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Encyclopedia > The Incredible Hulk (TV series)
The Incredible Hulk

Opening title credits
Format Drama
Science Fiction
Created by Kenneth Johnson
Starring Bill Bixby
Lou Ferrigno
Jack Colvin
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 82 (List of The Incredible Hulk episodes)
Production
Producer(s) James D. Parriott
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Original run November 4, 1977
November 28, 1977
March 10, 1978May 12, 1982
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

The Incredible Hulk was an American television series based on the Marvel comic book character of the same name. Two TV movies aired on CBS in 1977, and the show followed, airing from 1978 to 1982. It starred Bill Bixby as Dr. David Bruce Banner and Lou Ferrigno as the Hulk. The concept was developed for television by Kenneth Johnson, who also developed the Alien Nation TV series. Look up Hulk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Hulk may refer to: Hulk (comics), a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe Hulk (film), a 2003 film based on the comic book character, directed by Ang Lee Hulk (ship), a type of ships Hulk (roller coaster), a roller coaster... Image File history File links TIHcredits. ... Kenneth Johnson (born 26 October 1942) is an American screenwriter, producer and director best known as the creator of the series V. His creative efforts are almost entirely concentrated in the area of television science fiction. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lou Ferrigno at Comicon 2007 Louis Jude Ferrigno (born November 9, 1951[1]) is an American bodybuilder and actor. ... Jack Colvin (born October 13, 1932, Lyndon, Kansas; died December 1, 2005) was an American character actor of theater, film and TV, best known for the role of the snoopy tabloid reporter Jack McGee on the TV series The Incredible Hulk from 1977 through 1982, and a TV-movie sequel. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The year 1977 in television involved some significant events. ... The year 1978 in television involved some significant events. ... The year 1982 in television involved some significant events. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lou Ferrigno at Comicon 2007 Louis Jude Ferrigno (born November 9, 1951[1]) is an American bodybuilder and actor. ... Kenneth Johnson (born 26 October 1942) is an American screenwriter, producer and director best known as the creator of the series V. His creative efforts are almost entirely concentrated in the area of television science fiction. ... Alien Nation is a science fiction television series, based on the movie of the same name. ...

Contents

Development

In early 1977, Frank Price, head of Universal Television, offered producer and writer Kenneth Johnson a deal to develop a TV show based on any of several characters they had licensed from the Marvel Comics library. Johnson turned down the offer at first, but then, while reading the Victor Hugo novel, Les Miserables, he became inspired and began working to develop the Hulk comic into a TV show. Johnson first changed the name of Dr. Bruce Banner to Dr. David Banner. This change was made, according to Johnson, because he did not want the series to be perceived as a comic book series, so he wanted to change what he felt was a staple of comic books, and Stan Lee's comics in particular, that major characters frequently had alliterative names. On the DVD commentary of the pilot of The Incredible Hulk, Johnson also says that it was a way to honor his late son David. However, according to Stan Lee, Universal changed the name because the name "Bruce Banner" sounded, in the eyes of the network, like a "gay character" name, and "David Banner" sounded better for the character. (However, "Bruce" was used as his middle name, as that was the case in the comics, except in the comics his first name is "Robert," not "David." "Bruce" is visible on the tombstone at the beginning of the series.) Moreover, he dropped the major supporting characters from the comic (e.g. Betty Ross, Rick Jones, Thunderbolt Ross, Doc Samson, and Glenn Talbot). And, rather than being exposed to gamma rays from an atomic explosion, this version of the character received his overdose in a more mundane laboratory accident for the sake of realism. Another significant modification to the character was changing him from a nuclear physicist to a medical researcher/physician. Also, though the comic-book Hulk speaks, more often than not but not always, in a kind of childlike pidgin English ("Hulk smash!"), the TV Hulk does not speak at all, but merely growls and roars. Finally, despite its Marvel Superheroes roots, fantasy and science fiction elements were kept to a minimum in the series. The majority of episodes had absolutely none except for the Hulk himself. Universal Television (a. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Les Misérables is an 1862 novel by the famous French novelist Victor Hugo, set in the Parisian underworld. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Betty Ross (later Betty Talbot and then Betty Banner) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Richard Milhouse Rick Jones is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... General Thaddeus E. Thunderbolt Ross is a fictional character of Marvel Comics. ... Doc Samson (Dr. Leonard Samson) is a fictional character, a superhero and psychiatrist in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Major (later Colonel) Glenn Talbot is a fictional character and an armed-villain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about electromagnetic radiation. ...


