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Encyclopedia > The Last Supper
Major events in Jesus' life in the Gospels

The Last Supper was the last meal Jesus shared with his apostles before his death. The Last Supper has been the subject of many paintings, perhaps the most famous by Leonardo da Vinci. The meal is considered by most scholars likely to have been a Passover Seder, celebrated on the Thursday night (Holy Thursday) before Jesus was crucified on Friday (Good Friday). This belief is based on the chronology of the Synoptic Gospels, but the chronology in the Gospel of John has the Last Supper occurring before the Passover, for in that Gospel, Christ's death occurs at the time of the slaughter of the Passover lambs (this latter chronology is the one accepted by the Orthodox Church). Several scholars have questioned this chronology, and have rejected the assumption that the synoptics refer to the Passover Seder and held that they are harmonious with John.[1] Some Christians believe that a thorough examination of the Gospels indicates that the Last Supper was on a Tuesday, and that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday.[2] The chronology of Jesus depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of the life of Jesus by the four canonical gospels (which allude to various dates for several events). ... Jesus (8-2 BC/BCE– 29-36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... This article presents a description of Jesus life, as based on the four gospels. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... The Nativity refers to the birth of Jesus. ... Jacopo Bellinis Madonna and Child Blessing depicts the infant Jesus in the act of blessing the viewer The Child Jesus is a religious symbol based on the activities of Jesus as an infant up to the age of twelve that recurs throughout history, starting from around the third or... The Baptism of Christ, by Piero della Francesca, 1449 The Baptism of Jesus is the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. ... In Christianity, the temptation of Christ refers to the temptation of Jesus by Satan as detailed in the New Testament, specifically: Matthew 4:1-11 Mark 1:12-13 Luke 4:1-13 According to these Gospels, Jesus has fasted for forty days and nights in the desert or wilderness... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities which are supposed to have possessed (taken control of) a person or object. ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Jesus vertreibt die Händler aus dem Tempel by Giovanni Paolo Pannini The narrative of Jesus and the Money Changers occurs in both the Synoptic Gospels and in the Gospel of John, although it occurs close to the end of the Synoptic Gospels (at Mark 11:15-19, Matthew 21... The Olivet discourse is a passage found in the Synoptic Gospels of Mark (at Mark 13) and of Matthew (at Matthew 24-25), occurring just before the narrative of Jesus passion begins with the Anointing of Jesus, and in the narrative is a discourse given by Jesus on the Mount... A depiction of the Sanhedrin trial, by Giotto The Sanhedrin Trial of Jesus is an event reported by all the Canonical Gospels. ... The Passion is the technical term for the suffering and Agony of Jesus that led directly to the Crucifixion, a central Christian event. ... Entombment of Christ by Pieter Lastman The death of Jesus is an event described by the New Testament, as occurring after the Passion of Jesus, as a result of his crucifixion. ... According to the Trinitarian interpretation of the New Testament, Jesus was both human and God, so he had the power to lay his life down and to take it up again; thus after Jesus died, he came back to life. ... The Great Commission is a tenet in Christian theology emphasizing mission work and evangelism, particularly (but not exclusively) emphasized by evangelicals. ... The Christian doctrine of the Ascension holds that Jesus bodily ascended to heaven following his resurrection. ... Jesus (8-2 BC/BCE– 29-36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... Alternate meaning: See Apostle (Mormonism) The Christian Apostles were Jewish men chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth (as indicated by the Greek word απόστολος apostolos= messenger), by Jesus to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles, across the world. ... Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian Renaissance polymath: an architect, anatomist, sculptor, engineer, inventor, geometer, musician and painter. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Haggadah of Pesach. ... In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter, the day on which the Last Supper is said to have occurred. ... Artistic depiction of the crucifixion of Jesus. ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by most Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... The Synoptic Gospels is a term used by modern New Testament scholars for the Gospels according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke of the New Testament in the Bible. ... The Gospel according to John is a gospel document in the canon of the New Testament. ... ... Artistic depiction of the crucifixion of Jesus. ...


In the course of the Last Supper, and with specific reference to taking the bread and the wine, Jesus told his disciples, "Do this in remembrance of Me", (1 Cor 11:23-25). (The vessel which was used to serve the wine, the Holy Chalice, is considered by some to be the "Holy Grail"). In Christian mythology the Holy Chalice is the vessel which Jesus used at the Last Supper to serve the wine. ... In Christian mythology, the Holy Grail was the dish, plate, or cup used by Jesus at the Last Supper, said to possess miraculous powers. ...


According to tradition, the Last Supper took place in what is called today The Room of the Last Supper on Mount Zion, just outside of the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. The Room of the Last Supper marks the traditional location for the Last Supper, or Jesus last meal with his disciples. ... Mount Zion may refer to one of several places: Mount Zion, Illinois Mount Zion, Georgia Mount Zion, Wisconsin Mount Zion, Taiwan Mount Zion, Jamaica For the Biblical and historical use of the name, see Zion. ... ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: Yerushalayim; Arabic: al-Quds; Greek Ιεροσόλυμα; Latin Aelia Capitolina) is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 meters. ...


