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Encyclopedia > The Hustler (film)
The Hustler

original promotional poster
Directed by Robert Rossen
Produced by Robert Rossen
Written by Walter Tevis (novel)
Sidney Carroll
Robert Rossen (screenplay)
Starring Paul Newman
Jackie Gleason
Piper Laurie
George C. Scott
Music by Kenyon Hopkins
Cinematography Eugen Schüfftan (as "Eugene Shuftan")
Editing by Dede Allen
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date(s) September 25, 1961
Running time 134 min.
Country USA
Language English
Followed by The Color of Money
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

The Hustler is a 1961 American drama film. It tells the story of small-time pool hustler "Fast Eddie" Felson and his desire to be the best player in the country by beating legendary pool player "Minnesota Fats." After initially losing to Fats and getting involved with unscrupulous manager Bert Gordon, Eddie returns to beat Fats, but only after paying a terrible personal price. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Robert Rossen (March 16, 1908 - February 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter, film director, and producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Robert Rossen (March 16, 1908 - February 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter, film director, and producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Walter Stone Tevis (February 28, 1928 - August 8, 1984) was an American author. ... Sidney Carroll (May 25, 1913-November 3, 1988)was a film and television screenwriter. ... Robert Rossen (March 16, 1908 - February 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter, film director, and producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... Piper Laurie (born January 22, 1932) is an American actress. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Dede Allen (born Dorothea Carothers Allen, 3 December, 1925, in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American film editor. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... The year 1961 in film involved some significant events. ... A drama film is a film that depends mostly on in-depth character development, interaction, and highly emotional themes. ... Hustling is the deceptive act of disguising ones skill in a sport or game with the intent of luring someone of probably lesser skill into gambling (or gambling for higher than current stakes) with the hustler, as a form of confidence trick. ...


The Hustler is an adaptation of the 1959 novel of the same name by Walter Tevis. Sidney Carroll and Robert Rossen adapted the novel for the screen. Rossen directed the film on location in New York City. It stars Paul Newman as Eddie Felson, Jackie Gleason as Minnesota Fats, Piper Laurie as Sarah, and George C. Scott as Bert. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: The Hustler (novel) The Hustler is a 1959 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, later made into a 1961 film of the same title. ... Walter Stone Tevis (February 28, 1928 - August 8, 1984) was an American author. ... Sidney Carroll (May 25, 1913-November 3, 1988)was a film and television screenwriter. ... Robert Rossen (March 16, 1908 - February 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter, film director, and producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... Piper Laurie (born January 22, 1932) is an American actress. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ...


The film was a major critical and popular success and earned a reputation as a modern classic. It garnered a number of major awards and is credited with helping to spark a resurgence in the popularity of pool. It also inspired a real pool hustler to adopt the name of Gleason's character, Minnesota Fats, and use the association with the film to become a celebrity.

Contents

Plot

Small-time pool hustler "Fast Eddie" Felson (Paul Newman) travels cross-country with his partner Charlie (Myron McCormick) to challenge the legendary player "Minnesota Fats" (Jackie Gleason). Arriving at Fats's home pool hall, Eddie declares he will win $10,000 that night. Fats arrives and he and Eddie agree to play for $200 a game. After falling behind early, Eddie surges back to being $1,000 ahead and suggests raising the bet to $1,000 a game; Fats agrees. He sends a runner out ostensibly for a bottle of whiskey, but really to get professional gambler Bert Gordon (George C. Scott) to the hall. Eddie gets ahead $11,000 dollars and Charlie tries to convince him to quit, but Eddie insists the game will end only when Fats says it's over. Fats agrees to continue after Bert labels Eddie a "loser." After 25 hours and an entire bottle of bourbon, Eddie is ahead over $18,000, but loses it all along with all but $200 of his original stake. At their hotel, Eddie splits up the remaining stake with a sleeping Charlie and leaves. This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ...


