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Encyclopedia > The Legend of Zelda
The Legend of Zelda
Developer Nintendo R&D 4
Publisher Nintendo
Designer Shigeru Miyamoto
Koji Kondo
Takashi Tezuka
Toshihiko Nakago
Series The Legend of Zelda
Released JPN February 21, 1986[1]
NA August 22, 1987[2]
EU November 27, 1987
Genre Action-adventure
Mode(s) Single player
Ratings ESRB: E (Everyone) (GBA, Wii)
OFLC: G
Platform(s) FDS, NES, FC, GBA, GCN, Wii (VC)
Media Floppy disk (FDS version), 1 megabit cartridge (NES and FC version)
System requirements 22 blocks (Wii)

The Legend of Zelda (The Hyrule Fantasy ゼルダの伝説 Zeruda no Densetsu?, the "Hyrule Fantasy" subtitle was omitted from its English localization), is a video game designed by Shigeru Miyamoto and published by Nintendo. Set in the fantasy land of Hyrule, this is a classic example of the action-adventure genre, which centers around a young hero (Link) and his quest to rescue Princess Zelda from the evil Ganon by collecting the eight fragments of a powerful artifact known as the Triforce. Image File history File links Legend_of_zelda_cover_(with_cartridge)_gold. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Shigeru Miyamoto , born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer. ... Koji Kondo , b. ... Takashi Tezuka ) (born November 17, 1960) is a video game designer for Nintendo. ... The official sword and shield logo of The Legend of Zelda introduced during the release of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... Action-adventure games (British English: arcade adventure) are video games that combine elements of the adventure game genre with various action game elements. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... The ESRBs logo. ... The Office of Film and Literature Classification is a statutory censorship and classification body which provides day to day administrative support for the Classification Board which classified films, video games and publications in Australia, and the Classification Review Board which reviews films, computer games and publications when a valid application... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Nintendo Entertainment System (U.S., Europe, and Australia) NES redirects here. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... The official sword and shield logo of The Legend of Zelda introduced during the release of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. ... The Legend of Zelda was an American animated series loosely based on the first and second Legend of Zelda games for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... Shigeru Miyamoto , born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Hylia redirects here. ... Action-adventure games (British English: arcade adventure) are video games that combine elements of the adventure game genre with various action game elements. ... Rinku redirects here. ... Princess Zelda ) is a fictional character in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. ... Ganon ), also known as Ganondorf ) in his human form, the King of Evil, is a fictional character and primary antagonist of several games in Nintendos The Legend of Zelda series. ... For the arcade system board, see Triforce (arcade system board). ...


As the inaugural game of The Legend of Zelda series, it was first released in Japan as a debut title for the Famicom's Disk System peripheral. With its vast world, open-ended gameplay, scrolling capabilities, and save system, The Legend of Zelda featured groundbreaking technological and gameplay advancements. Because the Famicom Disk System was not released outside of Japan, the game was published internationally on the Nintendo Entertainment System's cartridge format in 1987, with an internal battery to facilitate data saving, where it enjoyed even greater critical and financial success. As one of Nintendo's flagship franchises, Zelda is among the most recognized names in video game history. The official sword and shield logo of The Legend of Zelda introduced during the release of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... A saved game is a piece of digitally stored information about the progress of a player in a computer or video game. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... A Legend of Zelda series logo The Legend of Zelda series (often shortened to Zelda, TLoZ, or LoZ), by Nintendo, is a series of video games created by celebrated game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Link battles three Octoroks in the Overworld.

