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Encyclopedia > The Invasion (professional wrestling)
This article is about the storyline. For the Pay-per-view, see WWF InVasion

The Invasion was a professional wrestling storyline in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) that began shortly after the WWF's purchase of World Championship Wrestling (WCW). It involved the WCW wrestlers "invading" WWF television in an attempt to "take over" the WWF. Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ...


The idea of a supercard featuring the two top promotions of the Monday Night Wars was considered to be a "dream match" scenario in the eyes of many fans, as it would allow the fans to see which promotion would be kayfabe superior. The angle began when Vince McMahon's son, Shane McMahon, announced on RAW that he bought WCW from under his father's nose.[1] This led to several run-in appearances of WCW wrestlers during RAW and SmackDown! over the months after WrestleMania X-Seven.[2] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term Monday Night Wars pertains to the period of American professional wrestling from September 4, 1995, to March 26, 2001. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... Shane Brandon McMahon[3][2] (born January 15, 1970)[1] is an American executive and part-time professional wrestler for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... For the video game series based on the show, see WWE SmackDown! (video game series). ... WrestleMania X-Seven was the seventeenth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ...


In June 2001, the angle grew in intensity as the WWF storylines somewhat abated to make room for the central Invasion storyline. WCW and Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) merged to form The Alliance and challenged the WWF's control over the wrestling industry.[3] An Inaugural Brawl took place at the WWF Invasion pay-per-view, where Stone Cold Steve Austin defected and joined the Alliance.[4] Many inter-promotional matches occurred after the Invasion between The Alliance and the WWF, leading up to the climax of the angle at Survivor Series 2001, when Team WWF (The Rock, Chris Jericho, Big Show, The Undertaker, and Kane) defeated Team Alliance (Stone Cold Steve Austin, Kurt Angle, Rob Van Dam, Booker T, and Shane McMahon) in a Winner-Take-All match.[5] This article is about the independent promotion from 1992-2001. ... Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ... Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... Survivor Series 2001 was the fifteenth annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Dwayne Douglas Johnson[6] (born May 2, 1972)[4], better known by his former ring name The Rock, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... Christopher Keith Irvine (born November 9, 1970), better known by the ring name Chris Jericho, is an American-Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician, and professional wrestler. ... Paul Wight, Jr. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Glen Thomas Jacobs (born April 26, 1967) better known by his ring name Kane, is an American professional wrestler. ... Kurt Steven Angle (born December 9, 1968) is an American professional wrestler and former Olympic amateur wrestler. ... Robert Alexander Szatkowski (born December 18, 1970 in Battle Creek, Michigan) better known by his ring name Rob Van Dam, is currently an inactive American professional wrestler. ... Robert Booker Tio Huffman[2] (born March 1, 1965)[2], better known by his wrestling personas Booker T and King Booker, is an American professional wrestler. ...


A very large storyline that spanned five months from June 2001 to November 2001, it has been met with heavy criticism.[6][7][8]

Contents

History

Monday Night Wars

Main article: Monday Night Wars

During the Monday Night Wars, the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) and World Championship Wrestling (WCW), the two top North American wrestling promotions, competed for ratings. Through developments such as the nWo and the Montreal Screwjob, fans continually compared the two promotions, and the Internet wrestling community was full of debate as to which of the two was superior. The term Monday Night Wars pertains to the period of American professional wrestling from September 4, 1995, to March 26, 2001. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ... North American redirects here. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... The New World Order was a stable of wrestlers, originally in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... The screwjob - Earl Hebner calls for the bell as Shawn Michaels holds Bret Hart in the Sharpshooter. ...


Among other factors, however, mismanagement within WCW (such as allowing wrestlers themselves to book matches) eventually led WCW to a downward spiral from which it never recovered. The Monday Night Wars came to an end on March 23, 2001, when the WWF bought WCW for what was considered to be a bargain price. Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


The final night of the Monday Night Wars occurred on March 26, 2001: RAW primarily focused on the major storylines heading into WrestleMania X-Seven, while Nitro held their final episode with a Night Of Champions. Vince McMahon opened up Nitro and announced a simulcast later that night to address the future of WCW. Throughout RAW, McMahon publicly named several WCW wrestlers who would not be retained.[1] After Sting defeated Ric Flair in WCW's final match, the simulcast began. McMahon talked about the buyout of WCW and toyed with the idea of making WCW into a huge media conglomerate, much like the WWF.[1] He asked the crowd who he should keep under his belt by mentioning names of WCW wrestlers and asking for a reaction. Lex Luger received a negative reaction from fans, and Hulk Hogan, Buff Bagwell, Booker T, Scott Steiner, Sting, and Goldberg received positive reactions.[1] Vince then proceeded to fire them all, however, to the cheers of the RAW crowd and the jeers of the Nitro crowd.[1] McMahon then announced that he would sign the contract and make the purchase official at WrestleMania. Shane McMahon, however, appeared on Nitro and announced in kayfabe that he had signed the contract and purchased WCW out from under his father's nose,[1] planting the seed for what was considered a lucrative future storyline opportunity. The Invasion did not begin immediately afterwards, as the WWF was preparing for WrestleMania X-Seven, the year's largest show, mere days away. March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... WrestleMania X-Seven was the seventeenth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... WCW Nitro was a television show on professional wrestling ran by WCW on Monday Nights in TNT to go to head-to-head competition with WWF RAW,the flagship show of the bitter rivals of WCW in the same time slot on Monday Nights. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... For other uses, see Sting (disambiguation). ... Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ... Lawrence Larry Wendell Pfohl (born June 2, 1958),[1][2] best known by his ring name Lex Luger, is an American former bodybuilder, professional wrestler and football player. ... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... Marcus Alexander Mark Bagwell (born January 10, 1970) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Buff Bagwell. ... Robert Booker Tio Huffman[2] (born March 1, 1965)[2], better known by his wrestling personas Booker T and King Booker, is an American professional wrestler. ... Scott Carl Rechsteiner (born July 29, 1962) better known by his ring name Scott Steiner, is an American professional wrestler. ... For other persons named Bill Goldberg, see Bill Goldberg (disambiguation). ... Shane Brandon McMahon[3][2] (born January 15, 1970)[1] is an American executive and part-time professional wrestler for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ...