Eddie stashes his belongings at the local bus terminal, where he meets Sarah Packard (Piper Laurie), an alcoholic "college girl" who walks with a limp. He meets her again at a bar. They go back to her place but she refuses to let him in, saying he is "too hungry." Eddie moves into a rooming house and starts hustling for small stakes. He finds Sarah again and this time she takes him in, but with reservations. Piper Laurie (born January 22, 1932) is an American actress. ...


Charlie finds Eddie at Sarah's and tries to persuade him to go back out on the road. Eddie refuses and Charlie figures out he plans to challenge Fats again. Eddie realizes that Charlie has held out his percentage and becomes enraged, believing that with that money he could have rebounded to beat Fats. Eddie dismisses Charlie as a scared old man and tells him to "go lie down and die" by himself.


Eddie finds a poker game where Bert is sitting and loses $20. After the game, Bert tells Eddie that he has talent as a pool player but no character. He figures that Eddie will need at least $3,000 to challenge Fats again. Bert calls him a "born loser," but nevertheless offers to stake Eddie in return for 75% of his winnings. Eddie refuses.


Eddie hustles a local pool shark, who breaks Eddie's thumbs. Sarah cares for him and tells him she loves him, but he can't say the words. When his thumbs heal, Eddie agrees to Bert's terms, deciding that 25% of something is better than 100% of nothing. The following is a glossary of traditional terms used in the three main cue sport disciplines: pocket billiards (pool), which denotes a host of games played on a table with six pockets such as straight pool, eight-ball, nine-ball, one-pocket and bank pool; carom billiards referring to the...


Eddie, Bert and Sarah travel to Louisville, Kentucky for the Kentucky Derby, where Bert arranges a match for Eddie against a wealthy local named Findley (Murray Hamilton). The game turns out to be billiards, not pool. Eddie loses badly and Bert refuses to keep staking him. Sarah pleads with Eddie to leave with her, saying that the world he's living in and its inhabitants are "perverted, twisted and crippled," but he refuses. Seeing Eddie's anger, Bert agrees to let the match continue at $1,000 a game. Eddie comes back to win $12,000. He collects his $3,000 share and decides to walk back to the hotel. Bert arrives first and subjects Sarah to a humiliating sexual encounter. After, she scrawls PERVERTED, TWISTED and CRIPPLED in lipstick on the bathroom mirror. Eddie arrives back at the hotel to learn that she has killed herself. Louisville redirects here. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... Murray Hamilton (March 24, 1923 – September 1, 1986) was an American stage, screen, and television character actor. ... Carambole billiards (or carom) is a billiards game possibly developed in the 18th century in France, though the exact date of invention is not clear. ...


Eddie returns to challenge Fats again, putting up his entire $3,000 stake on a single game. He wins game after game, beating Fats so badly that Fats is forced to quit. Bert demands a share of Eddie's winnings but Eddie, invoking the memory of Sarah, shames Bert into giving up his claim.


Production

The Tevis novel had been optioned several times, including by Frank Sinatra, but attempts to adapt it for the screen were unsuccessful. Director Rossen's daughter Carol Rossen speculates that previous adaptations focused too much on the pool aspects of the story and not enough on the human interaction. Rossen, who had hustled pool himself as a youth and who had made an abortive attempt to write a pool-themed play called Corner Pocket, optioned the book and teamed with Sidney Carroll to produce the script.[1] Sinatra redirects here. ...


Paul Newman was originally unavailable to play Fast Eddie, being committed to star opposite Elizabeth Taylor in the film Two for the Seesaw. Rossen offered the part to Bobby Darrin instead.[2] When Taylor was forced to drop out of Seesaw because of shooting overruns on Cleopatra, Newman was freed up to take the role, which he accepted after reading just half of the script.[3] For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Two for the Seesaw is a 1962 drama film, directed by Robert Wise and starring Robert Mitchum and Shirley MacLaine. ... Bobby Darin (May 14, 1936–December 20, American teen idols of the late 1950s. ... This article is about the 1963 film. ...