When The Legend of Zelda was released its gameplay defied categorization, incorporating elements from action games, adventure games, role-playing games, and puzzle games. The game begins with the player controlling Link from an overhead perspective, armed with a small shield. A sword is immediately available in a cave in front of him on the opening screen of the game. To advance, Link must explore the overworld, a large outdoor map with varied environments. Scattered across the overworld and hidden in caves, shrubbery, or behind walls are merchants, gamblers, old ladies, and other people who guide Link with cryptic clues. Barring Link's progress are creatures he must battle to locate the entrances to nine underground dungeons. Image File history File links Legend_of_zelda_gpscreenshot. ... Image File history File links Legend_of_zelda_gpscreenshot. ... Octoroks are fictional creatures that appear in The Legend of Zelda game series. ... In computer and video games, the overworld generally refers to an out-door or world map section of the game, as opposed to a dungeon or level. In a typical RPGs, the player can usually save their game whenever they like, and will usually have a different appearance (to reflect... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is an article about the computer and video game genre. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Minesweeper, a popular computer puzzle game found on many machines. ... Grand Theft Auto Top-down perspective, also sometimes referred to as birds-eye view, overhead view or helicopter view, is a camera angle used in computer and video games that shows the player and the area around him or her from above. ... In computer and video games, the overworld generally refers to an out-door or world map section of the game, as opposed to a dungeon or level. In a typical RPGs, the player can usually save their game whenever they like, and will usually have a different appearance (to reflect... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... Gambling (or betting) is any behavior involving the risk of money or valuables on the outcome of a game, contest, or other event in which the outcome of that activity is partially or totally dependent upon chance. ...


Each dungeon is a unique, maze-like collection of rooms connected by doors and secret passages and guarded by monsters different from those found on the overworld. Link must successfully navigate each dungeon to obtain one of the eight pieces of the Triforce of Wisdom. Dungeons also hide useful items, such as a boomerang for retrieving items and stunning enemies, and a recorder with magical properties. The first six dungeons have visible entrances, but the remaining three are hidden. Except for the final dungeon, which cannot be entered until the previous eight have been completed, the order of completing dungeons is somewhat arbitrary, but many dungeons can only be reached using items gained in the previous one. For other uses, see Maze (disambiguation). ... Secret passages are sometimes concealed using large items of furniture, such as this reconstruction of the bookcase that covered the entrance to Anne Franks secret room. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Link with most of the items and equipment he acquires in The Legend of Zelda. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ...


Nonlinearity, the ability to take different paths to complete the game, separated Zelda from its contemporaries. Link can freely wander the overworld, finding and buying items at any point. This flexibility enables unusual ways of playing the game; for example, it is possible to reach the final boss of the game (but not defeat him) without taking a sword.[3] Nintendo of America's management initially feared that players might become frustrated with the new concept, left wondering what to do next. As a result, the American version of the game's manual contains many hints, tips, and suggestions for players. In computer and video games, linearity denotes that the objectives of the game must be completed in a fixed sequence whereas non-linearity means that the player always has multiple choices. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ...


After completing the game, the player has access to a more difficult quest, officially referred to as the Second Quest,[4] where dungeons and the placement of items are different and enemies stronger.[5] Although a more difficult "replay" was not unique to Zelda, few games offered a "second quest" with entirely different levels to complete.[3] Entering "ZELDA" as the player's name starts the second quest immediately.[6] The Second Quest can be replayed each time it is completed.


Story and characters

The Legend of Zelda's plot relies heavily on back story given in the short (in-game) prologue and the instruction booklet. Hyrule was engulfed in chaos after an army led by Ganon, the Prince of Darkness, invaded the kingdom and secured the Triforce of Power, a magical artifact bestowing great strength.[7] Hyrule's Princess Zelda split the artifact's counterpart, the Triforce of Wisdom, into eight fragments, hiding them in secret dungeons throughout the land to prevent them from falling into Ganon's hands. She commanded her most trustworthy nursemaid, Impa, to escape and find a man courageous enough to destroy Ganon. Upon hearing this, Ganon grew angry, imprisoned the princess, and sent a party in search of Impa.[7] Look up plot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A prologue (Greek πρόλογος, from προ~, pro~ - fore~, and lógos, word), or rarely prolog, is a prefatory piece of writing, usually composed to introduce a drama. ... A manual of style is also called a style guide; see that article for an account of manuals of style generally. ... Ganon ), also known as Ganondorf ) in his human form, the King of Evil, is a fictional character and primary antagonist of several games in Nintendos The Legend of Zelda series. ... For the arcade system board, see Triforce (arcade system board). ... Princess Zelda ) is a fictional character in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. ... For the arcade system board, see Triforce (arcade system board). ... Impa, Sage of Shadow and last of the Sheikah (Ocarina of Time) Impa ) is a fictional character in the Legend of Zelda series of video games. ...