The Invasion

The WWF had effectively doubled the size of its roster through its acquisition of WCW, and as a result, there was not enough screen time for everyone. The original plan was to find a time slot on TNN to continue running WCW as a separate entity. Polls were even put up on WWF.com and WCW.com to decide the name of the new show. These plans fell through when no TV station would touch WCW because of its reputation for losing money.[9] The WWF eventually carried out a brand extension, effectively reviving WCW under its own auspices and running two separate promotions, each with one of the WWF's two existing televised shows, RAW and SmackDown!. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment Brand Extension was a device first used in 2002 by said professional wrestling organization as a means of providing separate brands of wrestling through its two top shows, RAW and SmackDown!, with the addition of ECW in 2006. ... For the video game series based on the show, see WWE SmackDown! (video game series). ...


As part of its plans, Lance Storm became the first WCW wrestler to appear on WWF programming, by running in during a match on the May 28 episode of RAW while a match was being contested.[10] At King of the Ring 2001 on June 24, then-WCW wrestler Booker T interfered during the Triple Threat Main Event match for the WWF Championship and almost cost Stone Cold Steve Austin the title.[11] Additionally, Austin suffered fractured bones in his hand from the side slam he took from Booker into an announce table. The next night, a confrontation occurred between WCW owner Shane McMahon and WWF owner Vince McMahon. While Vince was in the ring, Booker T came from behind to deliver his trademark scissor kick to Vince.[12] The WWF roster ran to the ring to the aid of Vince, but Booker T and Shane McMahon escaped through the crowd.[12] This incident marked the official start of the Invasion storyline, to which RAW announcer Jim Ross announced, "The battle lines have been drawn!"[12] Lance Timothy Evers (born April 3, 1969), known professionally by his ring name Lance Storm, is a retired Canadian professional wrestler. ... In professional wrestling, a run-in occurs when one or more individuals who are not actively participating in a match run into the ring. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... King of the Ring is an annual World Wrestling Entertainment tournament held from 1985 to 2002. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Booker Tio Huffman[2] (born March 1, 1965)[2], better known by his wrestling personas Booker T and King Booker, is an American professional wrestler. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... A scissor kick or Gunting (in Malay Language) in martial arts is used to describe certain kicking techniques that resemble a pair of scissors. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ...


The WWF eventually began to recognize WCW and tested the idea of a brand extension by giving WCW the final twenty minutes of RAW with Scott Hudson and Arn Anderson doing announcing duties in place of Jim Ross and Paul Heyman. During a match between Buff Bagwell and Booker T for the WCW World Heavyweight Championship, WWF wrestlers Kurt Angle and WWF Champion Stone Cold Steve Austin interfered in retaliation by beating Booker T up, with Bagwell joining Angle and Austin by attacking Booker T.[13] This match did not go over well at all with the audience in attendance.[14] One source cites that the match should have showcased the best of WCW but instead featured too many restholds and not enough action.[14] The audience jeered at the wrestlers with chants of "This match sucks!" and "Boring!"[14] A WWF source close to Vince McMahon said that Vince had "absolutely hated" the segment.[14] This was the last time a WWF broadcast would showcase the WCW in this fashion. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Paul Heyman (born September 11, 1965 in Scarsdale, New York) is a professional wrestling manager, on-air talent, and former promoter formerly employed by World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Marcus Alexander Bagwell, also known as Buff Bagwell, is an American professional wrestler best known for his nine year career with World Championship Wrestling. ... The World Championship Wrestling (WCW) World Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling world championship in World Championship Wrestling. ... Kurt Steven Angle (born December 9, 1968) is an American professional wrestler and former Olympic amateur wrestler. ...


Up until this point, the WCW contingent were being built up to being malcontent faces rising up against the heel Vince McMahon, because of Vince's bluster during the final Nitro broadcast and Shane's usurping of the WCW ownership. Originally, WCW talents' were meant to attack strictly heel WWF wrestlers. The strongly negative reaction of the core WWF viewership to the WCW product and talent,[14] however, coupled with the reality that a WCW wrestling program to appeal to their fans would not come to fruition, led to the entire WCW contingent to abruptly turn heel. One example was the heel gimmick of then WCW Alliance Member, Diamond Dallas Page engaging in a feud against the babyface gimmick of The Undertaker.[15] In professional wrestling, a heel is a villain character. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Page Joseph Falkinburg, Jr. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ...