Rossen filmed The Hustler over six weeks, entirely in New York City. Much of the action was filmed at two now-defunct pool halls, McGirr's and Ames Billiard Academy.[4] Other shooting locations included a townhouse on East 82nd Street, which served as the Louisville home of Murray Hamilton's character Findley, and the Manhattan Greyhound bus terminal. The film crew built a dining area that was so realistic that confused passengers sat there and waited to place their orders.[5] Willie Mosconi served as technical advisor on the film[4] and shot a number of the trick shots in place of the actors.[6] Rossen, in pursuit of the style he termed "neo-neo-realistic,"[7] hired actual street thugs, enrolled them in the Screen Actors Guild and used them as extras.[8] Early shooting put more focus on the pool playing, but during filming Rossen made the decision to place more emphasis on the love story between Newman and Laurie's characters.[9] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the US bus line. ... The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) is an American labor union representing over 120,000 film and television principal performers and background performers worldwide. ...


Cast

Pool champion Willie Mosconi has a cameo appearance as Willie, who holds the stakes for Eddie and Fats's games. Boxing champion Jake LaMotta also has a cameo as a bartender. This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... Piper Laurie (born January 22, 1932) is an American actress. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Murray Hamilton (March 24, 1923 – September 1, 1986) was an American stage, screen, and television character actor. ... William Joseph Mosconi aka (June 27, 1913–September 12, 1993), an American billiards player from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is considered by most who knew him to be one of the best players in the history of the game. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... The following is a glossary of traditional terms used in the three main cue sport disciplines: pocket billiards (pool), which denotes a host of games played on a table with six pockets such as straight pool, eight-ball, nine-ball, one-pocket and bank pool; carom billiards referring to the... Giacobbe La Motta (born July 10, 1921), better known as Jake LaMotta, nicknamed The Bronx Bull and The Raging Bull, is a former boxer who was world middleweight champion and whose life has been as controversial outside the ring as it was inside it. ...


Reception

Critical

The Hustler had its world premiere in Washington, D.C. on September 25, 1961. Prior to the premiere, Richard Burton hosted a midnight screening of the film for the casts of the season's Broadway shows, which generated a great deal of positive word of mouth.[10] For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For other uses, see Word of mouth (disambiguation). ...


The film was well-received by critics, although with the occasional caveat. Variety praised the "solid performances"[11] of the entire main cast but felt that the "sordid aspects"[11] of the story prevented the film from achieving the "goal of being pure entertainment."[11] Variety also felt the film was far too long. Stanley Kauffmann, writing for The New Republic, concurred in part with this assessment. Kauffmann strongly praised the principle cast, calling Newman "first-rate"[12] and calling Scott's performance "his most credible performance to date."[12] Laurie, he says, gives her part "movingly anguished touches"[12] (although he also mildly criticizes her for over-reliance on Method acting). Although he found that the script "strains hard to give an air of menace and criminality to the pool hall"[12] and also declares it "full of psedo-meaning,"[12] Kauffmann lauds Rossen's "sure, economical"[12] direction, especially in regard to Gleason who, he says, does not so much act as "[pose] for a number of pictures which are well arranged by Rossen. It is the best use of a manikin by a director since Kazan photographed Burl Ives as Big Daddy."[12] The New York Times, despite finding that the film "strays a bit"[13] and that the romance between Newman and Laurie's characters "seems a mite far-fetched,[13] nonetheless found that The Hustler "speaks powerfully in a universal language that spellbinds and reveals bitter truths."[13] Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Stanley Kauffmann (24 April 1916 – ) is an American film critic and author. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... Method acting is an acting technique in which actors try to replicate real life emotional conditions under which the character operates, in an effort to create a life-like, realistic performance. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 –14 April 1995) was an Academy Award winning American actor and acclaimed folk music singer and author. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Awards

