White Witch is said to be descended from Lilith, who some religious texts say was Adam's first wife. For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses of the word, see Redemption Redemption is a religious concept referring to forgiveness or absolution for past sins and protection from eternal damnation. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... Icon of Christ in a Greek Orthodox church This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... This article is about the demon Lilith. ...


Lewis similarly borrowed Biblical ideas (Old Testament in this case) in his Space Trilogy: for example, in That Hideous Strength the Tower of Babel and the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah are re-enacted in modern England, while in Perelandra the events of Paradise and the temptation of Adam and Eve are renacted on Venus and a Cambridge don in effect becomes a prophet in the Biblical sense - i.e. a person to whom God directly speaks. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... That Hideous Strength is a 1945 novel by C. S. Lewis, the final book in Lewiss theological science fiction Space Trilogy. ... This article is about the Biblical story. ... For other uses, see Sodom and Gomorrah (disambiguation). ... Perelandra (also titled Voyage to Venus in a later edition published by Pan Books) is the second book in the Space Trilogy of C. S. Lewis. ... Paradise, Jan Bruegel Paradise is an English word from Persian roots that is generally identified with the Garden of Eden or with Heaven. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... This article is about the planet. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


J. R. R. Tolkien was a close friend of Lewis', a fellow member of the Inklings, and an early reader of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. However, despite his sharing Lewis' Christian faith, Tolkien was rather dismissive of the book. He considered its theology to be both blatant and naive, and the mixture of different mythic elements very inconsistent. He specifically objected to the curious presence of Father Christmas, and the mixture of both Norse and Greek mythologies. In addition, he came to dislike the avuncular manner of story-telling for children. Tolkien redirects here. ... The Eagle and Child pub (commonly known as the Bird and Baby) in Oxford where the Inklings met on Thursday nights in 1939. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ...


When he wrote The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Lewis did not intend for it to be part of a larger work. This may account for several inconsistencies in the series. For example, The Horse and His Boy establishes that humans live in both Archenland and Calormen during the reign of the witch, which calls into question the reliance on the four children to break the witch's spell, as other humans could have been brought in from those nearer locations. Nor is there any explanation as to what has become of the descendants of the original (human) rulers of Narnia, whose dynasty was ordained by Aslan in The Magician's Nephew. Cover of a recent edition of The Horse and His Boy The Horse and His Boy is a novel by C.S. Lewis. ... In C. S. Lewiss fantasy novels the Chronicles of Narnia, Archenland is a nation to the south of Narnia. ... In C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series of novels, Calormen (pron. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ...


Allusions

Professor Kirke is based on W.T. Kirkpatrick, who tutored a 16-year-old Lewis. "Kirk," as he was sometimes called, taught the young Lewis much about thinking and communicating clearly, skills that would be invaluable to him later[2]


Narnia is caught in endless winter when the children first enter. Norse mythology also has a "great winter", known as the Fimbulwinter that is said to precede Ragnarok. The trapping of Edmund by the White Witch is reminiscent of the seduction and imprisonment of Kay by The Snow Queen in Hans Christian Andersen's novella of that name. The fimbulwinter is an element in Norse pagan eschatology. ... Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cover of a modern Danish edtion of The Snow Queen (Sneedronningen) Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Snow Queen The Snow Queen (Danish: Sneedronningen) is a fairy tale written by Hans Christian Andersen and first published in 1845. ... For other uses, see Hans Christian Andersen (disambiguation). ...


The dwarves and giants are from Norse mythology. Fauns, centaurs, minotaurs, dryads, etc. are all from Greek mythology. Father Christmas, of course, was part of popular English folk lore. Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... See also centaur (planetoid), Centaur (rocket stage) Guido Reni, Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 In Greek mythology, the centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race part human and part horse, with a horses body and a human head and torso (illustration, right). ... In Greek mythology, the Minotaur was a creature that was half man and half bull. ... The Dryad by Evelyn De Morgan Dryads are tree spirits in Greek mythology. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...