Addition of ECW

Main article: The Alliance

On July 9 on RAW, Kane was scheduled to go into a handicapped match against Mike Awesome and Lance Storm.[3] Chris Jericho came out and offered to be Kane's partner, thus turning it into a tag team match.[3] Near the end of the match, Jericho applied the Walls of Jericho on Lance Storm. As the move was being applied, however, Rob Van Dam and Tommy Dreamer ran through the audience and into the ring and started to beat on Kane and Jericho.[3] In response, WWF wrestlers consisting of The Dudley Boyz, Tazz, Justin Credible, Rhyno, and Raven ran to the ring. After a brief stand-off, the WWF cavalry turned around and attacked Kane and Jericho.[3] This prompted Paul Heyman to leave the announce table and enter the ring. After high-fiving the wrestlers, he announced that ECW has been brought into the Invasion.[3] Heyman talked about how tired he was sitting beside Jim Ross and discussing WCW vs. WWF, stating that he felt that everyone had forgotten about ECW and announced, "This Invasion just got taken to the extreme."[3] is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Glen Thomas Jacobs (born April 26, 1967) better known by his ring name Kane, is an American professional wrestler. ... Michael Lee Alfonso (January 24, 1965 – February 17, 2007) better known by his ring name Mike Awesome, was an American professional wrestler best known in America for his work in Extreme Championship Wrestling, World Championship Wrestling, and in World Wrestling Entertainment and also in Japan for his work with Frontier... Lance Timothy Evers (born April 3, 1969), known professionally by his ring name Lance Storm, is a retired Canadian professional wrestler. ... Christopher Keith Irvine (born November 9, 1970), better known by the ring name Chris Jericho, is an American-Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician, and professional wrestler. ... Robert Alexander Szatkowski (born December 18, 1970 in Battle Creek, Michigan) better known by his ring name Rob Van Dam, is currently an inactive American professional wrestler. ... Thomas Laughlin (born February 14, 1971),[2] is an American professional wrestler better known by his ring name, Tommy Dreamer. ... For the rest of the stable see Dudley family. ... Peter Senerchia (born October 11, 1967),[2] is a retired American professional wrestler best known by his ring name Tazz, (originally Tazmaniac and later shortened to simply Taz). ... Peter Joseph Polaco (born October 16, 1973 in Ozone Park, New York) is an American professional wrestler who competes under the name Justin Credible. ... Terry Gerin, better known as Rhyno (born October 7, 1975 in Detroit, Michigan) is a professional wrestler currently performing for World Wrestling Entertainment on the RAW brand. ... Scott Anthony Levy (born September 8, 1964) better known by his ring name Raven, is an American professional wrestler. ... Paul Heyman (born September 11, 1965 in Scarsdale, New York) is a professional wrestling manager, on-air talent, and former promoter formerly employed by World Wrestling Entertainment. ... This article is about the independent promotion from 1992-2001. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ...


Later during the night, Shane and Vince McMahon bumped into each other backstage.[3] Shane told his father that ECW needed to be taken care of and pointed out that there were 10 ECW wrestlers under Heyman's belt.[3] He suggested that he would take five of his WCW wrestlers and have them team up with five of Vince McMahon's WWF wrestler's later that night to take out ECW.[3] Vince agreed but stubbornly insisted that WCW would eventually meet its demise when all was said and done.[3]


At the end of the night, the WCW wrestlers came into the ring, accompanied by Shane McMahon. The WWF wrestlers then came into the ring and, before ECW entered, the WCW and WWF wrestlers started to brawl.[3] The WWF wrestlers cleared the ring but then were stormed by the ECW wrestlers and taken out.[3] After this, WCW's men came into the ring and high-fived the ECW men.[3] Paul Heyman and Shane McMahon then hugged and started to dismantle the WWF wrestlers.[3] Vince McMahon, stunned, came out and asked what was going on.[3] Shane McMahon responded that he was responsible for all the events that just transpired and announced that ECW and WCW merged to form The Alliance.[3] He then announced that the new owner of ECW was Stephanie McMahon.[3] Stephanie Marie McMahon-Levesque[1] (born September 24, 1976) better known by her maiden name Stephanie McMahon, is World Wrestling Entertainments Executive Vice President of Talent and Creative Writing. ...


Stone Cold's leave and return

The "old" Stone Cold, a "beer-swilling, foul-mouthed SOB".

Stone Cold took a change in character during this time. Instead of being a beer-drinking redneck, he was more emotional and tried to cheer-up Vince McMahon, who was clearly stressed from the threat of The Alliance, by doing something generous like giving Vince a cowboy hat as a present.[16] During a July 12 SmackDown!, Stone Cold played "Kumbaya" and "We Are the Champions" for McMahon, to which Vince was unresponsive.[17] Later that night, Vince McMahon came out and asked Stone Cold to come to the ring, announcing him as the man that would lead Team WWF into the pay-per-view and into victory.[17] Upon entering, Vince McMahon told Stone Cold that he had changed quite a bit since WrestleMania, and when the WWF goes up against The Alliance at the upcoming pay-per-view, he did not need a Stone Cold that gave him hugs and gifts and baked him cookies. He needed the "old" Stone Cold who was a "beer-swilling, foul-mouthed SOB" and the "old" Stone Cold that "didn't take shit from anyone." He asked Stone Cold to knock him down, even yelling to the crowd, "If you want Stone Cold to beat the living hell out of Vince McMahon, give me a hell yeah!" to which the crowd responded enthusiastically.[17] Stone Cold, however, shook his head and proceeded to leave the ring, turning his back on Vince McMahon.[17] Later that night when Diamond Dallas Page and Shane McMahon went up against the Undertaker and Kurt Angle, many members of the Alliance interfered.[17] Kane and Jericho came to help their team, but the Alliance's numbers were too many, and without Stone Cold to back up his teammates, Team WWF was overwhelmed.[17] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1212 × 1696 pixel, file size: 498 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1212 × 1696 pixel, file size: 498 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kumbaya (also spelled Kum Ba Yah) is a song claimed to have been composed by Reverend Marvin V. Frey (1918–1992) in the 1930s in Portland, Oregon. ... We Are The Champions is a power ballad written by Freddie Mercury, recorded and performed by Queen for their 1977 album News of the World. ... Page Joseph Falkinburg, Jr. ...