Link, carrying the many items he acquires in his quest.
Link, carrying the many items he acquires in his quest.

According to the manual, Impa fled for her life, but was overtaken by her pursuers. As Ganon's henchmen surrounded her, a youth drove the monsters off. The boy's name was Link, and Impa told him of Hyrule's plight.[8] Link resolved to save Zelda, but to fight Ganon he had to find and reassemble the scattered fragments of the Triforce. Undeterred, Link set off for Hyrule in an epic adventure.[8] This is a copyrighted promotional image. ... This is a copyrighted promotional image. ... Rinku redirects here. ...


During the course of the game, Link locates the eight underground labyrinths (or dungeons) and retrieves the Triforce fragments from the clutches of powerful guardian monsters. Along the way, he picks up a variety of useful items and upgrades to aid him in his quest. With the Triforce of Wisdom, Link is able to infiltrate Ganon's fortress high upon Death Mountain. He confronts the Prince of Darkness, destroying him with a Silver Arrow discovered deep within Ganon's dungeons. Link picks up the Triforce of Power from Ganon's ashes and returns both Triforces to Princess Zelda, whom he releases from her nearby cell. According to Zelda's words, peace would then return to Hyrule. This article is about the mazelike structure from Greek mythology. ... The dungeons of Blarney Castle. ... Look up item in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Death Mountain (Japanese: デスマウンテン, Desu-Maunten) is a fictional mountain (occasionally a volcano as well), located in the fictional land of Hyrule in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. ...


A "symbol of courage, strength and wisdom",[9] Link was designed by Miyamoto as a coming-of-age motif for players to identify with: the silent protagonist begins the game an ordinary boy but grows in strength and fortitude to triumph over the ultimate evil.[10] For other uses, see Coming of Age (disambiguation). ... In literature, a motif is a recurring element or theme that has symbolic significance in the story. ... ‹ The template below (Rescue) is being considered for deletion. ...


The name of the princess was inspired by Zelda Fitzgerald: "Zelda was the name of the wife of the famous novelist Francis Scott Fitzgerald. She was a famous and beautiful woman from all accounts, and I liked the sound of her name. So I took the liberty of using her name for the very first Zelda title," Miyamoto explained.[11] Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 - March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama, was the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, whom she married in 1920. ... F.Scott Fitzgerald, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896-December 21, 1940), was a Jazz Age novelist. ...


Development and release

Designer Shigeru Miyamoto was responsible for the development of Super Mario Bros., which was released for the Famicom and Nintendo Entertainment System in 1985. In Mario, Miyamoto downplayed the value of the high score in favor of a more concrete goal — to "complete" the game. The evolution of games from endurance tests to simple narratives gave players a goal beyond simple continued survival.[12] Shigeru Miyamoto , born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer. ... This article is about the Super Mario Brothers video game for the NES. For other uses, see Super Mario Bros. ... High score of the Commodore 64 game Great Giana Sisters. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Miyamoto's team worked on The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros. concurrently, trying to separate the ideas: Super Mario Bros. was to be linear, where the action occurred in a strict sequence, whereas The Legend of Zelda would be the total opposite.[13] Miyamoto himself was in charge of deciding which concepts were "Zelda ideas" or "Mario ideas." Contrasting with Mario, Zelda was made non-linear and forced the players to think about what they should do next with riddles and puzzles.[14] This article is about the Super Mario Brothers video game for the NES. For other uses, see Super Mario Bros. ...

Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk
Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk

With The Legend of Zelda, Miyamoto wanted to take the idea of a game "world" even further, giving players a "miniature garden that they can put inside their drawer."[12] He drew his inspiration from his experiences as a boy around Kyoto, where he explored nearby fields, woods, and caves, and through the Zelda titles he always tries to impart to players some of the sense of exploration and limitless wonder he felt.[12] "When I was a child," he said, "I went hiking and found a lake. It was quite a surprise for me to stumble upon it. When I traveled around the country without a map, trying to find my way, stumbling on amazing things as I went, I realized how it felt to go on an adventure like this."[15] The memory of being lost amid the maze of sliding doors in his family's home in Sonobe was recreated in Zelda's labyrinthine dungeons.[16] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 511 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1336 × 1568 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 511 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1336 × 1568 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to en. ... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... A modular origami system that has 2 tabs and 2 pockets. ...


In the initial game designs, the player would start the game with the sword already in their inventory. According to Miyamoto, those in Japan were confused and had trouble finding their way through the multiple path dungeons. Rather than listening to the complaints, Miyamoto took away the sword, forcing players to communicate with each other and share their ideas to solve puzzles. This was a new form of game communication, and in that "Zelda became the inspiration for something very different: Animal Crossing. This was a game based solely on communication."[17] Dōbutsu no Mori logo used in Japan Animal Crossing, known in Japan as Dōbutsu no Mori lit. ...


In February 1986, Nintendo released the game on the Famicom's new Disk System peripheral. The Legend of Zelda was joined by a re-release of Super Mario Bros. and Tennis, Baseball, Golf, Soccer, and Mahjong in its introduction of the Famicom Disk System. It made full use of the Disk System’s advantages over the Famicom with a disk size of 128 kilobytes, which was expensive to produce on cartridge format.[12] Due to the still-limited amount of space on the disk, however, the Japanese version of the game was only in katakana. It used rewritable disks to save the game, rather than passwords.[18] It also used the microphone built into the Famicom's controller that was not included in the NES. This led to confusion in the U.S. as the instruction manual reads that Pols Voice, a rabbit-like enemy in the game, "hates loud noise".[19] Blowing or shouting into the Famicom's microphone kills these creatures. However, they cannot be killed through use of the flute, and on the NES must be killed with either the sword or bow and arrow. Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... Tennis is a video game released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1986. ... Baseball gameplay, infield view Baseball gameplay, outfield view Baseball is a simple baseball video game made by Nintendo in 1983 for the Nintendo Family Computer, making it one of the first games released for the Famicom. ... Golf is a game made for the NES. This was the first golfing game to feature Mario. ... NES Soccer is a video game developed and published by the Intelligent Systems team of Nintendo as part of its Sports Series for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Mahjong Taikai, a Japanese Mahjong computer game on PSP, produced by Koei in 2005. ... Depending on the context in which it is used, the word kilobyte may mean either 1,000 or 1,024 bytes. ... Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ... A saved game is a piece of digitally stored information about the progress of a player in a computer or video game. ... A regular password-inserting screen (from Gods). ...

The Legend of Zelda game cartridge, in its distinctive gold color.

Contrary to the fears of Nintendo's management, the game was wildly popular and well received. Nintendo published the game a year later in North America, with a small portion of the box cut out to display the unique gold-colored cartridge. In 1987, The Legend of Zelda became the first NES title aside from Super Mario Bros. to sell one million copies.[20] In 1988, 7 million more NES units were sold, along with 33 million game cartridges. Nintendo of America sought to keep its strong base of fans: anyone who purchased a game and sent in a warranty card became a member of the Fun Club, whose members got a four-, eight-, and eventually thirty-two-page newsletter. Seven hundred copies of the first issue were sent out free of charge, but the number grew as the data bank of names got longer.[21] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1650 × 2200 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1650 × 2200 pixel, file size: 2. ... In commercial and consumer transactions, a warranty is an obligation that an article or service sold is as factually stated or legally implied by the seller, and that often provides for a specific remedy such as repair or replacement in the event the article or service fails to meet the... Look up Newsletter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


From the success of magazines in Japan, Nintendo knew that game tips were an incredibly valued asset. Players enjoyed the bimonthly newsletter's crossword puzzles and jokes, but game secrets were most valued. The Fun Club drew kids in by offering tips for the more complicated games, especially Zelda, with its hidden rooms, secret keys, and passageways.[21] The mailing list grew. By early 1988, there were over 1 million Fun Club members, which led then-Nintendo of America president Minoru Arakawa to start Nintendo Power magazine.[21] Crossword Puzzle was the second to last album made by The Partridge Family, and was not one of the most popular albums. ... Minoru Arakawa (荒川實, Arakawa Minoru; born September 3, 1946) was the president of Nintendo of America (NOA) from 1980 to 2002. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ...