The Hustler received nine Academy Award nominations. The film won two, for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White (Harry Horner and Gene Callahan) and Best Cinematography, Black-and-White (Eugen Schüfftan). The film was also nominated for Best Picture and Newman was nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role. Gleason and Scott were both nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role; Scott refused the nomination. Laurie was nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role. Rossen received nominations for Best Director and, with Carroll, for Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium.[14] Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Art director Harry Horner (1910 - 1994) was born in what is now Slovakia and found his way into the film business via his association with Max Reinhardt. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ...


Newman was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor. Gleason and Scott were each nominated for Best Supporting Actor and Scott was also nominated as Best New Star of the Year.[15] The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ...


At the 1962 BAFTA Awards, The Hustler tied with the Soviet film Ballad of a Soldier for Best Film from Any Source. Newman won for Best Foreign Actor and Piper Laurie was nominated for Best Foreign Actress.[16] Gleason was honored as Best Supporting Actor by the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures and the film was named among the Board's ten best films of 1961.[17] Rossen was named Best Director by the New York Film Critics Circle Awards[18] and Rossen and Carroll shared the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Written Drama.[19] BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... CCCP redirects here. ... Ballad of a Soldier, (Баллада о солдате, Ballada o soldate) is a 1959 Soviet Union award-winning motion picture drama directed by Grigori Chukhrai that is set in World War II. Storyline Spoiler warning: Ballad of a Soldier is not primarily a war story but recounts, within the context of the turmoil of... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George B. McClellan, Jr. ... New York Film Critics Circle Awards are given annually to honor excellence in cinema worldwide by an organization of film reviewers from New York City-based publications. ... Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ...


Legacy

In the decades since its release, The Hustler has cemented its reputation as a classic. It currently holds a 97% "fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes.[20] Roger Ebert, echoing earlier praise for the performances, direction and cinematography and adding laurels for editor Dede Allen, cites the film as "one of those films where scenes have such psychic weight that they grow in our memories"[6] and "one of the few American movies in which the hero wins by surrendering, by accepting reality instead of his dreams."[6] He further cites Fast Eddie Felson as one of "only a handful of movie characters so real that the audience refers to them as touchstones."[6] TV Guide calls the film a "dark stunner"[21] offering "a grim world whose only bright spot is the top of the pool table, yet [with] characters [who] maintain a shabby nobility and grace."[21] The four leads are again lavishly praised for their performances and the film is summed up as "not to be missed."[21] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Dede Allen (born Dorothea Carothers Allen, 3 December, 1925, in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American film editor. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ...


Paul Newman reprised his role as Fast Eddie Felson in the 1986 film The Color of Money, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role. A number of observers and critics have suggested that this Oscar was in belated recognition for his performance in The Hustler.[6][22] The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ...


In 1997, the Library of Congress selected The Hustler for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."[23] Carroll and Rossen's screenplay was selected by the Writers Guild of America in 2006 as the 96th best motion picture screenplay of all time.[24] Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ...


The Hustler is credited with sparking a resurgence in the popularity of pool in the United States, which had been on the decline for decades.[25] The film also brought recognition to Willie Mosconi, who, despite having won multiple world championships, was virtually unknown to the general public.[26]


Perhaps the greatest beneficiary of the film's popularity was a real-life pool hustler named Rudolf Wanderone Jr. Mosconi claimed in an interview at the time of the film's release that the character of Minnesota Fats was based on Wanderone, who at the time was known as "New York Fatty." Wanderone immediately adopted the Minnesota Fats nickname and parlayed his association with the film into book and television deals and other ventures. Author Walter Tevis denied for the rest of his life that Wanderone had played any role in the creation of the character.[27] Other players would claim, with greater or lesser degrees of credibility, to have served as models for Fast Eddie, including Ronnie Allen, Ed Taylor, Ed Parker and Eddie Pelkey.[28]