On the July 16 edition of RAW, Stone Cold was shown drinking and playing pool at a bar downtown.[18] During the night, Vince McMahon held a WWF meeting backstage. Undertaker and the APA gave a motivational speech on how they should not tolerate the Alliance any longer.[18] After they were finished, Brooklyn Brawler wheeled Freddie Blassie into the room so he could address the wrestlers and pump them up for the night.[18] As the WWF wrestlers united, Stone Cold could be seen watching the events on the television at the bar.[18] He proceeded to slam his cue stick on the pool table and left.[18] is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Faarooq & Bradshaw The APA The Acolyte Protection Agency (A.P.A), also known as Hells Henchmen and The Acolytes, was a professional wrestling tag team in World Wrestling Entertainment, active between October 1998 and March 2004. ... Steve Lombardi is a professional wrestler/road agent better known as the Brooklyn Brawler. ... Fred Blassie (February 8, 1918 – June 2, 2003) was an American professional wrestler born in St. ...


Later that night, DDP and Rhyno faced Kane and the Undertaker.[18] During the match, there was interference from the Alliance.[18] In response, the Hardy Boyz, the APA, Jericho, and Kurt Angle came to help their WWF allies, but more Alliance members came in and overwhelmed the WWF wrestlers.[18] Backstage, many WWF and Alliance wrestlers were fighting each other, and the WWF seemed to be on the losing end of things.[18] A truck was seen driving up to the arena, however, and Stone Cold came out with his cue stick and proceeded to beat down any WCW and ECW wrestlers in his path.[18] He then came to the ring, trash-talking on the way down, and beat down the Alliance wrestlers, giving Stunners to most of the men in the ring.[18] The WWF wrestlers had cleaned house and were standing tall.[18] The WWF seemed to be in good shape for the upcoming pay-per-view with Stone Cold's return.[18] The Hardy Boyz (also known as the The Hardys and Team Xtreme) are a professional wrestling tag team in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) that consists of real life brothers Matt and Jeff Hardy. ... A stunner is a common term in professional wrestling referring to the sitout three-quarter facelock jawbreaker maneuver. ...


WWF InVasion

Main article: WWF Invasion

At InVasion, the Inaugural Brawl took place between Team WCW/ECW and Team WWF. The WWF consisted of Stone Cold Steve Austin, Kurt Angle, Chris Jericho, Kane, and the Undertaker, who all squared off against the team of DDP, Booker T, Rhyno, and the Dudley Boys.[4] Near the end of the match, all of the wrestlers were outside of the ring except Booker T and Angle. Kurt Angle applied the ankle lock on Booker T, who tapped out, but no referee was there to witness it. Stone Cold then dragged a referee into the ring, but in a stunning turn of events, kicked Kurt Angle in the face, Stunned him, and placed Booker T on top of Kurt Angle and told the referee to count. Team WCW/ECW won the match due to Stone Cold's betraying the WWF.[4] Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ... Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ...


The next night, Austin claimed he joined the Alliance because they appreciated him.[19] He cited Vince's hugging of Angle and calling The Rock on the phone as signs that Vince did not appreciate Austin and accused McMahon of grooming Angle to be the next WWF Champion.[19]


The WWF gains momentum

Shane McMahon, on the July 26 edition of SmackDown!, extended an invitation to The Rock, who had not been seen since the RAW following WrestleMania X-Seven, to the Alliance.[20] Also that night, Kurt Angle challenged Booker T to a WCW World Heavyweight Championship match, which Booker T accepted. The WWF gained momentum when Angle beat Booker T with an ankle lock, taking the WCW Championship away from the Alliance.[20] Angle's title run proved to be short-lived, as Booker T won it back on the July 30 episode of RAW.[21] is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwayne Douglas Johnson[6] (born May 2, 1972)[4], better known by his former ring name The Rock, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... WrestleMania X-Seven was the seventeenth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... The World Championship Wrestling (WCW) World Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling world championship in World Championship Wrestling. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On that same RAW, The Rock returned for the first time since his kayfabe suspension on the April 2 edition of RAW.[21] Shane and Vince McMahon were in the ring that night, and each tried to convince The Rock to join their respective side.[21] Shane McMahon took the liberty of reminding The Rock of how Vince screwed him out of the WWF Championship earlier that year at WrestleMania and also in a steel cage match the day after WrestleMania.[21] Vince McMahon replied that Shane was somewhat accurate in his accusations but ceded that it was wrong for him to back Stone Cold, as he was a rattlesnake that he should have known would eventually bite him.[21] He promised to The Rock that he had no intention of screwing him if he returned to the WWF but also ceded that he could not promise that he never would; if it was good for business, he said, then he just might do it.[21] He told The Rock that he was at least being honest with him and pleaded for The Rock to trust himself, stating that his future was with the fans and the WWF.[21] The Rock, however, Rock Bottomed Vince McMahon and proceeded to shake Shane's hand, but he then proceeded to Rock Bottom him as well.[21] He picked up the microphone and emphatically asserted, "Finally, the Rock has come back... to the WWF." The Rock had chosen a side, and that side was the World Wrestling Federation.[21] In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A bloodied Kane inside a current style WWE cage. ...


His return led to a WCW Title match between The Rock and Booker T at SummerSlam 2001, which The Rock won, marking the second time the WCW Championship belt changed sides to the WWF.[7] At that same pay-per-view, Austin retained his WWF Championship against Angle after Angle won by disqualification.[7] SummerSlam 2001 was the fourteenth annual SummerSlam professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ...