The main story is an allegory of Christ's crucifixion. Aslan sacrifices himself for Edmund, a traitor who deserved death, in the same way that Christ sacrificed Himself for sinners. The cross is replaced by the Stone Table (which were used in Celtic religion). Additionally, the splitting of the Stone Table reflects the veil of the temple splitting at the point of Christ's death. As with the Christian Passion, it is women (Susan and Lucy) who tend Aslan's body after he dies and are the first to see him after his resurrection.(BBC News 2006) The significance of the death contains elements of both the ransom theory of atonement and the satisfaction theory: Aslan suffers Edmund's penalty (satisfaction), and buys him back from the White Witch, who was entitled to him by reason of his treachery (ransom). The Ransom view of the atonement is a doctrine in Christian theology related to the meaning and effect of the death of Jesus Christ which originated in the early Church, particularly in the work of Origen. ... The satisfaction view of the atonement (also known as the penal or punishment theory) is a doctrine in Christian theology related to the meaning and effect of the death of Jesus Christ and has been traditionally taught in Catholic, Lutheran, and Reformed circles. ...


The freeing of Aslan's body from the stone table by field mice is reminiscent of Aesop's Fable of "The Lion and the Mouse." In the fable, a lion catches a mouse, but lets him go free. The mouse promises to return the favour and does so when he gnaws through the lion's bonds after he has been captured by hunters[3] Nofootnotes|date=February 2008}} Aesop, as conceived by Diego Velázquez Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... The Lion and the Mouse, illustrated by Milo Winter in a 1919 Aesop anthology The Lion and the Mouse is an Aesops fable. ...


The plot device of a magic wardrobe which has no back and which provides to children an entrance to worlds of magic and fantasy appeared in 1931 in Erich Kästner's (otherwise very different) children's book "The 35th of May, or Conrad's Ride to the South Seas". Erich Kästner (February 23, 1899 - July 29, 1974) is one of the most famous German authors of the 20th century. ... The 35th of May, or Conrads Ride to the South Seas ( in German, its original language) is a novel by Erich Kästner, first published in 1931. ...


Differences between the British and American editions

Prior to the publication of the first American edition of Lion, Lewis made the following changes. Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ...

  • In chapter one of the American edition, the animals that Edmund and Susan express interest in are snakes and foxes rather than the foxes and rabbits of the British edition.
  • In chapter six of the American edition, the name of the White Witch's chief of police is changed to "Fenris Ulf" from "Maugrim" in the British.
  • In chapter thirteen, "the roots of the World Ash Tree" takes the place of "the fire-stones of the Secret Hill".

When HarperCollins took over publication of the series in 1994, they used the British edition for all subsequent editions worldwide. (Ford 2005) According to the Edda Fenrisulfr bites off the hand of Týr (John Bauer, 1911) In Norse mythology, Fenrir or Fenrisulfr is a wolf, the son of Loki and the giantess Angrboða. ... Maugrim is a powerful wolf and one of the White Witchs servants in the book The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis. ... For other uses, see Yggdrasil (disambiguation). ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ...


Film, television, and theatrical adaptations

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe has been adapted for television, stage, radio and cinema, including the BBC serial The Chronicles of Narnia. A Walt Disney Pictures film, entitled The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was released in December 2005 and has grossed over $740 million worldwide. Narnia redirects here. ... For other uses of Serial, see Serial (disambiguation). ... The BBC produced a television adaptation of four books of C. S. Lewiss The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1988), Prince Caspian (1989), The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1989) and The Silver Chair (1990). ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the...


References

  • Ford, Paul (2005). Companion to Narnia, Revised Edition. San Francisco, CA: Harper. ISBN 0-06-079127-6. 
  • "CS Lewis letter tells tales of Narnia", BBC News, 2006-06-19. 
  • Wheat, Leonard F. Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials - A Multiple Allegory: Attacking Religious Superstition in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and Paradise Lost (Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2007)

This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Ryken, Leland; and Mead, Marjorie Lamp (2005). A Reader's Guide Through the Wardrobe: Exploring C. S. Lewis's Classic Story. London: InterVarsity Press. ISBN 0-8308-3289-0. 

InterVarsity Press (IVP) is the name of two publishers of evangelical Christian books. ...