Casting

For the role of Dr. David Banner, The producers originally considered Larry Hagman, of I Dream of Jeannie fame, to play Banner.[citation needed] However, Hagman won the part of J.R. Ewing on Dallas. Johnson cast veteran television actor Bill Bixby, the man Johnson himself viewed as his personal first choice. At first, Bixby hadn't wanted to do the series; after reading the script, he quickly signed on. Next, character actor Jack Colvin was cast as Jack McGee. Modeled after the character of Javert in Les Miserables, McGee was a tabloid reporter who relentlessly pursued the Hulk. The most daunting task, however, was finding someone to play the Hulk. Arnold Schwarzenegger auditioned, but was turned down due to his inadequate height.[citation needed] Actor Richard Kiel was hired for the role and production commenced on the pilot movie. However, during filming, Kenneth Johnson's own son pointed out that Kiel's tall but non-muscular physique (due to his excess bodyfat) did not resemble the build of the comic book Hulk. The Hulk had to be believable, strong, and scary. Soon, Kiel was dropped and bodybuilder Lou Ferrigno replaced him, though a very brief shot of Kiel as the character remained in the pilot (according to Johnson in his commentary on a DVD release). Larry Hagman (born on September 21, 1931) is a popular American actor who is famous for playing J.R. Ewing in the 1980s television soap opera Dallas and Major Anthony Nelson on the sitcom I Dream of Jeannie. ... For the episode of The Twilight zone, see I Dream of Genie (The Twilight Zone). ... Larry Hagman as J.R. Ewing John Ross J.R. Ewing, Jr. ... The Southfork Ranch, home of the Ewing family The original cast of Dallas. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jack Colvin (born October 13, 1932, Lyndon, Kansas; died December 1, 2005) was an American character actor of theater, film and TV, best known for the role of the snoopy tabloid reporter Jack McGee on the TV series The Incredible Hulk from 1977 through 1982, and a TV-movie sequel. ... Les Misérables is an 1862 novel by the famous French novelist Victor Hugo, set in the Parisian underworld. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Richard Dawson Kiel (born September 13, 1939, in Detroit, Michigan) is an American actor best known for his role as Jaws in the James Bond movies The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979) as well as the video game Everything or Nothing, Mr. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Lou Ferrigno at Comicon 2007 Louis Jude Ferrigno (born November 9, 1951[1]) is an American bodybuilder and actor. ...


Premise

The origins of the Hulk in the TV series differ greatly from the original comic book. David Banner is a physician/scientist who has been traumatized by the loss of his wife in a fatal car accident and his guilt over his inability to save her from the burning wreckage. He begins to conduct research into strange phenomena in which human beings temporarily display superhuman levels of strength, trying to understand why others faced with a traumatic experience similar to his own were able to save themselves or their loved ones while he was not. He concludes that high levels of gamma radiation from sunspots are the cause. To prove the theory, he bombards his body with gamma radiation to see if he can endow himself with temporary superhuman strength. This article is about electromagnetic radiation. ... For other uses, see Sunspot (disambiguation). ...


Unbeknownst to Banner, the equipment had been upgraded, causing him to administer a far higher dose than he'd intended (2,000,000 units instead of 300,000). He initially thinks that the experiment has failed, but later that evening during a rainstorm, he experiences a flat tire and injures himself while trying to change it. The resulting pain and anger trigger his first transformation (which begins with Banner's eyes turning a whitish-green color) into the Hulk. The Hulk proceeds to destroy Banner's car, then wanders all night through the woods before coming across a young girl fishing, reminiscent of the 1931 Frankenstein film where the monster kills the girl. The Hulk tries to help her, but she runs away. He is shot by her father, who is thrown thirty yards into the lake. He eventually transforms back to Banner with no memory after the tire-changing incident. Firestone tire This article is about pneumatic tires. ... Frankenstein is a 1931 science fiction film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and very loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ...


While Banner and Dr. Elaina Marks, his research partner and the only other person who knows what has really happened to him, try to reverse the process, the interferences of a nosy reporter named Jack McGee (Jack Colvin) result directly in the destruction of the research laboratory. Dr. Marks dies from injuries received in the explosion, after the Hulk, seen by McGee, carries her away from the burning building. Banner, now presumed dead, is forced to go on the run while trying to find a "cure" for his condition. In a manner vaguely similar to the popular series The Fugitive, this forms the basis of the TV series, as Banner endlessly drifts from place to place assuming different identities. Along the way, Banner finds himself feeling obliged to help the people he meets in his travels and odd jobs with their problems. Despite his attempts to stay calm, Banner inevitably finds himself in innumerable stressful and dangerous situations that trigger his transformations into the Hulk. Fortunately, the Hulk's animalistic personality still reflects Banner's good and compassionate nature, which means he typically restricts his wrath on villains threatening him while helping people in distress. Jack Colvin (born October 13, 1932, Lyndon, Kansas; died December 1, 2005) was an American character actor of theater, film and TV, best known for the role of the snoopy tabloid reporter Jack McGee on the TV series The Incredible Hulk from 1977 through 1982, and a TV-movie sequel. ... The Fugitive is an American television series produced by QM Productions and United Artists Television that aired on ABC from 1963-1967. ...