The following RAW and SmackDown! showings featured primarily inter-promotional matches between the two companies. Austin stole Kurt Angle's medals during one of the shows, and on the August 30 edition of SmackDown!, tied them to a cinder block and threw them in a river.[22] The following RAW, Debra and Stephanie bought a new truck for Stone Cold, but Angle came up from behind and nailed Austin in the back of the head with a pipe. He put a cinder block and rope in the truck, put Austin in it, and drove away on the truck. He threatened to throw Stone Cold into a river if he did not get a title shot. Austin complied and gave him a shot at the upcoming pay-per-view, Unforgiven. Angle said, however, that Austin was "still going into the water", but instead simply embarrassed Austin by throwing him into a kiddie pool.[23]. is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Debra Gale Marshall (born March 2, 1960[1] in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) is an American real estate agent and former professional wrestling manager and WWE Diva. ... Stephanie Marie McMahon-Levesque[1] (born September 24, 1976) better known by her maiden name Stephanie McMahon, is World Wrestling Entertainments Executive Vice President of Talent and Creative Writing. ...


The WWF gained even more momentum at Unforgiven, as The Rock retained the WCW Championship against Booker T, and Kurt Angle made Austin submit to the ankle lock, winning the WWF Championship from Stone Cold, putting both belts into the hands of the WWF.[24]


Jericho and The Rock Feud/The Alliance mounts a comeback

The Rock

There were several inter-promotional matches after Unforgiven. Furthermore, a crucial plot point formed when, on the October 8 airing of RAW, Jericho and The Rock teamed up against Shane McMahon and Rob Van Dam.[25] Jericho's face was drenched in blood and, with a steel chair in his hand, accidentally nailed The Rock when he was trying to hit Shane McMahon.[25] This caused a stir backstage later on in the night when The Rock checked to make sure Jericho, who was being treated by EMTs, was in good condition but stated that Jericho made a big mistake in the match.[25] Jericho, irritated, countered that everyone makes mistakes, including The Rock.[25] The Rock responded that everyone should own up to their mistakes but was more concerned with Jericho's condition.[25] As he went to leave the room, Jericho made a comment to the EMT wondering "what the hell" The Rock wanted for him.[25] The Rock overheard this, walked back, and asked Jericho to repeat himself.[25] Jericho did just that, and The Rock countered that his mistake actually cost them the match.[25] Jericho countered that he maybe should have hit The Rock instead with a chair on purpose and proceeded to taunt The Rock by stating that he should knock the People's Eyebrow off of The Rock's face.[25] The Rock provoked Jericho to do just that, and a brawl ensued.[25] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (982 × 1309 pixels, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Rock at WWF Fan Axxess. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (982 × 1309 pixels, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Rock at WWF Fan Axxess. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Alexander Szatkowski (born December 18, 1970 in Battle Creek, Michigan) better known by his ring name Rob Van Dam, is currently an inactive American professional wrestler. ...


Also that night, Stone Cold and Kurt Angle faced off for the WWF Championship, and William Regal, who sat at ringside to ensure a fair match would take place, hit Kurt Angle with the championship, thereby backstabbing the WWF and costing Angle the title.[25] William Regal as Goodwill Ambassador and Commissioner Darren Matthews aka William Regal (born May 10, 1965 in Staffordshire) is an English professional wrestler performing in World Wrestling Entertainment on the RAW brand. ...


The feud between Jericho and The Rock built up to a match at No Mercy on October 21, where Jericho beat the Rock to win the WCW Championship, and Stone Cold Steve Austin defeated Angle and Rob Van Dam to retain his WWF Championship.[26] This article is about the professional wrestling pay-per-view event. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the October 29 edition of RAW, Shane McMahon told his father, Vince McMahon, that a member of the WWF would jump ship to the Alliance that night. Later that same night, Kurt Angle backstabbed the WWF by hitting Jericho, The Rock, Undertaker, and Kane with steel chairs.[27] On the November 1 edition of SmackDown!, Angle, who originally led the WWF wrestlers, explained that he represented what is great about America -- he was a winner, and his defection came from his decision to fight along the winning side. That side included Stone Cold, a man, Kurt Angle claimed, knew how to win.[28] is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The end of the Invasion

On the November 5 airing of RAW, Vince McMahon countered Kurt Angle's defection by stating that a member of Team Alliance would defect during a match at the upcoming Survivor Series. Stone Cold came out to confront Vince about it, and Vince stated that Stone Cold would be the one to defect. Because of this announcement, many Alliance members began to distrust Stone Cold, looking at him with suspicious eyes, to which Stone Cold vehemently denied the charges and called Vince a liar.[29] Stone Cold went on to interrogate members of Team Alliance, questioning Booker T and sitting Rob Van Dam down in a room with a light shining on him.[30] is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Survivor Series 2001 was the fifteenth annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Robert Alexander Szatkowski (born December 18, 1970 in Battle Creek, Michigan) better known by his ring name Rob Van Dam, is currently an inactive American professional wrestler. ...


All of this led to a "Winner Take All" match at Survivor Series 2001, which pitted Team WWF (The Rock, Chris Jericho, The Undertaker, Kane, and The Big Show) against Team Alliance (Steve Austin, Kurt Angle, Booker T, Rob Van Dam, and Shane McMahon).[5] The final three men in the match were The Rock and Jericho vs. Austin.[5] Jericho was eliminated and, to continue the feud between the two men, attacked the Rock, even though Jericho's future was on the line if The Rock lost. The Rock and Austin continued to battle it out, and the referee was knocked down in the match.[5] Austin stunned the Rock and pinned him, but there was no referee to count it.[5] Austin approached the downed referee to try to revive him.[5] As this was occurring, Angle ran to the ring, picked up the WWF championship belt, and nailed Austin with it, revealing himself to be the defector to which McMahon was referring the entire time.[5] The Rock followed this with a Rock Bottom and a pin on Austin, to which the referee woke up and counted Austin down to three.[5] Team WWF prevailed, thus ending the storyline.[5] Christopher Keith Irvine (born November 9, 1970), better known by the ring name Chris Jericho, is an American-Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician, and professional wrestler. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Glen Thomas Jacobs (born April 26, 1967) better known by his ring name Kane, is an American professional wrestler. ... Paul Wight, Jr. ...