Last Supper Remembrances

The Last Supper is remembered by Roman Catholics as one of the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary, and by Protestants as the "inauguration of the New Covenant", mentioned by the prophet Jeremiah, fulfilled by Jesus at the Last Supper, when He said, "Take, eat; this [bread] is My Body; which is broken for you. Partake of the cup, drink; this [wine] is My Blood, which is shed for many; for the remission of sins". Other Christian groups consider the Bread and Wine remembrance as a change to the Passover ceremony, as Jesus Christ has become "our Passover, sacrificed for us" (I Corinthians 5:7). Partaking of the Passover Communion (or fellowship) is now the sign of the New Covenant, when properly understood by the practicing believer. Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads The Rosary (from Latin rosarium, crown of roses), is an important and traditional sacramental devotion of the Roman Catholic Church consisting of a set of prayer beads and a system of set prayers. ... Biblical Usage Some Bible translations use the term New Covenant. ... Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Jerusalem by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn. ... This article is about the Christian Holy Day. ... Biblical Usage Some Bible translations use the term New Covenant. ...

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The Last Supper fresco in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci

Early Christianity has created a remembrance service that took place in the form of meals known as "agape feasts": perhaps Jude, and the apostle Paul have referred to these as "your love-feasts", by way of warning (about "who shows up" to these). Agape is one of the Greek words for love, and refers to the "divine" type of love, rather than mere human forms of love. This form of the service apparently was a full meal, with each participant bringing their own food, and with the meal eaten in a common room. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1988x1016, 367 KB) Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) - The Last Supper (1495-1498) File links The following pages link to this file: The Last Supper (Leonardo) ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1988x1016, 367 KB) Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) - The Last Supper (1495-1498) File links The following pages link to this file: The Last Supper (Leonardo) ... The Last Supper (in Italian, Il Cenacolo or LUltima Cena) is a mural painting by Leonardo da Vinci for his patron Duke Lodovico Sforza. ... Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian Renaissance polymath: an architect, anatomist, sculptor, engineer, inventor, geometer, musician and painter. ... The Agape Feast was a love feast celebrated in apostolic times on any day, in addition to the Eucharist. ... Agapē (written αγάπη in the Greek alphabet, and pronounced or ), is one of several Greek words meaning love. ...


These worship services became codified as the Mass in Catholic traditions, and as the Divine Liturgy in the Orthodox Church, or the Christian Passover for yet other groups. At those services, Catholics and Eastern Orthodox celebrate the Eucharist. The name Eucharist is from the Greek word eucharistos which means thanksgiving or thank you. Catholics typically restrict the term 'communion' to the distribution to the communicants during the service of the "body" and "blood" of Christ. Mass is the term used to describe celebration of the Eucharist in the Western liturgical rites of the Roman Catholic Church, in the Anglo-Catholic tradition of Anglicanism, and in some largely High Church Lutheran regions: in Scandinavian countries the main non-Eucharistic Lutheran service is also known as the... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Pentecost is considered in Eastern Orthodoxy to be the birth of the Church. ... This article is about the Christian Holy Day. ... The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament[1], to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... This page is about the title. ...


Within many Christian traditions, the name Holy Communion is used. This name emphasizes the nature of the service, as a "joining in common" between God and humans, which is made possible, or facilitated due to the sacrifice of Jesus. The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... Michelangelos depiction of God in the painting Creation of the Sun and Moon in the Sistine Chapel Krishna, the eighth incarnation of Vishnu, one of the manifestations of the ultimate reality or God in Hinduism This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Another variation of the name of the service is "The Lord's Supper". This name usually is used by the churches of minimalist traditions; such as those strongly influenced by Zwingli. Some echoes of the "agape meal" may remain in fellowship, or potluck dinners held at some churches. The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... Zwinglis Successor Zwinglis successor, Heinrich Bullinger, was elected on December 9, 1531, to be the pastor of the Great Minster at Zürich, a position which he held to the end of his life (1575). ... A potluck or potluck dinner is a gathering of people for a meal where the participants are expected to bring food to be shared among everyone at the gathering. ...

Jacopo Bassano's the Last Supper
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Jacopo Bassano's the Last Supper

As well, the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints commonly refers to the service as The Sacrament. Download high resolution version (1188x650, 131 KB)Source: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (1188x650, 131 KB)Source: http://www. ... Jacopos The Last Supper Jacopo Bassano (also known as Giacomo da Ponte, c. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ...


Each major division of Christianity has formed a different theology about the exact meaning and purpose of these remembrance ceremonies, but most of them contain similarities.

Simon Ushakov's the Last Supper.
Simon Ushakov's the Last Supper.

Image File history File links Last Supper 1685 Uploaded from http://www. ... Image File history File links Last Supper 1685 Uploaded from http://www. ... Saviour Not Made by Hands, written by Ushakov for the Troitse-Sergiyeva Lavra in 1658, is a key painting of the Stroganov School of Muscovite icon-painting. ...

Notes

  1. ^ See Leon Morris, The Gospel According to John, Revised, pp. 684-695.
  2. ^ When Christ Died, and Rose

Leon Morris is a New Testament scholar who is currently retired. ...

External links


 
 

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