All the while, McGee continues pursuing the story of the mysterious monster whom he believes killed Banner and his associate. As a result, he often personally investigates sightings of the monster, forcing Banner to move on before the reporter can learn too much. A pivotal episode in this regard is "Mystery Man: Part 2" (second season). Here, an injured McGee is trying to escape a forest fire, aided by a man known only as "John Doe," whose face is covered by a gauze mask (actually Banner, who has lost his memory and burned his face in an auto accident, surviving only by "Hulking out"). During their ordeal, McGee reveals to "John" that he wants the Hulk to win a Pulitzer Prize so he can escape the pap produced by the National Register newspaper and go back to writing serious journalism. He later sees the mystery man transform into the Hulk in front of him and realizes that this is how the Hulk gets from one distant place to another without being seen in between. As a result, while McGee wants the creature captured, he does not want the creature killed for the sake of the human containing him. Throughout the entire series run, McGee never learns that Banner is the "John Doe" he pursues, though he actually comes face to face with Banner in the episode "Broken Image," but Banner manages to convince him he is a hood named Mike Cassidy, who is Banner's double. The series wraps up with a standard 50-minute episode ("A Minor Problem"). Colvin does not appear in this last episode or a few other episodes in the short, last season.


One big difference between the Hulk on TV and in comics is that the TV version was not bullet proof. However since bullets penetrate by exerting hundreds of pounds of force per square inch, the Hulk, who can bend steel in his bare hands, should have skin hard enough to be able to withstand such impacts. The TV Hulk does have a superhumanly accelerated healing ability which allows him to heal from such injuries very quickly (certainly before the episode is over). For instance, Banner is once rendered paraplegic, but when he next transforms into the Hulk, the creature's powerful healing ability allows him to walk normally in that form within seconds of transforming. In addition, after Banner changes back, the doctors are amazed to find his spinal injury has dramatically improved enough literally overnight to be able to use leg braces to stand. After Banner's next transformation into the Hulk, his spinal cord injury is completely healed and his ability to walk is completely restored.


Opening narration

The opening narration to the show was done by Ted Cassidy. Each week it went like this: Theodore Crawford Ted Cassidy (born July 31, 1932 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - January 16, 1979 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor who played Lurch (in which role he was able to demonstrate his genuine skill on the harpsichord) and Thing on The Addams Family. ...

Dr. David Banner: physician; scientist. Searching for a way to tap into the hidden strengths that all humans have. Then an accidental overdose of gamma radiation alters his body chemistry. And now when David Banner grows angry or outraged, a startling metamorphosis occurs. The creature is driven by rage and pursued by an investigative reporter. (Bixby: "Mr. McGee, don't make me angry. You wouldn't like me when I'm angry."--a clip from the first pilot) The creature is wanted for a murder he didn't commit. David Banner is believed to be dead, and he must let the world think that he is dead, until he can find a way to control the raging spirit that dwells within him.

The original narration for the second pilot episode, Death in the Family, was fundamentally the same, but had some differences in the specifics, and was as follows:

Dr. David Banner: physician; scientist. Searching for a way to tap into the hidden strengths that all humans have. Then an accidental overdose of gamma radiation interacts with his unique body chemistry. And now when David Banner grows angry or outraged, a startling metamorphosis occurs. The creature is driven by rage and pursued by an investigative reporter. (Bixby: "Mr. McGee, don't make me angry. You wouldn't like me when I'm angry.") An accidental explosion took the life of a fellow scientist and supposedly David Banner as well. The reporter thinks the creature was responsible. (McGee: "I gave a description to all the law enforcement agencies; They got a warrant for murder out on it!") A murder which David Banner can never prove he or the creature didn't commit. So he must let the world go on thinking that he, too, is dead, until he can find a way to control the raging spirit that dwells within him.

Music

One of the distinctive elements of this series that set it apart was the musical score used. In particular, the most famous music is a wistful piano piece called "The Lonely Man". It is typically used at the closing credits that show Banner on the road hitchhiking to the next town, burdened as ever with the destructive curse. This kind of quiet motif is unique in superhero television series, which usually end with fast-tempoed and brassy theme music. Joe Harnell was the music composer of the series. A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


"The Lonely Man" is also a running motif on the Opie and Anthony show on XM Satellite Radio. The hosts play the music when a guest tells a story that is either sad in nature, unfunny, or has gone wrong. Opie (Gregg Hughes, b. ... “XM” redirects here. ...