Notes

  1. ^ Rossen, Carol. DVD commentary, The Hustler Special Edition
  2. ^ Starr p. 76
  3. ^ Newman, Paul. DVD commentary, The Hustler Special Edition
  4. ^ a b Dyer pp. 117-9
  5. ^ "'The Hustler,' at Martini, Filmed On Location In N.Y.", The Galveston News, 1961-10-05. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Ebert, Roger. "The Hustler (1961)", Chicago Sun-Times, 2002-06-23. Retrieved on 2008-03-31. 
  7. ^ Kilgallen, Dorothy. "Voice of Broadway", New Castle (PA) News, 1961-05-29. 
  8. ^ "Dream Street", Uniontown (PA) Morning Herald, 1961-09-08. 
  9. ^ Kilgallen, Dorothy. "Edith Piaf Worries Friends", Lowell Sun, 1961-04-21. 
  10. ^ Naylor, David (director). (2001). The Hustler: The Inside Story [film].
  11. ^ a b c Variety staff. "The Hustler", Variety, variety.com, 1961-01-01. Retrieved on 2008-04-24. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Kauffmann, Stanley. "The Talent of Paul Newman", The New Republic, 1961-10-09, pp. 28. 
  13. ^ a b c Weiler, A H. "Provocative Duo: 'The Hustler' and 'The Mark' Again Show Films Can Hit Social Ills", The New York Times, 1961-10-08. 
  14. ^ The Hustler - Awards. allmovieguide.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  15. ^ Awards Search: The Hustler. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  16. ^ Film Nominations - 1961. British Academy of Film and Television Awards. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  17. ^ Awards - 1961. National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  18. ^ New York Film Critics Circle: 1961 Awards. New York Film Critics Circle. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  19. ^ WGA Awards. Writers Guild of America. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  20. ^ The Hustler. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  21. ^ a b c The Hustler. TVGuide.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  22. ^ Berardinelli, James (2002). Review: Hustler. Reelviews.net. Retrieved on 2008-04-24. “25 years late, Newman won the Best Actor Oscar for playing Fast Eddie.”
  23. ^ "New to the National Film Registry", The Library of Congress Information Bulletin, Library of Congress, December 1997. Retrieved on 2008-03-20. 
  24. ^ 101 Greatest Screenplays. Writers Guild of America West. Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  25. ^ Dyer p. 119
  26. ^ Dyer p. 117
  27. ^ Dyer pp. 121-2
  28. ^ Dyer p. 127

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References

  • Dyer, R. A. (2003). Hustler Days: Minnesota Fats, Wimpy Lassiter, Jersey Red, and America's Great Age of Pool. New York, Muf Books. ISBN 156731807X.
  • Starr, Michael and Michael Seth Starr (2004). Bobby Darrin: A Life. Taylor Trade Publications. ISBN 1589791215.