Aftermath

The WCW World Heavyweight Championship was later unified with the WWF Championship to form the WWF Undisputed Championship. Here, Triple H holds both belts.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 775 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1076 × 833 pixel, file size: 230 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 775 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1076 × 833 pixel, file size: 230 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... The World Championship Wrestling (WCW) World Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling world championship in World Championship Wrestling. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The WWE Undisputed Championship title belt (2002) The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Undisputed Championship was a professional wrestling championship. ... Paul Michael Levesque[4] (born July 27, 1969)[4] is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Triple H, an abbreviation of his former Hunter Hearst Helmsley moniker. ...

WCW

After The Alliance was disbanded, the WCW World Heavyweight Championship would be simply renamed the World Championship, and later unified with the WWF Championship to form the WWF Undisputed Championship. The Undisputed Championship was originally represented with both the original WWF and WCW title belts, as the champion would carry both belts around, until being replaced with a single belt. At the beginning of the WWE Brand Extension, the champion would appear on both RAW and SmackDown! until then champion Brock Lesnar took the title to Smackdown. Eric Bischoff would reward Triple H with the the former WCW championship belt, as he was the last person to have it, renaming it the World Heavyweight Championship. The Undisputed Championship would be renamed the WWE Championship, as having two world titles contradicted the term "undisputed." The World Championship Wrestling (WCW) World Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling world championship in World Championship Wrestling. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The WWE Undisputed Championship title belt (2002) The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Undisputed Championship was a professional wrestling championship. ...


Another WCW championship, the WCW Cruiserweight Championship, was rebranded as a WWE title and replaced the WWF Light Heavyweight Championship as the WWE Cruiserweight Championship.[5] Additionally, the WCW United States Championship was revived in 2003 as a SmackDown!-exclusive title, thus becoming the WWE United States Championship. The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Cruiserweight Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The World Wrestling Federation (WWF) Light Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling championship. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Cruiserweight Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) United States Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) United States Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ...


ECW

Although the WCW brand effectively died once and for all following the end of this storyline, ECW was "temporarily" revived by WWE in 2005 for the purposes of a special "reunion" show, ECW One Night Stand, held on June 12, 2005.[31] The build-up to this one-shot event featured former ECW talent putting over the virtues of the brand versus the WWE product and appearances by several former ECW wrestlers not under contract to WWE. In 2006, it was announced that WWE would be reviving ECW as its third "brand" (to complement RAW and SmackDown!). The second One Night Stand, held on June 11, 2006, led to the official debut of the new ECW the following Tuesday.[32] This article is about the WWE brand. ... ECW One Night Stand 2005 was a professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the WWE brand. ... ECW One Night Stand 2006 was a professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other

Test won the Immunity Battle Royal, which granted him immunity from being fired for an entire year, beginning a storyline in which he would bully other wrestlers simply because he could. Every Alliance member who held championships were also immune from being fired, such as Christian, the Dudley Boyz, and Rob Van Dam. William Regal got his job back by being the first to join Vince McMahon's infamous Kiss My Ass Club. The remaining Alliance members (with the exception of RVD) would associate themselves with Vince, who immediately turned heel, against Austin, who immediately turned face. Kurt Angle remained a heel, despite being the one responsible for the end of the Alliance. It was during this storyline that Stone Cold Steve Austin coined the "What?" catchphrase, which fans continue to chant to this day. Ric Flair would make a return and become the kayfabe co-owner of the WWE with Vince.


Reaction

The Invasion angle was a large storyline that spanned for almost half of 2001 and brought about financial success for the WWF, such as the InVasion pay-per-view being one of the highest non-major event buyrates in the history of pay-per-views.[33] However, the Invasion storyline has come under criticism by wrestling fans and wrestling media,[7] with the storyline being called a flop.[6] Other media refer to the storyline as "one of the most poorly handled, ego-filled story lines in wrestling history."[8] The Invasion storyline was awarded the 2001 Gooker Award by WrestleCrap for worst gimmick, storyline, or event in wrestling. Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ... Wrestlecrap is a professional wrestling website created by RD Reynolds and Merle Vincent, serving as a hall of shame for some of the worst gimmicks and storylines in pro wrestling history. ...


The Weakness of the Alliance

Throughout the storyline, many inter-promotional matches had WWF wrestlers winning over WCW/ECW wrestlers, usually cleanly. In contrast, most of the Alliance's wins were due to interference or disqualification. For example, it took Tazz assisting Raven at InVasion for Raven to beat William Regal.[4] The Rock, however, won cleanly at SummerSlam 2001, despite Shane McMahon's helping Booker T.[7] Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ...


One particular example of this was during the Inaugural Brawl at the InVasion pay-per-view. Besides Austin's turn in the match that was needed to secure a WCW/ECW win over the WWF, Slam! Wrestling alleged that the Alliance wrestled poorly in comparison to the WWF wrestlers:

"Portrayed as disorganized and inferior grapplers, the ECW-WCW Team had more than its fair share of mistimed moves which hurt their own team members while the "WWF squad" of course wrestled like a well-oiled machines. The weakening of the ECW-WCW dubbed superstars didn't stop there either. The WWF faction battered their enemy tag partners off the ring apron over and over again making them appear weak and more times than not, the ECW-WCW grapplers gained an advantage only by double-teaming or employing underhanded tactics. The message sent was loud and clear. The best of ECW-WCW is not good enough to hang with the WWF."[4]

It has been speculated that the reason for this was because Vince McMahon did not want the WWF to look weak while fighting the Alliance, as he worked very hard to put down his competition, especially WCW.[6][34][35] Smash Wrestling alleges that WWF wrestlers needed to defect to make the Alliance appear to be a credible threat.[33]


Overemphasis on the McMahons

The Invasion storyline was presented with a backdrop of a McMahon feud. In storyline, WWF was owned by Vince McMahon, WCW was owned by Shane McMahon, and ECW was owned by Stephanie McMahon. Although the feud did not center completely around the McMahons, the family feud storyline had been done many times before.[36][37] In addition to this, the Stone Cold versus Vince McMahon feud was to start again when Vince McMahon hit Austin in the back of the head with a chair at No Mercy. As stated by a Slam! Wrestling synopsis of No Mercy 2001: This article is about the professional wrestling pay-per-view event. ...