Cancellation

In 1981, with a major entertainment union strike on the horizon, the production team continued filming episodes for the show's 5th season directly upon completion of the fourth. However, with seven of these "in the can," CBS cancelled the show due to a slight change in the ratings and budget. Rumors were going around at the time that Bill Bixby's contract was up, and that he wanted to move on. Bixby had wanted to see his character being cured from being the Hulk.[citation needed] Also, both executive producer Kenneth Johnson and producer Nicholas Corea had gone to Harvey Shepard, who was president of CBS entertainment at the time, to ask for clearance to shoot nine unfilmed scripts for the series to give the show a mid-season run.[citation needed] They were turned down, and the pilot and the first four seasons were released into general syndication. By that time the union had gone on strike as expected, and that autumn CBS aired five of the seven "5th season" episodes made, running the last two and repeating three of the others the following summer. That fall, all seven were added to the rerun package. The nine unfilmed scripts included, "Los Indios," Parts 1-2 (Season 3), "Double Exposure," (Season 3), "The Trial of Jack McGee," (Season 5), "David Banner, RIP," (Season 5), "The Steel Mill," (Season 5), "The Survivors," (Season 5), "Killer on Board," (Season 5), and "Eyes of the Beholder," (Season 5). Also, Johnson and Corea had wanted to do a two-hour series finale in which Banner is caught and is found out to be alive, goes on trial for the death of Elaina Marks, resolves things with McGee, and gets cured from his hulk-outs.


Made for TV movies

Two episodes of the series appeared first as stand-alone movies, but were later re-edited into one-hour length (two-parters) for syndication. They were produced as pilots before the series officially began in 1978. “Telefilm” redirects here. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...

  • The Incredible Hulk (pilot) - 1977 (also seen overseas as a feature)
  • The Incredible Hulk: Death in the Family - 1977 (retitled Return of the Incredible Hulk for overseas movie release)
  • In addition, "Married", the two-hour premiere episode of the second season in 1978, has been shown as a movie with the title Bride of the Incredible Hulk.

Six years after the cancellation of the television series in 1982, three television movies were produced with Bixby and Ferrigno reprising their roles. All of these aired on NBC. Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... “Telefilm” redirects here. ... This article is about the television network. ...

  • The Incredible Hulk Returns - 1988 David Banner meets a former student (played by Steve Levitt), who has a magical hammer that summons Thor (played by Eric Allan Kramer), a Viking warrior prevented from entering Valhalla. Set up as a back-door pilot for a live-action television series starring Thor. One should note that the Thor character in The Incredible Hulk Returns bears little resemblance to the Marvel Comic book hero/ancient Norse thunder god named Thor (although his long blond hair and clean-shaven face, totally unlike the red-bearded Norse god in authentic mythology who the comic character supposedly is, do match). This project marked Colvin's final appearance with the franchise and the McGee aspect of the storyline was left unresolved.
  • The Trial of the Incredible Hulk - 1989 David Banner meets the blind lawyer named Matt Murdock and his masked alter ego: Daredevil. The Incredible Hulk and the Daredevil battle the Kingpin of Crime, although he was referred to here only by his given name, Wilson Fisk. Daredevil was played by Rex Smith, while John Rhys-Davies played Fisk. This was also set up as back-door pilot for a live-action television series starring Daredevil. The Daredevil presented in Trial of... is much more true to his Marvel Comic book roots than Thor had been. Stan Lee had a cameo appearance as one of the jury members sitting on Banner's trial.
  • The Death of the Incredible Hulk - 1990 David Banner falls in love with an Eastern European spy (played by Elizabeth Gracen) and saves two kidnapped scientists. The film ends with The Hulk taking a fatal fall from an airplane, reverting before he dies so Banner can make a dying declaration.

Despite the apparent death of the Hulk in the 1990 film, more Incredible Hulk television movies were planned (including a proposed Rebirth of the Incredible Hulk to help launch a pilot for Iron Man). In the mid-80s, there was also talk about doing a television movie with the cast from the 1977-1979 live action Spider-Man television series. However, all such projects were cancelled when Bill Bixby died of cancer in November 1993. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Steve Levitt is an American actor who has starred in films and on television. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Eric Allan Kramer played Ator in Quest for the Mighty Sword. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... A Valkyrie is waiting at the gates of Valhalla on the Tjängvide image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. ... A television pilot is a test episode of an intended television series. ... Marvel Comics, sometimes called by the nickname House of Ideas, is an American comic book company. ... The Trial of the Incredible Hulk is a 1989 TV movie sequel to the 1970s Incredible Hulk television series, featuring both the Hulk and fellow Marvel Comics character Daredevil. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... The Kingpin (Wilson Fisk) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics villain who has battled many Marvel crime-fighters; most often Spider-Man, Daredevil and The Punisher. ... Image:RexSmith. ... John Rhys-Davies (born May 5, 1944) is an English actor best known for his supporting roles as the charismatic Arab excavator Sallah in the Indiana Jones films, and the dwarf Gimli in The Lord of the Rings trilogy (in which he also voiced the towering Ent, Treebeard). ... A television pilot is a test episode of an intended television series. ... Marvel Comics, sometimes called by the nickname House of Ideas, is an American comic book company. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... The Death of the Incredible Hulk was the last of three revival TV movies from the 1977-1982 television show The Incredible Hulk. ... This article is about the year. ... Elizabeth Ward Gracen is an American actress known almost as much for her off-screen activities as for her movie and television roles. ... For the upcoming film and video game based on the superhero, see Iron Man (film) and Iron Man (video game). ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the first live-action TV series made to the popular comic book The Amazing Spider-Man and was shown in the USA between 1977-1979. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