External links

Preceded by
The Apartment
BAFTA Award for Best Film from any Source
1960
tied with Ballad of a Soldier
Succeeded by
Lawrence of Arabia
For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The Apartment is a 1960 romantic comedy-drama directed by Billy Wilder, and starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, and Fred MacMurray. ... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... Ballad of a Soldier, (Баллада о солдате, Ballada o soldate) is a 1959 Soviet Union award-winning motion picture drama directed by Grigori Chukhrai that is set in World War II. Storyline Spoiler warning: Ballad of a Soldier is not primarily a war story but recounts, within the context of the turmoil of... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... Illustration of a three ball pocket billiards game in early 19th century Tübingen, Germany, using a table much longer than the modern type. ... Pocket billiards at a pub in Groningen, Netherlands 8 ball pool in Beijing, China Pocket billiards, most commonly referred to as pool, is the general term for a family of games played on a specific class of billiards table, having 6 receptacles called pockets (or holes) along the rails, in... A correct nine ball rack Nine ball is a contemporary variation of pocket billiards, with historical beginnings rooted in the United States and traceable to the 1920s. ... Eight ball players Eight ball is a billiards game played with a cue ball and 15 billiard balls on a pool table with 6 pockets. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... A straight pool rack, right before the opening break. ... Bank pool has been gaining popularity in recent years. ... A kick shot in action. ... Woodcut detail from A Little Pretty Pocket-Book (1744), providing the first known reference to baseball. ... The leather shake bottle used as a carom target in bottle pool. ... Chicago is a money ball pocket billiards gambling game. ... A pocket billiards game, circa 1800s Germany Cowboy pool, sometimes just called cowboy, is a hybrid pool game combining elements of English billiards through an intermediary game, with more standard pocket billiards characteristics. ... Vincent Van Goghs The Night Café Cribbage, sometimes called cribbage pocket billiards, cribbage pool, fifteen points and pair pool, is a two player pocket billiards game that, like its namesake card game, has a scoring system which awards points for pairing groups of balls (rather than playing cards) that... Golf is a pool game usually played for money. ... A leather shake bottle and plastic pills or peas as used in Kelly pool. ... Rotation (or rotation pool) is a pocket billiards (pool) game played using a standard pool table and standard triangular rack of fifteen (solid/stripe) billiard balls. ... 10-Ball is basically 9-Ball with the number 10 ball added to the game. ... Three Ball is a gambling game of pocket billiards, playable by any number of persons in rotation. ... Billiards redirects here. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 2. ... Carambole billiards (or carom) is a billiards game possibly developed in the 18th century in France, though the exact date of invention is not clear. ... Carambole billiards (or carom) is a billiards game possibly developed in the 18th century in France, though the exact date of invention is not clear. ... Paul Gauguins Night Café at Arles (1888) Artistic billiards, sometimes called fantasy billiards or fantaisie classique, is a carom billiards discipline in which players compete at performing 76 preset shots of varying difficulty. ... Five-pins (Italian cinque birilli), also known as five-pin billiards or Italian billiards (It. ... Inset from School of Recreation, 1710. ... Jacob Schaefer, Sr. ... There are two similar yet distinct carom billiard games known as 4-ball. ... Illustration of a three ball pocket billiards game in early 19th century Tübingen, Germany, using a table much longer than the modern type. ... Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... A snooker table English Billiards is a form of billiards played on a 6 × 12 rectangular table with pockets in the four corners and in the middle of the long sides (see Snooker for markings and a diagram). ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Bumper pool is a casual billiards game played on an octagonal or rectangular table with one pocket centered on each end. ... Bagatelle (from French by way of the Italian bagattella, a trifle) is a game, the object of which is to get a number of balls past pins (which act as obstacles) into holes. ... For the games with billiard balls, see Carom billiards, or Cue sport more generally. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Illustration of a three ball pocket billiards game in early 19th century Tübingen, Germany, using a table much longer than the modern type. ... The following is a glossary of traditional terms used in the three main cue sport disciplines: pocket billiards (pool), which denotes a host of games played on a table with six pockets such as straight pool, eight-ball, nine-ball, one-pocket and bank pool; carom billiards referring to the... Illustration from Michael Phelans 1859 book, The Game of Billiards Cue sports techniques (usually more specific, e. ... Larger tables may require multiple lamps to properly light the playing surface. ... A close-up picture of American-style pool balls Billiard balls are used in cue sports, such as carom billiards, pool, and snooker. ... A pool hall in Detroit A pool, billiard[s] or snooker hall or parlo[u]r (sometimes also written poolhall, snookerhall) is a place where people get together for playing pool and/or other cue sports such as carom billiards or snooker. ... A cue stick A cue stick or simply cue, is an item of sporting equipment essential to the games of billiards, pool and snooker. ... A rack is the name given to a frame (usually wood or plastic) used to organize billiard balls at the beginning of a game. ...

 
 

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