Since Nintendo did not have many products, it made only a few commercials a year, meaning the quality had to be phenomenal. The budget for a single commercial could reach US $5 million, easily four or five times more than most companies spent.[22] One of the first commercials made under Bill White, director of advertising and public relations, was the market introduction for The Legend of Zelda, which received a great deal of attention in the ad industry. In it, a wiry-haired, nerdy guy (John Kassir) walks through the dark making goofy noises, yelling out the names of some enemies from the game, and screaming for Zelda.[22] A television advertisement, advert or commercial is a form of advertising in which goods, services, organizations, ideas, etc. ... USD redirects here. ... Johnny Kassir (born October 24, 1957 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American actor, voice actor, and comedian who has been active in many facets of entertainment since 1984. ...


The Legend of Zelda was a gold mine for Nintendo, which released a slew of Zelda-related merchandise, from toys and guidebooks to watches, apparel, trash cans, and even a breakfast cereal called the Nintendo Cereal System. The game and its sequel, The Adventure of Link were adapted into an animated series, episodes of which were shown each Friday on television's The Super Mario Bros. Super Show. Link and Zelda appeared in select episodes of Captain N: The Game Master that revolved around themes from The Adventure of Link. A Legend of Zelda series logo The Legend of Zelda series (often shortened to Zelda, TLoZ, or LoZ), by Nintendo, is a series of video games created by celebrated game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. ... A teddy bear A toy is an object used in play. ... Nintendo Cereal System was a breakfast cereal produced by Ralston Cereals in 1988. ... Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the second in the Legend of Zelda series of games. ... The Legend of Zelda is a cartoon series based on the popular Legend of Zelda video games created by Shigeru Miyamoto. ... Various television shows based on Super Mario Bros. ... Captain N: The Game Master is a cartoon series that aired on U.S. and United Kingdom television from 1989 to 1992. ...


Reception

The Legend of Zelda was a bestseller for Nintendo, selling over 6.5 million copies in its initial run.[23] It was reissued in 1990 as part of Nintendo's "Classic Series", along with Zelda II, Metroid, and other high-profile games. The game placed first in the player's poll "Top 30" in Nintendo Power's first issue[24] and continued to dominate the list into the early 1990s. A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. ... Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the second in the Legend of Zelda series of games. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


The Legend of Zelda places prominently in lists of games considered the greatest or most influential: it placed first in Game Informer's list of the greatest games ever, fifth in Electronic Gaming Monthly's 200th issue listing "The Greatest 200 Videogames of Their Time,"[25] seventh in Nintendo Power's list of the 200 Best Nintendo Games Ever,[26] and 80th among IGN readers' "Top 99 Games."[27] Zelda was inducted into GameSpy's Hall of Fame in August 2000[28] and voted by GameSpy's editors as the tenth best game of all time.[29] Editors of the popular Japanese magazine Famitsu voted the game among the best on the Famicom.[30] Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is an American-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Cover art for Issue 1 of Famitsū magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom Tsūshin Famitsū abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ...


Even in its Game Boy Advance port, created 17 years after its initial release, The Legend of Zelda passes the test of time, scoring 79% at the Game Rankings and 87% at the Game Ratio rankings compilations. In individual ratings, IGN scored The Legend of Zelda with an 8 out of 10, GamePro a 4.5 out of 5, Nintendo Power a 4.5 out of 5, and 1UP.com a 9 out of 10.[31][32]In Gamespot, both Gameboy Advance and the Wii scored 7.2 for its originality. “GBA” redirects here. ... Game Rankings is a website which keeps track of video game reviews from other sites, and combines them to present an average rating for each game. ... GamePro is an American video game magazine published monthly. ... 1UP.com is a video-game site owned and operated by Ziff Davis Media, publisher of popular videogame magazines Computer Gaming World (CGW) (now known as Games for Windows: The Official Magazine (or GFW) Magazine), Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), and the now-defunct Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine (OPM), GMR...