DVD releases

All three of the NBC TV movies (The Incredible Hulk Returns, The Trial of the Incredible Hulk and The Death of the Incredible Hulk) have been available on DVD since 2003, the first two were released by Anchor Bay Entertainment while The Death of the Incredible Hulk was released by 20th Century Fox home video. A double-sided DVD entitled The Incredible Hulk - Original Television Premiere, which contained the original pilot and the "Married" episodes, was released by Universal Studios DVD in 2003 to promote Ang Lee's Hulk motion picture. A six-disc set entitled The Incredible Hulk - The Television Series Ultimate Collection was released by Universal DVD later in 2003. This set includes several notable episodes including "Death in the Family," "The First," and "Prometheus". The following is a list of DVD releases for the 1970s TV series The Incredible Hulk: TV-Movies The 3 made-for-TV movies that were released after the TV series ended have been released on DVD. 20th Century Fox released the final movie, while Anchor Bay Entertainment released... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Trial of the Incredible Hulk is a 1989 TV movie sequel to the 1970s Incredible Hulk television series, featuring both the Hulk and fellow Marvel Comics character Daredevil. ... The Death of the Incredible Hulk was the last of three revival TV movies from the 1977-1982 television show The Incredible Hulk. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ang Lee (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born October 23, 1954) is an Academy-Award winning film director from the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... Hulk is a 2003 superhero film based on the comic book series The Incredible Hulk published by Marvel Comics. ...


On July 18, 2006, Universal released The Incredible Hulk - Season One on DVD. This set contains the original pilot movies, the entire first season, and a "preview" episode ("Stop the Presses") from Season Two. is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On July 17, 2007, Universal released The Incredible Hulk - Season Two on DVD as a 5-disc set. The set included the entire second season, the Married episodes (AKA Bride of the Incredible Hulk), and preview episode (Homecoming) from season three. [1] On June 3, 2008, Universal will release The Incredible Hulk - Seasons Three and Four on DVD to promote The Incredible Hulk - Motion Picture. is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Miscellanea