For fans who didn't catch it the fifth, tenth or twentieth time they've run the angle, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and Vince McMahon are about to feud once again... First up was Vincent McMahon labeling Austin with a steel chair as he was waiting to put a dazed RVD away... Three minutes later, it was Shane McMahon's turn to hurl Kurt Angle out of the ring and into a steel ring post. Vince tackled Shane over the announce table and the two began pummeling one another. Back in the ring, Austin laid a "Stone Cold" Stunner on to retain the belt as a disgruntled Vince scowled. Gee, how many times have we seen that scenario play itself out before? Austin wins. Vince fumes. Fans snore. Whatever.[26]

The storyline also allegedly centered too much on the McMahons, who were getting more airtime than the wrestlers.[8]


It has been argued that the Invasion angle may have been more successful if Paul Heyman and Eric Bischoff were perceived as controlling ECW and WCW, respectively, instead of Stephanie and Shane McMahon.[6] Paul Heyman (born September 11, 1965 in Scarsdale, New York) is a professional wrestling manager, on-air talent, and former promoter formerly employed by World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Eric Aaron Bischoff (born May 27, 1955[1]), is a former professional wrestling booker and on-screen personality, most known for serving as President of World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later General Manager of World Wrestling Entertainments RAW brand. ...


Lack of big-name WCW talent/Overemphasis on WWF defectors

Many fans had dreamed of a day where they could pit WWF and WCW wrestlers against each other, but the storyline's final match ended with four WWF wrestlers brawling it out. As a column in Online World of Wrestling stated:

"While it was good TV, it wasn't what everyone thought the WCW vs WWF would have been all about... When the fans of WWF and WCW reminisced about a WCW vs WWF match back in the glory days of Monday Night Wars of around 1997, their match would have probably gone like this: WCW would probably have a team of Hollywood Hulk Hogan, Scott Hall, Kevin Nash, Goldberg, and Ric Flair against... maybe the WWF team of Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, the Undertaker, Shawn Michaels, and Mick Foley. Something like that anyway, obviously, even if Vince had done this thing right and signed some good WCW talent we would have had a match a little different due to... factors such as retirement or injuries or something, but still similar to that."[6]

It is important to note that some of the WCW wrestlers' absences were out of the WWF's control. Many of WCW's top wrestlers had contracts with AOL Time Warner, WCW's parent company, and were willing to sit at home rather than wrestle for less money. Ric Flair and Rey Mysterio were not signed until the end of the Invasion because they were tied to their contracts, and therefore their absence was out of the WWF's control.[38] In addition, Scott Steiner was recovering from an injury.[38][39] Others, such as Hulk Hogan, Kevin Nash, Scott Hall, and Goldberg, were not signed until well after the storyline finished.[38] Because of this, the WWF's opponent allegedly lacked the strong identity of WCW.


To bolster the ranks of WCW (in lieu of big WCW names), some WWF wrestlers (such as Stone Cold Steve Austin) defected and joined the Alliance.[4] Although both WWF and WCW featured talents who had worked for both companies, wrestlers such as Stone Cold had their greatest success in WWF and were seen by fans as WWF wrestlers. Kurt Angle had never wrestled a match for either WCW or ECW, but was a main player for the Alliance towards the end of the storyline. In fact, despite both being viewed as prominent WWF wrestlers, they ended up not only being main players of the Alliance, with Stone Cold being the leader that carried championship gold, but also playing a bigger role than the WCW and ECW stars during the Invasion. For example, the final two Alliance members were Stone Cold and Angle at Survivor Series 2001 -- Booker T and Rob Van Dam were eliminated only after Shane McMahon.[5]


Several top WCW and ECW talent who were top superstars in their previous company such as Diamond Dallas Page, Justin Credible, Raven and Tazz were put down into low-mid card matches, while lesser-ranked WWF wrestlers who defected to the Alliance, such as Test, were given a greater push.