External links

Narnia Portal
Image File history File links Portal. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... Narnia redirects here. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... For the film adaptation of the novel, see The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. ... The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is a fantasy novel by C. S. Lewis. ... The Silver Chair is part of The Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven fantasy novels written by C.S. Lewis. ... Cover of a recent edition of The Horse and His Boy The Horse and His Boy is a novel by C.S. Lewis. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... This article is about the novel by C. S. Lewis. ... The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of fantasy films from Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media based on the series of novels, The Chronicles of Narnia written by C.S. Lewis in the 1950s. ... Peter Pevensie is one of the major characters in the childrens fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. ... Susan Pevensie is one of the major characters in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series. ... Edmund Pevensie (1930 - 1949) is a major character in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia. ... Lucy Pevensie (1932 - 1949) is a fictional character in C. S. Lewis The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Eustace Clarence Scrubb (1933 - 1949) is a character in C. S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia. ... Jill Pole (1933 - 1949) is a major character from C. S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia series. ... Digory Kirke (1888 - 1949) is a human character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Polly Plummer is a human fictional character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Caspian X, King of Narnia, Lord of Cair Paravel, and Emperor of the Lone Islands, also called Caspian the Seafarer and Caspian the Navigator (born 2290–died 2356, Narnian Time) is a fictional character in the Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis. ... In C. S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia fictional series, Rilian (2325-?) is the son of King Caspian and the daughter of Ramandu the star. ... Tirian is an Asian based company, that buildings and stenghts proactive companys. ... For other uses, see Aslan (disambiguation). ... Shasta is a fictional character in C.S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia. ... Aravis is a main character in C.S. Lewis The Horse and his Boy. ... Bree (short for Breehy-hinny-brinny-hoohy-hah) is a fictional character in C. S. Lewiss The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Hwin is a fictional character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... In the C.S. Lewiss fictional world of Narnia, Mr. ... Jadis, the White Witch is the key villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published book in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series, and the second chronologically. ... Trumpkin is a fictional character in C.S. Lewis fantasy novel series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Reepicheep is a character from C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series. ... Puddleglum is a Marshwiggle in C. S. Lewiss novel The Silver Chair, part of The Chronicles of Narnia. ... The Lady of the Green Kirtle, also known as the Queen of Underland, is a character in The Silver Chair by C. S. Lewis, appearing as the main villain. ... Shift is a fictional character in the childrens fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. ... This article is about a fictional character, for other uses of Puzzle see Puzzle (disambiguation) Puzzle is a fictional character in The Last Battle, the seventh and final book of C. S. Lewis The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Uncle Andrew Ketterley is a fictional character from C. S. Lewiss fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. ... This is a list of characters in the series of fantasy novels by C. S. Lewis called The Chronicles of Narnia. ... Narnian creatures are any non-human inhabitants of Narnia, the fantasy world created by C. S. Lewis as a setting for his The Chronicles of Narnia. ... For other uses of Narnia, see Narnia (disambiguation). ... In C. S. Lewiss fantasy novels the Chronicles of Narnia, Archenland is a nation to the south of Narnia. ... Cair Paravel is the capital of Narnia in The Chronicles of Narnia. ... In C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series of novels, Calormen (pron. ... Charn is a fictional realm in C. S. Lewiss book The Magicians Nephew, one of the Chronicles of Narnia. ... In the Chronicles of Narnia, The Lone Islands are a set of three islands - Felimath, Doorn, and Avra - that are part of the Narnian empire. ... Telmar is a country in the world of Narnia created by the British author C.S. Lewis. ... The Wood between the Worlds is a location in The Magicians Nephew, part of the Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis. ... Aslans How, or the Hill of the Stone Table, is a high mound or cairn south of the Great River in Narnia next to the Great Woods. ... Aslans Country is a fictional location from C. S. Lewis The Chronicles of Narnia series. ... This is a list of fictional places in the series of novels by C. S. Lewis collectively known as The Chronicles of Narnia. ... The BBC produced a television adaptation of four books of C. S. Lewiss The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1988), Prince Caspian (1989), The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1989) and The Silver Chair (1990). ... The First Battle of Beruna as depicted in the 2005 film The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. ... The Dawn Treader was a Narnian ship, built by King Caspian X, in the Chronicles of Narnia, and is featured primarily in the book The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. ... The events of the Narnian timeline, listed side-by-side against relevant Earth events. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Narnia redirects here. ... For the film adaptation of the novel, see The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. ... The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is a fantasy novel by C. S. Lewis. ... The Silver Chair is part of The Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven fantasy novels written by C.S. Lewis. ... Cover of a recent edition of The Horse and His Boy The Horse and His Boy is a novel by C.S. Lewis. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... This article is about the novel by C. S. Lewis. ... The Space Trilogy, Cosmic Trilogy or Ransom Trilogy is a trilogy of three science fiction novels by C. S. Lewis. ... Out of the Silent Planet is the first novel of a science fiction trilogy written by C. S. Lewis, sometimes referred to as the Space Trilogy or Ransom Trilogy. ... Perelandra (also titled Voyage to Venus in a later edition published by Pan Books) is the second book in the Space Trilogy of C. S. Lewis. ... That Hideous Strength is a 1945 novel by C. S. Lewis, the final book in Lewiss theological science fiction Space Trilogy. ... The Pilgrims Regress is a book of allegorical fiction by C.S. Lewis. ... The Screwtape Letters is a work of Christian fiction by C.S. Lewis first published in book form in 1942. ... The Great Divorce: A Dream is a work of fantasy by C. S. Lewis . ... Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold is a 1956 parallel novel by C. S. Lewis. ... The Screwtape Letters is a work of Christian fiction by C. S. Lewis first published in book form in 1942. ... The Dark Tower is a fragment of a novel attributed to C. S. Lewis and published posthumously by his personal secretary, Walter Hooper, in 1977. ... Boxen is a fictional world that was created by C. S. Lewis as a child and was inhabited by talking animals. ... Spirits in Bondage (1919) was author and Christian apologist C.S. Lewiss first published work. ... Dymer is a narrative poem by C.S. Lewis published in 1926 under the pseudonym Clive Hamilton. ... Written in 1936 by C. S. Lewis, The Allegory of Love is an exploration of the Medieval conventions of courtly love. ... The Personal Heresy is a collection of essays by C.S. Lewis and E. M. W. Tillyard that discusses poetrys relationship to the poets personality. ... The Problem of Pain is a 1940 book by C. S. Lewis, in which he seeks to provide a Christian response to intellectual questions about suffering. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Abolition of Man is a 1943 book by C. S. Lewis. ... In Miracles, C.S. Lewis makes the case for the titular events by first explaining how there must be something more than nature or the whole show and then detailing why that something more is a benevolent being and why it is likely that he would intervene with nature after... Mere Christianity[2] is a book by C. S. Lewis, adapted from a 1943 series of BBC radio lecture broadcast while Lewis was at Oxford during World War II. It is considered a classic work in Christian apologetics. ... Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life is a partial autobiography published by C.S. Lewis in 1955. ... The Four Loves is a book by C. S. Lewis which explores the nature of love from a Christian perspective through thought-experiments and examples from literature. ... Studies in Words is a secular work of linguistic scholarship written by Clive Staples Lewis and published by the Cambridge University Press in 1960. ... The basic idea of An Experiment in Criticism is to evaluate the quality of books not by how they are written, but by how they are read. ... A Grief Observed, first published in 1961, is a collection of C.S. Lewiss reflections on the experience of bereavement, after his wife, Joy Gresham, died from cancer. ... Brut, about the mythic Brutus of Troy, is a Middle English poem compiled and recast by the priest Layamon. ... God in the Dock is a collection of essays and speeches from C. S. Lewis. ...

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NarniaWeb Marketplace - Home Page (51 words)
The Chronicles of Narnia - The Lion, the Wi...
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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1734 words)
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
The White Witch responsible for 100 years of cold knows full well that an ancient prophecy says two sons of Adam and two daughters of Eve will come to challenge her curse.
It is in the spiritual realm that The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe displays its greatest positivity.
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