  • One episode featured Bixby's My Favorite Martian co-star Ray Walston as an illusionist, and was titled "My Favorite Magician." Bill's The Magician trainer Mark Wilson served as "magic consultant."
  • In the beginning, the full metamorphosis of Banner transforming into the Hulk would be shown until around the start of season 3. Due to production costs and Bill Bixby's refusal to wear green makeup during transformation, no full metamorphosis would be shown other than the triggering of Banner's transformation and the shirt tearing up as his body gains strength, with the Hulk appearing on the next scene.
  • Actor Ted Cassidy was the opening narrator of the series. He also provided the vocal growls and roars of the creature in the opening credits.
  • The "white eyes" were contact lenses that were of white-greenish color. Both Bill Bixby and Lou Ferrigno have said in past interviews that the lenses were very uncomfortable. Bixby actually had to have pain-killing drops applied to his eyes in order to tolerate them. At the time there were no computer technologies in place to prevent Bixby and Ferrigno from wearing these lenses.
  • To rip out shirts, pants, shoes, etc., Lou Ferrigno would wear clothes that were a size too small, and they were scored to help with the ripping. It was also standard procedure for Banner to wear long-sleeved shirts so Lou could split a sleeve with his bicep.
  • Lou Ferrigno sometimes wore green slippers for his feet during his Hulk scenes, particularly in scenes where the creature had to run on pavement. The slippers are especially notable in the episode "Terror In Times Square"; Ferrigno was reluctant to run through the streets of New York barefoot.
  • In a bit of method-acting, Bixby stated often in interviews that while the Hulk-out scenes were being filmed, he would leave the set, as he didn't want to know what the Hulk had done if his character wasn't supposed to know, either.
  • Executive producer Kenneth Johnson originally wanted the Hulk's skin color to be red, rather than the established green. Johnson believed red would better reflect the character's anger, but Stan Lee, the Hulk's co-creator, rejected this idea.
  • Bill Bixby helped and taught Lou Ferrigno acting techniques, and he returned the favor by putting Bixby on a workout regimen to build up his stamina for the series' demanding production schedule.
  • In an interview with the Hulk comic magazine issue 20 April 1980, Johnson had said that they had finished filming a two-part episode called "Los Indios." However, Johnson has since said that those episodes were in pre-production but never made.
  • During the summer of 1980 Universal was trying to cut costs from the show. The studio had wanted the creators of the show to have a mobile home with sets and a new character and only one Hulk-out per episode (this was the same basic plot that CBS employed for their recently-cancelled Saturday Morning series Shazam! where Billy Batson travelled from town to town with his 'Mentor' in a Winnebago and when trouble arose, would transform into Captain Marvel). Kenneth Johnson vocally opposed the move despite the threat of cancelling the series, but finally CBS put more money into the show for better quailty.
  • Jack McGee was created for the TV show. However, in his 1995 novel, What Savage Beast, Hulk writer Peter David had McGee in the novel.
  • Frank Orsatti was Bill Bixby's stuntman in the series. He directed some episodes of the series as well, most notably the two part episode "The First", featuring a man whom was able to transform into a Hulk-like creature thirty years ago, but was cured. Manuel Perry was Lou Ferrigno's stuntman.
  • Bill Bixby did not film scenes for the season 3 episode, "Proof Positive." At the time, he was getting a divorce from his first wife, actress Brenda Benet. Stuntman Frank Orsatti was used for the shots before the Hulk-out scene, and Banner was shown only briefly and from a distance in these scenes. The plotline focused on McGee and was laden with flashbacks from previous episodes, and in one (from "Behind the Wheel"), Bixby-as-Banner can be glimpsed as the driver of a cab the reporter hires.
  • The three NBC made-for-TV movies reviving The Hulk were produced by Bill Bixby, who also directed one episode during the initial 1978-82 series. Bixby directed the latter two of the three movies, with Nicholas Corea directing the first one.
  • Both Bixby and Ferrigno played dual roles during the run, in the episodes "Broken Image" and "King of the Beach", respectively.
  • The Incredible Hulk was the beginning series of the highly-rated Friday-night block on CBS, where it was followed by The Dukes of Hazzard and Dallas. The series lineup began as such in 1979 and remained that way until 1981, when the Hulk moved to a new night during the abbreviated fifth and final season.
  • The set of The Incredible Hulk television program was visited for an episode of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood, where Mr. Rogers showed the kids at home how the Hulk was not a monster, just an actor wearing makeup.
  • The episode "Never Give A Trucker An Even Break" is heavily influenced by Steven Spielberg's Duel. In fact, many scenes were taken directly from Duel and edited into the episode. (Careful viewers can tell who'll be driving the small red car by the color of a character's clothes.) Reportedly, Spielberg was so unhappy with his work being used as stock footage, he had his susequent contracts ban such use.
  • Likewise, the episode "747" was built around footage borrowed from the movie Airport 1975, and "Earthquakes Happen" utilized shots from Earthquake. Starlog magazine's episode guide for the series claimed that "On the Line," the 3rd season finale, also contained "much stock footage," but failed to identify the original production.
  • Starlog also said that the second season episode "A Child in Need," was actually filmed as part of the first season's production block.
  • The second pilot episode "Death in the Family" references a drug called Myostatin. This chemical, however, was not named in real-life until 1997-- many years after the episode aired. [2][3]
  • There is a small debate on the reasons why Banner's first name was changed to David. In the Q & A documentary "Mutants. Monsters and Marvels" with Kevin Smith, Stan Lee claims that Universal TV executives thought the name 'Bruce' wasn't 'manly' enough (Bruce being a stereotypical first name for gay men). Many comics fans accept this as the truth. However, in the DVD commentary for the Incredible Hulk pilot, Kenneth Johnson states the name change in honor of his son, David (and as a signal to fans that the show would not be entirely faithful to the comic). Also, it has been said that Johnson hated "comic book-style names", particularly Marvel editor/writer Stan Lee's habit of alliterative names (e.g., Bruce Banner, Peter Parker, Matt Murdock, etc.).
  • In a 1980 MAD Magazine satire of the TV show, a cartoon panel attempting to explain the reason why Banner's name was changed. In the panel, two TV network executives are shown discussing the need to change his name from Bruce to David, with one saying (as noted above) Bruce wasn't a name that was 'strong or masculine enough'. In the background of the panel, a TV set is drawn broadcasting the Summer Olympic Games, just as the announcer is saying "...and Bruce Jenner wins the Decathlon."
  • In the opening of the show, Dr. Banner is shown looking at his own tombstone which reads "David Bruce Banner" (a mixing of two names- Bruce from the comic and David from the TV version). In a bit of art imitating life on the pardon that President Reagan gave the Hulk in the pages of a 1982 comic book had the named listed as David Bruce Banner.
  • The ending sequence of the series was parodied by maniacal cartoon baby Stewie Griffin in an episode of Family Guy. In that same episode, his father Peter Griffin flawlessly performs "The Lonely Man" while drunk.
  • Another Family Guy episode, Emission Impossible has Peter visiting his wife's sister and bringing out one of her husband's small shirts to which he puts on and asks her to say, "David Banner, I just slashed your tires," to which he "Hulks out" by ripping the shirt.
  • In a third Family Guy episode, Peter attends a funeral in which he says the opening dialog of the show, instead regarding Jesus. At the end he holds up a picture of Jesus which one half of the picture is slowly covered by a green hulk styled Jesus.
  • The Incredible Hulk is very heavily referenced throughout the hit sitcom The King of Queens, in which Lou Ferrigno ostensibly plays himself as the Heffernans' next-door neighbor. As a result, he is often the target of "Hulk jokes" that Doug Heffernan and his friends like to make.
  • Lou Ferrigno is the only actor to film scenes for every episode of the series.
  • On "Shooting Stars", Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer appeared in The Sunderland Independent Film Corporation's version of The Incredible Hulk, in which Dr. David Banner's rage is triggered when he is overcharged for a macaroon.
  • Bill Bixby never let his son watch the show because he thought his son would be scared by the transformation his dad made in the series.
  • Bixby wanted to direct frequently, but the demanding production schedule--particularly the special effects scenes--meant he was able to do this on only one episode, "Bring Me the Head of the Hulk" in the fourth season.