See also

Professional wrestling
Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Invasion (sometimes typeset InVasion or alternatively billed as InVasion: WCW/ECW vs. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Nick Ponton (March 26, 2001). RAW Results 3-26-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  2. ^ Arnold Furious (February 14, 2004). Smash wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-12.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Calvin Martin (July 9, 2001). RAW Results 7-9-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  4. ^ a b c d e f John Powell. Austin turns at Invasion. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k John Powell. "WWF pulls out Survivor Series win" and Title Unification Information. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  6. ^ a b c d e Bruce Chen (May 19, 2005). The Flop of the Invasion. Retrieved on 2007-12-09. “Eric Bischoff was not present and Paul Heyman was not given as much authority as he could have been”
  7. ^ a b c d e John Powell. Rock wins WCW title. Retrieved on 2007-12-09. “...they have bungled the WCW-ECW invasion angle so badly that it will go down as the greatest screw ups in the federation's illustrious history.”
  8. ^ a b c Matthew Evans (November 8, 2007). Give It A Rest, Vince. Retrieved on 2007-12-09. “...one of the most poorly handled, ego-filled story lines in wrestling history.”
  9. ^ Arnold Furious (Nov. 10, 2003). Smash Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-12.
  10. ^ Calvin Martin (May 28, 2001). RAW Results 5-28-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  11. ^ John Powell. Angle and Edge rule KOTR. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  12. ^ a b c Calvin Martin (June 6, 2001). RAW Results 6-25-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  13. ^ Calvin Martin (July 2, 2001). RAW Results 7-2-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  14. ^ a b c d e Buck Woodward (July 3, 2006). This day in wrestling history... (7/3). Retrieved on 2007-12-12. “what many fans felt was the worst main event in the history of the program... The match was embarrassing, and chants of "Boring" and "This Match Sucks" were clearly heard throughout.”
  15. ^ Patrick Hickey Jr.. DDP Interview. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  16. ^ Calvin Martin (July 5, 2001). Smackdown! Results 7-5-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-12. “Austin gives Vince a present from Texas. Austin says he was in such a good mood he bough himself one too. The presents are sterling cowboy hats.”
  17. ^ a b c d e f Big Calbowski (July 12, 2001). WWF Smackdown! results 7-12-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Calvin Martin (July 16, 2001). RAW Results 7-16-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  19. ^ a b Calvin Martin (2001-07-23). RAW Results 7-23-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  20. ^ a b Big Calbowski (July 26, 2001). Smackdown! Results 7-26-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i Calvin Martin (2001-07-30). RAW Results 7-30-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  22. ^ Calvin Martin (Aug. 30, 2001). Smackdown! Results 8-30-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  23. ^ JARO (September 3, 2001). Smackdown! Results 9-3-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  24. ^ John F. Molinaro. Angle wins WWF title. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k JARO (October 8, 2001). RAW Results 10-8-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  26. ^ a b John Powell. McMahons ruin No Mercy. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  27. ^ Kevin Gregg (October 29, 2001). RAW Results 10-29-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  28. ^ Big Calbowski (November 1, 2001). Smackdown! Results 11-1-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  29. ^ Kevin Gregg (November 5, 2001). RAW Results 11-5-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  30. ^ Big Calbowski (November 8, 2001). Smackdown! 11-8-01. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  31. ^ Chris Gramlich. One great Night of hardcore hostalgia. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  32. ^ Brian Elliot. "ECW Resurrected at PPV" and comments about ECW's revival. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  33. ^ a b Arnold Furious (June 27, 2003). Smash Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  34. ^ Tony Cottam (June 28, 2003). Smash Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  35. ^ Tony Cottam (February 22, 2003). Smash Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  36. ^ John Powell. Stephanie betrays Vince at Armageddon. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  37. ^ John Powell. Wrestlemania 2000 a flop. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  38. ^ a b c Arnold Furious (June 27, 2003). Smash Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  39. ^ Arnold Furious (June 30, 2003). Smash Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... This is the history of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), a sports entertainment/professional wrestling promotion. ... // This is a list of professional wrestlers, managers and other workers that were employed in World Wrestling Entertainment from: 1952–1963 (as the Capitol Wrestling Corporation) 1963–1979 (as the World Wide Wrestling Federation) 1979–2002 (as the World Wrestling Federation) 2002–present time (as World Wrestling Entertainment) This list... Black Saturday is the name given by wrestling fans on July 14, 1984, when Vince McMahon and the World Wrestling Federation took over the Saturday night time slots on WTBS that had been home to Georgia Championship Wrestling. ... The term Monday Night Wars pertains to the period of American professional wrestling from September 4, 1995, to March 26, 2001. ... The screwjob - Earl Hebner calls for the bell as Shawn Michaels holds Bret Hart in the Sharpshooter. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment Brand Extension was a device first used in 2002 by said professional wrestling organization as a means of providing separate brands of wrestling through its two top shows, RAW and SmackDown!, with the addition of ECW in 2006. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Draft Lottery, also known as the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Draft, is a device used to provide new brand competition and to refreshen the promotions rosters. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) video library is currently the largest collection of professional wrestling videos and copyrights in the world. ... World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) has a wide range of shows all over the world, including television, films, online, video on demand and pay-per-views. ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... WWE Friday Night SmackDown is a professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the flagship broadcast of the SmackDown brand. ... This article is about the WWE brand. ... Each month, World Wrestling Entertainment holds one or two annual pay-per-view events. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Deep South Wrestling, or DSW for short, is a professional wrestling promotion located in the south U.S. and features some wrestlers from the 1980s, 1990s and present time wrestlers. ... The Heartland Wrestling Association is a Midwestern independent professional wrestling promotion based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... International Wrestling Associations logo The International Wrestling Association (IWA) is a wrestling promotion in Puerto Rico. ... Memphis Championship Wrestling (MCW) was a professional wrestling promotion ran by Terry Golden, based in Memphis, Tennesse. ... Ohio Valley Wrestling (OVW) is an American independent professional wrestling promotion based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... WWE Films is a subsidiary of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... WWE Niagara Falls is a retail establishment that is located in Niagara Falls, Ontario and owned by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... Coliseum Video logo (1985 - 1997) WWE Home Video is a video distribution and production company that show World Wrestling Entertainment programming. ... WWE Books is a subsidiary of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Coliseum Video logo (1985 - 1997) WWE Home Video is a video distribution and production company that show World Wrestling Entertainment programming. ... WBF Logo The World Bodybuilding Federation (WBF) was a bodybuilding organization founded in 1990 by Vince McMahon that lasted until 1992. ... The World was a WWE-themed restaurant in Times Square in New York City on the corner of Broadway and 43rd Street. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ... The WCW logo from 1999 to 2001. ... This article is about the independent promotion from 1992-2001. ...

 
 

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