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Encyclopedia > The Landon School
Landon School
Image:Whiterocks.jpg
Virtute et non vi
Established 1929
School type Private Preparatory School
Religious affiliation Non-sectarian
Headmaster David M. Armstrong
Location Bethesda, MD, USA
Campus Suburban, 75 acres (.30 km²)
Enrollment 675 total
Lower School: 125
Middle School: 216
Upper School: 334
Faculty >100
Average class size <15
Student:teacher
ratio
6:1
Average SAT
scores (2006)
644 math
625 verbal
629 writing
Athletics 15 Interscholastic Sports
Color(s) Brown and White
Mascot Bear
Conference IAC
Homepage http://www.landon.net/ Landon School homepage

Landon School is an independent, non-sectarian, college preparatory school for boys in grades 3-12. Current enrollment is 675 students. The school sits on 75 acres in Bethesda, Maryland just outside of Washington, D.C. 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebuilt in 1850, which in turn took its name from Jerusalems Pool of Bethesda. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebuilt in 1850, which in turn took its name from Jerusalems Pool of Bethesda. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... ...

Contents

Background

It was founded by Paul Landon Banfield, with the help of his wife Mary Lee, in 1929. The school's first location was an old brownstone in the embassy row area of Washington, D.C. Banfield moved Landon to its present campus in Bethesda in 1936. 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Landon's mission statement reads,

"Landon School prepares talented boys for productive lives as accomplished, responsible and caring men whose actions are guided by the principles of perseverance, teamwork, honor and fair play."

The school's motto is "Virtute et non vi", meaning, "By virtue, not by force."


Landon School's Headmasters have been:

  • Paul Landon Banfield: 1929-1970
  • Hugh Riddleberger: 1970-1981
  • Malcolm Coates: 1981-1989
  • Damon F. Bradley: 1990-2004
  • David M. Armstrong: 2004-present

The school prides itself on its student-initiated and student-run Honor Code, begun in the early 1960s. An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ...


A few years ago Landon students were caught cheating on the SATs sparking a wave of controversy


Athletics

Notable for its athletic programs, Landon is often recognized for its sports teams, in particular its tennis and lacrosse teams. As of 2005, Landon had won 45 IAC tennis championships and 23 lacrosse IAC championships. The lacrosse team in particular is the pride of the school's athletic program. Consistently among the top 20 programs in the country and several times #1, it is Landon's most well-known sport. Landon had won 23 straight IAC championships and had beaten arch-rival Georgetown Prep 17 game in a row before losing in 2003. This 17 game run was widely known in lacrosse circles as "The Streak" and its end was as epic as it was inevitable. The Landon-Prep lacrosse game is the sporting event of the year for both schools and is arguably the most heralded rivalry lacrosse game in the country, drawing thousands of fans. Georgetown Prep has always been competitive with Landon, even if they had not beaten them before, and has actually won the league championship the last two years, ending Landon's long dominance of the area. For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Landon's Varsity Lacrosse Team was national champion in 1999, 2001, and 2002. Currently, many Landon graduates captain NCAA Division 1 lacrosse teams, including University of Pennsylvania, Duke University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Virginia, and University of Maryland. Landon boasts numerous All-Americans in NCAA Division 1 and 2 lacrosse, and the class of 2005 featured an unheard of 13 Division 1 recruits. The team has an astounding 29 graduates currently playing Division 1 Lacrosse. But in recent years Georgetown Prep another lacrosse powerhouse has gotten the better of Landon. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... The term All-American has two uses: It can be used as a reference to an athlete selected as a member of an All_America team, as in Eddie George was named an All-American football player by both wire services in 1995. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Landon currently offers varsity sports in football, soccer, cross country, basketball, ice hockey, wrestling, swimming, riflery, lacrosse, baseball, track and field, tennis, rugby, water polo, and golf, as well as excellent intramural programs including a fencing and Ultimate Frisbee team. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Minnesota State High school Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two competitors competing for a physical advantage. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... The shooting sports include those competitive sports involving tests of proficiency (accuracy and speed) using various types of guns such as firearms and airguns (see Archery for more information on shooting sports that make use of bows and arrows). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... A rugby union scrum. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, handball and wrestling. ... Golf is a sport in which individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs, and also is one of the few ball games that does not use a fixed standard playing area. ...