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... My Favorite Martian was an American television sitcom aired on CBS from September 29, 1963 to September 4, 1966 for 107 episodes (75 in black and white 1963-1965, 32 color 1965-1966). ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... The Magician was an American television series that ran during the 1973–1974 season. ... James Mark Wilson (b. ... Theodore Crawford Ted Cassidy (born July 31, 1932 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - January 16, 1979 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor who played Lurch (in which role he was able to demonstrate his genuine skill on the harpsichord) and Thing on The Addams Family. ... Kenneth Johnson (born 26 October 1942) is an American screenwriter, producer and director best known as the creator of the series V. His creative efforts are almost entirely concentrated in the area of television science fiction. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jackson Bostwick as Captain Marvel in the Shazam! television show. ... For the 2005 film, see The Dukes of Hazzard (film). ... The Southfork Ranch, home of the Ewing family The original cast of Dallas. ... Mister Rogers Neighborhood was a childrens television show hosted by Fred Rogers which was produced by Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania public broadcaster WQED-TV and Fred Rogers not-for-profit production company Family Communications, Inc. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... Duel is a 1971 telemovie about a trucker harassing a motorist on a remote and lonely road. ... Earthquake is a 1974 action adventure/disaster/thriller film that achieved huge box-office success, inspiring the Disaster film genre of the 1970s where recognizable all-star casts attempt to survive life or death situations. ... Starlog is a science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ... Myostatin (formerly known as Growth differentiation factor 8) is a growth factor that limits muscle tissue growth, i. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Stewie redirects here. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Peter Löwenbräu Griffin is the protagonist in the American animated television series Family Guy. ... The King of Queens is an Emmy nominated, American comedy series that ran for nine seasons, from 1998 until 2007. ... Douglas Steven Doug Heffernan (born February 9, 1965 in Montreal) is a fictional character in the American situation comedy The King of Queens. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

References

  1. ^ The Incredible Hulk - It's Official Now! "Hulk - 2nd Season" Smashes to DVD in July!, TV Shows on DVD, April 17, 2007
  2. ^ Episode Quotes from Death in the Family
  3. ^ GDF-8 (Myostatin) discovered in 1997. McPherron AC, Lawler AM, Lee SJ. Regulation of skeletal muscle mass in mice by a new TGF-beta superfamily member. Nature 1997;387:83-90. PMID 9139826.

is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. ...