Impact and legacy

The Legend of Zelda is considered a spiritual forerunner of the console role-playing game (RPG) genre.[3] Though its gameplay elements are different from those of typical computer or console RPGs, its bright, cartoonish graphics, fantasy setting, and musical style were adopted by many RPGs. Its commercial success helped lay the groundwork for involved, nonlinear games in fantasy settings, such as those found in successful RPGs, including Crystalis, Soul Blazer, Square's Seiken Densetsu series, and more recently, Alundra and Brave Fencer Musashi. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the band, see Cartoons (band). ... Crystalis, known in Japan as God Slayer: Haruka Tenkū no Sonata , lit. ... Soul Blazer (or Soul Blader in Japan) is a Super Nintendo Entertainment System game by Enix and Quintet released in 1992. ... Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... Seiken Densetsu lit. ... Alundra is an Action RPG for the PlayStation released in 1997. ... Brave Fencer Musashi , Brave Fencer Musashiden) is a console role-playing game (RPG) published by Squaresoft in 1998 for the Sony PlayStation. ...


The Legend of Zelda spawned numerous sequels and spin-offs and remains one of Nintendo's most popular series. Although the plot of Zelda is simplistic by today's standards, it established important characters and environments of the Zelda universe: Link, Princess Zelda, Ganon, Impa, and the Triforce as the power that binds Hyrule together.[12] A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... Rinku redirects here. ... Princess Zelda ) is a fictional character in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. ... Ganon ), also known as Ganondorf ) in his human form, the King of Evil, is a fictional character and primary antagonist of several games in Nintendos The Legend of Zelda series. ... Impa, Sage of Shadow and last of the Sheikah (Ocarina of Time) Impa ) is a fictional character in the Legend of Zelda series of video games. ... For the arcade system board, see Triforce (arcade system board). ... Hylia redirects here. ...


The overworld theme and distinctive "secret found" jingle have appeared in one form or another in nearly every subsequent Zelda title. The theme has also appeared in various other games featuring Zelda series references.



Versions

The Legend of Zelda has been re-released on multiple platforms, most recently on the Wii's Virtual Console in 2006. The game was re-released in cartridge format on the Famicom in 1994.[33] The game was also included in The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition for the Nintendo GameCube,[34] and is also obtainable in the GameCube game Animal Crossing using various cheat devices such as the Action Replay. The game was also re-released on the Game Boy Advance in 2004 along with its sequel, The Adventure of Link, as part of the Classic NES Series. The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... For other uses, see Animal Crossing (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... 2004 2004 in games 2003 in video gaming 2005 in video gaming Notable events of 2004 in video gaming. ... Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the second in the Legend of Zelda series of games. ... The Classic NES Series in North America (Famicom Mini Series in Japan and NES Classics in Europe) are a series of Game Boy Advance games that were originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System/Famicom and Famicom Disk System emulated on the Game Boy Advance. ...