The Arts

The Arts play a very important role at Landon. The school is recognized as one of the top private institutions in the area for the advancement of the Arts.[citation needed] The Upper School has a two-year requirement for either music or art.


The school's musical groups include the Bearitones, a Jazz Band, a Concert Band, a String Ensemble, Handbells, and various choirs for younger students. Studio art classes include ceramics, digital arts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. A jazz band (or jazz ensemble in western dialects of American English) is a musical ensemble that plays jazz music. ... A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ... Ancient Egyptian ceramic art: Louvre Museum. ... Drawing involves the choice of one or more tools from a wide variety and the choice of a support appropriate to that tool in order to make marks. ... For building painting, see painter and decorator. ... Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or sensor. ... Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ...


Some highlights of Landon's Arts curriculum:

The Landon Symphonette 
The Landon Symphonette is a compendium of talented musicians from the school, as well as other local area high schools and colleges who play together with professionals.
In its 16th Season (as of 2006-07) under the direction of Mr. Richard Weilenmann, The Landon Symphonette has become a premiere mentoring orchestra in the Washington Metropolitan area. Participation in the orchestra is attained through recommendation by the students’ music teacher or private instructor, and a required audition from the Symphonette Director.
The Landow Art Gallery 
The Landow Gallery is a coveted gallery for temporary exhibits of artwork of everything from Landon student work to professional showings, and artwork by artists from other local-area schools. The intimate space is ideal and alternately used for recitals, small-scale musical productions, poetry readings and faculty performances. It was established by original curator and beloved long-time former-Landon teacher Ellie Johnson, who died in the summer of 2006. The current gallery curator is prominent Washington, D.C. artist and Landon art teacher Mr. Walt Bartman.
Located in Landon's Middle School building terrace, the Landow Gallery is open all school days from 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. as well as Weekends from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Academics

Landon's place as one of the nation's elite private schools is grounded in its stellar academic reputation. The school consistently sends its graduates to the top universities in the country. Some of the most popular destinations for Landon grads are the University of Virginia, Duke, Georgetown University, the University of Maryland, Yale University, and Davidson College.


Some highlights of Landon's academic curriculum:

Humanities 
All Landon juniors are required to take two semesters of Humanities: Landon's unique and rigorous interdisciplinary course designed to introduce students to the rudiments of Western culture and civilization. The course is a study of major ideas and influences that have shaped European culture from the Classical to Modern era through thorough analysis of history, literature, art and music.
Economics 
In its third annual “Advanced Placement Report to the Nation 2007,” published on February 7, 2007, the College Board has recognized Landon School as an exemplar program in AP Microeconomics among non-public schools in the world.
Teacher Mr. John Bellaschi and his Advanced Placement students ranked first in the nation in the small-size school evaluation category (<300 students in grades 10-12). Landon is one of five schools in Maryland recognized this year by the College Board’s report.
Buchanan Library
Built in 1962, Landon's Buchanan Library is dedicated to Wiley T. Buchanan, a former Landon parent and trustee. The Library boasts a collection of over 27,000 volumes, including a prolific reference and literary criticism section.

The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article describes the ancient classical period: for the classical period in music (second half of the 18th century): see Classical music era. ... The Modern-Era of NASCAR is a dividing line in NASCARs history. ... Microeconomics is a branch of economics that studies how individuals, households, and firms make decisions to allocate limited resources,[1] typically in markets where goods or services are being bought and sold. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... The College Board is a non-profit examination board in the United States that was formed in 1900 as the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). ...