External links

List of live action television programs based on Marvel Comics
The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... TV.com is a website belonging to the CNET Games and Entertainment family of websites. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Enemies Abomination Absorbing Man Agamemnon Ajax Alien Kid Anacondas Ape Men Armaggeddon John Armbruster Amphibion Aquon Bi-Beast Brian Banner Boomerang Yuri Brevlov Caiman Captain Barracuda Captain Cybor Captain Omen Changellings Circus of Crime/Ringmaster Cobalt Man Crypto-Man DSpayre Dark Hulk Devastator Devil Hulk Draxon Death Riders Droog... Betty Ross (later Betty Talbot and then Betty Banner) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Bereet is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... Caiera is a character in the Marvel ComicsUniverse, created during the Planet Hulk storyline. ... Marlo Chandler is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Doc Samson (Dr. Leonard Samson) is a fictional character, a superhero and psychiatrist in the Marvel Comics universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Richard Milhouse Rick Jones is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Mastermind Excello is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics, first appearing in its predecessor Timely Comics. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... The Warbound are a group of fictional characters in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Jim Wilson is the name of a fictional African American Marvel Comics book character that was a longtime friend of Bruce Banner and Rick Jones. ... Enemies Abomination Absorbing Man Agamemnon Ajax Alien Kid Anacondas Ape Men Armaggeddon John Armbruster Amphibion Aquon Bi-Beast Brian Banner Boomerang Yuri Brevlov Caiman Captain Barracuda Captain Cybor Captain Omen Changellings Circus of Crime/Ringmaster Cobalt Man Crypto-Man DSpayre Dark Hulk Devastator Devil Hulk Draxon Death Riders Droog... The Abomination (Emil Blonsky) is a fictional supervillain that appears in the Marvel Universe and is a perennial foe of the Incredible Hulk. ... Agamemnon is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... The Bi-Beast is a fictional character and a supervillain that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... The Gamma Corps are a fictional comic book military unit published by Marvel Comics. ... Hulkbusters is the name of three fictional organizations in the Marvel Universe. ... The Leader (Samuel Sterns) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the Hulk. ... Madman is a fictional supervillain from the Marvel Comics universe. ... Mercy is a fictional villain at the Marvel Comics universe. ... General Thaddeus E. Thunderbolt Ross is a fictional character of Marvel Comics. ... General John Ryker is one of the Hulks enemies. ... Major (later Colonel) Glenn Talbot is a fictional character and an armed-villain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Tyrannus (real name Romulus Augustus) is an immortal supervillain in the Marvel Universe. ... U-Foes is the name of a comic book supervillain team appearing in various series published by Marvel Comics. ... The Wen-Di-Go (or more commonly: Wendigo) is a man-eating creature in Marvel comics that is based on the mythical creature of the same name. ... Zzzax (sometimes spelled Zzaxx) is a fictional character, an elemental supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This is a list of media appearances for Hulk. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Trial of the Incredible Hulk is a 1989 TV movie sequel to the 1970s Incredible Hulk television series, featuring both the Hulk and fellow Marvel Comics character Daredevil. ... The Death of the Incredible Hulk was the last of three revival TV movies from the 1977-1982 television show The Incredible Hulk. ... The Marvel Superheroes[1] is a Canadian-made animated television series starring five popular comic-book superheroes from Marvel Comics. ... The Incredible Hulk was an American animated television series based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. ... In 1996, UPN brought Marvel Comics Hulk back to animated form (his last animated series was in 1982 for NBC). ... Hulk is a 2003 superhero film based on the comic book series The Incredible Hulk published by Marvel Comics. ... The Incredible Hulk is a 2008 superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character the Hulk. ... Questprobe was the name of a trilogy of text adventure computer games featuring Marvel Comics characters. ... Hulk is one of the video games. ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... World War Hulk is a comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics beginning in May 2007. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has also been depicted in other fictional universes. ... Hulk 2099 is a Marvel Comics fictional character created by Gerard Jones and Dwayne Turner. ... Originally released as a part of the merchandise for 2003 Hulk film, Hulk Hands are large foam-rubber shaped Hulk style clenched fists in to which you insert you hands. ... The Incredible Hulk Coaster is a nice roller coaster located in Universals Islands of Adventure in Orlando, Florida. ... This is a listing of powers and abilities possessed by the Hulk, a fictional comic book superhero from the Marvel Comics universe. ... Below is a list of television series and made for TV movies based on Marvel Comics properties. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the first live-action TV series made to the popular comic book The Amazing Spider-Man and was shown in the USA between 1977-1979. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Trial of the Incredible Hulk is a 1989 TV movie sequel to the 1970s Incredible Hulk television series, featuring both the Hulk and fellow Marvel Comics character Daredevil. ... The Death of the Incredible Hulk was the last of three revival TV movies from the 1977-1982 television show The Incredible Hulk. ... Dr. Strange is a made-for-TV movie based on the Marvel Comics fictional character Dr. Strange, created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko. ... Captain America, the alter ego of Steve Rogers,[1] is a fictional comic-book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses of the term, see Power pack The Power Pack is a team of fictional child superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... On February 20, 1996, the Fox Broadcasting Company aired a made-for-television telefilm based on the Marvel Comics series Generation X. The film (produced by Marvel Entertainment) featured Banshee and Emma Frost as the headmasters of Xaviers School for Gifted Youngsters and M, Skin, Mondo, Jubilee and two... Mutant X (created by Marvel Studios, a division of Marvel comics) is a television series that first aired October 6, 2001. ... Man-Thing, as portrayed in the 2005 TV-movie Man-Thing is a 2005 telefilm, directed by Brett Leonard and featuring the Marvel Comics creature created by Stan Lee, Roy Thomas and Gerry Conway. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Incredible Hulk (TV series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2741 words)
In a manner similar to the popular series The Fugitive, this forms the basis of the TV series, as Banner endlessly drifts from place to place assuming different identities, while at the same time involuntarily using the powers of the Hulk to deal with the problems of the people that he encounters.
The Incredible Hulk and the Daredevil battle the Kingpin of Crime.
The Incredible Hulk was the beginning series of the highly-rated Friday-night block on CBS, which was followed by The Dukes of Hazzard and Dallas.
Hulk (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6495 words)
After several years, the series was retitled The Incredible Hulk due to the character's popularity, and its run continued until March of 1999, at which point the series restarted with a new issue #1.
According to the Leader, the Grey Hulk persona of this period was strongest during the night of the new moon and weakest during the full moon, with the reverse holding true for Banner.
Hulk 2 is tentatively slated to be released in 2007.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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