BS Zelda no Densetsu

Main article: BS Zelda no Densetsu

BS Zelda no Densetsu, based on the original The Legend of Zelda, was released for download in four episodes on the Satellaview, a satellite modem add-on to Nintendo's Super Famicom system, from August 9, 1995 to August 30, 1995. The first game broadcast on the Satellaview, BS Zelda featured updated graphics, a smaller overworld, and different dungeons. Link was replaced by the Satellaview mascots, a boy wearing a backward baseball cap and a girl with red hair. It also featured "Sound Link", where every few minutes players were cautioned to listen carefully as a live narrator, broadcast over the network, gave them play clues.[35] When the game was rebroadcast in December 1996, the layout of the world was changed again. This revision had a smaller broadcast audience and is known as Map 2. Sometimes these two games are known as the Third and Fourth Quest, similar to the NES game's Second Quest. BS Zelda no Densetsu , lit. ... The BS-X logo. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the scientific discipline of computer graphics. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Zelda no Densetsu. GameSpot. Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  2. ^ The Legend of Zelda. GameSpot. Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  3. ^ a b c Andrew Long. Oldest School. RPGamer. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  4. ^ ZELDA: The Second Quest Begins (1988), p. 27
  5. ^ ZELDA: The Second Quest Begins (1988), p. 28
  6. ^ ZELDA: The Second Quest Begins (1988), p. 26
  7. ^ a b The Legend of Zelda Instruction Booklet (1989), p. 3
  8. ^ a b The Legend of Zelda Instruction Booklet (1989), p. 4
  9. ^ Nintendo (January 1, 2006). The Great Hyrule Encyclopedia - Link. Zelda Universe. Retrieved on 2005-09-20.
  10. ^ Superplay Editorial Staff (2003-04-23). Shigeru Miyamoto Interview. Superplay Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-09-24.
  11. ^ Mowatt, Todd. In the Game: Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto. Amazon.com. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  12. ^ a b c d e Vestal, Andrew; Cliff O'Neill; and Brad Shoemaker (2000-11-14). History of Zelda. GameSpot. Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  13. ^ "Miyamoto Speaks", Nintendo Power 89: 64–67, October 1996, <http://www.miyamotoshrine.com/theman/interviews/1096.shtml>.
  14. ^ Bufton, Ben (2005-01-01). Shigeru Miyamoto Interview. ntsc-uk. Retrieved on 2006-09-23.
  15. ^ Sheff (1993), p. 51
  16. ^ Sheff (1993), p. 52
  17. ^ Fahey, Michael (2007-03-08). GDC07: Liveblogging Nintendo. Kotaku.
  18. ^ alistairw (September 8, 2006). Special: History of The Legend of Zelda Series. Nintendo. Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  19. ^ The Legend of Zelda Instruction Booklet (1987), p. 36
  20. ^ Sheff (1993), p. 172
  21. ^ a b c Sheff (1993), p. 178
  22. ^ a b Sheff (1993), p. 188
  23. ^ March 25, 2004. The Magic Box (2004-03-25). Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  24. ^ "Top 30", Nintendo Power 1: 102, July/August 1988.
  25. ^ S.B. (February 2006). The 200 Greatest Video Games of their Time. Electronic Gaming Monthly. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  26. ^ "NP Top 200", Nintendo Power 200: 58–66, February 2006.
  27. ^ Readers' Picks Top 99 Games: 80-71. IGN (April 11, 2005). Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  28. ^ Buecheler, Christopher (August 2000). The Gamespy Hall of Fame. GameSpy. Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  29. ^ GameSpy Staff (July 2001). GameSpy's Top 50 Games of All Time. GameSpy. Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  30. ^ taragan (2006). Famitsu Readers' All-time Favorite Famicom Games. Pink Godzilla. Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  31. ^ Classic NES Series: The Legend of Zelda. Game Rankings. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  32. ^ Classic NES Series: The Legend of Zelda. Game Ratio. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  33. ^ Fryguy64 (2001-06-28). The Legend of Zelda/The Hyrule Fantasy: Zelda no Densetsu (JP). Nintendo Database. Retrieved on 2007-09-29.
  34. ^ IGN Staff (2003-10-06). True Zelda Love. IGN. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  35. ^ BS The Legend of Zelda. IGN. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.

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References

  • Sheff, David (1993). Game Over: How Nintendo Zapped an American Industry, Captured Your Dollars, and Enslaved Your Children. Random House. ISBN 0-679-40469-4. 
  • (1987) The Legend of Zelda Instruction Booklet (in English). Nintendo of America, Inc.. Stock No. 004-000-00345-4. 
  • "ZELDA: The Second Quest Begins", Nintendo Power 1: 26–36, July/August 1988

External links

Official sites
General resources

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