Faculty

Landon uses the teacher-coach model, in which its faculty also serve as advisors and coaches to the boys. Every coach at the school also teaches a subject. As of 2005, significant faculty members include Tom Dixon, Mac Jacoby, Steve Sorkin, Alan Rosenthal, Earl Jackson, Frederico Mora, Bob Long, Rob Bordley, Sara Atherton, Drew Johnson, Richard Brockhaus, Ellie Johnson, Edwin Sundt, Richard Tuckerman, Bill Reed, Austin Zimmer, Alfredo Benavides, Peter Swinehart, and Fred Zirm. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable Alumni

Michael Darr Barnes (born September 3, 1943 in Washington, DC) represented Maryland in the United States House of Representatives from 1979 to 1987 and has been the president of the Brady Campaign gun control organization since March 1, 2000. ... Alan Brinkley is the Allan Nevins Professor of History at Columbia University. ... Donald Dell (born June 17, 1938 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA) was an outstanding tennis player, U.S. Davis Cup captain, tennis leader and administrator. ... The great Australians Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall with the Cup in 1953 The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ... The Ertegun brothers, Ahmet Ertegun (1923) and Nesuhi Ertegun (1917&#8211;1989) are co-founders of Atlantic Records. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the background The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential rock and... Fred W. Hetzel (born July 21, 1942 in Washington, DC) is a retired American basketball player. ... The National Basketball Associations Rookie of the Year Award, first given after the 1952-1953 NBA season, is given to the top first-year player in the league. ... Rush Dew Holt, Jr. ... W. M. Kiplinger (1891-1967) was best known as the founder of Kiplinger, a publishing company located in Washington, D.C.. He attended Ohio State University from 1908 until 1912. ... Kiplingers magazine cover Kiplingers Personal Finance is a magazine that has been continuously published, on a monthly basis, from 1947 to the present day. ... Frederick V. McNair, IV (born July 22, 1950, in Washington DC, USA) is a former professional tennis player from the United States who reached the World No. ... Maurice Richard Maury Povich (born January 17, 1939 in Washington, D.C.) is an American TV talk show personality who currently hosts his self-titled talk show Maury which has earned him national recognition due to the paternity tests that are often aired. ... John Jacob Rhodes III, (son of John Jacob Rhodes), who was a Republican Representative from Arizona, was born in Mesa, Ariz. ... There are different people named Tom Scott: Tom Scott, Scottish poet. ... Nantucket Nectars is a beverage company created by Tom First and Tom Scott, known as Tom and Tom or The Juice Guys. ... M. Ward is the stage name of Portland, Oregon based singer-songwriter Matt Ward. ... Tewaaraton Trophy is an award given to the top American college lacrosse player since 2001. ...

Trivia

Landon's sister school is the Holton-Arms School, also located in Bethesda. Holton-Arms is an independent college-preparatory school for girls in grades 3–12 dedicated to the “education not only of the mind, but of the soul and spirit. ...


External links

  • Landon School website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Biography of Confederate Senator L. C. Haynes (2614 words)
Landon Carter Haynes was born on December 2, 1816 by the banks of the Watauga river, in the Buffalo community of Carter county, Tennessee four miles from Elizabethton.
Landon, the oldest son, was named in honor of General Landon Carter, for whom Carter county is named.
Landon and Eleanor had a number of children, including Robert who followed his father's political footsteps and was elected several times to the Tennessee General Assembly from Madison County in western Tennessee.
Jodie Landon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (215 words)
Jodie Abigail Landon, better known plainly as Jodie Landon, is a cartoon character in the MTV television show, Daria.
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Unlike many teenaged female fl television characters (both cartoon and real), Landon is not a member of a group of popular girls (though she is considered "cool"), she is a rather lonely girl who maintains a casual friendship both with Daria and with Daria's best friend, Jane.
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